2011-2012 Departmental Performance Report
Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

2.1 How the Agency Plans and Reports Outcomes

In accordance with the Treasury Board Secretariat's (TBS) Management, Resources and Results Structure (MRRS) Policy, the CFIA planning and reporting framework is based on a desired strategic outcome, a PAA, and an associated governance framework. The PAA is aligned with desired GoC outcomes and takes into consideration the impact of several factors – including the global and national environment, GoC priorities, CFIA strategic risks, CFIA's human and financial resource capacity, and the outcomes of CFIA's past performance and related lessons learned.

This report highlights key accomplishments and gives an account of the progress made in advancing the plans and priorities identified in the CFIA's 2011–12 Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP). Under strategic outcome and program activities, details are given on performance as it relates to special initiatives, risk mitigation strategies, and ongoing activities. Special focus is given to how this affects Canadians.

Section 2.2 of this report describes performance information, including highlights, challenges, lessons learned, and expected results for the strategic outcome, measured against targets through the use of compliance and other relevant performance indicators.

2.1.1 Assessment of Compliance and Performance Targets

Given the complexity and inherent variability of the agriculture, agri-food, forestry, and fishery production, processing, and distribution sectors, the approach to assessing compliance varies across commodity groups. The CFIA uses a variety of tools to monitor and promote compliance, including inspections, audits, product sampling, and testing. The CFIA uses risk-based approaches that target the areas of highest risk. For example, the CFIA focuses its efforts on systems, processes, and facilities that directly affect the safety of food, animal and plant health. The resulting compliance rates indicate the extent to which regulated parties have adhered to requirements specified in federal acts and regulations. As the Agency implemented a new PAA and PMF at the beginning of fiscal year 2011–12, the Agency is unable to perform a trend analysis (using year-over-year data) as this 2011–12 Departmental Performance Report (DPR) represents the first year we are reporting against this new PAA and PMF. For detailed information on compliance assessment, see Section 4.2 in the 2011–12 DPR.

Qualitative and quantitative performance targets provide a basis for measuring the performance of regulated parties and of the CFIA in relation to how they achieve the results expected of them. The targets in this report are for critical program areas and are based either on historical averages of actual performance or on the expected results of effective programming (e.g. rate of industry compliance with regulatory standards). The CFIA has assessed the extent to which performance has met or exceeded established targets and provided analysis when performance fell below the established targets. Targets for programs that monitor activities are set differently than those for programs that focus on specific areas of non-compliance. Where applicable, performance indicator results have been rounded down to the nearest percentage point.

The CFIA assigns a data quality rating to every performance result indicator in the CFIA's DPR. The ratings provide a reasonable assessment of the reliability and limitations of the CFIA's performance information. For each indicator, the CFIA applied a consistent methodology for evaluating the data and processes used to derive performance results.

Information on performance result methodologies and data is used to substantiate that the information reported in the CFIA's DPR is valid, reliable, fair, and supported by appropriate evidence. This information is also the basis for determining the data quality ratings for each indicator. Ratings are based on an assessment of the systems and processes used to manage data and the systems and processes used to derive performance results from the data.

A data quality rating of Higher Confidence, Moderate Confidence or Lower Confidence, as categorized below, is determined for each indicator and included in the performance tables in Section 2.2.

Table 2-1 Data Quality Rating

Data Quality Rating
Higher Confidence Results rating where (1) the data used to derive performance results is stored and managed using reliable systems and methods; and (2) performance results are derived using reliable systems and methods.
Moderate Confidence Results rating where (1) the data used to derive performance results is stored and managed in most cases using reliable systems and methods; and (2) performance results are derived in most cases using reliable systems and methods.
Lower Confidence Results rating where there are gaps in the reliability of data sources and/or performance results: data and performance results are supported or derived from systems and methods that do not support data robustness and reliability.

2.1.2 Auditor General's Assessment of Performance Information

Assessment - Auditor General's Assessment of Performance Information in the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's 2010–11 Performance Report - Page 1

Description for Assessment - Auditor General's Assessment of Performance Information in the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's Performance Report - Page 1

Auditor General's Assessment of Performance Information in the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's 2011-12 Performance Report

Review Engagement Report

To the President of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency
and the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

What I Assessed

As required by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act, I have assessed the fairness and reliability of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's performance information for 2011-12 with respect to the objectives established in its 2011-12 corporate plan.

Management's Responsibility

The performance information reported in the Agency's performance report and the objectives established in its corporate plan are the responsibility of management.

My Responsibility

My responsibility is to assess the fairness and reliability of the performance information included in the Agency's performance report against the objectives established in its corporate plan. My assessment did not include the objectives set out in the corporate plan or commenting on the Agency's actual performances.

The Nature of My Assessment

My assessment covered only the performance information included in the section of the Agency's performance report titled "Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome". My assessment did not include the information referenced by Web links included in the report.

My assessment consisted of a review performed in accordance with Canadian generally accepted standards for review engagements established by the Auditing and Assurance Standards Board (AASB) and, accordingly, consisted primarily of enquiry, analytical procedures, and discussion related to the Agency's performance information as supplied to me by the Agency. I conducted this assessment using the criteria for the assessment of fairness and reliability described in the Annex. There were no changes to the criteria from those of the prior year report.

My assessment is based on a review which provides a moderate level of assurance and does not constitute an audit. Consequently, I do not express an audit opinion on the Agency's performance information.

Conclusion

Based on my assessment, nothing has come to my attention that causes me to believe that the Agency's performance information for 2011-12, with respect to the objectives established in its corporate plan, is not, in all significant respects, fair and reliable using the criteria described in the Annex to this report.

Dale Shier, CA
Principle
for the Auditor General of Canada

21 September 2012
Ottawa, Canada

Assessment - Criteria for the Assessment of Fairness and Reliability

Description for Assessment - Criteria for the Assessment of Fairness and Reliability

Criteria For The Assessment Of Fairness And Reliability

Office Of The Auditor General

The following criteria were developed to assess the fairness and reliability of the information about the Agency's performance with respect to the objectives in its corporate plan. Two key issues were addressed: Has the Agency reported on its performance with respect to its objectives? Is that information fair and reliable? Performance information with respect to objectives is fair and reliable if it enables Parliament and the public to judge how well the entity or program in question is performing against the objectives it set out to accomplish.

Fairness

RELEVANT: The performance information reports in context, tangible, and important accomplishments against objectives and costs.

MEANINGFUL: The performance information describes expectations and provides benchmarks against which performance is compared.

ATTRIBUTABLE: The performance information demonstrates why the program made a difference.

BALANCED: A representative and clear picture of performance is presented, which does not mislead the reader.

Reliability

RELIABLE: The performance information adequately reflects the facts.

These criteria were developed specifically for the assessment. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has acknowledged that they were suitable for the assessment.

More information on the criteria is available on our website at http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/meth_gde_e_10217.html

2.2 Performance by Strategic Outcome

2.2.1 Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base

Mitigating risks to food safety is the CFIA's highest priority, and the health and safety of Canadians is the driving force behind the design and development of CFIA programs. The CFIA, in collaboration and partnership with industry, consumers, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, continues to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to unsafe food and zoonotic diseases, and maintaining a stable plant and animal resource base.

The current and future economic prosperity of the Canadian agriculture, fishery and forestry sectors relies on a healthy and sustainable animal and plant resource base. As such, the CFIA is continually improving its program design and delivery in the animal and plant area in order to minimize and manage risks. In an effort to protect the natural environment from invasive animal and plant diseases and plant pests, the CFIA also performs extensive work related to the protection of environmental biodiversity.

The CFIA supports Canadian agriculture and agri-food businesses' ability to enter domestic and global markets and their success therein. The CFIA works to develop and implement regulatory frameworks that: address risks to consumers; verify truth in labelling information (prevent misleading information); and confirm that imports and exports meet Canadian and international requirements. To support these objectives, the CFIA engages in outreach and consultation activities with key stakeholders and partners (including those in industry), consumers, and international trade and standards organizations.

Table 2-2: Strategic Outcome Performance Indicators

Stategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base
Performance Indicators Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating
Standards-related restrictions on exports of Canadian commodities (food, animals, plants, and their products) are addressed.5 Not Applicable The CFIA regularly engages with our international regulatory counterparts to seek science-based solutions to over-come technical market access barriers. The CFIA contributes to market access based on the integrity of Canada's food safety and animal and plant health systems, negotiation export provisions to meet trading partners' needs; and leading on SPS negotiations to protect the health of Canadian consumers and Canada's agricultural resources, while seeking to address unjustifi ed barriers to trade. Higher Confidence
Canada's status on the OIE6 disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk"7 Status maintained Status maintained Met Higher Confidence
Percentage of Canadians who have confidence in the Canadian food supply system Historical trend (Increasing) 68% Met Higher Confidence

Key strategic risks, as identified in the CFIA's Corporate Risk Profile:

  • Foodborne Hazards
  • Animal and Zoonotic Outbreaks/Incidents
  • Plant Pests and Diseases
  • Human Resources
  • Science and Technology Capacity
  • Information and Decision Making
  • Partnerships
  • Internal Coordination
  • Program Frameworks

To mitigate risks and achieve its strategic outcome, the CFIA concentrated its efforts in 2011–12 on the delivery of the following four priorities:

  • Focus on Programs
  • Strengthen Strategic Directions, Performance Measurement, and Transparency
  • Focus on People
  • Focus on Stewardship

Percentage of 2011–12 Actual Spending by Program Activity

Pie Chart - Percentage of 2011-12 Actual Spending by Program Activity

Description for Pie Chart - Percentage of 2011-12 Actual Spending by Program Activity
Percentage of 2011-12 Actual Spending by Program Activity
Food Safety and Nutrition Risks Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Plant Resources Program International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Internal Services
45%19%11%5%20%

