2012-2013 Departmental Performance Report

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The Honourable Rona Ambrose, PC, MP Minister of Health

For the period ending March 31, 2013

Minister's Message

Honourable Rona Ambrose PC, MP Minister of Health

The Honourable Rona Ambrose, PC, MP
Minister of Health

I am pleased to welcome the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to the Health Portfolio. By having all three federal authorities responsible for healthy food and food safety, there is a clear focus on Canadian consumers. This change will allow for better coordination, collaboration and communication when it comes to food safety.

The Agency's 2012-13 Performance Report outlines its wide range of achievements in helping to ensure that Canada has a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base. The CFIA is working diligently to protect the health and safety of Canadians while modernizing its regulations and approach to inspection.

The Government of Canada is committed to ensuring that Canadian consumers have confidence in the food they buy and eat. We understand that every day, parents make choices about what goes on the dinner table. Our Safe Food for Canadians Act was a significant milestone in strengthening Canada's world-class food safety system.

This Act gives the Agency a solid legislative platform from which to:

  • improve food safety oversight to better protect consumers;
  • streamline and strengthen legislative authorities; and
  • enhance internal market opportunities for Canadian industry.

Our Government will continue to work with the provinces and territories to further strengthen food inspection regimes.

Our Government introduced the Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan. This Plan underscores that Canadian consumers remain our Government's top priority when it comes to healthy food and food safety. It provides a clear vision for the CFIA as it moves forward to strengthen what is already one of the strongest food safety systems in the world. It is underpinned by four main objectives:

  • stronger food safety rules;
  • more effective inspection;
  • a renewed commitment to service; and
  • more information for consumers.

The CFIA will continue to support the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food for non-food safety agricultural activities, including economic and trade issues, as well as important animal health and plant protection work. For example, due to the efforts of the bi-national Regulatory Cooperation Council, Canada and the United States have agreed to recognize each other's disease control zoning for foreign animal disease outbreaks. This arrangement will keep the US market open to Canadian products while protecting animal and human health on both sides of the border during a foreign animal disease outbreak.

Canada continues to be a world leader in food safety. This reputation is based on the commitment to excellence and innovation, as well as the skills and dedication, of every member of the CFIA and the Health Portfolio. Our Government will continue to put the health and safety of Canadians first.

The Honourable Rona Ambrose, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Section I: Organizational Overview

1.1 Raison d'être

THE CFIA'S LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY

CFIA Wide
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food
    Administrative Monetary Penalties Act
Food Safety
  • Food and Drugs Act (as it relates to food)
  • Safe Food for Canadians Act (SFCA)
    (Once brought into force, the SFCA will replace the following):
    • Canada Agricultural Products Act
    • Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act (as it relates to food)
    • Fish Inspection Act
    • Meat Inspection Act
Plant
  • Fertilizers Act
  • Plant Breeders' Rights Act
  • Plant Protection Act
  • Seeds Act
Animal
  • Health of Animals Act
  • Feeds Act

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canada's largest science-based regulatory agency. It has approximately 7,120Footnote 1 employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal, and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy.

The CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services in order to:

  • prevent and manage food safety risks;
  • protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species;
  • prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases;
  • contribute to consumer protection; and
  • contribute to market access for Canada's food, plants, and animals.

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective risk management, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

1.2 Responsibilities

THE CFIA'S KEY FEDERAL PARTNERS

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Health Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Canadian Grain Commission
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada, including Canadian Forest Service
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
  • Environment Canada, including Canadian Wildlife Service

The CFIA is responsible for administrating and enforcing 13 federal statutes and 38 sets of regulations, for regulating the safety and quality of food sold in Canada, and for supporting a sustainable plant and animal resource base. In November 2012, the Safe Food for Canadians Act received Royal Assent. This new legislation, when in force, will allow the CFIA to create new regulations that provide the necessary legal framework for a single, consistent approach to strengthening food inspection in Canada. It updates and consolidates the Fish Inspection Act, the Canada Agricultural Products Act, the Meat Inspection Act, and the food provisions of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act.

The CFIA shares many of its core responsibilities with other federal departments and agencies, with provincial, territorial and municipal authorities, with private industry, and with other stakeholders. The CFIA works with its partners to implement food safety measures; manage food, animal, and plant risks, incidents and emergencies; and promotes the development of food safety and disease control systems to maintain the safety of Canada's high-quality agriculture, agri-food, aquaculture and fishery products. The CFIA's activities include verifying the compliance of imported products; registering and inspecting establishments; testing food, animals, plants, and their related products; and approving the use of many agricultural inputs. The CFIA also provides scientific advice, develops new technologies, provides testing services, and conducts regulatory research.

At the CFIA, decisions are based on high-quality, timely, relevant science. Science informs policy development and program design and delivery through foresight, advice, risk assessment, the influence of international standards, research and development, and testing.

1.3 Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

To effectively fulfill its responsibilities in safeguarding Canada's food and sustaining its animal and plant resource base, the CFIA aims to achieve its strategic outcomeFootnote 2 (A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base). The CFIA's Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), shown in Figure 1, illustrates how the Agency's strategic outcome aligns with those of the Government of Canada and reflects how the Agency plans to allocate and manage its resources to achieve the corresponding expected results. The Agency's priorities are reviewed annually to facilitate effective resource management within the context of the PAA framework. The four priority areas established for 2012–13 are detailed further in Section 1.4 and Section II.

Program Activity Architecture for the CFIA

Description for Flowchart – Program Activity Architecture for the CFIA

The CFIA's Vision
To excel as a science-based regulator, trusted and respected by Canadians and the international community

The CFIA's Mission
Dedicated to safeguarding Canada's food, animals and plants, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment and economy

GoC Outcome Areas

  • Healthy Canadians
  • Strong Economic Growth
  • A Clean and Healthy Environment
  • A Fair and Secure Marketplace
  • A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce

Strategic Outcome
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

Program Food Safety Program Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Plant Resources Program International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Internal Services*
Sub-Program
  • Meat & Poultry
  • Egg
  • Dairy
  • Fish & Seafood
  • Fresh Fruits & Vegetables
  • Processed Products
  • Imported and Manufactured Food Products
  • Terrestrial Animal Health
  • Aquatic Animal Health
  • Feed
  • Plant Protection
  • Seed
  • Fertilizer
  • Intellectual Property Rights
  • Governance and Management Support
  • Resource Management Services
  • Asset Management Services

The CFIA's Foundation

  • Sound Science
  • Effective Regulatory Base
  • Effective Inspection Programs
  • Effective Risk Management
  • Strong Partnerships
  • Transparent Timely Communications

The CFIA's Priorities

  • Strong Foundations
  • Working with Partners
  • Enhancing Services
  • Strengthening Internal Services

Key Risk Areas

  • Management Information and IM/IT Infrastructure
  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Managing Change
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships
  • Emergency Management

*The Internal Services program activity supports the CFIA's strategic outcome and all its programs.

1.4 Organizational Priorities

For the 2012–13 fiscal year, the CFIA focussed on four strategic business priorities with the goal of strengthening the Agency's foundations, mitigating strategic risks and helping effectively deliver core program activities. The following table summarizes the Agency's performance with respect to achieving these priorities. Additional details are provided in Section II.

It should also be noted that during the 2012–13 fiscal year, the Agency's change agenda, and its priorities were further refined through the Agency's Long-Term Strategic Plan (LTSP). By defining the Agency's long-term vision and carefully considering its key strategic risks, the Long-Term Strategic Plan assists the CFIA in mitigating its risks, strengthening its foundations, and effectively delivering its core program activities.

Priority TypeFootnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Building a stronger foundation to enable effective and efficient program delivery New Link to Food Safety Program (2.2.1.1), Animal Health and Zoonotics Program (2.2.1.2), and Plant Resources Program (2.2.1.3)
Summary of Progress
Currently the CFIA manages twelve sets of regulations and eight specific programs related to the oversight of food safety in Canada. With the coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Act, which received Royal Assent in November 2012 and which will improve food safety oversight, these regulations and programs will be managed as a single set of food regulations. This new legislation which is expected to come into force in the near future, will allow for new regulations to be made that provide the necessary legal framework for a single, consistent approach to strengthening food inspection in Canada. As we move forward, the CFIA will consult stakeholders and other interested parties on the new Food Regulatory Framework.

Canada has one of the best inspection systems in the world. However, in response to pressures from increased globalization in the food industry and advances in science and technology, the CFIA continued to modernize its approach to food inspection in 2012–13. It consulted with stakeholders on the new improved food inspection model and redesigned many of its business functions in order to maintain a robust approach to food safety and consumer protection.

Finally, the CFIA recognizes that it must actively respond to changing demands on food related research and testing in order to support the early identification of hazards. Therefore in 2012–13, as part of Budget 2011, the CFIA began working with its partners to explore the concepts, processes, and mechanisms available to establish a national laboratory network for food safety. This collaboration will provide for a data sharing platform and harmonized laboratory methods and tools which will allow the CFIA and its partners to more effectively share and learn as food safety science evolves. It will also facilitate improved tracking and responses to food related illnesses.

Priority Type3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Working closely with partners to optimize health and safety outcomes and economic objectives across jurisdictions New Link to Food Safety Program (2.2.1.1), Animal Health and Zoonotics Program (2.2.1.2), Plant Resources Program (2.2.1.3), and International Collaboration and Technical Agreements (2.2.1.4)
Summary of Progress
As partners in the largest bilateral trading relationship in the world, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and President Barack Obama announced the Beyond the Border Declaration and the Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council in February 2011. Both initiatives seek to deepen our partnership and enhance our security, prosperity and economic competiveness while respecting each other's sovereignty. Specifically, in 2012–13, the CFIA worked with stakeholders and our US counterparts to conduct four joint assessments on commodities of common interest from third countries, and developed and announced a zoning protocol which, in the event of a contagious animal disease outbreak, will provide for continued bilateral trade from areas located outside the disease control and eradication zone.

The CFIA led Canada's efforts with the United States to launch pilot projects for simultaneous submissions for crop protection products and initiated a one-year pilot project aiming to streamline export certification and examine alternative approaches to import inspection activities.

In an effort to further protect consumers from Listeriosis, the CFIA entered into a partnership with Genome Canada and Alberta Innovates Bio Solutions. This partnership project aims to map the genome of Listeria bacteria so that more rapid tests can be developed as current test methods take at least five days. Genomic techniques could improve accuracy and cut testing time significantly, allowing the CFIA and industry to more effectively identify potentially unsafe foods and respond more quickly to protect consumers.

Priority Type3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Enhancing service to improve results for regulated parties and consumers New Link to Food Safety Program (2.2.1.1), Animal Health and Zoonotics Program (2.2.1.2), and Plant Resources Program (2.2.1.3)
Summary of Progress
The reputation and credibility of the CFIA are vital to its ability to deliver its mandate. As always, the CFIA is committed to being accountable for how it does business. This includes informing stakeholders and the public of its regulatory activities and decisions and reporting publicly on its performance. It is from this commitment that the CFIA developed the "Statement of Rights and Service for Producers, Consumers and Other Stakeholders". The Statement articulates the Agency's commitment to stakeholders. As well, it provides a compendium of audience-specific guides to inspection to provide stakeholders with a better understanding of: their specific rights when interacting with the CFIA; how the CFIA works with that specific stakeholder group; and the standards of behaviour by which CFIA employees abide. In addition, an Office of Complaints and Appeals was established and became operational in April 2012. This office investigates stakeholder complaints and appeals related to the quality of service, administrative errors and regulatory decisions. For more information on this office please visit the website.

Further, in an effort to promote a fair and consistent approach to program funding and to encourage effective and responsive service delivery, the CFIA made significant progress on a multi-year plan to review all of its service standards and fees. The goal is to ensure that all CFIA service standards and fees are in line with the actual costs of delivering the services and that all industry sectors are being treated equally in terms of service standards and applicable fees. In support of this, the CFIA has engaged extensively with stakeholders and invited feedback on proposed amendments. In 2012–13 the CFIA completed consultations on the following user fee amendments: Destination Inspection Service, Overtime Fees, and Importer Licensing. For more information on this please visit the website.

Priority Type3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Strengthening internal management to enhance effectiveness New This management priority is part of Internal Services (2.2.1.5), which contributes to all Program Levels
Summary of Progress
To deliver on its mandate, the CFIA must be able to attract, retain, and develop talented, dedicated employees at all levels. With this in mind, the Agency continued to implement its 2008–13 Human Resources Renewal Plan and act on its human resources priorities through such vehicles as collective staffing, the development of a 1-888 HR function, and targeted training of CFIA inspectors.

The CFIA has also made significant progress in ensuring that the Agency has the controls in place to allow managers to administer and deliver effectively and efficiently. It has accomplished this through such measures as improving internal reporting capability for monitoring performance against plans and aligning agency resources towards Agency priorities and high risk-based activities. These outcomes were reached through the establishment of a Business Information Management Center (BIMC), a business-driven approach to capture, integrate, provide access to, and report on our business data and information to enhance decision making within the CFIA.

1.5 Risk Analysis

The CFIA is responsible for identifying and managing risks to the food supply and the plant and animal resource base on which safe food and a prosperous economy depends. As such, the Agency has developed a robust risk management discipline to be adopted by all parts of the CFIA as an integral part of policy, priority setting, planning, resourcing, delivery, review and reporting activities.

The vast majority of the risks that fall within the Agency's mandate are managed in concert with numerous partners and stakeholders, both domestic and international. Within that context, the Agency's risk environment is rapidly changing and increasingly complex. Factors influencing key strategic risks faced by the Agency include (but are not limited to):

  • the emergence of global supply chains, which have fundamentally changed the way agricultural products are produced, processed, packaged, distributed and sold;
  • an increase in both the volume and variety of goods coming into Canada;
  • increased export opportunities for Canadian producers, coupled with changing international standards and more stringent requirements;
  • rapid advances in processing and manufacturing technologies, resulting in significant increases in production speed, volume and diversity and the subsequent need for legislative and regulatory frameworks to keep pace;
  • an increasingly knowledgeable, demanding and risk-averse stakeholder base;
  • the ongoing emergence of new pathogens due to increases in international travel and trade, microbial adaptation, changes in production methods and distribution as well as human demographics and behaviour;
  • a greater understanding of the convergence of human, animal and ecosystem health issues; and
  • a growing international consensus around the need for common scientific equipment and approaches to support industry oversight and the global agri-food trade.

