2011-2012 Departmental Performance Report
Section I: Agency Overview

1.1 Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canada's largest science-based regulatory agency. It has over 72001 employees working across Canada, in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy.

CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services to:

  • prevent and manage food safety risks;
  • protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species;
  • prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases;
  • contribute to consumer protection; and
  • contribute to market access for Canada's food, plants, and animals.

CFIA bases its activities on science, effective management of risk, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its mandate.

THE CFIA'S LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY

CFIA Wide

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act

Food

  • Canada Agricultural Products Act
  • Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act (as it relates to food)
  • Fish Inspection Act
  • Food and Drugs Act (as it relates to food)
  • Meat Inspection Act

Plant

  • Fertilizers Act
  • Plant Breeders' Rights Act
  • Plant Protection Act
  • Seeds Act

Animal

  • Health of Animals Act
  • Feeds Act
  • Seeds Act

1.2 Responsibilities

The CFIA is responsible for administering and enforcing 13 federal statutes and 38 sets of regulations, for regulating the safety and quality of food sold in Canada and for supporting a sustainable plant and animal resource base. The CFIA shares many of its core responsibilities with other federal departments and agencies, with provincial, territorial and municipal authorities, and with other stakeholders.

The CFIA works with its partners to implement food safety measures; manage food, animal and plant risks and emergencies; and promote the development of food safety and disease control systems to maintain the safety of Canada's high-quality agriculture, agri-food, aquaculture and fishery products. The CFIA's activities include verifying the compliance of imported products; registering and inspecting establishments; testing food, animals, plants, and their related products; and approving the use of many agricultural inputs. The CFIA also provides scientific advice, develops new technologies, provides testing services, and conducts regulatory research.

At the CFIA, decisions are based on high-quality, timely, relevant science. Science informs policy development and program design and delivery through foresight, advice, risk assessment, the influence of international standards, research and development, and testing.

THE CFIA's KEY FEDERAL PARTNERS

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Health Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Canadian Grain Commission
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada, including Canadian Forest Service
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
  • Environment Canada, including Canadian Wildlife Service

1.3 Strategic Outcome and Program Activity Architecture (PAA)

To effectively fulfill its responsibilities in safeguarding Canada's food and sustaining its animal and plant resource base, the CFIA aims to achieve one strategic outcome (a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base).2 The CFIA's Program Activity Architecture (PAA), shown in Figure 1, illustrates how the CFIA's strategic outcome aligns with those of the Government of Canada (GOC) and reflects how the CFIA plans to allocate and manage its resources to achieve the corresponding expected results. In 2011–12, a new PAA, consisting of one Strategic Outcome and five Program Activities, was established to better reflect how the CFIA operates. The CFIA's priorities are reviewed annually to facilitate effective resource management within the context of the PAA framework.

Click on image for larger view
Flowchart - Figure 1: Program Activity Architecture for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Figure 1: Program Activity Architecture for the CFIA

Description for Flowchart - Program Activity Architecture for the CFIA

The CFIA's Vision
To excel as a science-based regulator, trusted and respected by Canadians and the international community
The CFIA's Mission
Dedicated to safeguarding Canada's food, animals and plants, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment and economy

Strategic Outcome
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base
Program Activity Expected Results GoC Outcome Areas
Internal Services* Food Safety Program
  • Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated
  • Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements

Healthy Canadians

Strong Economic Growth

A Clean and Healthy Environment

Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized
  • Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated
  • Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases
  • Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to
Plant Resources Program
  • Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated
  • Domestic plants and plants products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Confirmed incidences of new quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (eradicated/controlled) through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders
  • Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
  • Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, and technical arrangements
  • International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animal, plant, and their products
  • International regulatory cooperation to support CFIA's mandate

A Fair and Secure Marketplace

A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce

The CFIA's Foundation

  • Sound Science
  • Effective Regulatory Base
  • Effective Inspection Programs
  • Effective Inspection Programs
  • Effective Risk Management
  • Strong Partnerships
  • Transparent Timely Communications

The CFIA's Priorities

  • Focus on programs
  • Strengthen strategic directions, performance measurement and transparency
  • Focus on people
  • Focus on stewardship

Key Risk Areas

  • Foodborne Hazards
  • Science and Technology Capacity
  • Information for Decision-Making
  • Partnerships
  • Internal Co-ordination
  • Program Framework
  • Animal Diseases (including Zoonotics) / Outbreaks / Incidents
  • Plant Pests and Diseases
  • Human Resources

* The Internal Services program activity supports the CFIA's strategic outcome and all its program activities

1.4 Organizational Priorities

For 2011–12, the CFIA identified four Agency-wide Business Priorities to continue to strengthen the CFIA's foundations, mitigate strategic risks, and help effectively deliver its core program activities. The following table summarizes the CFIA's performance with respect to achieving these priorities. Additional details are provided in Section II.