2.2.1.1 Program Activity 1: Food Safety Program

Flowchart - Program Activity 1: Food Safety Program

Flowchart - Program Activity 1: Food Safety Program
Program Activity Expected Results GoC Outcome Areas
Food Safety Program
  • Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated
  • Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
Healthy Canadians

Key Risk Areas

  • Foodborne Hazards
  • Program Framework
  • Partnerships
  • Science and Technology Capacity

Program Activity Description:

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate public health risks associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves these objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and outreach activities and through the verification of industry compliance to standards and science-based regulations. The CFIA works closely with federal/provincial/territorial governments and other Federal Government partners, as well as consumers, producers, farmers, and industry. The program helps consumers receive information about food safety and nutrition more easily, and it serves to diminish unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry through a robust program design supported by inspection and sampling procedures. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the CFIA's ability to manage risks associated with food and the food supply system, including foodborne illness. In instances of non-compliance, the CFIA takes regulatory action using a suite of tools that include investigation and enforcement. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Activities within the Food Safety Program supported the Focus on Programs priority as well as the Strengthen Strategic Direction priority and helped mitigate the following strategic risks:

  • Foodborne Hazards
  • Program Framework
  • Partnerships
  • Science and Technology Capacity

2011-12 Financial Resources ($ millions)

Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
351.5 355.9 328.9

2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
3,177 3,238 61

Variance Analysis:

Several initiatives included in this program activity did not spend all their resources this fiscal year resulting in a variance of $27.0 million between Total Authorities and Actual Spending. These initiatives include the Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan, the Government's response to Listeriosis and Food Safety Modernization. The Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan experienced a delay in obtaining Treasury Board approval to proceed with the Agency's IM/IT projects. Also, delays in the development of the importer licensing program resulted in the deferment of dependent activities such as hiring and training the inspection staff required to deliver the program. Food Safety Modernization was not able to spend all of its resources as they were received late in the fiscal year. Part of the overall Food Safety Program variance can also be attributed to the administrative spending restraint measures that were put in place during the last quarter of the fiscal year. These measures were implemented to ensure that there would be resources available via the carry forward to address known pressures in the 2012–13. With the renewal of the PAA in 2011–12, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its authorities and FTEs to the new Program Activities. Since this initial exercise and further review, some discrepancies have been identified. The CFIA is making every effort to address these to allow for better representation in the 2012–13 DPR.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

The CFIA implemented a new PAA and PMF at the beginning of fiscal year 2011–12. As such, trend analysis information cannot be provided for 2011–12.

Table 2-2a: Summary of Performance: Food Safety and Nutrition Risks

Expected Results: Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated
Performance Indicators* Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating*
Number of commodity areas whose target for the percentage of inspected, federally registered establishments found to be in compliance with federal regulations has been met8 6 out of 6 met 3 out of 6 met Not Met Not Applicable
Meat and Poultry 98% 92% Not Met Higher Confidence
Egg 98% 99% Met Higher Confidence
Dairy 98% 100% Met Lower Confidence
Fish and Seafood 98% 97% Not Met Higher Confidence
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 98% 100% Met Higher Confidence
Processed Products 98% 94% Not Met Moderate Confidence
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision leaf icon 100% 100% Met Higher Confidence
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision9 95% 100% Met Higher Confidence

* For more information on data ratings and limitations regarding the CFIA's performance indicators, please see Section 2.1.1

Performance Summary and Compliance Methods

Percentage of inspected federally-registered establishments in compliance with federal regulations

Meat & Poultry

As a result of the Weatherill Report, 12 new Processed Meat inspectors were hired in the Montreal West Region in Quebec. This increase in inspectors was due to the large concentration of ready-to-eat (RTE) establishments (52) in this region. With more inspectors onsite, more inspection tasks were delivered which led to an increase in non-conformities being identified in the Corrective Action Requests (CAR). The CFIA continues to communicate and work with industry to increase understanding of requirements and of the related Compliance Verification System (CVS) policies. The CFIA aims to increase the levels of industry compliance through ongoing communication and education. As such, it is expected that the number of CARs will fall within the normal range next fiscal year.

Fish and Seafood

In 2011–12, the CFIA updated its guidelines relating to fish inspection regulations to help industry better understand the existing regulatory requirements. The new guidelines established new procedures around Corrective Action Plans (CAPs) and subsequently caused compliance rates to decrease. It is expected that compliance rates will improve as industry adjusts to the new guidelines. For more information on the updated guidelines visit: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/fispoi/qual/qaqre.shtml

Processed Products

The target was not met due to a change in methodology. Compliance is now defined as having been achieved when the initial establishment inspection is satisfactory, rather than when the follow-up inspection is satisfactory.

Compliance Approaches and Methods

A monitoring approach10 is used to assess compliance for all commodities under this indicator. For all commodities under this indicator, except for Processed Products, compliance results are determined at the initial inspection, in the audit, or in the first follow-up visit. Processed Products determines compliance results on initial inspection.

Table 2-2b: Summary of Performance: Food Safety and Nutrition Risks

Expected Results: Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
Performance Indicators* Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating*
Number of commodity areas whose target for the percentage of domestic food products found to be compliant with federal regulations has been met11 6 out of 6 met 4 out of 6 met Not Met Not Applicable
Meat and Poultry 95% 96% Met Higher Confidence
Egg 95% 93% Not Met Higher Confidence
Dairy 95% 96% Met Higher Confidence
Fish and Seafood 95% 98% Met Higher Confidence
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 95% 97% Met Higher Confidence
Processed Products 95% 94% Not Met Higher Confidence
Number of commodity areas whose target for the percentage of imported food products found to be compliant with federal regulations has been met12 6 out of 6 met 4 out of 6 met Not Met Not Applicable
Meat and Poultry 95% 99% Met Higher Confidence
Egg 95% 99% Met Higher Confidence
Dairy 95% 90% Not Met Higher Confidence
Fish and Seafood 95% 84% Not Met Higher Confidence
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 95% 95% Met Higher Confidence
Processed Products 95% 95% Met Higher Confidence

* For more information on data ratings and limitations regarding the CFIA's performance indicators, please see Section 2.1.1

Performance Summary and Compliance Methods

Percentage of Domestic Food Products in Compliance with Federal Regulations

Egg

The performance is below the target due to an increase in the reported violations of a certain chemical residue from a group of chemicals called Ionophores. Health Canada has determined that the levels present do not represent a risk to the consuming public. The CFIA is in consultation with industry to provide them guidance on the preparation of feed in order to bring down the level of residues thereby reducing the residue levels carrying over into eggs.

Processed Products

The target was not met due to quality issues with the maple sap and tomato inputs used in producing certain processed products. These quality issues stemmed from adverse weather conditions in 2011–12. The unseasonably warm spring negatively affected the quality of the maple syrup harvest while the rainy summer negatively affected the quality of the tomato harvest. These were not food safety issues.

Percentage of Imported Food Products in Compliance with Federal Regulations

Dairy

The majority of non compliances came from chemical residue tests that detected Thyreostatica. Investigations showed that these violations were caused by background levels from Brassica crops being fed to production animals. There are no health and safety issues identified with this compound at the levels indicated.

Fish & Seafood

In 2011–12, the sampling approach used was more risk-based than in previous years. This naturally focused attention towards product types that were more likely to be non-compliant, thereby decreasing the overall compliance rate compared to previous years.

Compliance Approaches and Methods

A monitoring approach10 is used to assess compliance for all commodities under this indicator. Compliance results are determined during the initial testing phase of food and product samples.

Additional Information:

The CFIA's Food Safety Action Plan: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/concen/concengov/govplane.shtml

Listeria Policy update: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/eng/1339424983711/1339425115046

Compliance Verification System Procedures: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/eng/1335181754842/1335241998814

Strategic Performance Analysis13

Modernizing the Current Inspection System and Approach

As part of the Agency-wide Inspection Modernization initiative, a dedicated team worked with inspectors, subject matter experts and industry to review current programs, identify and challenge current practices, and identify elements that would be fundamental to a single and consistent approach to inspection across food commodities. By the end of 2011 –12, key components of a draft improved food inspection model were developed and discussed with the Ministerial Advisory Board, and the External Audit Sub-Committee. Listeria icon

DID YOU KNOW?

In 2011–12 the CFIA conducted over 2,900 inspection/audits:

  • Meat and Poultry (755)
  • Dairy (176)
  • Fish and Seafood (553)
  • Shell Eggs (1,002)
  • Fresh Produce (88)
  • Processed Products (332)

The CFIA began work in 2011–12 to modernize its manuals, policies, and procedures with the goal of reducing the number of these documents and moving towards establishing a common set of documents covering the food safety area.

The development of an integrated approach for identifying and ranking food safety risks was initiated in order to assist in priority setting and planning. Concurrently, the Meat Program implemented a new risk-based sampling plan for Ready-to-Eat (RTE) Listeria icon products and food contact surfaces where the frequency of sampling is based on the established relative risk associated with the product. As a result, a higher risk product is sampled more frequently than a lower risk product. Listeria icon

In support of these initiatives, the CFIA worked with its federal partners (Health Canada and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) on developing legislation that would improve food safety oversight to better protect consumers, streamline and strengthen legislative authorities, and enhance international market opportunities for Canadian industry. This legislation (Safe Food for Canadians Act) was subsequently tabled early in 2012–13 and its implementation will be reported on in future performance reports.

leaf icon As part of its efforts to modernize inspection, and building on its success with the compliance verification system (CVS), the CFIA initiated work to develop a task-based approach to compliance verification for the Imported and Manufactured Food Program. The goal of this work, which continues into the current fiscal year, is to improve inspection accountability, efficiency and consistency for domestic and imported food in the Non-Federally Registered Sector (NFRS). Listeria icon Ultimately, this approach will enable improved program delivery and a more uniform application of inspection procedures.

leaf icon Various reports and studies, including the Weatherill Report, have identified the need for consistent, timely, and up-to-date training for CFIA inspection staff. Additionally, Budget 2011 also provided a further $100 million over five years to invest in inspector training, tools and technology, and science capacity. Listeria icon In response, the CFIA has developed a plan to deliver core training to all new inspection staff as they enter the Agency. The pilot will begin in the fall of 2012. To support current staff in the consistent performance of their duties in their current and future roles, CFIA has delivered "refresher training" to over 430 existing inspection staff members. This is the first installment of a plan to provide training to all current inspection staff. The core and refresher programs form part of a four-year effort to ensure staff have the training they need to deliver the CFIA's modernized inspection model. In addition, all inspection staff tasked with Listeria inspection received nine weeks of meat processing training, and over 250 inspectors working in meat processing establishments have received part of the training.

leaf icon The ability for frontline staff to deliver on their priorities was strengthened through the development and implementation of the National Recruitment Group in Fall 2010, which launched a National Selection process resulting in a National pool of fully assessed applicants being created by the end of June 2011. This will streamline the process of hiring inspectors and create a sustainable pool from which managers can draw, thereby freeing the time of managers to focus on program delivery instead of recruitment.