A cornerstone of the CFIA's risk management process is the development of an Agency-wide Corporate Risk Profile (CRP). The Agency's 2012 CRP identifies the key strategic risks to which the Agency is exposed as a result of its internal and external operating environments, along with strategies aimed at reducing risk exposure to tolerable levels over the next several years. The results of the corporate risk profiling process have directly informed the priorities presented in Section 1.4 as well as the strategies presented throughout this report.

The following provides the highlights of the CFIA's key strategic risks, gives the planned responses to those risks, and links the risks to organizational priorities and program activities. The risks outlined below were identified in the 2012 RPP. Given that the Agency's corporate risks are currently static, and that response strategies are relatively long-term in nature, the risk responses were not significantly modified.

Table 1: Risk Summary

Detailed information on progress achieved under each of the mitigation strategies can be found in Section 2.2.1 where a leaf icon symbol has been included.

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture Linkage to Organizational Priority

Management Information and IM/IT Infrastructure:

Potential Threat:
The ability to make risk-based decisions due to the lack of timely, accurate and useful data and information.

The Agency's diverse information requirements and national presence has resulted in an IM/IT infrastructure containing a complex mix of new and old equipment that supports multiple IM/IT systems and databases. Differences in how information is collected analyzed and used across multiple systems and hardware may impede information sharing and timely operational and regulatory decision making.

Strategy: Strengthen planning, reporting and performance monitoring by increasing the level of horizontal collaboration between program design and operational delivery and by strengthening internal reporting mechanisms, tools and systems to create sustainable and reliable sources of information that can be used for reporting and decision making.

Achievement: The Agency has implemented a three year planning cycle. As well, a senior management reporting "dashboard" of the Agency's key performance data and semi-annual reporting on plans have been used to monitor progress against plans and ensure that the Agency maintains a reliable source of information for decision making.

Linked to the CFIA's main Strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Establish a Business Information Management Centre (BIMC) to improve the timeliness and accessibility of business data.

Achievement: The BIMC has promoted information sharing, fostered a culture of performance management, and supported sound decision making through the development of a quarterly senior management dashboard of the Agency's key performance indicators.

  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Consolidate and streamline IT infrastructure services through Shared Services Canada (SSC).

Achievement: SSC has confirmed that the CFIA/AAFC Data Centre will be one of the interim sites for the consolidation by theGovernment of Canada DataCentre. Work continues to evaluate overall requirements and future actions.

  • Working with Partners
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Inspection Effectiveness:

Potential Threat:
The ability to have appropriate inspection effectiveness to expeditiously prevent, detect, and respond to threats to food safety, animals and plants.

The Agency delivers 14 independently evolved inspection programs, each having diverse and complex requirements for training, information collection and industry compliance based on the commodity being regulated. Currently, the Agency's resource efficiency is impacted due to the maintenance of multiple training programs and IM/IT systems used to address distinct variations in inspection processes, tools, and information collection.

Strategy: Execute Inspection Modernization Initiative.

Achievement: The Agency has designed a new and improved risk-based inspection model which integrates a Risk-Based Inspection Oversight Model (RBIO) and is based on common inspection activities and standard processes. Implementation is planned over the next 2-3 years. Currently in the implementation phase.

Linked to the CFIA's main strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

  • Strong Foundation

Strategy: Strengthen planning, reporting and performance monitoring by increasing the level of horizontal collaboration between program design and operational delivery and by strengthening internal reporting mechanisms, tools and systems to create sustainable and reliable sources of information that can be used for reporting and decision making.

Achievement: The Agency has implemented a three year planning cycle. As well, a senior management reporting dashboard of the Agency's key performance indicators and semi-annual reporting against plans have been used to monitor progress on plans and ensure that the Agency maintains a reliable source of information for decision making.

  • Strengthen Internal Management

Scientific Capability:

Potential Threat: The ability to have the scientific capability to adapt and respond in a timely manner.

Advancements in science and technology have increased the complexity of the commodities the Agency regulates. Additionally, there is growing international consensus around the need for common scientific equipment and approaches to support industry oversight and the global agri-food trade. The Agency is expected to maintain an employee base and modern laboratory facilities that reflects these advancements in regulated products and international requirements.

Strategy: Laboratory infrastructure strategy.

Achievement: The Agency invested in new science technologies in key locations and upgraded critical laboratory infrastructure.

Linked to the CFIA's main strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

  • Strong Foundation

Strategy: Enhance laboratory response capacity.

Achievement: The Agency has initiated two collaborative agreements: one with Genome Canada and the other with Genome Alberta Innovates Bio Solutions, which focus on developing rapid detection methods for Listeria. As well, staffing processes have been finalized for additional laboratory personnel at various locations across the Agency.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Working with Partners

Strategy: Provide both new and experienced inspection staff with consistent and relevant training that reflects the new inspection model.

Achievement: The Agency developed an HR Strategy that targets recruitment, training and retention for new hires and experienced staff. A part of this plan is a new six week training program for all new CFIA inspectors. To date, it has completed three pilots (two English, one French) with 54 participants.

  • Enhancing Service
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Integrate Laboratory Network.

Achievement: The Agency developed a plan for an integrated network of laboratories to improve food safety response. Governance and a strategy have been developed to support the federal provincial and territorial efforts toward standardization and coordination of food safety surveillance activities.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Working with Partners

Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework:

Potential Threat:
The ability of the current legislative, regulatory and program framework to support the effective delivery of the Agency's mandate.

Rapid advances in processing and manufacturing technologies have resulted in significant increases in production speed, volume and diversity, requiring the subsequent need for updated legislative and regulatory frameworks. Statutes and authorities impact the design and delivery of programs that regulate new commodities and support economic competitiveness within the industry.

Strategy: Legislative renewal through the development and passage of regulations under the Safe Food for Canadians Act and the coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Act and its regulations.

Achievement: The Safe Food for Canadians Act received Royal Assent on November 22, 2012.

Linked to the CFIA's main strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

  • Strong Foundation
  • Enhancing Service

Strategy: Implement a Multi-Year Regulatory Plan.

Achievement: The Agency laid the foundation for the development of a modernized risk and outcome-based regulatory framework. Over the coming months, the Agency will be consulting with stakeholders on the proposed new regulatory framework.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Enhancing Service

Managing Change:

Potential Threat:
The ability to effectively manage change on an ongoing basis.

The global evolution of economic, social and environmental factors influences the regulatory and business environment within which the Agency operates. Consequently, fiscal restraint is growing in importance, as is the subsequent need for greater innovation to achieve efficiency while maintaining or increasing effectiveness in the way the Agency does its business and delivers its mandate.

Strategy: Provide both new and experienced inspection staff with consistent and relevant training that reflects the new inspection model.

Achievement: The Agency developed an HR Strategy that targets recruitment, training and retention for new hires and experienced staff. Part of this plan is a new six-week training program for all new CFIA inspectors. To date, it has completed three pilots (two English, one French) with 54 participants.

Linked to the CFIA's main strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

  • Enhancing Service
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Reinforce values and ethics to ensure ongoing dialogue between managers, supervisors, and employees and to provide guidance and advice within respective areas/ branches.

Achievement: Value and Ethics was added as a standing agenda item for many management teams and staff meetings, encouraging open dialogue. Comprehensive Value and Ethics training was provided, emphasizing the importance of ethical dialogue. The Senior Value and Ethics Officer made regular presentations to various Branch Management Teams (this year representing 50% of the Agency) and sent out messages and tools to support dialogue between managers, and supervisors and their staff.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Strengthen planning, reporting and performance monitoring by increasing the level of horizontal collaboration between program design and operational delivery and by strengthening internal reporting mechanisms, tools and systems to create sustainable and reliable sources of information that can be used for reporting and decision making.

Achievement: The Agency has implemented a three year planning cycle. As well, a senior management reporting dashboard of the Agency's key performance indicators and semi­annual reporting on plans have been used to monitor progress against plans and ensure that the Agency maintains a reliable source of information for decision making. Additionally internal governance processes have been implemented to better support planning and decision making.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Enhance project management. Design, deliver and establish, accessible and user friendly project management services for all employees.

Achievement: The CFIA conducted an independent assessment of project management maturity and has developed strategies/ approaches to further mature project management within the Agency.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Enhance internal and public engagement by enabling greater accountability for compliance, as well as improved service delivery and information sharing through the provision of quality online information and access to services in a context that the public wants and expects.

Achievement: The CFIA has completed and published its Transparency Policy which, along with the Statement of Rights and Service and the Complaints and Appeals Office, has enhanced the CFIA's reputation for fairness, accountability, and transparency.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Working with Partners
  • Enhancing Service
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Transparency and Leveraging Relationships:

Potential Opportunity:
Opportunity for the Agency to increase its transparency and accountability to stakeholders.

Information sharing enables regulated parties to take steps to ensure compliance and also helps to increase public awareness and confidence in the Canadian marketplace. Diverse methods exist to engage and collaborate with industry, other governmental stakeholders and the public to enhance the development of outputs that are mutually beneficial and agreed-upon.

Strategy: Enhance Service and Communication: Transparency Policy; Web Communication Strategy; Complaints/Appeals Mechanism; Access to Information and Privacy ATIP Modernization.

Achievement: The Transparency Policy was completed and published on April 1, 2013. The Implementation of the Complaints and Appeals Office was completed and launched in April 2012. Training sessions were delivered to increase ATIP awareness.

Draft Privacy Governance Framework developed.

Linked to the CFIA's main strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Electronic Service Delivery Platform.

Achievement: E-business and e-certification now integrated with electronic service delivery platform (ESDP). The projects are managed under one project management office in order to gain efficiencies and leverage commonalities of the desired systems.

  • Strong Foundation

Strategy: User Fees/Service Standards Modernization.

Achievement: The review and modernization of user fees and service standards is making progress;

  • Destination Inspection draft proposal was completed;
  • Importer licensing proposal, for the non-federally registered sector, was approved;
  • Animal Export Certificates and Overtime Fees Proposals progressed as planned.
  • Strong Foundation

Strategy: Red Tape Reduction Initiatives.

Achievement: Initiatives contributing to the Red TapeReduction objectives are progressing well. e.g. legislative and regulatory renewal; inspection modernization strategy; training to support professional delivery of services; Transparency Agenda; ethical relationships; user fees and service standards; issuance of export certificates; etc.

  • Strong Foundation

Strategy: International Engagement: International Program Framework; International Strategic Framework; FDA Comparability and Border Initiatives with the US.

Achievement: The Agency made contributions to a common CFIA/AAFC database which will track on-going, emerging, and priority international issues.

Progress has been made with respect to Trans Pacific Partnership negotiations and free trade negotiations with the EU, India, and China.

Mutual recognition of zoning decisions between Canada and the US in the event of a highly contagious animal disease outbreak was arranged developed and announced.

Four joint assessments on third countries were conducted by Canada and the US to better protect both countries from off shore animal and plant risks.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Working with Partners
  • Enhancing Service
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Emergency Management:

Potential Threat:
The ability to respond to multiple simultaneous or large-scale emergencies.

The CFIA has a well-planned emergency preparedness and response capacity. However threat environments continue to evolve, requiring regular updating of plans and responses to reflect changes and find efficiencies to ensure the Agency maintains a minimum of essential business functions during emergencies.

Existing risk mitigation strategies resulted in a tolerable level of residual risk. The currently established Risk Response Strategy will be monitored.

Linked to the CFIA's main strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

  • Strong Foundation
  • Working with Partners
  • Enhancing Service
  • Strengthen Internal Management

1.6 Summary of Performance

The increase from Planned Spending to Actual Spending reflects funding received during 2012–13 via supplementary estimates and from Treasury Board Votes. Some of this funding was related to initiatives that sunsetted and been renewed, but the renewed resources were not reflected in the Agency's Planned Spending, as it had not yet been approved by Parliament. The Agency also received: funding transferred from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada as part of a multi-year Memorandum of Understanding to continue the Growing Forward Program Suite; funding carried forward from the previous fiscal year; funding related to increased statutory compensation payments; and takes into account recent savings initiatives undertaken by the government.

The decrease of 283 from Planned to Actual Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) is related to delays in certain projects and some initiatives as well as an acceleration in the application of reductions related to savings initiatives.

For variance analysis at the Program Level, please see the applicable Program in Section II of this document.