Operational Priority Type3 Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program Activity(ies)
Focus on Programs OngoingLink to Food Safety Program (2.2.1.1), Animal Health and Zoonotics Program (2.2.1.2), and Plant Resources Program (2.2.1.3)

The CFIA's services are built on a foundation of legislation, regulatory programs, and inspection delivery. Keeping this foundation strong is key to the CFIA's effective and efficient service delivery. In this regard the CFIA continued to systematically review and strengthen its program and regulatory framework in order to protect the public, consumers, animals and plants, and contribute to trade and fair market access.

Additionally, knowing that the stewardship of food safety and plant and animal health is a shared responsibility, the CFIA, through its collaborative efforts and partnership opportunities with industry, consumers, federal, provincial, and municipal governments and organizations, as well as international partners, continued to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to unsafe food and zoonotic diseases as well as preventable risks solely related to animal and plant health.

Management Priority Type3 Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program Activity(ies)

Strengthen Strategic Directions, Performance Measurement and Transparency

New

This management priority is part of Internal Services (2.2.1.5), which contributes to all Program Activities

The CFIA developed a service-centered agenda focused on prevention and on improving service delivery. In an effort to determine how it will position itself in the future, the CFIA continued to work on the development of a Long-Term Strategic Plan (LTSP). This plan will be instrumental in setting a long-term vision for the CFIA, determining focus areas, major goals, and strategies in order to ultimately create a strategic framework for the CFIA.

The CFIA also took concrete steps in the development of a suite of transparency and service-related initiatives that will provide a basis for interaction with stakeholders. This suite includes a transparency policy, a statement of rights and service, guides to inspection, the establishment of service standards, and a consultation policy and framework. The CFIA also launched a Complaints and Appeals Office which will provide a more transparent way for external partners to register complaints.

Further to this, because stakeholders desire and expect information and services to be available on the internet, the CFIA is implementing its Web Communications Strategy. Once fully implemented, the CFIA's website will provide Canadians with easy access to services and important information in a format that Canadians want and expect.

Management Priority Type3 Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program Activity(ies)

Focus on People

New

This management priority is part of Internal Services (2.2.1.5), which contributes to all Program Activities

The CFIA depends on a highly skilled, multi-disciplinary staff complement located across the country to deliver on its mandate. With this in mind the CFIA continued to implement its 2008 –2013 CFIA Renewal Plan in an effort to have the right people in the right place at the right time.

Furthermore, to attract, develop and retain a human resources base with the necessary skills and competencies to effectively deliver on its responsibilities, the CFIA continued to engage and train employees, including front line staff, in support of career development. These actions continue to improve organizational performance and to maintain a vibrant workforce.

Management Priority Type3 Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program Activity(ies)
Focus on Stewardship NewThis management priority is part of Internal Services (2.2.1.5) which contributes to all Program Activities

The effective management of any organization, particularly one as large and complex as the CFIA, depends upon a stable analytical foundation for strategic and operational decision making and the demonstration of value and performance.

In support of this priority, the CFIA finalized work on the information management & information technology campaign plan. This plan was developed collaboratively and cooperatively with the horizontal committees and enables the CFIA to invest in areas that will give inspectors and scientists the ability to leverage technology in order to be successful in their day-to-day operations in safeguarding the nation's food supply and plant and animal health.

The CFIA also continued to review and strengthen its project management capacity to ensure effective delivery of large-scale projects within the CFIA.

1.5 Risk Analysis

A cornerstone of the CFIA's risk management process is the development of a Corporate Risk Profile (CRP). While the CFIA's day-to-day service delivery is focused on controlling and mitigating operational risks, the CRP, which was updated for 2011–12, focuses on strategic risks and identifies mitigation strategies for addressing those risks. The following is a summary of the CFIA's strategic risk areas, as outlined in the CRP, and the associated mitigation strategies. Detailed information on progress achieved under each of the mitigation strategies can be found in Section 2.2.1 where a leaf icon symbol has been included.