On December 19, 2011, the Government of Canada released its final report to Canadians on the actions taken to respond to all of the recommendations by Ms. Sheila Weatherill outlined in the Report on the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak. More specifically, the CFIA advanced the implementation of Health Canada's Listeria policy on multiple fronts:

  • Manuals of procedure, policies and guidance documents for meat and for high-risk, non-meat RTE foods were revised to reflect the food safety practices recommended in Health Canada's revised Policy on Listeria monocytogenes in Ready-to-Eat Foods;
  • New environmental sampling plans were implemented in federally registered non-meat establishments to monitor for Listeria in the food processing environment, and new resources were provided for technical support to risk-assessments resulting from positive Listeria samples;
  • The CFIA, Health Canada, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) developed a standard operating procedure (SOP) addressing how provincial/municipal/territorial agencies should request laboratory testing support from their federal partners. This SOP will help to ensure that analytical testing capacity is in place in the event of another outbreak and that food samples that arrive in federal labs can be more easily traced back to the food product sampled; and
  • The internal evaluation of Changes to Inter-Departmental Interfaces14 noted that "Overall, the review found that the inter-departmental, inter-jurisdictional ability to manage and respond to foodborne illness outbreaks has been significantly strengthened since the release of the Weatherill Report in 2009". The report suggested a review of federal/provincial/territorial memoranda of understanding (MOUs) to determine if a higher level of consistency can be obtained. Revisions of the MOUs are underway. Listeria icon

The CFIA worked with 17 businesses in a pilot project to simplify and streamline registration requirements. This led to the development and publication of procedural changes to the Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures in September 2011. These changes make it easier for small businesses to set up on-site retail operations and to apply for federal registration.

Implementing the Food Safety Action Plan

leaf icon During 2011–12 the CFIA continued implementation of its portion of the Government of Canada's Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan – the Food Safety Action Plan (FSAP). Work continued towards better understanding food safety risks through targeted microbiological and chemical food hazard surveys. Further information was gathered through border blitzes and both food safety and labeling compliance inspection activities, which focused on areas of highest risk in both the non-federally registered and fresh fruit and vegetables sectors.

The CFIA collaborated with Health Canada, the PHAC, and its provincial counterparts on the development of a risk prioritization model. Collaborations and information sharing also took place with international trading partners and regulatory counterparts on food safety issues and risk management approaches.

Past food safety issues have highlighted the importance of gathering regular feedback from Canadians on food safety, food recalls, and confidence in Canada's food safety system. Public Opinion Resarch (POR) results have helped inform outreach initiatives and policies related to food safety and have provided the Agency with a better understanding of consumers' awareness, attitudes, and behaviors in terms of food safety, and have helped ensure communications material is consistent with the needs of Canadians.

In the Fall of 2011, the CFIA published the results of four targeted POR surveys. One of these looked at the issue of food safety confidence and measured public awareness of food recalls and inspections. Ninety-three percent of Canadians surveyed expressed a degree of confidence in Canada's food safety system15. Results revealed that the percentage of Canadians that gave Canada's food safety system a favourable to strong confidence rating remains steady from last year at 68 percent. That is up from 60 percent in 2008. The POR report shows Canadians are increasingly likely to feel more confident in the system when there is a food recall because it demonstrates the system is working.

Moreover, the CFIA received approximately 750 media calls on food safety, including approximately 200 on food recalls in 2011-12.

leaf icon Following stakeholder consultation undertaken in 2010–11, the CFIA responded to feedback on the proposed licensing regime for imported food sector products. As a result, progress was made on the regulations, supporting documents, and information technology (IT) requirements associated with the proposed licensing regime. The proposed regulatory framework will help to improve importers' ability to:

  • quickly identify, respond to and advise the CFIA of potentially unsafe imported food; and
  • increase the CFIA's ability to communicate important information to industry to mitigate food safety incidents;

One example demonstrating the impact of efforts over the first three years of the FSAP project was seen in March 2011. Efforts to enhance the CFIA's ability to identify and track imported food products facilitated a successful rapid response to potentially contaminated food during the nuclear crisis in Japan. Border lookouts and enhanced import controls were put in place to mitigate the risk of Japanese products contaminated with radionuclides from entering the Canadian market and, in concert with Agency-wide collaboration and with Health Canada, enabled the identification and testing of over 600 shipments between March 24 and June 11, 2011. None of the products tested showed results above the Canadian action levels for radiation in food.

Maintaining Capacity to Deliver Programs and Respond to Emergencies while Enhancing Science Capacity

The CFIA conducted innovative work in the area of trend analysis that brings together multiple data sources to identify patterns and determine areas of improvement for the greatest risks. To support this work, the Agency's experts initiated discussions with academia, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the United States Food and Drug Administration to provide guidance in the analysis of Listeria data and validation of risk-based sampling and trend analysis models. Listeria icon

leaf icon The CFIA also developed a novel method for the rapid confirmation and identification of Listeria from meat and food contact surfaces in order to enable the reporting of Listeria-positive samples two to three days sooner than in current approaches. Evaluation and publication of other new, rapid screening methods were completed and have been validated and published in the Health Canada Compendium of Analytical Methods. The CFIA also engaged in an interdepartmental pilot project to bring together the latest in genomics technologies aimed at improving food and water safety. Listeria icon

In collaboration with provinces and territories, the CFIA designed a national baseline study for Salmonella and Campylobacter in broiler chicken to establish prevalence levels of pathogens, develop pathogen reduction targets, and identify/improve strategies to monitor and reduce pathogen levels. Collaboration also took place with several provinces to complete an inventory and analysis of food safety surveillance activities within the agriculture portfolios. The analysis identified opportunities for more efficient and coordinated food safety surveillance through joint planning, collaborative priority setting and improved information sharing. The information collected through this baseline study will contribute to the development of pathogen reduction programs and serve as a benchmark to measure the effectiveness of intervention measures. This baseline study is part of the broader FPT Pathogen Reduction Initiative aimed at decreasing the health risks and economic impact of food-borne pathogens in Canadian meat and poultry.

The development of a post-farm recognition process was completed in 2011–12. The purpose of the CFIA recognition programs, developed under funding from the Minister of Agriculture's Growing Forward initiative, is to provide national government food safety recognition oversight to industries that did not previously have access to such programs, thereby filling food safety gaps in the food continuum. The completion of the post-farm food safety recognition program means that national food safety programs are now available to industry across the full continuum—from the farm to retail levels. A pilot of the initial technical review (first part of the recognition process) was successfully launched with the Canadian Produce Marketing Association (CPMA) using Growing Forward funding.

Carrying out education and outreach

In July 2011, the CFIA completed an internal evaluation on the stakeholder consultation process16 within the Agency. As a result of this evaluation, the CFIA's consultation process now has a web presence. Current and past consultations are available, as is the new Consultation Policy and Framework, finalized in January 2012. This is intended to bring a consistent approach to consultation that will better serve the needs of stakeholders and, ultimately, Canadian consumers. Listeria icon

Also, in an ongoing effort to support transparency and open dialogue with Canadians, the CFIA continued to provide email, Really Simple Syndication (RSS), and social media notifications to consumers and industry stakeholders for high-risk health hazards and all classes of allergy alerts. Listeria icon

Further, the Consumer Association Roundtable, a forum for dialogue between the CFIA and consumer organizations, met twice in 2011–12 (June 9 and October 20-21, 2011). They discussed issues such as country-of-origin labeling in wine, the Japanese nuclear incident, and allergen food labeling. The CFIA communicates with the Roundtable on various subjects of interest throughout the year, via email and teleconference. Records of discussion from each meeting are posted on the CFIA website. The CFIA is currently planning its fifth face-to-face meeting with the Roundtable in November 2012.

Collaborating with Stakeholders and Partners to Enhance Program Frameworks

The CFIA worked with AAFC to develop a traceability framework in order to track the movement of animals throughout their life cycle. Details on progress in this area can be found in the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program area.

leaf icon In 2011–12, the CFIA created a Regulatory Transformation Office which will prioritize and identify a plan forward on food safety regulations. Additionally, regulatory amendments were made in areas concerning compensation for seeds and meat inspection.

In February 2012, the CFIA began a food safety investigation and instituted a national recall of beef products that may have been contaminated with E. coli. This investigation was prompted by an illness in one person in Alberta that was linked to products from a food processing company. Based on the CFIA investigation results, Health Canada determined there could be a risk of product contamination going as far back as July of 2011. The recalled products, which were produced between July 1, 2011, and February 15, 2012, included beef burgers that were sold at supermarkets and prepared in restaurants and institutional establishments across the country. Only one illness could be demonstrated to have resulted from contaminated product related to this investigation. A post incident analysis and lessons learned exercise was launched following this event and was ongoing as of the end of the fiscal year 2011–12.