Financial Resources – Total Agency ($ millions)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities
(available for
use) 2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
(Planned vs.
Actual Spending)
685.5 723.9 846.7 782.1 58.2
Human Resources (FTEsFootnote 4)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
6729 6446 (283)Footnote 5
Performance Summary Table for Strategic Outcome and Programs ($ millions)
Strategic Outcome 1:
A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base
Program Total
Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates 2012–13)
Planned Spending Total
Authorities
(available
for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
Alignment to
Government
of Canada
Outcomes
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2012–13 2011–12 2010–11
Food Safety Program 304.8 340.3 352.7 330.5 369.5 353.6 328.9 313.8 Healthy Canadians
Animal Health and Zoonotics 132.5 132.5 132.0 89.2 210.7 175.4 140.3 133.9

Healthy Canadians

Plant Resources Program 84.4 86.6 84.7 74.4 93.5 89.0 84.0 80.1

A Clean and Healthy Environment

International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 45.4 45.4 31.7 25.6 35.2 33.4 34.8 33.3

A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce

Strategic Outcome 1
Sub-Total
567.1 604.8 601.1 519.7 708.9 651.4 588.0 561.1
Performance Summary Table for Internal Services ($ millions)
Internal Services Total
Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates
2012–13)
Planned Spending Total
Authorities
(available
for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2012–13 2011–12 2010–11
118.4 119.1 130.3 116.9 137.8 130.7 149.7 160.7
Sub-Total 118.4 119.1 130.3 116.9 137.8 130.7 149.7 160.7
Total Performance Summary Table ($ millions)
Strategic Outcome(s)
and Internal Services
Total
Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates
2012–13)
Planned Spending Total
Authorities
(available
for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2012–13 2011–12 2010–11
685.5 723.9 731.4 636.6 846.7 782.1 737.7 721.8
Total 685.5 723.9 731.4 636.6 846.7 782.1 737.7 721.8

1.7 Expenditure Profile

The Agency's overall spending has increased from 2009–10 to 2012–13 by approximately 9%. This is as a result of additional funding received for the following: Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan: to increase the frequency of food inspections in meat processing establishments; the Government's response to Listeriosis; Modernizing Federal Laboratories (Under Canada's Economic Action Plan); the Pork Industry Recovery and Expansion Strategy; Food Safety Modernization; transfers from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada for the Traceability National Information Portal (TNIP) and Growing Forward; as well as for increased expenditures under statutory compensation. This also takes into account resources that the Agency transferred to Shared Services Canada (SSC) in 2011–12 to consolidate, streamline and improve Government information technology and information management services as well as the first year of reductions stemming from savings initiatives. In the first year, the majority of the savings of $2.0 million were related to administrative efficiencies.

Planned Spending resources for 2013–14 to 2015–16 are scheduled to decline over this three-year period. This is as a result of the following: the implementation of incremental savings initiatives; the transfer of resources to Public Works and Government Services Canada for the Consolidation of Pay Services Project; a reduction starting in 2015-16 in funding for Food Safety Modernization projects which is in line with the approved investment plan; as well as the sunsetting of resources that the Agency received for other initiatives. The CFIA plans to seek renewal of these sunsetting resources either alone, or in collaboration with another department. Until the renewals are approved by Parliament, the CFIA cannot include these initiatives in Planned Spending.

With respect to the implementation of specific savings initiatives, on-going savings in the amount of $56 million will be achieved through: administrative efficiencies, such as sharing common administrative services between the CFIA and AAFC; as well as program changes to improve services and facilitate trade such as implementing agreed upon changes with the provinces with respect to the delivery of certain inspection activities under provincial jurisdiction and more effective response to animal diseases and plant pests. None of the measures affect delivery of the CFIA's front-line food safety services.

Agency Spending Trend
Figure 3: The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's past spending trend and future spending within the context of a seven-year trend. Description follows.
Description of Figure 3: The CFIA's past spending trend and future spending within the context of a seven-year trend
Actual Spending
2009–10 718.1
2010–11 721.8
2011-12 737.7
2012–13 782.1
Planned Spending
2013–14 731.4
2014–15 636.6
2015-16 619.9

1.8 Estimates by Vote

For information on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's organizational votes and/ or statutory expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2013 (Volume II). An electronic version of the Public Accounts 2013 is available on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.

Section II: Analysis of Programs and Sub-Programs by Strategic Outcome

2.1 How the Agency Plans and Reports Outcome

In accordance with the Treasury Board Secretariat's (TBS) Management, Resources and Results Structure (MRRS) Policy, the CFIA planning and reporting framework is based on a desired strategic outcome, a PAA, and an associated governance framework. The PAA is aligned with desired Government of Canada (GoC) outcomes and takes into consideration the impact of several factors – including the global and national environment, GoC priorities, CFIA strategic risks, CFIA's human and financial resource capacity, and the outcomes of the CFIA's past performance and related lessons learned.

This report highlights key accomplishments and gives an account of the progress made in advancing the plans and priorities identified in the CFIA's 2012–13 Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP).

Section 2.2 of this report describes performance information, including highlights, challenges, lessons learned and expected results for the strategic outcome and measures it against targets through the use of compliance and other relevant performance indicators. Additionally, details are given on performance as it relates to special initiatives, risk mitigation strategies, and ongoing activities. Special focus is given to how this affects Canadians.

2.1.1 Assessment of Compliance and Performance Targets

Given the complexity and inherent variability of the agriculture, agri-food, forestry and fishery production, processing, and distribution sectors, the approach to assessing compliance varies across commodity groups. The CFIA uses a variety of tools to monitor and promote compliance, including inspections, audits, product sampling, and testing. The CFIA uses risk-based approaches that target the areas of highest risk. For example, the CFIA focuses its efforts on systems, processes, and facilities that directly affect the safety of food, animal, and plant health. The resulting compliance rates indicate the extent to which regulated parties have adhered to requirements specified in federal acts and regulations.

Qualitative and quantitative performance targets provide a basis for measuring the performance of regulated parties and of the CFIA in relation to how they achieve the results expected of them. The targets in this report are for critical program areas and are based either on historical averages of actual performance or on the expected results of effective programming (e.g. rate of industry compliance with regulatory standards). The CFIA has assessed the extent to which performance has met or exceeded established targets and provided analysis when performance fell below established targets. Targets for programs that monitor activities are set differently than those for programs that focus on specific areas of non-compliance. Where applicable, performance indicator results have been rounded to the nearest percentage.

2.2 Performance by Strategic Outcome

2.2.1 Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base

Mitigating risks to food safety is the CFIA's highest priority, and the health and safety of Canadians is the driving force behind the design and development of CFIA programs. The CFIA, in collaboration and partnership with industry, consumers, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, continues to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases.

The current and future economic prosperity of the Canadian agriculture and forestry sectors relies on a healthy and sustainable animal and plant resource base. As such, the CFIA is continually improving its program design and delivery in the animal health and plant resource areas in order to minimize and manage risks. In an effort to protect the natural environment from invasive animal and plant diseases and plant pests, the CFIA also performs extensive work related to the protection of environmental biodiversity.

The CFIA supports Canadian agriculture and the ability of agri-food businesses to enter domestic and global markets and complete successfully therein. The Agency works to develop and implement regulatory frameworks that: address risks to consumers; enforce labelling information requirements (ensuring the information is not misleading); and ensure that imports and exports meet Canadian and international requirements. To support these objectives, the CFIA engages in outreach and consultation activities with key stakeholders and partners (including those in industry), consumers, and international trade and standards organizations so that its regulatory frameworks are based on the most current and relevant information, thereby remaining as up to date as possible within this rapidly evolving, global environment. In so doing, the CFIA is able to maintain open and transparent communication with its stakeholder and consumer base.

In the fall of 2011, the CFIA began a systematic review of its regulatory frameworks for food safety and plant and animal health. This regulatory review will allow the Agency to modernize and maintain Canada's food safety and animal and plant health systems while adapting to consumer, global and scientific trends through such mechanisms as outcome based approaches. Further information on the CFIA's work in this area can be found in Sections 2.2.1.1, 2.2.1.2, 2.2.1.3, and 2.2.1.4.

To successfully deliver on its strategic outcome, the CFIA has developed a robust risk management discipline, and it fosters the use thereof throughout the Agency. As such, the CFIA continually monitors and assesses its operating environment in order to be aware of threats and opportunities concerning the achievement of its desired outcome. A cornerstone of its risk management process is the development of an Agency-wide Corporate Risk Profile (CRP). Key strategic risks, as identified in the Agency's CRP, are:

  • Management information and IM/IT infrastructure;
  • Inspection effectiveness;
  • Scientific capability;
  • Legislative, regulatory and program framework;
  • Managing change;
  • Transparency and leveraging relationships; and
  • Emergency management.

In order to mitigate these risks and achieve its strategic outcome, the Agency will, through the actions of its programs (Food Safety, Animal Health and Zoonotics, Plant Resources, International Collaboration and Technical Agreements), concentrate its efforts for 2012–13 on the delivery of key initiatives supporting the following four priorities:

  • Building a stronger foundation to enable effective and efficient program delivery;
  • Working closely with partners to optimize health and safety outcomes and economic objectives across jurisdictions;
  • Enhancing service to improve results for regulated parties and consumers; and
  • Strengthening internal management to enhance effectiveness.
2.2.1.1 Program 1: Food Safety Program
Program Activity 1. Description follows.
Description of image – Program Activity 1

Program: Food Safety Program

Expected Results:

  • Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated
  • Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements

GoC Outcome Areas:

  • Healthy Canadians

Key Risk Areas:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Program Level: Food Safety Program
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
(Planned
vs. Actual
Spending)
304.8 340.3 369.5 353.6 13.3
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Program: Food Safety Program
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
2997 3216 219
Table 2-1a: Summary of Performance by Program: Food Safety Program
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Number of commodity areas where federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targetsFootnote 6 6 out of 6 met 5 out of 6 met
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decisionleaf icon 100% 100% Met
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decisionFootnote 7 95% 96% Met
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where domestic food products meet established compliance targetsFootnote 8 6 out of 6 met 6 out of 6 met
Number of commodity areas where imported food products meet established compliance targetsFootnote 9 6 out of 6 met 5 out of 6 met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The increases from Planned to Actual Spending of $13.3 million and Planned to Actual FTEs of 219 are, in part, due to additional resources received from the government for various food safety activities. Actual Spending also reflects efficiencies in the implementation of the IMIT project under the Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan. These efficiencies came mainly from the use of commercially available sub-components, Government of Canada standard solutions, and capitalizing on internal shared services and infrastructure.

In addition to the above, the variances in the financial resources and the FTEs are also related to the realignment of the Agency's PAA in 2011–12. This realignment saw the CFIA reduce from 8 Programs to 5. During this realignment, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its Planned Spending and FTEs to the revised Programs. However, while preparing the 2011–12 DPR, it was noticed that some Planned Spending and FTEs did not properly align with the corresponding actual amounts. This same issue affects the 2012–13 information. This issue was corrected in the 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Safe Food for Canadians Act

leaf iconFood in Canada is currently regulated under a suite of different statutes: the Food and Drugs Act, the Fish Inspection Act, the Meat Inspection Act, the Canada Agricultural Products Act, and the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act. While these food statutes have served Canadians well, the time has come to have stronger and more modern statutes to manage and mitigate today's risks to food safety, while ensuring that Canadian industry has continued opportunities in international trading markets. To achieve this, the Government of Canada tabled the Safe Food for Canadians Act on June 7, 2012. The Act received Royal Assent on November 22, 2012 and is expected to come into force in the near future. This Act consolidates the four existing Acts and will allow the CFIA to create new regulations that provide the necessary legal framework for a single, consistent approach to strengthening overall food inspection in Canada, including strengthening oversight of food commodities being traded inter-provincially or internationally. The Act focuses on three important areas:

  • improved food safety oversight to better protect consumers;
  • streamlined and strengthened legislative authorities; and
  • enhanced international market opportunities for Canadian industry.

In the near future, the CFIA will work with consumer groups and industry to develop new regulations to support the Act. During this period, the CFIA will also launch a number of significant food safety enhancements.

Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan

The passage of the Safe Food for Canadians Act in November 2012 set the stage for important changes to Canada's food safety system. These changes are aimed at better protecting consumers and Canadian families from food safety risks. To achieve this, the Government of Canada is taking further action to strengthen Canada's world-class food safety system with the launch of the Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan. The Action Plan builds on previous Government of Canada food safety enhancements and focuses on continuous improvement based on science, global trends, and best practices. The Action Plan also provides a strong footing upon which to base the Government's response to the recommendations of the Independent Advisory Panel that investigated the XL Food recall in the fall of 2012. This plan aims to modernize the Canadian food safety system, one of the best food safety systems in the world, through:

  • stronger food safety rules;
  • more effective inspection;
  • a commitment to service; and
  • more information for consumers.
Safe Food for Canadians Regulations

leaf iconIn 2012–13, as part of the Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan, the CFIA began a systematic review of the Meat Inspection Regulations, the Fish Inspection Regulations, the regulations under the Canada Agricultural Products Act and the food related provisions of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Regulations with the goal of developing a new regulatory framework under the Safe Food for Canadians Act. The proposed regulatory modernization will replace thirteen federal food inspection regulations with one single set of regulations. This will include:

  • horizontal provisions applying to all food imported and prepared for trade inter-provincially (e.g. licensing, preventive controls, traceability for exports and inter­provincial trade, and record-keeping);
  • commodity-specific food safety requirements (e.g. fresh fruit and vegetables);
  • commodity-specific trade requirements and consumer protection provisions (e.g. standards of identity, country or origin labelling, commodity specific consumer protection requirements, and horizontal labelling requirements); and
  • complementary regulations regarding disclosure of information and administrative monetary penalties.

The proposed regulatory framework was released for public consultation at the Food Safety Regulatory Forum in June, 2013. To support the consultation process, the CFIA developed a discussion paper that sets out a proposed framework for new regulations, including specific proposals to stimulate debate, generate ideas, and provide a starting point for discussions. The consultation period on the proposed regulatory framework will end on November 30, 2013.

As part of a comprehensive review of its regulatory frameworks, the CFIA continued to advance on other regulatory proposals, such as: repealing the regulatory requirements concerning pre-market registration of labels and recipes under the Meat Inspection Regulations, and the registration of labels under the Processed Products Regulations the requirements to use registered construction and packaging materials and chemicals in the Fish Inspection Regulations; and the requirements to use registered chemical agents and cleaning compounds under the Egg Regulations.

Food Inspection Modernization

leaf iconIn 2012–13 the Agency continued to leverage the funding announced in Budget 2011, which provided the CFIA with $100 million over five years to modernize its inspection system. The CFIA draFTEd a proposed improved food inspection model that establishes common inspection procedures and tools, regardless of the food commodity being inspected, and is founded on the premise of focusing inspection on the basis of ongoing scientific analysis of food safety risks. This first draft was developed through the involvement of key internal and external stakeholders. Between July and November 2012, the CFIA held internal and external consultations on the first draft of the proposed model. Consultations involved almost 50 agencies, departments, industry groups, unions, consumer associations and international communities.