CFIA Risk Areas Mitigation Strategies

1. Foodborne hazards

The CFIA, and co-operating jurisdictions, may fail to detect, track and/or mitigate foodborne pathogens, toxins, chemical contaminants and other food-borne hazards that could pose a threat to human health.

Improving and modernizing inspection approaches

  • Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan
  • Compliance Verification System
  • Address key recommendations of the Report of the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak
  • Inspection Modernization Initiative

Maintaining capacity to predict and respond to emergencies

  • Public Warnings for Class I Food

Carrying out education and outreach activities

  • The Consumer Association Roundtable

Collaborating with partners and stakeholders to enhance program and regulatory frameworks

  • Food Import Program

2. Animal Diseases (including zoonotics) / outbreaks / incidents

The CFIA may fail to prevent the entry and/or spread of an animal disease that either threatens the animal resource base and/or is potentially transmissible to humans (a zoonotic).

Conducting animal disease surveillance, detection and control activities

  • National Biosecurity Strategy
  • National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP)
  • Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Program

Collaborating with partners to enhance program and regulatory frameworks

  • National Farmed Animal Health and Welfare Strategy
  • Implement recommendations from Auditor General's report on CFIA preparedness for animal disease emergencies (“Animal Disease – Canadian Food Inspection Agency”)
  • Traceability framework

Collaborating with partners and stakeholders to enhance program and regulatory frameworks

  • Animal Import Program

3. Plant Pest and Diseases

The CFIA may fail to appropriately prevent, detect, contain and mitigate a pest or disease that threatens the plant resource base.

Conducting plant disease surveillance, detection and control activities

  • Implement recommendations from Auditor General's Report on “Managing risks to Canada's plant resources – Canadian Food Inspection Agency “

Preventing the spread of invasive alien species and assessing agricultural products for safety and efficacy

  • National Invasive Alien Species (IAS) Strategy

Collaborating with partners and stakeholders to enhance program and regulatory frameworks

  • National farm level biosecurity standards (under the Growing Forward initiative)
  • Modernization of plant import program

4. Human Resources

The CFIA may be unable to attract, develop and retain a human resource base with the necessary competencies to fully and effectively deliver on its responsibilities.

Implement the CFIA Renewal Plan (2008–2013)

Conducting engagement, training and career development

  • Implement priority-setting for and consistent delivery of scientific and technical training and leadership development at the Agency
  • Continue to support mandatory and developmental language training
  • Develop an internal communications and employee engagement strategy that provides opportunities for two-way communications and promotes an environment that encourages employee satisfaction, motivation and commitment
  • Budget 2011 investments in inspector training

5. Science and Technology Capacity

The CFIA's science and/or technology capacity (e.g. methods, tests and practices) may not remain abreast of new scientific or regulatory developments.

Ensure research activities align with risks, develop science and technology capacity, foster stronger research collaborations, and stay abreast of new scientific or regulatory developments.

  • Genomics Research and Development Initiative
  • Develop new detection and identification methodologies such as molecular methods for the identification and differentiation of various crop kinds and the development of improved diagnostic tests for henipaviruses4
  • Develop, modify, validate and implement methods and rapid tests to detect and characterize viruses and parasites in food
  • Budget 2011 investments in science capacity

6. Information for Decision Making

Performance, analytical and scientific information may be insufficiently compiled, focused and defined to appropriately support decision making and reporting in the CFIA.

Developing the basis for the compilation, interpretation and analysis of organizational information

  • Develop an IM/IT Strategic Plan (referred to as the IM/IT Campaign Plan)
  • Complete analysis of aging IM/IT systems and infrastructure as well as a complete capacity assessment
  • Develop Performance Management and Reporting System (PMRS) to enhance performance tracking and reporting in the Agency
  • Creation of Business Intelligence Management Centre to produce timely, consistent, accessible and trusted information

7. Partnerships

The roles and responsibilities of key partners may be insufficiently coordinated to support program delivery.

Enhancing relationships with partners and stakeholders

  • Leverage partnerships with other government departments, and with provinces and universities to strengthen laboratory and scientific networks
  • Implement the renewed Consultation Framework
  • Engaged with the United States through the Beyond the Border Initiative (BtB): and the Canada – United States Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC)

8. Internal Coordination

There may be insufficient coordination within the CFIA to support program design and delivery.

Improving internal coordination

  • Continue to improve governance and horizontal management

9. Program Framework

The CFIA's legislative, regulatory and program framework may be insufficient to protect Canadian consumers and facilitate trade.