Lessons Learned

In 2011–12, an internal audit of the CFIA's Management of Food Export Certificates was completed with the goal of assessing whether CFIA export certificates for food were well-managed and issued in accordance with relevant legislations, policies, directives, and standards. The findings of this audit identified that the management of export certificates for food has weaknesses, with risk exposures related to control and risk management. One of the key findings was that data related to issued export certificates was not consistently recorded, was incomplete and could have been at risk of being lost.

CFIA management recognizes that there is a need to build a more effective and efficient information tracking system. As such, in 2011–12 the CFIA initiated the Enterprise Electronic Certification project with the aim to address issues relating to the completeness of export certificate data. Pending completion of this project, the CFIA is implementing short-term solutions to ensure that the required information regarding export certificates is available.

Another finding from the audit was that security standards with respect to export certificates had not been established for all programs. Additionally, security practices were not consistent between programs. The CFIA will work to assess and identify the security risks related to export certificates and develop and implement appropriate security guidelines for the effective and consistent protection of export certificate information across all Food programs.

2.2.1.2 Program Activity 2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Flowchart - Program Activity 2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Description for Flowchart - Program Activity 2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Program Activity

Program Activity Expected Results GoC Outcome Areas
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized
  • Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated
  • Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases
  • Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to

Strong Economic Growth

A Clean and Healthy Environment

Key Risk Areas

  • Animal Diseases (including Zoonotics) / Outbreaks / Incidents
  • Science and Technology Capacity
  • Program Framework

Program Activity Description:

The purpose of the Animal Health and Zoonotic Diseases Program is to diminish risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feed, and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program's objectives will be achieved by reducing risks to Canada's animals (including livestock, terrestrial and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, mitigating and managing risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare, and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. In addition, the program will continue to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans (i.e. zoonoses) by controlling diseases within animal populations. The Animal Health and Zoonotic Program supports the health and welfare of Canada's animal resources and instills confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Planned activities within the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program support the Focus on Programs priority as well as the Strengthen Strategic Direction priority and will help to minimize the following strategic risks:

  • Animal Diseases (including zoonotic) Outbreaks/Incidents
  • Partnerships
  • Science and Technology Capacity
  • Program Frameworks

2011-12 Financial Resources ($ millions)

Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
131.3 149.4 140.3

2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
1,524 1,199 (325)

Variance Analysis:

With the renewal of the PAA in 2011–12, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its authorities and FTEs to the new Program Activities. Since this initial exercise and further review, some discrepancies have been identified. CFIA is making every effort to address these to allow for better representation in the 2012–13 DPR.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

The CFIA implemented a new PAA and PMF at the beginning of fiscal year 2011–12. As such, trend analysis information cannot be provided for 2011–12.

Table 2-3a: Summary of Performance: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Expected Result: Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized
Performance Indicators* Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating*
Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways17 0 Entries 0 Entries Met Higher Confidence
Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease18 100% 100% Met Moderate Confidence

* For more information on data ratings and limitations regarding the CFIA's performance indicators, please see Section 2.1.1

Table 2-3b: Summary of Performance: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Expected Result: Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
Performance Indicators* Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating*
Percentage of legally exported animal shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements19 99% 99% Met Higher Confidence
Canada's status on the OIE6 disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk"7 Status maintained Status maintained Met Higher Confidence

* For more information on data ratings and limitations regarding the CFIA's performance indicators, please see Section 2.1.1

Table 2-3c: Summary of Performance: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Expected Result: Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated
Performance Indicators* Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating*
Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease20 100% 100% Met Moderate Confidence

* For more information on data ratings and limitations regarding the CFIA's performance indicators, please see Section 2.1.1

Table 2-3d: Summary of Performance: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Expected Result: Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases
Performance Indicators* Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating*
Manuals for CFIA animal health officials are updated as needed21 All necessary manual updates are completed All necessary manual updates were completed Met Higher Confidence
Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises in which CFIA participates22 9 9 Met Higher Confidence

* For more information on data ratings and limitations regarding the CFIA's performance indicators, please see Section 2.1.1

Table 2-3e: Summary of Performance: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Expected Result: Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to
Performance
Indicators*
Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating*
Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion23 100% There were no cases of trans-boundary and significant emerging diseases Not Applicable Higher Confidence
Percentage of cases where CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease24 100% There were no cases of trans-boundary and significant emerging diseases Not Applicable Higher Confidence

* For more information on data ratings and limitations regarding CFIA's performance indicators, please see Section 2.1.1

Additional Information:

BSE Enhanced Surveillance Program: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/disemala/bseesb/surv/surve.shtml

Animal Diseases: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/disemala/disemalae.shtml

Aquatic Animal Health Export Program:
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/aqua/exp/expe.shtml

Livestock Traceability: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/trac/trace.shtml

OAG Report: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_201010_09_e_34292.html#hd3c

Strategic Performance Analysis

Day-to-Day Risk Management

To maximize program efficiency and effectiveness, the CFIA developed an Animal Health Program Framework. This framework consolidates all existing information on animal health activities within the CFIA, including efficient delivery practices and roles and responsibilities. The development of this framework is a significant step toward establishing a risk-based strategic plan that will guide all work within the animal health program.

leaf icon To more effectively manage animal emergencies and continue strengthening preparedness for emergencies and future challenges, the CFIA continued to implement the recommendations of the Auditor General from the CFIA Preparedness for Animal Disease Emergencies report. Specifically, the CFIA:

  • completed, and published online, the hazard specific plan (HSP) which provides guidelines to operational staff on how to respond to disease outbreaks for Notifiable Avian Influenza (AI);
  • made significant progress towards making the electronic Canadian Emergency Management Response System (CEMRS) available in both official languages; CEMRS is a platform used for capturing information related to disease outbreaks electronically, mostly in real-time. The provision of disease intelligence in real-time enables more timely and precise decision making, thereby limiting the extent of a disease incursion; and
  • conducted Lessons Learned processes after each emergency disease outbreak. For example, the CFIA completed a Lessons Learned exercise with respect to the 2010 AI outbreak in Alberta. As a result the need for the CFIA to ensure rapid access to equipment for poultry flock depopulation though placement of such equipment at multiple sites across Canada was identified. This equipment has since been provided. Also, communication issues, information storage processes, and surge capacity challenges were recognized as areas for improvement and are now factored into emergency planning and training activities.

In 2011–12, the CFIA made progress towards modernizing its surveillance activities by developing a terrestrial animal health surveillance inventory and by examining laboratory testing capacities to identify options available to increase the efficiency of surveillance testing activities. This work was carried out in concert with the ongoing development of a five-year strategic surveillance plan and has improved the CFIA's ability to objectively prioritize and conduct effective surveillance activities within the Animal Health Program.

Strengthening Partnerships, Communication and International Collaboration

In 2011–12, the CFIA continued to protect animal health and welfare by conducting inspection activities and delivering programs to prevent and control the entry and spread of animal diseases. More specifically, the CFIA continued to work with partners and stakeholders to better identify and respond to existing and emerging zoonotic threats. This was achieved through activities such as the Agency's participation in the Inter-Agency Wild Bird Influenza Survey, its efforts with respect to the Canadian Notifiable Avian Influenza Surveillance System, and the ongoing work of the CFIA's National Centre for Foreign Animal Diseases in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Additionally, the CFIA worked with other federal partners, as well as the U.S. government, to manage a comprehensive diagnostic system focusing on zoonotic influenza viruses of concern. Lastly, the CFIA collaborated with the University of Tokyo for the development of improved diagnostic tests for henipaviruses. Development of vaccines and appropriate risk mitigation strategies for henipaviruses is critical for Canada's emergency preparedness as it relates to animal diseases.

leaf icon Working with the PHAC, the CFIA continued to pursue more integrated surveillance methods. For example, the CFIA participated in discussions that led to revisions of the 2007 North American Plan for Animal and Pandemic Influenza (NAPAPI). The revised plan will support broader coordination with Mexico and the US and will provide Canada with opportunities to anticipate threats and mitigate against potential impacts (such as border disruptions) resulting from animal or pandemic influenza.

The CFIA showed leadership in international standard-setting and science-based technical agreements intended to improve animal health worldwide by actively participating in annual international trade meetings such as the quadrilateral meeting between Canada, the U.S., Australia and New Zealand, the Canada/EU Joint Management Committee Meeting, and the Canada/ U.S. cross border meetings. Additionally, the CFIA, through AAFC's Market Access Secretariat, continued to work to support market access for Canadian producers and exporters. For example, in 2011–12, the CFIA worked with officials from the United Arab Emirates and reached agreement on health certificate requirements for live cattle. Canada also successfully secured access for live cattle, sheep and goats to the Philippines.

DID YOU KNOW?

Given a dynamic and rapidly changing world economy, the unprecedented scale of movement of people, animals and goods, the uncertainty of climate change impacts and the accelerated pace of technological innovation, the challenge of addressing emerging animal-disease-related emergencies has never been greater. Fore-CAN, a long-term planning initiative led by the CFIA, is designed to anticipate and prepare for all types of animal-disease-related emergencies and the potential consequences associated with them. The Fore-CAN project team developed a number of conceptual and planning tools. These include a framework for an integrated animal health risk management system which highlights the key aspects that need to be considered when looking at animal disease emergency scenarios, such as avian influenza or foot-and-mouth disease.

leaf icon The CFIA implemented several key initiatives designed to improve its ability to protect the health and sustainability of the Canadian animal resource base. For example, the CFIA continued the development of national farm-level biosecurity standards for the beef, dairy, mink, sheep, goat, and bee sectors. The establishment of standards, and supporting producer guides, involved extensive consultations with a broad range of stakeholders, including producers, industry associations, provincial and federal governments, and academia. These standards will provide stakeholders with a framework that they can use by stakeholders for the development of a nationally consistent approach to biosecurity. In addition, an animal biosecurity planning guide was produced under the Growing Forward initiative to assist provinces and stakeholders in biosecurity programming until commodity-specific standards are available.