A technical working group was formed in early July 2012 to develop and compile policies, procedures, protocols, forms, illustrations and detailed descriptions of the inspection procedures for the components of the proposed model framework. Feedback from the initial consultations with front-line inspectors, collective bargaining agents, industry groups and consumers informed the development of a second draft. Consultation on this second draft took place from November 2012 to March 2013, using webinars and face-to-face meetings.

Similar to other regulatory agencies around the world, the CFIA uses scientific knowledge to inform the planning of its oversight and inspection activities (inspection, audits, directed sampling and testing, surveillance, etc.) In 2012–13, the CFIA initiated the development of a Risk-Based Inspection Oversight Model (RBIO) that will improve the consistency of risk-based decisions when planning the use of its inspection resources. To support the ongoing implementation of this framework, the CFIA uses various information sources (environmental scanning, Codex Alimentarius standards, effectiveness of industry's preventive controls plans, etc.) and has implemented a number of monitoring and surveillance programs to expand its understanding of existing food-hazard combinations.

Pathogen Reduction Initiative

In an effort to improve detection of and response to foodborne threats, the CFIA continued the implementation of the pathogen reduction initiative. In 2012–13, in collaboration with provinces and territories, the CFIA advanced its national baseline study for Salmonella and Campylobacter in broiler chicken by completing the sampling phase and initiating the testing phase. The information collected through this baseline study will contribute to the development of pathogen reduction programs in poultry and serve as a benchmark to measure the effectiveness of intervention measures. This baseline study is part of the broader Federal/ Provincial/Territorial (FPT) Pathogen Reduction Initiative aimed at decreasing the health risks and economic impact of food-borne pathogens in Canadian meat and poultry.

Integrated Laboratory Network

leaf iconIn an effort to improve laboratory responses to national foodborne emergencies, the CFIA and its provincial, territorial, academic and industrial partners continued to advance work on the development of a national network of laboratories. This network will allow for a more effective exchange of scientific, surveillance and monitoring information while harmonizing laboratory methods and tools. Specifically, a strong foundation for the initiative was established through the definition of a formal governance structure that includes a federal, provincial, and territorial steering committee supported by a technical working group. As well, an Integrated Laboratory Network Strategy was developed that focuses on:

  • standardizing and coordinating national laboratory capacity;
  • meeting increased demands for laboratory services;
  • managing and addressing food-related emergencies; and
  • providing future consideration of electronic sharing of scientific data and information nationally.
Enhanced Surveillance

In 2012–13, the CFIA continued leveraging funds from Budget 2012 to enhance surveillance of potential foodborne illness outbreaks. The CFIA participated in the federal, provincial, territorial surveillance task team that completed an inventory of Federal Provincial Territorial (F/P/T) food safety surveillance activities in Canada. The resulting analysis will form the basis for collaborative F/P/T priority setting improve information sharing among partners, and leverage existing food safety initiatives.

Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan

The CFIA continued making significant progress in implementing its portion of the Government of Canada's Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan and the associated user fee were published in Canada Gazette I and the proposed Imported Food Sector Regulations will enable better identification of unsafe foods and ingredients and allow the CFIA to identify and engage importers. In anticipation of the implementation of these regulations, pilot projects on both the compliance verification approach and a web-based licence management system were conducted to identify issues prior to roll-out.

Work also continued on food safety risk scanning and prioritization. Progress in this area included expanding the list of food hazard combinations to be included for risk ranking. These activities contribute to the Agency's risk mapping capability and enable the identification of gaps in food safety controls and potential intervention points in the farm to fork continuum. As an example, a risk profile, which is a compilation of scientific information on a specific food hazard combination, was completed for E. coli in spinach.

In support of transparency, the CFIA published the results of its chemical residue and microbiological targeted surveys and updated Product of Canada information on its website.

The CFIA also conducted twelve Product of Canada labelling investigations while continuing to monitor compliance with guidelines through its inspection and label verification activities and responding to inquiries, complaints and referrals related to the interpretation and implementation of the revised policy.

In 2012–13, the CFIA continued to engage with its regulatory counterparts in QUAD governments (Canada, US, Australia, New Zealand) to enhance regulatory cooperation and information exchange regarding food safety, to collaborate with its counterparts in other governments (e.g. China, Mexico, Guatemala, India) to advance relationship building as it concerns food safety. The CFIA also continued its participation in Codex Working Groups, including the review and development of the Codex Annexes on melons and berries.

Further efforts involved targeted oversight of imported products with the completion of 69 border blitz inspections and 550 import surveillance activities, as well as, IM/IT infrastructure and information enhancements for tracking imported food products.

With the CFIA's enhanced recall capacity, over 250 food recall incidents related to non-federally registered and fresh fruit and vegetable products were managed, this included responding to over 2,600 web-based enquiries. As for Service Canada, they received over 4,800 requests for information regarding recalls.

Sub-Program: Meat and Poultry

Financial Resources ($ millions) –  For Sub-Program Level: Meat and Poultry
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
177.2 191.2 14.0
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Meat and Poultry
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
1695 1819 124
Table 2-1b: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Meat and Poultry
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Federally registered meat and poultry establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered meat and poultry establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 94% Not Met
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met
Percentage of tested imported meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 99% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Although this year's compliance rate (94%) was below the target rate of 98%, this is a marked improvement over last year (92%). The performance improvement was most likely dampened due to the fact that, in 2012–13, the CFIA conducted intensified inspection activities in response to several high visibility food safety incidents. The intensified inspection activities may have resulted in a higher number of non-compliant establishments which would have reduced the overall improvement in the compliance rate for 2012–13. The CFIA will continue to work closely with industry to improve the compliance rate of federally registered meat and poultry establishments.

XL Food Recall

On September 4, 2012 the CFIA identified Escherichia Coli (E. Coli) 0157:H7 in products supplied by the XL Foods Inc. plant in Brooks, Alberta. The CFIA issued its first recall alert on September 16, 2012 and provided 20 consecutive expansions/updates until October 20, 2012. During this period, the CFIA continued its food safety investigation and CFIA inspectors also continued enhanced supervision of ongoing operations at the plant.

The Public Health Agency of Canada reported 18 confirmed cases of human illness due to this contamination of E. Coli 0157:H7. Following the recall by XL Foods Inc., the Government of Canada appointed an Independent Expert Advisory Panel to conduct a review of events and circumstances related to the XL Foods Inc. E. coli O157:H7 investigation and recall. The advisory panel completed its review and released the report on June 5, 2013.

The Panel found that all key players interviewed expressed a keen desire to ensure that the food Canadians eat is safe. However, the panel also found that responsibilities towards food safety programs were not always met. The Government has accepted all of the recommendations of the Independent Panel and the CFIA, and Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada are working together to address all 30 recommendations. Further progress on the implementation of the recommendations will be provided in future DPR's.

The recently announced Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan closely aligns with many of the panel's recommendations. For example, several of the recommendations are fully or partially addressed through enhancements to E. coli O157 controls, which were announced on May 17. Additionally, the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food announced the creation of Inspection Verification Teams (IVTs) to oversee the performance of the entire food safety system. The IVTs are meant to ensure that the overall food safety system is effective and that food safety rules and standards are consistently and thoroughly followed and enforced.

Meat Hygiene Pilot

The Meat Hygiene Pilot, a project aimed at simplifying requirements for establishments involved in the slaughter, processing or packaging of meat products traded inter-provincially, was completed in 2012–13. The pilot resulted in regulatory changes that will allow establishments to apply to become federally registered. This will facilitate the inter-provincial trade of meat, while maintaining food safety standards. The first set of the regulatory amendments were published in Canada Gazette II in November 2011 and complementary amendments to the Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures have been made and implemented. A second set of regulatory amendments were pre-published in Canada Gazette I in April 2012.

Listeria policy

In 2012–13, the CFIA continued work in relation to Health Canada's revised Listeria Policy. Guidance materials have been developed and communicated to industry sectors to promote the effective implementation of the new policy. Significant progress was made toward the validation of new laboratory methods for more rapid analysis of samples, while laboratory analytical capacity continued to be augmented. The Agency also integrated enhanced verification and inspection activities, as well as the collection and evaluation of environmental samples, into its existing inspection work plans.

Sub-Program: Egg

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Egg
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
9.7 9.6 (0.1)
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Egg
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
79 85 6
Table 2-1c: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Egg
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Federally registered shell egg establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered shell egg establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 98% Met
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 97% Met
Percentage of tested imported shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 100% Met

Sub-Program: Dairy

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Dairy
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
12.9 12.8 (0.1)
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Dairy
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
109 117 8
Table 2-1d: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Dairy
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Federally registered dairy establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered dairy establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 100% Met
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 97% Met
Percentage of tested imported dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 96% Met

Sub-Program: Fish and Seafood

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Fish and Seafood
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
46.0 45.8 (0.2)
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Fish and Seafood
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
387 415 28
Table 2-1e: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Fish and Seafood
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Federally registered fish and seafood establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fish and seafood establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 98% Met
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 99% Met
Percentage of tested imported fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 91% Not Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The fish and seafood program's risk-based sampling approach resulted in the rejection of 16 lots of imported fish with 6 of those lots rejected due to veterinary drug residues in farmed fish from one specific market. The CFIA is currently working on a strategy to address this compliance issue. If those 6 cases are removed from the data set the resulting compliance rate is 94.4%, very close to the target and an improvement over last year's compliance rate.

Sub-Program: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
26.1 26.0 (0.1)
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
207 222 15
Table 2-1f: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Federally registered fresh fruit and vegetables establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fresh fruit and vegetable establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 99% Met
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fresh fruit and vegetable samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met
Percentage of tested imported fresh fruit and vegetables samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 95% Met

Sub-Program: Processed Products

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Processed Products
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
12.1 12.1 0.0
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Processed Products
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
99 106 7
Table 2-1g: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Processed Products
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Federally registered processed products establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered processed products establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 98% Met
Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met
Percentage of tested imported processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met

Sub-Program: Imported and Manufactured Food Products

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Imported and Manufactured Food Products
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
56.3 56.1 (0.2)
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Imported and Manufactured Food Products
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
421 452 31
Table 2-1h: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Imported and Manufactured Food Products
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food (IMF) products are mitigated Percentage of major health risks in the imported and manufactured food sector that are addressed through the annual update to food safety inspection programs 95% 100% Met
Percentage of inspected IMF products with accurate net quantity, composition, labelling and advertising 70%Footnote 10 94% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned Food Labelling Modernization

To respond to emerging trends and challenges, and to address Canadian's interest for more information about the products they buy, the CFIA explored ways to improve Canada's food labelling system. More specifically, the CFIA developed a proposed approach that responds to recommendations to move toward a more modern and innovative food labelling system through alignment with the Safe Food for Canadians Act. The Food Labelling Modernization initiative will require engagement and input from external stakeholders, including consumers. Public consultations were launched in June 2013.

The CFIA also undertook preliminary work towards the development of an online labelling tool that will provide industry and consumers with a way to easily access information regarding regulatory requirements for labelling food. The intent of this tool is to create greater industry awareness of, understanding of, and compliance with labelling requirements for a broad range of information (e.g. net quantity; date markings; nutrition labelling; bilingual labelling, and legibility and location). The CFIA expects to launch the labelling tool in 2014–15. During its development, industry and other stakeholders will be consulted to ensure that this new tool meets its desired outcome.

Additionally, the CFIA developed the regulatory proposal necessary to implement the Budget 2012 decision to increase efficiency by eliminating the mandatory pre-approval of labels for meat and processed products for industry. The CFIA continues to enforce compliance of regulatory requirements for labelling and claims through inspection and enforcement activities.

2.2.1.2 Program 2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Program Activity 2. Description follows.
Description of image – Program Activity 2

Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Expected Results:

  • Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized
  • Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated
  • Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases
  • Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to

GoC Outcome Areas:

  • Strong Economic Growth
  • A Clean and Healthy Environment

Key Risk Areas:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, mitigating and managing risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instils confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Program Level: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
(Planned vs.
Actual Spending)
132.5 132.5 210.7 175.4 42.9
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
1524 1118 (406)
Table 2-2a: Summary of Performance by Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathwaysFootnote 11 0 Entries 0 Entries Met
Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic diseaseFootnote 12 100% 100% Met
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirementsFootnote 13 99% 100% Met
Canada's status on the OIEFootnote 14 disease risk status lists remains either free, controlled risk, or negligible riskFootnote 15 Status
maintained
Status
maintained
Met
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal diseaseFootnote 16 100% 100% Met
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as neededFootnote 17 All necessary manual updates are completed All necessary manual updates were scompleted Met
Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises in which CFIA participatesFootnote 18 9 10 Met
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashionFootnote 19 100% There were no cases of transboundary and significant emerging diseases Not Applicable
Percentage of cases where CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging diseaseFootnote 200 100% There were no cases of transboundary and significant emerging diseases Not Applicable
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $42.9 million is mainly due to an increase in statutory compensation payments as well as resources received to continue the Growing Forward Program Suite.

In addition to the above, the variances in the financial resources and the FTEs are also related to the realignment of the Agency's PAA in 2011–12. This realignment saw the CFIA reduce from 8 Programs to 5. During this realignment, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its Planned Spending and FTEs to the revised Programs. However, while preparing the 2011–12 DPR, it was noticed that some Planned Spending and FTEs did not properly align with the corresponding actual amounts. This same issue affects the 2012–13 information. This issue was corrected in the 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

During the 2012–13 fiscal year, the Agency modernized its program policy framework as it relates to animal health:

  • The CFIA led a working group consisting of representatives from F/P/T governments, and industry that developed criteria for categorizing animal disease in Canada. This will allow the Agency to enhance its system of animal disease control and provide a more seamless response to emerging zoonotic disease threats;
  • With regards to feed, the Agency identified and engaged stakeholders in an effort to align feed regulations with strategic objectives, reduce unnecessary burden on stakeholders, and support innovation by keeping pace with changes in science and technology. In terms of program delivery, this improves the CFIA's consistency and reduces complexity; and
  • The Agency also promoted global harmonization and collaboration among international animal health product regulatory agencies, with the objective of streamlining regulatory processes and facilitating timely access to veterinary biologics. This facilitates Canada's market access.