Enhancing the Agency's regulatory framework with respect to consumer protection

  • Continue to work towards renewal of the legislative framework for food safety
  • Develop a legislative framework for traceability
  • Plan to modernize/update the regulatory framework

1.6 Summary of Performance

2011–12 Financial Resources ($ millions)

Planned Spending Total Authorities* Actual Spending*
744.0 794.4 737.7

*Excludes amount deemed appropriated to Shared Services Canada. Please see Section 2.3 for more information.

The variance between Planned Spending and Total Authorities is mainly attributed to the following: new funding received for Food Safety Modernization and for the development of a Traceability Information Sharing Solution; funding received to continue the Growing Forward Program Suite; funding from the 2010-11 carry forward as well as increases related to statutory items. In addition, the CFIA transferred resources to Shared Services Canada. The variance between Total Authorities and Actual spending can be explained in part by unspent resources in several initiatives such as the Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan; Food Safety Modernization; the Government's response to Listeriosis; Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE); funding received for the development of a Traceability Information Sharing Solution and Invasive Alien Species (IAS). In addition, the Agency put in place spending restraint measures during the last quarter of the fiscal year to ensure that there would be resources available via the carry forward to address known pressures in 2012–13.

2011–12 Human Resources Full-Time Equivalents (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
6,914 6,623 (291)

FTE is a standard financial measure used to capture the total paid hours of an organization's workforce over the course of a fiscal year. For example, one FTE could represent one full-time employee or two part-time employees whose time is split equally over the year. FTE amounts differ from the total number of employees shown in Section 1.1 (7,200) as the latter considers the number of individuals employed by the CFIA at a specific point in time, including active employees, those on leave status as well as suspended employees. Actual FTEs are lower than Planned primarily due to spending restraint measures put in place by the Agency during the last quarter of the fiscal year. This resulted in fewer hires than planned.

Summary of Performance Tables

Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

Performance Summary, Excluding Internal Services

Program Activity 2010-11 Actual Spending ($ millions) 2011-12 ($ millions) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
Food Safety Program 313.8 326.5 351.5 355.9 328.9 Healthy Canadians
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 133.9 131.3 131.3 149.4 140.3 Healthy Canadians
Plant Resources Program 80.1 84.6 84.6 91.6 84.0 A Clean and Healthy Environment
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 33.3 44.3 44.3 45.4 34.8 A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce
Total 561.1 586.7 611.7 642.3 588.0

Internal Services

Internal services consist of groups that perform related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of the programs and the corporate obligations of an organization. These groups include the following: Management and Oversight Services, Communication Services, Legal Services, Human Resources Management Services, Financial Management Services, Information Management Services, Information Technology Services, Real Property Services, Security Management Services, Environmental Management Services, Materiel Management Services, Procurement Services, and Travel and Other Administrative Services.

Performance Summary for Internal Services

Program Activity 2010-11 Actual Spending ($ millions) 2011-12 ($ millions)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities* Actual Spending*
Internal Services 160.7 132.3 132.3 152.1 149.7

*Excludes amount deemed appropriated to Shared Services Canada. Please see Section 2.3 for more information.

1.7 Expenditure Profile

Departmental Spending Trend

Bar Chart - Departmental Spending Trend

Description for Bar Chart - Departmental Spending Trend
Spending Trend ($ Millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
597.0 689.1 744.0 718.1 721.8 737.7

Planned Spending has increased steadily from 2009–10 to 2011–12. This is mainly due to incremental resources received for new or existing initiatives such as: the Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan; the Government's Response to Listeriosis; increased frequency of food inspections in meat processing establishments; the Pork Industry Recovery and Expansion Strategy; collective bargaining; Food Safety Modernization; and funding received for a traceability information sharing solution.

1.8 Estimates by Vote

For information on Canadian Food Inspection Agency's organizational votes and/or statutory expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2012 (Volume II). An electronic version is available at http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/recgen/txt/72-eng.html

1.9 Office of the Auditor General Reports

The Auditor General has assessed the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's performance information presented in Section 2 of this report. This assessment is only a review level of assurance, and does not constitute an audit. The Auditor General's Assessment Report is included in front of the performance information in Section 2.

The Auditor General has audited the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's financial statements. These financial statements and the auditor's report are presented in Section 3.

The Auditor General has not evaluated or audited any other sections of this report.

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