The Agency also continued to promote animal biosecurity through the Animal Health Starts on the Farm campaign. In its third year, the campaign focuses on simple, on-farm measures that livestock and poultry producers can take to protect the health of their animals. Communications materials, including mail-outs, brochures, posters, and DVDs, were distributed to livestock and poultry producers online, by mail, and at exhibits and other events.

leaf icon As part of its ongoing measures to mitigate threats related to BSE, the CFIA continued to enforce the removal of specified risk material (SRM), bovine tissues that are at risk of containing BSE-causing prions, from the human food chain. This was primarily accomplished through the enforcement and verification of SRM removal during the compliance inspections in federally registered facilities. The CFIA also continued to monitor the level of BSE and the effectiveness of measures taken to control it in the domestic cattle population. The CFIA successfully collected and tested 30,307 samples from rendering facilities, dead stock facilities and provincial and federal abattoirs. No cases of BSE were detected in Canada during the 2011–12 fiscal year. Monitoring the level and distribution of BSE in Canada has allowed the country to maintain a controlled BSE risk status and to maintain and expand market access. In addition, following the Annual General Session of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), the CFIA reviewed and updated the BSE import policy annex containing the country status list.

Key Strategic Initiatives

leaf icon The CFIA continued the development and implementation of the National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP). This included the implementation of import controls for aquatic animals under the Health of Animals Regulations. Prior to full enforcement of the Regulations, there is a one-year transition period supported by the Stream of Commerce Policy from December 2011 to December 2012. The control of imports is an important tool in preventing the introduction and spread of aquatic animal diseases and helps protect Canada's aquatic animal resources. Additionally, in support of market access, the CFIA developed the policy, procedures and training for the Aquatic Animal Health Compartmentalization Program and began the implementation of this Program to facilitate and support the import and export of salmonids25. The Compartmentalization Program is allowing trade from compartments26 even when located in areas infected with federally regulated aquatic diseases.

Other program functions, such as certifying exports of aquatic animals, engaging in emergency disease response activities, developing risk assessments, and carrying out disease surveillance plans, were also conducted. For instance, the NAAHP developed the Surveillance Plan for Infectious Salmonid Anemia Virus (ISAV), Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus (IPNV) and Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV) in Anadromous Salmonids in British Columbia.

The CFIA continued building strong relationships with key aquatic animal health stakeholders through several consultation sessions that involved federal, provincial, and territorial partners and industry groups. For example, the CFIA met with provincial and territorial departments to discuss regulatory options around the proposed domestic movement control program and delineation of zones to control the spread of federally reportable diseases that currently exist in Canada.

Legislative and Regulatory Modernization

leaf icon In support of the National Agriculture and Food Traceability System (NAFTS) initiative, the CFIA has made significant progress towards completing regulatory amendments that would authorize the implementation of a pig identification and movement reporting system. This regulatory amendment supports the CFIA's ability to trace animals back to the origin farm in the event of a disease outbreak and supports the rapid normalization of trade following disease outbreaks. In parallel, the CFIA made progress on the development of, and consultations on, a proposed regulatory amendment for cattle, bison, sheep, goat, deer, elk and horses.

The CFIA continued to work jointly with AAFC to develop the Traceability National Information Portal (TNIP). This portal will provide authorized users with a single electronic point of access to livestock traceability information and will allow authorized users to conduct traceability investigations more rapidly, accurately, and efficiently.

leaf icon In the context of the National Farmed Animal Health and Welfare Strategy, which is designed to support and enhance Canada's farmed animal system, the CFIA continued to enhance Canada's system by conducting a review of the Health of Animals Regulations, specifically as they relate to modernizing the regulations concerning humane transportation. This review included consultation with stakeholders and a detailed consideration of current science. To this end, any changes to the Regulations will recognize the most recent advances in animal welfare and science and will address new technology and industry practices that did not exist when the humane transportation portion of the Regulations was first drafted. As well, following consultations with the National Farm Animal Care Council, the CFIA is participating in the revision of eight on-farm codes of practice for beef, horses, poultry, sheep, and pigs, which will contribute to the improved fitness of animals for transport. This is in line with one of the findings made in the CFIA internal evaluation on the Administrative Monetary Penalties (AMPs),27 which responds to non-compliance in areas where corrective action requests are insufficient.

Lastly, the CFIA continued to strengthen its capacity to respond to future threats by developing contingency plans in cooperation with our international and domestic partners through the International Animal Health Emergency Reserve (IAHER) agreement and the Canadian Veterinary Reserve and Foreign Animal Disease Emergency Support (FADES) agreements, and by enhancing diagnostic capacity through the creation and expansion of the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network (CAHSN) laboratories.

Lessons Learned

In 2010, the CFIA conducted an internal review of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 outbreak at a pig farm. The report noted that the 2009 H1N1 pandemic presented unique challenges, including the risk of human-to-animal transmission. The potential threat to human health by infected swine was also a concern, as was the impact on the pork industry in the event that countries began imposing trade restrictions on Canadian exports.

The report concluded that the CFIA should take steps to ensure relevant emergency response training is provided to all levels of response personnel. It went on to state that in order to mitigate the risk of response personnel becoming infected and ill and/or passing on the illness to other swine they come in contact with, training should include familiarity with the requirements of protocols, directives and guidelines on the use of personal protective equipment and the shipping of biological samples. The report also noted that an Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) advisor position should be located at the Incident Command level for all suspected zoonotic outbreaks with the goal that new and/or emerging risk to the health and safety of response personnel may be identified and mitigated early.

The Agency has developed an action plan to address the opportunities for improvement identified by the report. The CFIA is fully committed to providing all front-line responders with the relevant emergency response training to animal health emergencies and is currently identifying ongoing training needs for animal disease emergency response preparedness. Additionally, the role and responsibilities of the OHS officer were reviewed, and the OHS officer will now report to the Incident Commander in the field and regional levels, and continue to report directly to the Logistics Chief in the area and national levels.

2.2.1.3 Program Activity 3: Plant Resources Program

Flowchart - Program Activity 3: Plant Resources Program

Description for Flowchart - Program Activity 3: Plant Resources Program
Program Activity Expected Results GoC Outcome Areas
Plant Resources Program
  • Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated
  • Domestic plants and plants products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Confirmed incidences of new quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (eradicated/controlled) through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders
  • Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained

Strong Economic Growth

A Clean and Healthy Environment

Key Risk Areas

  • Plant Pests and Diseases
  • Science and Technology Capacity
  • Program Framework

Program Activity Description:

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program's objectives are achieved through the regulation of agricultural and forestry products; the mitigation of risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) arising from regulated pests and diseases; the regulation of the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers, and plant products; and the management of plant health emergencies and incidents. The program facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders, and is also designed to guard against deliberate threats to the plant resource base. As the program achieves its objectives, confidence is instilled in Canada's plant production systems and plant products, and the health of Canada's plant resources is strengthened.

Planned activities within the Plant Resources Program support the Focus on Programs priority as well as the Strengthen Strategic Direction priority, and will also help to mitigate the following strategic risks:

  • Plant Pests and Diseases
  • Partnerships
  • Science and Technology Capacity
  • Program Frameworks

2011-12 Financial Resources ($ millions)

Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
84.6 91.6 84.0

2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
809 851 42

Variance Analysis:

With the renewal of the PAA in 2011–12, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its authorities and FTEs to the new Program Activities. Since this initial exercise and further review, some discrepancies have been identified. CFIA is making every effort to address these to allow for better representation in the 2012–13 DPR.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

The CFIA implemented a new PAA and PMF at the beginning of fiscal year 2011–12. As such, trend analysis information cannot be provided for 2011–12.

Table 2-4a: Summary of Performance: Plant Resources Program

Expected Result: Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated
Performance Indicators* Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating*
Number of new foreign reportable plant diseases and pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves Historical Trend (Year over year) 0 entries Not Applicable Higher Confidence

* For more information on data ratings and limitations regarding the CFIA's performance indicators, please see Section 2.1.1

Table 2-4b: Summary of Performance: Plant Resources Program

Expected Result: Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
Performance Indicators* Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating*
Percentage of domestic plants and plant products in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements. 90%28 95% Met Higher Confidence

* For more information on data ratings and limitations regarding the CFIA's performance indicators, please see Section 2.1.1

Table 2-4c: Summary of Performance: Plant Resources Program

Expected Result: Confirmed new incidences of new quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (eradicated/controlled) through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders
Performance Indicators* Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating*
Percentage of confirmed cases of quarantine pests for which notices were issued 100% 100% Met Higher Confidence
Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner 90% 100% Met Higher Confidence

* For more information on data ratings and limitations regarding the CFIA's performance indicators, please see Section 2.1.1

Table 2-4d: Summary of Performance: Plant Resources Program

Expected Result: Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained
Performance Indicators* Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating*
Percentage of certified plant and plant product shipments (lots) that meet the country of destination regulatory requirements 99% 99% Met Higher Confidence

* For more information on data ratings and limitations regarding the CFIA's performance indicators, please see Section 2.1.1

Additional Information:

December 2008 OAG report on "Managing Risks to Canada's Plant Resources":
http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_200812_e_31776.html

Invasive Species: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/invasive

Growing Forward initiative:
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/hidb-bdih/initiative-eng.aspx?Org=1&Hi=104

Strategic Performance Analysis29

Day-to-Day Risk Management

Mitigating the risks to Canada's plant resource base that arise from regulated plant pests and diseases is integral to maintaining a safe, accessible and environmentally sustainable food supply. As an example of important work performed in this area, Budget 2011 provided the CFIA with close to $10 million over 5 years to help mitigate the movement of the Plum Pox Virus (PPV); a plant disease that drastically reduces yields of stone fruit. In 2011 and 2012, measures such as surveys and activities to monitor the movement of stone fruit material were conducted by the CFIA. These surveys did not detect the virus outside of the established quarantine area. With the implementation of these and other activities, the CFIA will be able to monitor the virus and mitigate potential to spread to other stone fruit growing areas of Canada.