Sub-Program: Terrestrial Animal Health

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Terrestrial Animal Health
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
104.9 114.9 10.0
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program: Terrestrial Animal Health
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
1139 836 (303)
Table 2-2b: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Terrestrial Animal Health
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Federally registered veterinary biologics establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered veterinary biologics establishments in compliance with federal regulations 90%Footnote 21 100% Met
Veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations Percentage of tested veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations 100% 100% Met
Animals in Canada are transported humanely Percentage of inspected live loads in compliance with humane transport standards 100% 99% Not Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Traceability

leaf iconIn an effort to promote compliance, the CFIA developed and distributed communication products to regulated parties across Canada. This communication campaign had a particular focus on the new pig traceability requirements, which were published in Canada Gazette I during 2012–13. In order to maintain inspection quality and consistency, the CFIA updated the program's manual of procedures and required all inspectors verifying compliance with traceability met training obligations. The CFIA also developed additional traceability information sharing agreements with the provinces. Using these agreements, the CFIA worked collaboratively with provinces and industry to launch the Traceability National Information Portal (TNIP), which provides single window access to traceability information. The completion of this initiative will improve the CFIA's service delivery and ensure that regulators at all levels can make informed decisions to effectively manage issues related to animal health. Additionally, the CFIA successfully solicited feedback from stakeholders on proposed changes to the Health of Animals Act intended to strengthen livestock and poultry traceability in Canada. These amendments to the Health of Animals Act came into force during 2012–13 with the passage of Bill S-11.

Surveillance

To support and maintain a modernized and efficient surveillance system that supports animal health programs and facilitates market access, the CFIA has created an inventory of animal disease surveillance and testing activities. Based on this, the Agency developed a prioritized Animal Disease Surveillance Plan, which utilizes an internationally recognized prioritization approach. For example, following the detection of Schmallenberg virus in Europe, (where it is causing a range of symptoms in cattle including fever, diarrhea, reduced milk yield and birth defects), the CFIA implemented a new import measure. This import control mandates that animals must test negative for Schmallenberg virus before their semen or embryos can enter Canada from countries in the European Union. Through this policy, the CFIA is working to protect the national herd from production losses and economic consequences associated with this emergent animal disease.

In 2012–13, as part of its ongoing commitment to maintaining the effectiveness and efficiency of its operational program delivery, the animal health program updated its manuals of procedures and hazard specific plans. In support of this, and due in part to the 2010 OAG report on animal diseases, the CFIA developed hazard-specific plans and procedures for higher risk diseases such as Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) and Avian Influenza. The CFIA strengthened its approach to controlling avian influenza in domestic poultry by adding low pathogenicity H5 and H7 avian influenza viruses to the list of reportable diseases. The updated manuals and procedures have been posted on the CFIA's internal website for reference and use by CFIA staff and will be continually reviewed and revised as needed.

Humane Transportation

As part of the management response and action plan for the Evaluation of Administrative Monetary Penalties (2012), a review was done of Schedule 1 of the Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Regulations to ensure the clarity of the language used and that the classification of violations represent current practice. Additionally, regulations that will enhance animal welfare controls remain under revision. Upon finalization, these regulations will provide the CFIA with increased enforcement capacity to better protect the health and welfare of animals being transported. The CFIA is also continuing to work toward providing operational training to inspectors in order to strengthen awareness regarding the humane transport of animals. The CFIA is also a member of the National Farm Animal Care Council (NFACC) and, as a participating member worked to:

Sub-Program: Aquatic Animal Health

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Aquatic Animal Health
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
6.4 39.0 32.6
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program: Aquatic Animal Health
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
106 77 (29)
Table 2-2c: Summary of Performance by Program: Aquatic Animal Health
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Domestic aquatic animals and their products are compliant with Canadian regulations and meet the standards of international agreements Percentage of certified aquatic animal and aquatic animal product shipments that meet the receiving country's import requirements 99% 99% Met
Risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base are mitigated Number of reportable aquatic animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 0 Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

To ensure that domestic aquatic animals and products are compliant with Canadian legal requirements and meet the standards of international agreements, the CFIA continued development of the National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP). This involved a phased-in implementation approach of import controls for aquatic animals under the Health of Animals Regulations. Additionally, for the majority of aquatic animal trade covered by the new import requirements, export certificates have been negotiated with Canada's largest trade partners.

Program efficiencies within the Aquatic Animal Health Import Program are being realized through various strategic approaches such as the implementation of a compartmentalization program, biosecurity measures, and regionalization. These strategic approaches have helped reduce the costs of testing and inspections, and also reduced the workload, for both the federal government and industry, associated with the implementation of import controls. Additionally, an information sharing and engagement process with Aboriginal groups on the proposed Domestic Movement Control Programs under NAAHP has been developed and implemented.

Lastly, in order to get a more complete picture of the health profile of the salmon populations in British Columbia, the NAAHP, in collaboration with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), the Province of British Columbia and industry, have implemented a surveillance initiative targeting both cultured and wild salmon species to investigate the presence of infectious salmon anaemia (ISA), infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) and infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN). During the 2012–13 year, the CFIA began collecting and testing wild salmon off the coast of British Columbia. Through this initiative, approximately 5,000 wild salmon will be collected and studied annually for a minimum of two years.

Sub-Program: Feed

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Feed
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
21.2 21.5 0.3
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program: Feed
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
279 205 (74)
Table 2-2d: Summary of Performance by Program: Feed
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Feed establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed establishments in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, not including labelling tasks 95% 97% Met
Feed labels meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed facilities in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, when assessed against inspection tasks associated with labelling 95% 97% Met
2.2.1.3 Program 3: Plant Resources Program
Program Activity 3. Description follows.
Description of image – Program Activity 3

Program: Plant Resources Program

Expected Results:

  • Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated
  • Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders)
  • Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained

GoC Outcome Areas:

  • Strong Economic Growth
  • A Clean and Healthy Environment

Key Risk Areas:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instils confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Program Level: Plant Resources Program
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
(Planned vs.
Actual Spending)
84.4 86.6 93.5 89.0 2.4
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Program: Plant Resources Program
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
830 849 19
Table 2-3a: Summary of Performance by Program Level: Plant Resources Program
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselvesFootnote 22 0 0 Met
Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreementsFootnote 23 90%Footnote 24 93% Met
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders)Footnote 25 Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issuedFootnote 26 100% 100% Met
Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner 90%Footnote 27 100% Met
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirementsFootnote 28 99% 99% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $2.4 million is, in part, due to the resources received to continue the Growing Forward Program Suite as well as an increase in statutory compensation payments.

In addition to the above, the variances in the financial resources and the FTEs are also related to the realignment of the Agency's PAA in 2011–12. This realignment saw the CFIA reduce from 8 Programs to 5. During this realignment, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its Planned Spending and FTEs to the revised Programs. However, while preparing the 2011–12 DPR, it was noticed that some Planned Spending and FTEs did not properly align with the corresponding actual amounts. This same issue affects the 2012–13 information. This issue was corrected in the 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

In 2012–13, the CFIA continued to deliver the Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program (PPMMP) aimed at managing the Plum Pox Virus (PPV), a plant disease that drastically reduces yields of stone fruit. Specifically, the CFIA's survey and monitoring activities determined that the virus had not spread beyond the established quarantine area. Additionally, in an effort to further contain PPV, the CFIA continued to communicate the risks related to the movement and propagation of regulated plant materials to residents and stone fruit growers in and around the quarantine region.

An increase in the number of interceptions and regulatory actions being taken against non­compliant commodities led the CFIA to take steps to prevent the entry of pests through field crop pathways. Following World Trade Organization (WTO) notification and consultation guidelines, the CFIA advised member countries of Canada's intent to require that all exports be certified free of the khapra beetle and wooly cupgrass (WCG) prior to importation to Canada. The proposed new requirements recognize that the U.S. is officially as free of the khapra beetle, and will allow U.S. grain to be imported uncertified into Canada– provided the Canadian importer can demonstrate how they can mitigate pests risks either through treatments or processes. Imports from countries other than the U.S. would be required to be certified as pest-free for all end uses in Canada.

The Agency also developed new system approach requirements to harmonize with U.S. requirements. They will serve to update the import policy directive on tomato fruits and further reduce the risk of introducing Tuta absoluta into Canadian greenhouses. Under this system approach, countries wishing to export tomatoes to Canada will be required to meet additional phytosanitary requirements, including pest exclusionary measures, pest surveys, record keeping, safeguarding of shipments, and staff training.

Sub-Program: Plant Protection

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Plant Protection
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
69.2 71.1 1.9
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Plant Protection
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
657 672 15
Table 2-3b: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Plant Protection
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Pre-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of inspected shipments from off-shore system approaches or pre-clearance programs in compliance with federal regulations 85%Footnote 29 99%Footnote 30 Met
At-Border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of pre-arrival documentation in compliance with Canadian import requirements 90%Footnote 31 99% Met
Post-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of new pest detections that have a science based management plan initiated within one year 90%Footnote 32 No new pests were detectedFootnote 33 Not Applicable
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The CFIA saw strong compliance of pre-arrival documentation in relation to Canadian import requirements which demonstrates that foreign countries and importers appear to have a solid understanding of the Canadian requirements. In addition, cases where deficiencies were identified, importers were able to readily address the deficiencies in order to permit the import of their plant or plant product shipment.

There was also high compliance rates for shipments from off-shore systems approaches or pre-clearance programs which indicates that the investment in communication of our Canadian requirements to foreign countries and resources in developing and auditing the systems-based programs in the countries of origin is showing positive results.

Invasive Alien Species (IAS) Strategy

Invasive species can be harmful when introduced into new areas. These species can invade agricultural and natural areas, causing serious damage to Canada's economy and environment.

As part of its ongoing response to invasive plants, the CFIA drafted an Invasive Plants Directive which describes the CFIA's invasive plants policy and provides a list of pest plants that are prohibited in Canada. The intended outcome of the directive is to control the importation and domestic movement of plants considered as pests in Canada. Comments from domestic and international stakeholder consultations on the invasive plants policy, a list of proposed pest plants, and the directive itself were considered in developing this directive. Additional collaborative work with stakeholders and partners on WCG and kudzu supported the ongoing management and/or eradication of these, and other, invasive plants. Specific to WCG, a government-industry working group was created to develop domestic regulatory measures aimed at mitigating the spread of this pest.

Further, the Agency continued communication and collaboration with provinces and stakeholders. Specifically, invasive plant surveys were conducted that focussed on high-risk pathways and facilities (e.g. bird seed facilities). As well, the CFIA worked to develop and implement new import-related phytosanitary measures aimed at reducing risk associated with those high-risk pathways. On the science front, the CFIA continued the development of diagnostic methods and tools that would improve the ability to identify high-risk invasive plants.

Finally, the CFIA participated in international standard-setting, harmonization of approaches, negotiations, and bilateral meetings with key trading partners, specifically with the United States, Korea, and Japan to discuss the risks associated with Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM).

Work towards eradicating AGM included broad stakeholder consultations and engagement, including an AGM Summit in December, 2012. As a result, revisions were made to strengthen the AGM program. The effect of these revisions will help mitigate the risk of introduction of AGM to Canada.

Sub-Program: Seed

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Seed
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
11.3 11.6 0.3
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Seed
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
117 120 3
Table 2-3c: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Seed
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic pedigreed seed lots in compliance with federal regulations 95% 96% Met
Percentage of authorized confined releases of Plants with Novel Traits (PNTs) into the Canadian environment that are in compliance with the authorized conditions 90%Footnote 34 97% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Canada's seed certification system provides a robust foundation for nearly $30 billion in grain, feed, seed and crop production industries. The CFIA, working in close collaboration with two industry partners, the Canadian Seed Growers' Association (CSGA) and the Canadian Seed Institute (CSI), ensures that pedigreed seed produced in Canada meets and exceeds domestic and international standards. Because of the rigorous system in place, this key performance indicator has consistently exceeded its target year after year and Canadian seed maintains an excellent reputation in international markets.

The CFIA's Confined Research Field Trial Program allows proponents to conduct in-field testing of a PNT (generally including plants with traits developed through biotechnology) under conditions of confinement. The CFIA verifies that these conditions are being met, and any sites that are found to be non-compliant must return to compliance within a short period of time. In 2012–13, the target was exceeded for several reasons: highly educated applicants and field managers were included in the program requirements; good communication practices were held between the CFIA, applicants, and field managers; and no extreme weather patterns occurred during the growing season. Trials are designed to minimize risk to the environment (including wildlife) and potential spread from the site, for example, soil incorporation of plant material after the completion of the trial.

Work with industry continued on the transfer of seed crop inspection services to an alternative service delivery (ASD) system. This transfer will allow the Agency to target its resources more effectively to address its core mandate. Work included consultation and communication with stakeholders on an industry model to transition to ASD and the establishment of authorized seed crop inspection services and licensed seed crop inspectors in anticipation of its implementation in April, 2014.

Sub-Program: Fertilizer

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Fertilizer
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
5.2 5.3 0.1
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Fertilizer
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
47 48 1
Table 2-3d: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Fertilizer
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected fertilizer and supplement products in compliance with federal regulations (Fertilizers Regulations) 90% 92% Met
Percentage of submissions reviewed within the prescribed service delivery standards 90% 92% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Fertilizer Modernization

leaf iconWork towards modernizing the Agency's Fertilizer Regulations continued, and included focusing regulatory oversight on the safety of fertilizers and supplements, implementing risk-based approaches and strengthening industry's leadership role in quality assurance and verification. The CFIA's work included extensive consultations with stakeholders, including the Canadian Fertilizer Products Forum, to address efficacy, safety, and labelling provisions, as well as definitions and exemptions. The modernization will also provide industry with greater flexibility, reduced costs, and less red tape.