The CFIA protects the Canadian plant resource base by regulating the movement and use of plants, plant products and associated goods to mitigate the introduction and spread of insects, pathogens, pest plants and other invasive species (IAS), and by managing plant health emergencies. In support of this, the CFIA developed a Plant Program Framework that captures all plant-related activities in an effort to plan and manage the Agency's plant priorities in a strategic fashion. In addition, the CFIA aims to sustain the marketability of Canadian plants and plant products by strengthening Canada's reputation for being free of certain insects, pathogens, and pest plants and by meeting international quality standards for plant products.

leaf icon IAS are frequently introduced via imported plants, plant products, or packaging and shipping materials. Effective regulation of these pathways reduces the likelihood of new introductions of IAS through trade, thus helping to protect Canada and Canadians from their negative impacts while facilitating access to international markets for Canadian plants and plant products. It is not always possible to prevent introductions from occurring, which makes surveillance and early detection of IAS within Canada an important complement to preventative measures. The prevention and management of IAS is a responsibility the CFIA shares with federal partners. As such, when an invasive species is detected, the CFIA works with its partners to implement appropriate measures to protect the Canadian plant resource base.

DID YOU KNOW?

In 2011–12, the CFIA:

  • issued approximately 4,860 import permits (and 788 letters) for plant and plant products;
  • conducted more than 139,000 product assessments and inspections of plants, plant products, and crop inputs for import, domestic, or export purposes;
  • issued approximately 67,776 phytosanitary certificates for Canadian products; and
  • performed more than 1,575 ship inspections to secure access to foreign markets for Canadian products.

leaf icon Because preventing the introduction and spread of invasive species in Canada is a shared responsibility, collaboration on a national coordinated approach is required to streamline activities, roles, and responsibilities. This approach involves establishing and maintaining strong partnerships and effective and proactive communication in an effort to coordinate the protection of Canada's plant resources. For example, the CFIA, along with provincial, territorial, and federal partners and with invasive species councils and other stakeholders developed an Early Detection Rapid Response (EDRR) network plan for invasive plants in Canada. Throughout 2011–12 the plan was implemented through an EDRR working group that had regular discussions on issues of mutual concern. One example that was of mutual interest to multiple stakeholders was the current lack of registered herbicides for aquatic plants in Canada and possible options for controlling these invasive plants. The EDRR network provided a mechanism to bring together all parties to better understand concerns and begin developing solutions.

Strengthening Partnerships, Communications, and International Collaboration

In accordance with its Statement of Values30, the CFIA's Risk Analysis Framework was developed to address plant and animal health and food safety risks in an approach that is consistent with international standard-setting bodies (i.e. International Plant Protection Convention, Codex Alimentarius Commission, and the Office Internationale des Epizooties). The initial part of the Risk Analysis is risk assessment, which is the determination of the degree of risk involved in a particular activity, such as potential pest introduction through a particular commodity or pathway. Guided by its Risk Analysis Framework, the CFIA completed a plant risk analysis of Russian dandelion in response to a request to import the species for latex production. The risk analysis concluded that the species did not pose an unacceptable risk to the Canadian plant resource base.

leaf icon To mitigate the risk of the introduction and spread of pests and diseases in the potato, grain, and oilseed sectors, the CFIA made significant progress toward the development of voluntary national farm-level biosecurity standards. In particular, the CFIA completed a producer-level consultation within the potato sector to better understand common farm-level biosecurity practices currently in use. These consultations provided insight into best practices, common gaps, and high-risk areas, and ultimately informed the redevelopment of the current biosecurity standards. This collaboration provided a useful mechanism to engage producers and identify challenges associated with adopting a voluntary biosecurity standard for the commodity sectors, and it will provide for a practical and realistic national farm level biosecurity standard. Plant icon These voluntary standards are intended to:

  • provide a nationally consistent approach for producers to mitigate the risk of pest and disease introduction, spread and release;
  • facilitate advancements in industry's knowledge of the risks associated with pests;
  • identify and increase awareness to encourage implementation of measures that will support improved biosecurity practices; and
  • help identify potential gaps in current biosecurity measures, which can help producers improve the control of pests and diseases in potatoes, grains, and oilseeds at the farm level.

DID YOU KNOW?

The CFIA has developed a primer on importing plants and plant products31 to raise awareness and understanding of the CFIA's Plant Health Import Control Program and related import requirements for plants, plant products and other articles regulated under the Plant Protection Act.

This communication piece primarily targeted Canadian importers, but it was also aimed at foreign national plant protection organizations and foreign exporters. The primer was posted on the CFIA web site on February 29, 2012, and hard copies were printed and distributed to key stakeholder groups in February and March of 2012. Due to high demand, this publication has been reprinted twice since its first issue.

leaf icon The CFIA is continuing efforts to better protect the plant resource base and maintain market access for Canadian commodities. With regards to the regulation of agricultural and forestry products, the CFIA is strengthening alternative service delivery models in an effort to create a more efficient and comprehensive mechanism for monitoring compliance using existing resources. In particular, in 2011–12, the Agency worked collaboratively with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to improve the Greenhouse Certification Program by addressing import and export challenges with the goal of continuing to streamline trade of greenhouse plants between Canada and the U.S. As a result, the modernization of the Greenhouse Certification Program was selected as a North American Perimeter Approach pilot project under the Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) initiative, designed to deepen regulatory cooperation with the U.S.

The CFIA also partnered with the Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec (MAPAQ) to work with Quebec crop producers affected by woolly cup grass32 to identify practical solutions to reduce the spread of this pest plant and to support on-farm eradication, where feasible. These efforts serve to underscore the CFIA's commitment to making pest management decisions in a transparent, accountable, and collaborative manner. Plant icon

leaf icon In addition to our collaborative efforts with other government departments, other levels of government, and industry, the CFIA also collaborated with research organizations such as universities and private institutions in an effort to obtain and share knowledge and expertise. Notably, the CFIA engaged with the Chinese Academy of Science, the Heilongjiang Forest Protection Institute, and the National Forest Center of Slovakia in operational field trials examining the effectiveness of the CFIA's forest pest survey methods. This project provided the CFIA with foresight regarding potential survey detection tools and provided reference material for the Ottawa Plant Laboratory and the Canadian National Collection of Arthropods on pests threatening Canada's forests.

In an effort to facilitate effective market access activities for Canada's plants, plant products, and related goods, the CFIA developed an International Plant Engagement Strategy in conjunction with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's Market Access Secretariat to support a more strategic approach to international engagement for plant activities.

In 2011–12, in an effort to enhance the public's awareness of the key role they play, the CFIA developed a new section in its website33 to inform the public on risks associated with invasive species introduced into Canada. Additionally the CFIA attended the "Canada Blooms" festival in Toronto in March 2012 and distributed fact sheets as a means to raise awareness of the negative impact of invasive plants in agricultural and natural areas. This event provided an opportunity to inform the public of how the CFIA contributes to preventing the introduction and spread of invasive plants in Canada; this includes the regulation of imports, and the monitoring and surveillance of invasive species. Furthermore, it was an opportunity for Canadians to learn how they can help in these efforts (ex. by importing and planting non-invasive ornamentals and reporting invasive plants to the CFIA).

Legislative and Regulatory Modernization

leaf icon In the fall of 2011, the CFIA began a systematic review of the Fertilizers Regulations in an effort to modernize the regulatory framework related to fertilizers, add flexibility, and reduce the burden on the regulated sector while also maintaining the highest possible product safety and environmental protection standards. The CFIA commenced consultations with the Canadian Fertilizer Products Forum (CFPF), a stakeholder-led initiative with a goal to improve the regulatory system regarding fertilizers and supplements, on the review, modernization, and implementation of the Regulations. As a result, the CFPF established a series of working groups in order to develop recommendations and provide advice to the CFIA on the review, modernization, and implementation of possible regulatory changes.

Infrastructure Improvement

leaf icon Finally, in an effort to invest in areas that will allow its inspectors and scientists to leverage technology in their roles of safeguarding the nation's plant health and ensure that our information management (IM) needs keep pace with our ability to maintain our programs and services; the Agency examined existing data sources to identify specific IM gaps. Recent initiatives, such as the Import Control and Tracking System and the Automated Directive Management System, have already helped address identified gaps for our Import function. Plant icon

Utilizing the new Import Control and Tracking System has enabled the monitoring of targeted imports to ensure the integrity of the import inspection program. Transaction details can be analyzed in real time, reducing delays in addressing non-compliance, rather than having to wait for field examination of documentation from the National Import Service Centre.

Lessons Learned

Field inspection of pedigreed seed crops is a requirement for field crop certification by the Canadian Seed Growers Association (CSGA). This in turn is a requirement for the CFIA's seed certification program, which included the issuing of official certified seed tags. As seed crop inspection largely benefits industry and due to the large resource demand for annually inspecting over 16,000 fields comprising approximately 1.1 M acres for pedigreed seed production, the CFIA took a proactive approach to finding an alternative service delivery (ASD) mechanism that is less resource-intensive, thus allowing the Agency to address our core mandate of health and safety.

In 2011, the CFIA initiated a pilot project to assess the opportunities for ASD of seed crop inspection by private authorized service providers. The lessons learned from the pilot provided insight into the challenges and opportunities for broader ASD of seed crop inspection. Specific lessons learned were related to:

  • Training and communications: a first-time learning experience for the CFIA, since we dealt with non-CFIA personnel who required more training, more shadow inspecting in the field, and more communication initially;
  • Second-party versus third-party models: the third-party fee-for-service model may not pique the interest of providers, depending on the crop, the timing of inspections, competing priorities, the geography and logistics involved, and the fees that the market can bear;
  • CFIA's approval process and oversight: for example, deciding on the percentage (per provider and per year) of fields that would require audit inspections;
  • Impacts on industry: the Canadian Seed Growers' Association has indicated that the CFIA may be moving too quickly on this initiative; if a viable alternative is to be established, they would require more advance notice and a longer transition period;
  • CFIA fees structure: CFIA fees only reflect a portion of the true cost of field inspections and seed certifications; a rise in fees, closer to the true cost, would drive the market from status quo to the ASD model more quickly and would provide more incentive to ASD providers;
  • CFIA's operations: shifting from inspecting to auditing and the need for re-training staff.

As it is implemented, Phase 2 of the pilot project in 2012 will allow the Agency to improve and expand its training and learning opportunities, improve crop inspection quality, and fine tune the level of field auditing of ASD providers.

2.2.1.4 Program Activity 4: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Flowchart - Program Activity 4: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Description for Flowchart - Program Activity 4: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Program Activity Expected Results GoC Outcome Areas
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
  • Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, and technical arrangements
  • International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animal, plant, and their products
  • International regulatory cooperation to support CFIA's mandate
A Fair and Secure Marketplace A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce

Key Risk Areas

  • Partnerships
  • Program Framework

Program Activity Description:

The CFIA's international collaboration and market access activities aim to contribute to a coherent, predictable, and science-based regulatory framework relating to food safety, animal health, and plant health that facilitates trade for the benefit of the Canadian economy. This is achieved by actively participating in international forums for the development of international science-based rules, standards, and guidelines and in the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and its negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.

Based on market demand, the CFIA will also continue to negotiate and certify against export conditions in order to support access to export markets. The CFIA, working with industry and interested stakeholders, will continue to develop and maintain export certification standards (which vary from country to country and commodity to commodity), conduct inspections, and issue export certificates.

Planned activities in this area support the Focus on Programs priority as well as the Strengthen Strategic Direction priority, and will also help to mitigate the following strategic risks:

  • Partnerships
  • Program Frameworks

2011-12 Financial Resources ($ millions)

Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
44.3 45.4 34.8

2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
363 361 (2)

Variance Analysis:

With the renewal of the PAA in 2011–12, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its authorities and FTEs to the new Program Activities. Since this initial exercise and further review, some discrepancies have been identified. CFIA is making every effort to address these to allow for better representation in the 2012–13 DPR.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

The CFIA implemented a new PAA and PMF at the beginning of fiscal year 2011–12. As such, trend analysis information cannot be provided for 2011–12.

Table 2-5a: Summary of Performance: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Expected Result: Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, and technical arrangements
Performance
Indicators*
Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating*
Number of Canadian positions on key rules and standards affecting trade in food, animal, plant, and their products that are effectively promoted. 10/Year 29 Met Moderate Confidence

* For more information on data ratings and limitations regarding the CFIA's performance indicators, please see Section 2.1.1

Table 2-5b: Summary of Performance: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Expected Result : International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animal, plant, and their products
Performance Indicators* Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating*
Number of actions taken to resolve issues identified through the Market Access Secretariat 5/Year 47 Met Moderate Confidence

* For more information on data ratings and limitations regarding the CFIA's performance indicators, please see Section 2.1.1

Table 2-5c: Summary of Performance: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Expected Result : International regulatory cooperation to support the CFIA's mandate
Performance Indicators* Targets Performance Status Data Quality Rating*
Number of cooperation initiatives achieved 3/Year 11 Met Moderate Confidence

* For more information on data ratings and limitations regarding the CFIA's performance indicators, please see Section 2.1.1

Please note: Five indicators found in the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements section of the 2011-12 RPP have been omitted from this report. The indicators that were omitted reported on performance at a low-level of detail which would not have added to the strategic performance story presented herein.

Additional Information:

AAFC's Market Access Secretariat (MAS):
http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1257798989228&lang=eng

Strategic Performance Analysis

Canadian industries operate in a multilateral trading system within which the volume and diversity of trade in food, plant, and animal products continues to increase. To adapt to global trade patterns, new varieties of risks, increased engagement of international bodies in trade-related activities, and complex partnerships with national and international partners and stakeholders, the CFIA continued to be an architect and advocate for a science-based approach to international rules and standards which can be applied within Canada and within the context of international trade. This is the basis for Canada's participation in multilateral fora and is essential for the management of bilateral and multilateral relationships.

Facilitating Market Access

Canada participates in a highly competitive trade environment and relies on Canadian animal, plant and food systems to serve as a basis for market access. As market access issues arise, effective resolution is facilitated by maintaining, and expanding the reputation of Canadian producers abroad and also by enhancing working relationships with federal partners and stakeholders and careful management of technical issues. For example, in 2011–12, as a partner in the Market Access Secretariat, the CFIA actively participated in a 47 related technical issues. These included:

  • In May 2011, India approved Canada's amended health certificate to restore access for the export of breeding horses, allowing Canadian exporters to compete for a share of India's $3.1 million market in 2010.
  • Canada - European Union (EU) recognition of equivalency of organic products was published in the EU Official Journal on June 20, 2011, formally recognizing the Canadian Organic Regime as equivalent to the EU system. Export values are estimated at approximately $46 million.
  • On August 1, 2011, Vietnam's Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development officially approved the import of live breeding cattle, live sheep, and live goats from Canada. This represented the first opening of a major Asian market for ruminant livestock. Industry estimates the Vietnamese market to have a potential worth of $50 million, and Canada can now compete for a share therein.
  • The United States Department of Agriculture made public, procedures for shipments of Canadian-origin sheep and goats transiting the United States by air or land to a third country. Small ruminants not currently eligible to enter the United States may move to approved airports in the United States for immediate export to third countries. In 2002, which represents the last year that Canadian small ruminants were eligible to enter the United States, exports to all destinations were valued at $12 million.

DID YOU KNOW?

Following the success of its technical specialists in Beijing, the CFIA increased its presence abroad with a new veterinary technical specialist placed in Moscow to help facilitate and sustain market access and advance regulatory cooperation. CFIA technical specialists abroad continued communicating with foreign authorities to explain the CFIA's rules, regulations, and inspection standards.

leaf icon On February 4, 2011, the Prime Minister of Canada and the President of the United States (US) announced the creation of two initiatives: the Beyond the Border Initiative (BtB): A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness, and the Canada - United States Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC). Subsequently, CFIA officials began working with central agencies to implement the objectives of these initiatives. Concerning the RCC, the CFIA contributed to the drafting of the Terms of Reference, Joint Action Plan, and work plans for the seven CFIA-led initiatives and three CFIA-supported initiatives. On BtB, the CFIA engaged with its US counterparts to draft language for initiatives identified through the BtB Working Group consultations. These served as the basis for the Border Action Plan, resulting in five CFIA-led initiatives and three CFIA-supported initiatives.

The CFIA also contributed to consultation sessions, coordinated by the Privy Council Office (PCO) and the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS), with Canadian stakeholders and Federal Departments on the BtB and the RCC. The CFIA has also begun implementing the work plans finalized under the RCC and the BtB, providing regular progress reports to PCO and TBS.

Finally, the CFIA led the Government of Canada delegation for the World Trade Organization Sanitary and Phytosanitary (WTO SPS) committee in negotiating the elaboration of science-based standards that form a component of the international regulatory framework. The SPS Committee focused on dispute avoidance (guidance for ad hoc consultations) and presented proposals to further enhance the implementation of the SPS Agreement (ex. a joint Canada-Japan proposal in support of the coordination of work amongst the international standard-setting bodies was adopted).

Canada hosted an IPPC workshop on the international movement of grain. The workshop provided an opportunity for participants from 20 countries to exchange useful information and identify potential issues related to the international movement of grain. The information collected will provide a solid basis for the development of an IPPC standard on the best practices on the international movement of grain.

The CFIA represented Canada in the OIE General Session of the World Assembly of Delegates of the OIE to adopt resolutions:

  • to guide the administration and future work program for the organization; and
  • for the adoption of revisions to the Aquatic Animal Health Code, the Terrestrial Animal Health Codes, and to their respective manuals of diagnostic tests and vaccines.
Emerging Issues and Risks

The number and variety of new and emerging issues relevant to the mandate of the CFIA stem from greater international movement of goods, new technologies, and changing consumer demands. The CFIA, in collaboration with other government departments, is increasingly active in developing or contributing to the development of policy positions, strategies and regulatory responses on a broad spectrum of emerging issues. For example, in one of its efforts to resolve specific bilateral trade issues and harmonize approaches to disease issues, the CFIA participated in discussions that led to the development of new conditions to address the Schmallenberg virus. The virus, transmitted from insects, is currently circulating in Europe and appears to be causing a range of adverse health effects in ruminant livestock, including fever, diarrhea, reduced milk yield, and birth defects.

leaf icon The CFIA further developed regulatory relationships on food safety, animal health, and plant health through continued engagement in existing committees and foreign and regulatory organizations such as the:

  • Health Canada – CFIA – United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) Food Safety Committee;
  • Canada – European Union (EU) Joint Management Committee; and
  • China's General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection, and Quarantine (AQSIQ).

The CFIA also created new senior level committees and technical working groups in order to exchange information on food safety initiatives and identify best practices, including those targeted at managing import risks. For example, the CFIA created a new senior level committee with Russia on sanitary requirements for animal products. The committee provides a forum for the CFIA to strengthen its relationship with regulatory counterparts in Russia while also working to resolve trade issues.

Lessons Learned

In 2011–12, trading partners in certain export markets informed the CFIA that official Canadian export certificates were being counterfeited, and as such, access to certain export markets was being threatened. Recognizing an area of weakness for Canada, and the potential loss of key markets for Canadian exporters, the CFIA implemented a strategy and further measures to increase the integrity of the CFIA's meat export certificates, an effort aimed at the prevention of counterfeit official certificates for export. As a result, not only is a system now in place to validate CFIA certificates with the government authorities of a few crucial countries where counterfeit documents have been detected, but the CFIA has begun applying this to other commodities to prevent similar incidents from occurring.