The Fertilizer Program is re-directing activities to focus on safety-related inspections. Historically compliance rates with safety standards have been higher than with quality standards. Over the last two years, the Program has been transitioning out of quality, reducing quality-related marketplace monitoring activities.

Sub-Program: Intellectual Property Rights

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Intellectual Property Rights
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
0.9 1.0 0.1
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Intellectual Property Rights
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
9 9 0
Table 2-3e: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Intellectual Property Rights
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Plant breeders develop new varieties for the Canadian market Percentage of Plant Breeders' Rights applications that reach approval and are granted rights 100% 100% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the 2012 calendar year, the number of approved applications was 386, and the number of approved applications that were granted Plant Breeders' Rights (PBR) was 201. For more information on PBR please visit the following website.

PBRs are a form of intellectual property protection which gives plant breeders exclusive rights to produce and sell reproductive material of their new plant varieties. The PBR program administers the Plant Breeders Rights Act to enable the granting of PBR to breeders. The granting of this intellectual property encourages investment in plant breeding and improves access to protected foreign varieties.

2.2.1.4 Program 4: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Program Activity 4. Description follows.
Description of image – Program Activity 4

Program:International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Expected Results:

  • Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC
  • International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products
  • International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate

GoC Outcome Areas:

  • A Fair and Secure Marketplace
  • A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce

Key Risk Areas:

  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through actively participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.

Based on market demand, the CFIA will also continue to negotiate and certify against export conditions in order to access export markets. The Agency, working with industry and interested stakeholders, will continue to develop and maintain export certification standards (which vary from country to country and commodity to commodity), conduct inspections and issue export certificates.

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Program Level: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
(Planned vs.
Actual Spending)
45.4 45.4 35.2 33.4 (12.0)
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Program: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
363 338 (25)
Table 2-4a: Summary of Performance by Program: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interestsFootnote 35 24 50 Met
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products Number of unjustified non-tariff barriers resolved 24Footnote 36 33 Met
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA-led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 5 9 Met
Number of CFIA-led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments 6Footnote 37 12 Met

Please note: Five indicators found in the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements section of the 2012–13 RPP have been omitted from this report. These indicators reported on performance at a low-level of detail which would not have added to the strategic performance story presented herein.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The decrease between Planned and Actual Spending of $12.0 million and Planned and Actual FTEs of 25 are related to the realignment of the Agency's PAA in 2011–12. This realignment saw the CFIA reduce from 8 Programs to 5. During this realignment, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its Planned Spending and FTEs to the revised Programs. However, while preparing the 2011–12 DPR, it was noticed that some Planned Spending and FTEs did not properly align with the corresponding actual amounts. This same issue affects the 2012–13 information. This issue was corrected in the 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

On February 4, 2011 Prime Minister Stephen Harper and President Barack Obama announced the Beyond the Border Declaration and the Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council. As a contributing partner in these agreementsFootnote 38 the CFIA has made significant progress over the past year. More specifically, in 2012–13, the CFIA worked with stakeholders and our US counterparts to achieve the following results:

  • Conducted four joint assessments on commodities of common interest from third countries. The joint assessments provided an opportunity: to consolidate resources; a chance for both Canada and the US to learn from each other's respective approaches to assessment; and the occasion to present a consolidated approach to foreign country assessments;
  • Developed, in consultation with industry stakeholders, a common approach to the process of classifying meat cuts and realize a common nomenclature for meat cuts for Canada and the US;
  • Developed and announced a zoning protocol which, in the event of a contagious animal disease outbreak, will provide for continued bilateral trade from areas located outside the disease control and eradication zone; and
  • Undertook two pilot projects for a Canada-United States perimeter approach to plant protection. The goal is to align regulatory policies and science-based approaches which will inform how both countries can work towards an increased consistency on import requirements, increase communication between the two countries, and develop equivalent or harmonized plant quarantine systems.

In January 2013, the Government of Canada reached an agreement with Japan to expand market access for Canadian beef to include products derived from animals under 30 months of age (UTM) – an improvement over the previous requirement which only permits beef exports from animals under 21 months of age.

The expansion of Canada's beef market access is but one illustration of how the CFIA technical experts posted in Beijing, Brussels, Mexico, Moscow, and Tokyo have contributed to Canada's trade agenda. These positions have:

  • led to stronger relationships with regulatory counterparts thereby maintaining the momentum of negotiations;
  • enabled face-to-face real time discussions; and
  • allowed the CFIA to project a Canadian perspective on common issues raised with the competent authorities by key trading partners.

leaf iconFrom a multilateral perspective, in the fall of 2012, Canada joined the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) – a free trade agreement comprised of twelve countries. While the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) is the overall lead, the CFIA co-led the sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations, and provided input into Canada's negotiating positions in the areas related to the CFIA's mandate. These included technical barriers to trade (TBT), regulatory cooperation, the environment, biotechnology, and intellectual property. The CFIA also continued to co-lead SPS negotiations with the European Union and India and contributed to the development of positions/strategies for free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations.

Additionally, the CFIA continued to lead Canada's participation in: the World Trade Organization (WTO) SPS Committee meetings; at the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC); the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE); and in certain committees of the Codex Alimentarius Commission to promote the development of science-based international rules and standards.

Further, the CFIA continued to engage through international standard setting bodies in support of the development and revision of science-based international standards. For example, in 2012–13, the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) produced a draft specification for the development of a standard on the international movement of grain. The CFIA, with the participation of the Canadian grain industry, provided significant input into the development of the draft specification. Additionally, the CFIA, as Head of Canada's delegation at the July 2012 session of the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC), worked closely with like-minded countries to promote the successful adoption of maximum residue limits (MRLs) for ractopamine (a feed ingredient promoting growth).

Finally, the CFIA continued to work closely with the Canadian Forest Service (CFS) to develop sound scientific and technical justifications in support of several bilateral market access discussions. This partnership included the review, by CFIA and other stakeholders, of a technical paper developed by the CFS. The technical paper corroborates an existing international standard on heat treatment approaches for the export of pest-free wood products. Once this paper is finalized, it will form the basis for technical discussions with trading partners; for the expansion of the trade in wood products demanding higher levels of treatment prior to export.

2.2.1.5 Internal Services

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Planning Highlights

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Program Level: Internal Services
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
(Planned vs.
Actual Spending)
118.4 119.1 137.8 130.7 11.6
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Program: Internal Services
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
1015 925 (90)
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The variances in the financial resources and the FTEs are related to the realignment of the Agency's PAA in 2011–12. This realignment saw the CFIA reduce from 8 Programs to 5. During this realignment, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its Planned Spending and FTEs to the revised Programs. However, while preparing the 2011–12 DPR, it was noticed that some Planned Spending and FTEs did not properly align with the corresponding actual amounts. This same issue affects the 2012–13 information. This issue was corrected in the 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities. Actual Spending for the Internal Services Program has decreased by $30 million over the past two years.

Citizen-Focused Services

leaf iconThe Agency's new Transparency Policy came in effect on April 1st, 2013 and has been posted on the CFIA's website. The policy provides a basis for improved, open communication with respect to CFIA activities and services. Its goal is to facilitate awareness and increase the positive engagement of the Agency's stakeholder community. To complement and support the Transparency Policy, the Agency had undertaken a number of transparency-related initiatives and has made significant progress in this regard:

  • In order to effectively communicate the CFIA's values and expected employee behaviours to the Agency's regulated parties, stakeholders and partners, the Agency developed and distributed The Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Our Regulated Parties, Stakeholders and Partners: An Ethical Relationship;
  • A Statement of Rights and Service for Producers, Consumers and Other Stakeholders and a compendium of guides for producers, consumers, processors, animal transporters, importers and exporters were developed to formally establish the principles that govern our interaction with stakeholders.
  • A Complaints and Appeals Office was created and has been operational since April 1, 2012. Outreach meetings with a number of internal and external stakeholders have taken place to share information about the Statement of Rights and Service and its accompanying guides, as well as the complaints and appeals process.
  • To increase awareness with respect to the nature and results of public opinion research (POR), the Agency defined and implemented a process for posting executive summaries of CFIA-related POR online;
  • The CFIA published Working for Canadians – an annual report of Agency activities told largely from the perspective of the CFIA's stakeholders;
  • The Agency developed and made public a policy entitled Transparency in Regulatory Decision Making; and
  • ATIP training on the new process and updated reporting mechanism was provided in Quebec, Ontario and Western Areas as well as with various groups as requested in the NCR. The ATIP Office also worked closely with Branch ATIP Advisors to increase awareness. Privacy Framework under development is scheduled to go through governance for approval in fiscal year 2013–14.
People

In support of its ongoing focus on its people, the CFIA worked to further its human resource priorities and support the contribution, productivity and satisfaction of its employees. A significant contribution towards this goal was the CFIA's move to replace the 2008–13 Renewal Plan with a three year Integrated HR/Business Plan. This plan paves the way forward for the Agency by providing the framework necessary to integrate various HR strategies so the Agency may meet its business requirements and better utilize the productive capacity of its employees.

leaf iconFor the hiring of new employees, the CFIA began using technology to administer existing paper-based assessment tools in an online environment. This eased the burden placed on employees during hiring processes. As well, the CFIA conducted research on the potential use of multiple standardized tools which would allow the Agency to increase its predictive ability for future job success, removing subjectivity and situations of potential bias. Additionally, a six week pre-requisite employment program was developed, three core training sessions were held, and a multi-year refresher training plan for existing inspection staff was created and implemented.

The CFIA emphasizes training initiatives that develop future leaders because they play a role in both employee training and employee retention, both of which are essential to the health of the Agency. The 2011 Public Service Employee Survey provided the CFIA with feedback which highlighted these areas. Based on this feedback, the CFIA's Learning Division initiated an Inspector School that was launched in 2012–13. The curriculum made efforts to ensure consistent orientation and cultural awareness for new CFIA inspectors and has led to the creation of an inspector-specific training strategy to ensure that the Agency's scientific and technical training is delivered consistently across the country.

Lastly, the effectiveness and efficiency of HR service delivery in the Agency has been improved by an extensive re-organization. The re-organization included the creation of a new Business Line Support Directorate, the implementation of the new 1-888 HR Service Centre and other internal re-structuring.

Stewardship

In order to provide a clear vision and guidance for the Agency's future, the CFIA internally published its Long-Term Strategic Plan (LTSP). The plan embodies:

  • The vision for the CFIA in 2025;
  • Focus areas – general strategic direction for the next five years;
  • Goals – broad outcomes within each focus area; and
  • Strategies – specific actions the Agency has committed to undertake in the next five years to achieve these goals.

This LTSP is now used to guide CFIA decision making and planning, as well as management accountability and its relationship with stakeholders.

leaf iconAs part of the evaluation of its spending, the CFIA has identified a number of opportunities across all programs to reduce costs associated with management, administration and other internal functions. This includes sharing services with other government departments, streamlining processes, simplifying regulatory requirements, and providing single window access to specialized expertise.

leaf iconAs part of the project management agenda, the CFIA continued implementation of its Project Management Framework. This included a continued focus on project management training which included the delivery of 32 sessions attended by 734 employees.

The CFIA also developed its Investment Plan, which provides a five-year (2012/13 – 2016/17) outlook describing planned investment in assets, acquired services and projects supporting its strategic outcome, priorities and objectives. The Investment Plan's key focus is to develop Agency-wide strategies to maintain its aging core infrastructure while advancing the Agency's modernization agenda which includes: inspection system modernization; enhanced science capacity and capability; and information management and information technology which support inspection services.

As a part of the IM/IT Campaign Plan the CFIA began the process to upgrade its document management and its third party business intelligence system and developed a senior management reporting dashboard of Agency key performance indicators which will assist in priority based decision making. Additionally the CFIA is currently enriching its Data Warehouse, Implementation data extracting tools and reports, leading in report development for Senior Management.

In accordance with the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, the CFIA considers the environmental effects of initiatives through its strategic environmental assessment process. This process is supported by the CFIA Environmental Policy commitment to apply sound environmental principles and practices in the development and delivery of its programs and the management of its facilities.

Risk Management

The CFIA made significant progress at integrating risk into its ongoing planning and reporting. Through the implementation of a focused business line portfolio approach that is enabled by corporate risks and planning resources, Integrated Risk Management (IRM) better supports strategic decision-making by ensuring that risk information is integrated within, and supports, existing business planning and priority-setting.

Additionally, the CFIA has successfully implemented 14 of the 17 security control measures that were foreseen in the Agency Security Plan (ASP) for the 2012–13 fiscal year. These security control measures include various enhancements to security-related compliance instruments, tools and awareness activities. The 2013–14 ASP deliverables will continue to strengthen the CFIA's Security Program by managing security risks and improving the overall security of its employees, the control and protection of CFIA information, physical infrastructures, and other valuable assets.

Section III: Supplementary Information

3.1 Financial Information

3.1.1 Financial Highlights

The financial highlights presented within the Agency's Performance Report are intended to serve as a general overview of the CFIA's financial position and operations. Financial statements are prepared in accordance with accrual accounting principles, Treasury Board accounting policies and year-end instructions issued by the Office of the Comptroller General which are based on Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector as required under Section 31 of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act.

The main financial highlights for 2012–13 are the reduction of the allowance for workforce adjustments and the reduction in expenses related to employee severance benefits, resulting in lower expenditures in most programs compared to 2011–12. Also important to note is that the compensation payments from the infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) outbreak in the Atlantic region led to higher expenditures in the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program. Finally, capital investments were greater in 2012–13 mainly because of the modernization of information technologies.