2.2.1.5 Internal Services

Internal Services provide robust, sustainable, and affordable enabling services in support of the CFIA's responsibilities and its strategic outcome. Internal services and internal operations ensure that the CFIA has sufficient resources to operate successfully and that matters of administration and human and capital resources are addressed.

Planned activities within the Internal Services Program support the Focus on People priority, the Focus on Stewardship priority and the Strengthen Strategic Directions, Performance Measurement and Transparency priority. It will also help to mitigate the following strategic risks:

  • Information and Decision Making
  • Internal Co-ordination
  • Human Resources

2011-12 Financial Resources ($ millions)

Planned Spending Total Authorities* Actual Spending*
132.3 152.1 149.7
* Excludes amount deemed appropriated to Shared Services Canada. Please see Section 2.3 for more information.

2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
1,041 974 (67)

Variance Analysis:

With the renewal of the PAA in 2011–12, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its authorities and FTEs to the new Program Activities. Since this initial exercise and further review, some discrepancies have been identified. The CFIA is making every effort to address these to allow for better representation in the 2012–13 DPR.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

The CFIA implemented a new PAA and PMF at the beginning of fiscal year 2011–12. As such, trend analysis information cannot be provided for 2011–12.

Strategic Performance Analysis

Build a Stronger Foundation to Enable Effective and Efficient Program Delivery

To strengthen its strategic direction, senior management at the CFIA continued to enhance its decision making and program delivery capacity through the implementation of the horizontal committee structure. Specifically, in 2011–12, the CFIA revised its business line structure to strengthen senior management decision-making capacity. The resulting three business line committees are generally comprised of and lead by Executive Directors and are organized along the core CFIA program activities: food safety and animal and plant health. Part of the revision included the creation of an International Coordination Committee (ICC). The ICC improves the integration and coordination of international issues across the three core business lines and includes members from Agriculture and Agri-food Canada's Market Access Secretariat. The revised structure fosters a more transparent communications approach and improves senior management's ability to monitor the implementation of strategic decisions. It also facilitates efforts to strengthen and integrate corporate planning and reporting functions and ensure priority setting and performance reporting are managed in a systematic way.

The 2010–11 internal audit report on plant health and biosecurity indicated that senior management was not being provided with reliable, consistent, and useful performance information that provided an overview of progress towards planned Plant program-wide objectives and priorities. In response, reporting and performance monitoring have been enhanced this past year within the CFIA. This has occurred through the implementation of a new Program Activity Architecture (PAA), Performance Measurement Framework (PMF), and financial coding structure that went into effect on April 1, 2011. These new structures will allow the CFIA to more effectively report on its performance and progress as the PAA, PMF and codes used in financial tracking are now more directly aligned to how the CFIA functions.

leaf icon The Performance Management Reporting Solution (PMRS), a multi-phased project to integrate and automate management and reporting requirements for PMF indicators, fully automated 16 PMF indicators, as well as 8 program delivery indicators, and 4 associated sub-indicators. Automated reporting of these PMF indicators and program delivery indicators will enhance efficiency and access to performance information, thereby improving report reliability and effective program management.

In 2011–12, the scope and budget of the PMRS project were re-base lined by the Multi-Project Special Project Advisory Committee (MP-SPAC) and the completion date was brought forward by one year to March 31, 2012. In acknowledgement of efforts currently underway within the Agency to integrate its diverse IM, performance measurement and reporting initiatives under one overarching strategy and plan, the PMRS project was instructed to complete the automation of the 16 indicators identified as ready for automation and then close out operation. The infrastructure and benefits of the PMRS will be leveraged as the CFIA moves forward with its more comprehensive Agency-wide approach to performance information management reporting.

The CFIA also continued to work on the development of its Long Term Strategic Plan (LTSP). This involved setting a vision for the CFIA and determining focus areas, major goals and strategies that will ultimately create a strategic framework for the CFIA. Until the LTSP is completed the CFIA is using its comprehensive change agenda in conjunction with its corporate risk profile to provide the equivalent level of strategic direction for priority setting and Agency business planning.

Enhance Service Focus to Improve Results for Regulated Parties and Consumers

In 2011–12 the CFIA began several initiatives to enhance transparency, improve engagement with stakeholders, and increase accountability. On February 27, 2012, the Minister of AAFC announced that the CFIA had developed a Statement of Rights and Service for Producers, consumers and other Stakeholders as well as six guides to inspection. The Statement and guides are important tools for stakeholders to use in their interactions with the CFIA. They outline what the CFIA does, what its service standards are, and what stakeholders can expect when dealing with the Agency. The purpose of the Statement and guides is to continue to strengthen transparency and communication with stakeholders and the public.

Additionally, in an effort to enhance communications with stakeholders, the CFIA realized that there was an opportunity to create a more transparent way for external partners to register complaints and appeals related to quality of service, administrative errors, and regulatory decisions. These efforts, combined with the development of the Statement and guide led to the creation of the Complaints and Appeals Office which was launched on April 2, 2012.

The CFIA is also implementing its Web Communications Strategy. Once fully implemented, the CFIA's website will provide Canadians with easy access to services and important information in a format that Canadians want and expect. Further to this, the CFIA also implemented a Web Content Management System (WCMS) that enhances the web publishing process, reducing potential errors and providing greater consistency in the structure of the CFIA web pages.

The CFIA has continued working to improve its access to information and privacy (ATIP) process. New mechanisms continue to be developed to and will be put in place to allow greater oversight, coordination, accountability and transparency over the ATIP process.

Following an assessment and internal audit of the CFIA's IM/IT capacity and infrastructure, the IM/IT Campaign Plan was developed. This strategic plan identifies specific goals and objectives to guide the IM/IT Program during the next 3 to 5 years. It aligns the Agency's IM/IT capability to its strategic goals and outcomes and provides the framework to address current and future capacity. The IM/IT Campaign Plan also creates a logical IM/IT service model by defining its services into four Lines of Operation: Information Management and Collaboration (IM&C), Enhanced Information Technology Infrastructure (EITI), Secure Integrated Information Environment (SIIE), and Modernized Business Applications (MBA). The Plan was developed collaboratively and cooperatively with the CFIA's horizontal committees and enables the CFIA, to invest in areas that will allow inspectors and scientists to leverage technology in their day-to-day operations in safeguarding the nation's food supply and plant and animal health.

The CFIA continues to work on the assessment of its security risks, through its Agency Security Plan (ASP). The CFIA is implementing activities identified in the plan while continuing to monitor controls that are currently in place. In accordance with the plan, measuring and monitoring results and progress reports will be submitted to Senior Management at the end of each fiscal year.

The CFIA focused on people management through the continued support of its communities of executives, managers, and youth. These include the Executive Community Committee (CEXCC), National Managers' Community (NMC), and Synapse (CFIA Youth Network). These networks are integral to the development of management and leadership skills, offering participants individualized learning opportunities, lunch and learn workshops, and job shadowing activities.

DID YOU KNOW?

Shared Services Canada was established on August 4, 2011, to consolidate and streamline existing resources and personnel relating to email, data centres, networks, and associated internal services from 44 departments and agencies across the Government of Canada.

Shared Services Canada will support all departments and agencies, including the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), in infrastructure services for the delivery of email, data centres, and networks. CFIA clients will continue to receive the high level of service that is already being provided.

leaf icon The CFIA has focused on building a highly trained and adaptive workforce that is able to keep pace with an increasingly complex business environment. Significant examples of work in this area include:

  • refresher training delivered to over 430 existing inspection staff members in an effort to ensure they have the competencies they need to deliver the modernized inspection model;
  • an Essentials for Supervision course (of which over 400 supervisors participated in) that focused on developing basic leadership skills aimed at supervisors or future supervisors; and
  • part-time official language training involving 5 hours of training during work hours and 5 hours of practice on employee time; this resulted in several employees receiving their enhanced language levels several months ahead of schedule.

leaf icon Planning and priority setting for technical training was improved with the use of the Inspector Commodity Identification Program and the curricula for each of our 14 inspection programs. The use of these two resources has allowed planners to verify training activities undertaken against required curricula and plan for any additional training required to fully meet the needs of each program.

During 2011–12, the CFIA created an integrated Union-Management Policy and Framework. This Framework has allowed the CFIA and the unions to foster improved communications and dialogue, better union and management relationships, and a healthier and more productive workplace.

leaf icon A National Joint Employment Transition Steering Committee was created in the winter of 2011 to address concerns and questions coming out of the implementation of the Deficit Reduction Action Plan (DRAP) and to better prepare for subsequent workforce adjustments. As well, a National Employment Transition Mailbox was created to deal with questions and concerns related to the implementation of DRAP on behalf of employees and union representatives. Additionally, the President's Corner was launched on the CFIA's intranet as a means of improving communication between the President and senior management and staff across the country.

Building on the work which began with the establishment of an Enterprise Project Management Office (ePMO) in 2010, the CFIA has continued to enhance its project management capacity. This includes the launch of the Enterprise Project Management Framework (ePMF) which included an ePMF Handbook and Governance, Rating and Reporting Guides. By putting the ePMF in place and developing guide materials, the CFIA has improved project delivery and outcomes by ensuring the projects are managed with the correct level of rigour and supervision.

2.3 Impacts on Financial and Human Resources Resulting from the Establishment of Shared Services Canada

2011-12 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities*
Net transfer post Orders in Council (OIC)** to Shared Services Canada (SSC) 07.1
2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual
Deemed to SSC016

* Pursuant to section 31.1 of the Financial Administration Act and Orders in Council P.C. 2011-0881, P.C. 2011-0877 and P.C. 2011–1297, this amount was deemed to have been appropriated to SSC, which resulted in a reduction in the appropriation for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

** Total authorities, as presented in the "2011–12 Financial Resources" table and the "Summary of Performance" section, is the net of any transfers to SSC. Actual spending does not include expenditures incurred on behalf of SSC as of the OIC date.

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