Condensed Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
Year ended March 31
(In thousands of dollars)
2012–13
Planned Results (Restated)
2013-13
Actual
2011-12
Actual
$ Change
(2012-13 Planned vs. Actual)
$ Change
(2012-13 Actual vs. 2011-12 Actual)
Total expenses 837,054865,151884,525(28,097)(19,374)
Total revenues 51,45957,63357,560(6,174)73
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 785,595807,518826,965(21,923)(19,447)
Agency – net financial position 150,08729,40326,862120,6842,541
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31, 2013
(In thousands of dollars)
2012–13 2011–12 $ Change
Total net Liabilites 246,592233,51013,082
Total net financial assets 70,17553,60516,570
Agency – net debt 176,417179,905(3,488)
Total non-financial assets 205,820206,767(947)
Agency – net financial position 29,40326,8622,541

Total net liabilities at the end of 2012–13 were $247 million, an increase of $13 million (6%) over the previous year's total net liabilities of $234 million. The increase is mostly explained by a $16 million increase in payables at year-end resulting largely from an Agency wide initiative for the modernization of information technologies. This increase was offset by a decrease in accrued liabilities of $6 million, the result of a reduction of $16 million in the allowance for workforce adjustments and an increase of $10 million for the allowance for expired collective agreements. Employee severance benefits represented 50% of total liabilities, at $123 million, followed by the accounts payable and accrued liabilities which corresponded to 36 % of total liabilities, at $88 million. Vacation pay and compensatory leave amounted to $35 million (14%), while deferred revenue represented less than 1% of total liabilities.

Pie chart - Liabilities by Type
Description for Pie Chart - Liabilities by Type
Employee severance benefits Accounts payable and accrued liabities Vacation pay and compensatory leave Deferred revenue
49.76%35.66%14.01%0.57%

The total net financial assets of $70 million represents an increase of $16 million (30%), mainly the result of a growth in the amount of Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF) caused by an increase in payables at year-end . The non-financial assets ($206 million) remained fairly constant with fiscal year 2011–12. Tangible capital assets represented the largest portion of the total assets, at $204 million (74%), while Due from CRF corresponded to 22% at $62 million. Accounts receivable and advances only represented 3%, followed by the inventory and prepaid expenses which were less than 1% of the total assets.

Pie chart - Assets by Type
Description for Pie Chart - Assets by Type
Tangible capital assets Due from CRF Accounts receivable and advances Inventory Prepaid expenses
73.78%22.49%2.94%0.28%0.52%

The total expenses were $865 million in 2013, a decrease of $19.4 million (2%) compared to last year. Significant variances come from the reduction of the workforce adjustment liability in 2012–13 and less employee severance benefit expenses compared to 2011–12, offset by an increase in payments related to the salmon (ISA) compensations. Despite the Financial Statements showing an expense reduction of $13 million in the Food Safety Program, when excluding accrual variations caused by one-time charges (listed above), the appropriation expenses for the Food Safety Program actually increased compared to 2011–12, due to additional resources received from the government for various food safety activities. The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program expenses increased mostly because of the salmon (ISA) compensation payments. In summary, the majority of the expenses, $392 million (45%) were under the Food Safety Program. The Animal Health and Zoonitics Program formed 22% of total expenses, while the Plant Resources Program represented 12% at $100 million. Approximately 5% of all expenses were under the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements. Finally, the Internal Services amounted to $144 million (17%), a reduction of $15 million compared to 2011–12.

Pie chart - Expenses by Program Activities
Description for Pie Chart - Expenses by Program Activities
Food Safety Program Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Plant Resources Program International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Internal Services
45.33%22.02%11.57%4.50%16.59%

The total revenues amounted to $58 million for 2012–13. Revenues remained fairly constant with the revenues earned in 2011–12. The inspection fees form the biggest portion of the revenues at $42 million, representing 73% of all revenues. 60% of the revenues was derived from the Food Safety Program, while the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements represented 19% at $11 million. The Plant Resources Program represented 14% of all revenues while the Animal Health and Zoonitics Program represented approximately 6%. 1% of all revenues were derived from Internal Services. Note that the revenues earned on behalf of Government corresponds mainly to the Agency's administrative monetary penalties and interest on overdue accounts.

Pie chart - Revenues by Program Activities
Description for Pie Chart - Revenues by Program Activities
Food Safety Program Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Plant Resources Program International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Internal Services
60.40%5.99%14.09%18.52%1.00%
Comparison between Future-Oriented Financial Information and Actual Results

CFIA planned results are taken from the 2012-2013 Future-Oriented Financial Statements referenced in the Agency's 2012-2013 Report on Plans and Priorities.

The main difference between the planned and the actual expenses comes from the compensation payments related to the infectious salmon anaemia outbreak leading to higher expenses in the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program than forecasted.

The most significant assumption made in the 2012-2013 Future-Oriented Financial Statements was the expected renewal of various collective agreements, which did not materialize by the end of fiscal year 2012-2013. A large number of employees were forecasted to receive a payout for employee severance benefits because of that renewal. The impact is an important variance between the planned and actual net cash provided by government. That same item also affected the net financial position forecast.

3.1.2 Auditable Financial Statements

Financial Statements of Canadian Food Inspection Agency (Unaudited)
Year ended March 31, 2013
Statement of Management Responsibility Including Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
(Unaudited)

Responsibility for the integrity and objectivity of the accompanying financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2013 and all information contained in these statements rests with the Agency's management. These financial statements have been prepared by management using the Government's accounting policies, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards.

Management is responsible for the integrity and objectivity of the information in these financial statements. Some of the information in the financial statements is based on management's best estimates and judgement, and gives due consideration to materiality. To fulfill its accounting and reporting responsibilities, management maintains a set of accounts that provides a centralized record of the Agency's financial transactions. Financial information submitted to the Public Accounts of Canada and included in the Agency's Departmental Performance Report is consistent with these financial statements.

Management is also responsible for maintaining an effective system of internal control over financial reporting (ICFR) designed to provide reasonable assurance that financial information is reliable, that assets are safeguarded and that transactions are properly authorized and recorded in accordance with the Financial Administration Act and other applicable legislation, regulations, authorities and policies.

Management seeks to ensure the objectivity and integrity of data in its financial statements through careful selection, training and development of qualified staff; through organizational arrangements that provide appropriate divisions of responsibility; through communication programs aimed at ensuring that regulations, policies, standards, and managerial authorities are understood throughout the Agency and through conducting an annual risk-based assessment of the effectiveness of the system of ICFR.

The system of ICFR is designed to mitigate risks to a reasonable level based on an on-going process to identify key risks, to assess effectiveness of associated key controls, and to make any necessary adjustments.

A risk-based assessment of the system of ICFR for the year ended March 31, 2013 was completed in accordance with the Treasury Board Policy on Internal Control and the results and action plans are summarized in the annex.

The effectiveness and adequacy of the Agency's system of internal control is reviewed by the work of internal audit staff, who conduct periodic audits of different areas of the Agency's operations, and by the Departmental Audit Committee, which is responsible for prividing the President with independant and objective advice on the maintenance of adequate control systems and the quality of financial reporting. The Departmental Audit Committee provides this support through oversight of core areas of the Agency's controls and accountabilities.

The financial statements of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency have not been audited.

B.A. (Bruce) Archibald, PhD
President

Peter Everson
Vice-President, Corporate Management Branch

Ottawa, Canada
August 22, 2013

Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31 (In thousands of dollars) 2013 2012
Liabilities
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (Note 4) $87,939 $78,125
Vacation pay and compensatory leave 34,557 31,593
Deferred revenue 1,404 2,024
Employee severance benefits (Note 5 [b]) 122,692 121,773
Total gross liabilities 246,592 233,515
Deferred revenue held on behalf of Government - (5)
Total net liabilities 246,592 233,510
Financial Assets
Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund 62,066 46,524
Accounts receivable and advances (Note 6) 9,152 8,062
Total gross financial assets 71,218 54,586
Accounts receivable and advances held on behalf of Government (Note 6) (1,043) (981)
Total net financial assets 70,175 53,605
Agency - net debt 176,417 179,905
Non-Financial assets
Prepaid expenses 1,434 1,161
Inventory 769 1,048
Tangible capital assets (Note 8) 203,617 204,558
Total non-financial assets 205,820 206,767
Agency - net financial position $29,403 $26,862

Contingent liabilities (Note 8)
Contractual obligations (Note 9)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

B.A. (Bruce) Archibald, PhD
President

Peter Everson
Vice-President, Corporate Management Branch

Ottawa, Canada
August 22, 2013

Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
Year ended March 31 (In thousands of dollars) 2013 Planned Results (Restated) 2013 2012
Expenses
Food Safety Program $380,521 $392,142 $405,507
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 159,611 190,472 172,265
Plant Resources Program 103,455 100,074 104,764
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 52,497 38,910 43,288
Internal Services 140,974 143,623 158,704
Expenses incurred on behalf of Government (4) (70) (3)
Total expenses 837,054 865,151 884,525
Revenues
Inspection fees 38,974 42,116 43,088
Registrations, permits, certificates 8,778 8,829 8,478
Miscellaneous fees and services 1,934 4,852 3,959
Administrative monetary penalties 184 2,012 837
Establishment license fees 1,697 1,783 1,888
Grading 608 175 211
Interest 27 32 44
Revenues earned on behalf of Government (743) (2,166) (945)
Total revenues 51,459 57,633 57,560
Net cost of operations 785,595 807,518 826,965
Government funding and transfers
Net Cash provided by government 780,234 709,583 705,399
Change in due from Consolidated Revenue Fund (5,956) 15,542 (27,285)
Services provided without charge by other government departments (Note 10) 78,071 85,870 82,764
Assets funded by other government departments (OGD) 662 130 138
Transfer of assets and liabilities from/to OGD (Note 11) - (1,066) (2,856)
Net cost of operations after government funding and transfers (67,416) (2,541) 68,805
Agency - net financial position - Beginning of year 82,671 26,862 95,667
Agency - net financial position - End of year $150,087 $29,403 $26,862

Segmented information (Note 12)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

The 2013 Planned Results were restated as a result of the 2011 amendments made to Treasury Board Accounting Standard 1.2 – Departmental and Agency Financial Statements to improve financial reporting by government departments and agencies.

Statement of Change in Agency Net Debt (Unaudited)
Year ended March 31 (In thousands of dollars) 2013
Planned Results
(Restated)
2013 2012
Net cost of operations after government funding and transfers $(67,416) $(2,541) $68,805
Change in tangible capital assets
Acquisition of tangible capital assets 27,832 33,631 14,277
Amortization of tangible capital assets (38,367) (34,395) (37,640)
Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets (306) (321) (119)
Loss on disposal of tangible capital assets (1,109) (34) (113)
Post-capitalization of tangible capital assets 52 48 47
Transfer from/to low value assets 701 - -
Tangible capital assets funded by other government departments (OGD) 662 130 91
Tangible capital assets transfer to OGD (Note 11) - - (4,919)
Total change due to tangible capital assets (10,535) (941) (28,376)
Change in inventories 14 (279) 35
Change in prepaid expenses 156 273 (7)
Net increase in Agency net debt (77,781) (3,488) 40,457
Agency - net debt - Beginning of year 140,542 179,905 139,448
Agency - net debt - End of year $62,761 $176,417 $179,905

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

The 2013 Planned Results were restated as a result of the 2011 amendments made to Treasury Board Accounting Standard 1.2 – Departmental and Agency Financial Statements to improve financial reporting by government departments and agencies.

Statement of Cash Flows (Unaudited)
Year ended March 31 (In thousands of dollars) 2013 2012
Operating activities
Cash received from:
Fees, permits and certificates $(60,281) $(59,460)
Cash paid for:
Salaries and employees benefits 552,577 609,234
Operating and maintenance 139,737 137,571
Transfer payments 42,137 3,086
Revenues collected on behalf of Government 2,103 810
Cash used by operating activities 676,273 691,241
Capital investment activities
Acquisition of tangible capital assets 33,631 14,277
Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets (321) (119)
Cash used by capital investment activities 33,310 14,158
Net cash provided by Government of Canada $709,583 $705,399

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

Notes to the Financial Statements (Unaudited)

Year ended March 31, 2013

1. Authority and Purposes

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (the "Agency") was established, effective April 1, 1997, under the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act. The Act consolidates all federally mandated food and fish inspection services and federal animal and plant health activities into a single agency.

The Agency is a departmental corporation named in Schedule II to the Financial Administration Act and reports to Parliament through the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food.

The mandate of the Agency is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of federal inspection and related services for food, animals and plants. The objectives of the Agency are to contribute to a safe food supply and accurate product information; to contribute to the continuing health of animals and plants; and to facilitate trade in food, animals, plants, and related products.

In delivering its mandate, the Agency operates under the following 4 program activities supported by internal services:

  1. Food Safety Program: The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.
  2. Animal Health And Zoonotics Program: The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, mitigating and managing risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instils confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.
  3. Plant Resources Program: The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instils confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.
  4. International Collaboration And Technical Agreements: The CFIA's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through actively participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and, the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.
  5. Internal Services: Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communication Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Material Management Services; Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across the organization and not those provided specifically to a program.

The Agency is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the following acts: Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act, Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act, Feeds Act, Fertilizers Act, Health of Animals Act, Plant Breeders' Rights Act, Plant Protection Act, Seeds Act, and the Safe Food for Canadians Act, which once enacted, will replace the Canada Agricultural Products Act, Fish Inspection Act, Meat Inspection Act, and Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act (as it relates to food).

In addition, the Agency is responsible for enforcement of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act and the Food and Drugs Act as they relate to food, except those provisions that relate to public health, safety, or nutrition.

Operating and capital expenditures are funded by the Government of Canada through parliamentary authorities. Compensation payments under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act and employee benefits are authorized by separate statutory authorities. Revenues generated by its operations are deposited to the Consolidated Revenue Fund and are available for use by the Agency.

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

These financial statements have been prepared using the Government's accounting policies stated below, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards. The presentation and results using the stated accounting policies do not result in any significant differences from Canadian public sector accounting standards.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

  1. Parliamentary authorities

    The Agency is mainly financed by the Government of Canada through parliamentary authorities. Authorities provided to the Agency do not parallel financial reporting according to generally accepted accounting principles since authorities are primarily based on cash flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in the Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position and in the Statement of Financial Position are not necessarily the same as those provided through authorities from Parliament. Note 3 provides a high level reconciliation between the bases of reporting. The planned results amounts in the Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position are the amounts reported in the future- oriented financial statements included in the 2012-13 Report on Plans and Priorities.

  2. Net cash provided by Government of Canada

    The Agency operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administrated by the Receiver General for Canada. All cash received by the Agency is deposited to the CRF and all cash disbursements made by the Agency are paid from the CRF.

    The net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements including transactions between departments of the Government of Canada.

  3. Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF)

    The amount of due from CRF are the result of timing differences at year-end between when a transaction affects authorities and when it is processed through the CRF. Amounts due from the CRF represent the net amount of cash that the Agency is entitled to draw from the CRF without further authorities to discharge its liabilities.

  4. Revenues

    Revenues for fees, permits and certificates are recognized in the accounts as the services are provided.

    Funds received from external parties for specified purposes are recorded upon receipt as deferred revenue. Revenue from external parties for specified purposes is recognized in the period in which the related expenses are incurred.

    Other revenues are accounted for in the period in which the underlying transaction or event occurred that gave rise to the revenues.

    Revenues earned on behalf of Government are non-respendable and are not available to discharge the Agency's liabilities. These revenues are presented as a reduction to the Agency's revenues. While the President is expected to maintain accounting control, he or she has no authority regarding the disposition of non-respendable revenues.

    As a result, non-respendable revenues are considered to be earned on behalf of Government of Canada and are therefore presented in reduction of the Agency's revenues.

  5. Expenses

    Expenses are recorded on an accrual basis:

    Transfer payments are recognized in the year in which the recipient has met the eligibility criteria or fulfilled the terms of a contractual transfer agreement.

    Vacation pay and compensatory leave are expensed as the benefits accrue to employees under their respective terms of employment.

    Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation, the employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans and legal services are recorded as operating expenses at their estimated cost.

  6. Employee future benefits
    1. Pension benefits:

      The Agency's eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan (the "Plan"), a multi-employer plan administered by the Government of Canada. Both the employees and the Agency contribute to the cost of the Plan. The Agency's contributions are expensed during the year in which the services are rendered and represent the total pension obligation of the Agency. Under present legislation the Agency is not required to make contributions with respect to actuarial deficits of the Plan.

    2. Severance benefits:

      Eligible employees are entitled to severance benefits, as provided for under labor contracts and conditions of employment. The cost of these benefits is accrued as employees render the services necessary to earn them. The obligation relating to the benefits earned by employees is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits at the Agency level using specific rates provided by the Office of the Chief Actuary of Canada.

    3. Other future benefit plans:

      The Government of Canada sponsors a variety of other future benefit plans from which employees and former employees can benefit during or after employment or upon retirement. The Public Service Health Care Plan and the Pensioners' Dental Services Plan represent the two major future benefit plans available to the Agency's employees.

      The Agency does not pay for these programs as they fall under the Government of Canada's financial responsibilities, but the Agency records its share of the annual benefits paid under these programs as a service provided without charge by other government departments. No amount is recorded in the Agency's financial statements with regard to either the actuarial liability of these programs at year end or the annual increase of such liabilities.

  7. Accounts receivable and advances

    Accounts receivable and advances are stated at amounts expected to be ultimately realized; a provision is made for receivables where recovery is considered uncertain.

  8. Contingent liabilities

    Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities which may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded. If the likelihood is not determinable or an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.

  9. Inventory

    Inventory consists of laboratory materials, supplies and livestock held for future program delivery and not intended for re-sale. It is valued at cost. If it no longer has service potential, it is valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value.

  10. Tangible capital assets

    All tangible capital assets and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $10,000 or more are recorded at their acquisition cost. Amortization of tangible capital assets is recorded on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:

    Asset class Amortization Period
    Buildings 20-30 years
    Machinery and equipment 5-20 years
    Computer equipment and software 3-10 years
    Vehicles 7-10 years
    Leasehold improvements Lesser of the remaining term of the lease or useful life of the improvement
    Assets under construction Once in service, in accordance with asset class
  11. Measurement uncertainty

    The preparation of these financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses reported in the financial statements. At the time of preparation of these statements, management believes the estimates and assumptions to be reasonable.

    The most significant items where estimates are used are contingent liabilities, the liability for employee severance benefits and the useful life of tangible capital assets. Actual results could significantly differ from those estimated. Management's estimates are reviewed periodically and, as adjustments become necessary, they are recorded in the financial statements in the year they become known.

3. Parliamentary Authorities

The Agency receives most of its funding through annual Parliamentary authorities. Items recognized in the Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position and the Statement of Financial Position in one year may be funded through Parliamentary authorities in prior, current or future years. Accordingly, the Agency has different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis. The differences are reconciled in the following tables:

  1. Reconciliation of net cost of operations to current year authorities used:
    (In thousands of dollars) 2013 2012
    Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers $807,518 $826,965
    Adjustments for items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting authorities:
    Add (less):
    Services provided without charge by other government departments (85,870) (82,764)
    Amortization of tangible capital assets (34,395) (37,640)
    Revenues pursuant to Section 30 of the CFIA act 56,003 56,570
    Accounts receivable and liabilities transferred to Shared Services Canada (1,066) (2,063)
    Bad debt (106) (113)
    Net changes in future funding requirements 6,648 (37,304)
    Low value assets funded by other government departments - (47)
    Loss on disposal of tangible capital assets (34) (113)
    Post-capitalization of tangible capital assets 48 47
    Sub-total (58,772) (103,427)
    Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities:
    Add (less):
    Acquisition of tangible capital assets 33,631 14,277
    Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets (321) (119)
    Sub-total 33,310 14,158
    Current year authorities used $782,056 $737,696
  2. Authorities provided and used:
    (In thousands of dollars) 2013 2012
    Vote 20 - Operating expenditures $624,956 $617,231
    Vote 25 - Capital expenditures 39,465 29,209
    Revenues pursuant to Section 30 of the CFIA act 60,758 58,835
    Statutory contributions to employee benefits plans and compensation payments 121,553 89,100
    Less:
    Authorities available for future years (30,412) (3,202)
    Lapsed authority – operating (26,332) (38,024)
    Lapsed authority – capital (7,932) (15,453)
    Current year authorities used $782,056 $737,696

4. Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities

The following table presents details of the Agency's account payable and accrued liabilities:

(In thousands of dollars) 2013 2012
Accounts payable to other government department (OGD) $8,362 $6,071
Accounts payable to external parties 32,825 30,855
Total accounts payable 41,187 36,926
Accrued liabilities 46,752 41,199
Total $87,939 $78,125

In Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012, the Government announced savings measures to be implemented by departments over the next three fiscal years starting in 2012-2013. As a result, the Agency has recorded at March 31, 2013 an obligation for termination benefits for an amount of $6,462,748 (2012 - $22,692,277) as part of accrued liabilities to reflect the estimated workforce adjustment costs.

5. Employee Benefits

  1. Pension benefits

    The Agency's employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan (the "Plan"), a multi- employer plan, which is sponsored and administered by the Government of Canada. Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2 percent per year of pensionable service times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings. The benefits are integrated with Canada/Quebec Pension Plans benefits and are indexed to inflation.

    Both the employees and the Agency contribute to the cost of the Plan. In 2012-2013, the Agency contributed $58,962,000 (2012 - $61,137,000), which represents approximately 1.7 times (2012 – 1.8 times) the contributions by employees.

    The Agency's responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan's sponsor.

  2. Severance benefits

    The Agency provides severance benefits to its employees based on eligibility, years of service and final salary. These severance benefits are not pre-funded and thus have no assets, resulting in a plan deficit equal to the accrued benefit obligation. Benefits will be paid from future authorities. Information about the severance benefits, measured for March 31, is as follows:

    As part of collective agreement negotiations with certain employee groups, and changes to conditions of employment for executives and certain non-represented employees, the accumulation of severance benefits under the employee severance pay program ceased for these employees commencing in 2012.

    Employees subject to these changes have been given the option to be immediately paid the full or partial value of benefits earned to date or collect the full or remaining value of benefits on termination from the public service. These changes have been reflected in the calculation of the outstanding severance benefit obligation.

    (In thousands of dollars) 2013 2012
    Accrued benefit obligation, beginning of year $121,773 $106,036
    Transferred to SSC, effective November 15, 2011 (Note 11) - (931)
    Subtotal 121,773 105,105
    Expense for the year 13,027 28,117
    Benefits paid during the year (12,108) (11,449)
    Accrued benefit obligation, end of year $122,692 $121,773

6. Accounts Receivable and Advances

The following table presents details of accounts receivable and advances:

(In thousands of dollars) 2013 2012
Receivables from other government departments (OGD) $3,514 $2,385
Receivables from external parties 6,090 6,038
Employee advances 55 82
Subtotal 9,659 8,505
Less:
Allowance for doubtful accounts on receivables from external parties (507) (443)
Accounts receivable 9,152 8,062
Accounts receivable and advances held on behalf of Government (1,043) (981)
Net accounts receivable $8,109 $7,081

7. Tangible Capital Assets
(In thousands of dollars)

Cost Accumulated amortization
Capital asset class Opening balance Acquisi-
tions
Adjust-
ments Table note 1
Disposals and write-offs Closing balance Opening balance Amorti-
zationTable note 2
Disposals and write-offs Closing balance 2013 Net book value 2012 Net book value
Land $3,331 $- $- $- $3,331 $- $- $- $- $3,331 $3,331
Buildings 285,251 1,295 11 73 286,484 194,058 10,376 59 204,375 82,109 91,193
Machinery and equipment 87,079 3,566 - 1,272 89,373 41,478 5,683 1,011 46,150 43,223 45,601
Computer equipment and software 60,243 11,768 4,828 133 76,706 35,974 7,315 133 43,156 33,550 24,269
Vehicles 36,906 3,860 - 3,047 37,719 26,457 3,367 2,970 26,854 10,865 10,449
Assets under construction 12,625 11,950 (6,672) 22 17,881 - - - - 17,881 12,625
Leasehold improvements 48,478 1,389 1,833 - 51,700 31,388 7,654 - 39,042 12,658 17,090
Total $533,913 $33,828 $- $4,547 $563,194 $329,355 $34,395 $4,173 $359,577 $203,617 $204,558

8. Contingent Liabilities

Claims relating to both legal and employee grievances have been made against the Agency in the normal course of operations. Some of these potential liabilities may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimate of liability is accrued and an expense recorded in the financial statements.

Amounts have been accrued for contingent liabilities as at March 31, 2013 pertaining to legal claims. The amount of the contingent liabilities for legal claims recognized is based on management's best estimate. Other legal claims against the Agency and other defendants include a class action suit related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) for which amounts and likelihood of liability are not determinable.

Claims and litigations for which the outcome is not determinable and an amount of claim can be made by management amount to approximately $284,637,050 ($84,852,000 in 2011-2012) at March 31, 2013.

No amounts have been accrued pertaining to employee grievances as at March 31, 2013.

9. Contractual Obligations

The nature of the Agency's activities can result in some large multi-year contracts and agreements whereby the Agency will be obligated to make future payments when the services/goods are received. Significant contractual obligations that can be reasonably estimated are summarized as follows:

(In thousands of dollars) 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 and thereafter Total
Capitals projects $253 $17 $- $- $- $270
Operating leases 2,203 314 313 314 1,408 4,552
Transfer payments 701 201 - - - 902
Operating contracts 10,430 1,531 799 329 271 13,360
Total $13,587 $2,063 $1,112 $643 $1,679 $19,084

10. Related Party Transactions

The Agency is related as a result of common ownership to all Government of Canada departments, agencies, and Crown corporations. The Agency enters into transactions with these entities in the normal course of business and on normal trade terms.

  1. Services provided without charge by other government departments

    During the year, the Agency received the employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans, accommodation, and legal services, without charge from other government departments. These amounts have been recognized in the Agency's Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position as follows:

    (In thousands of dollars) 2013 2012
    Employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans $42,978 $43,558
    Accommodation 31,101 30,736
    Legal services 928 1,909
    Shared Services Canada expenses 10,863 6,561
    Total $85,870 $82,764
  2. Other transactions with related parties:
    (In thousands of dollars) 2013 2012
    Accounts receivable from other government departments and agencies $3,514 $2,385
    Accounts payable to other government departments and agencies 8,362 6,071
    Expenses – Other Government departments and agencies 113,245 121,494
    Revenues – Other Government departments and agencies 371 242

11. Transfers from/to other government departments

Effective November 15, 2011, the Agency transferred responsibility for the information technologies activities to Shared Services Canada in accordance with the Order-in-Council of November 15th 2011, including stewardship responsibility for the assets and liabilities. Accordingly, the Agency transferred the following assets and liabilities related to information technologies activities to Shared Services Canada on November 15, 2011:

(In thousands of dollars) 2013 2012
Assets
Accounts receivable (Note 6) $- $(105)
Tangible capital assets (Note 7) - (4,919)
Total assets transferred - (5,024)
Liabilities
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (Note 4) (1,066) 1,075
Vacation pay - 162
Employee severance benefit (Note 5[b]) - 931
Total liabilities transferred (1,066) 2,168
Adjustment to the Agency net financial position $(1,066) $(2,856)

During the transition period (November 15, 2011 to March 31, 2012), the Agency continued to administer the transferred activities on behalf of Shared Services Canada. The administered expenses amounted to $6,561,000 for the year 2012. These expenses were recorded as service provided without charge (Note 10 [a]) in fiscal year 2012.

12. Segmented information

Presentation by segment is based on the Agency's program activities architecture. The presentation by segment is based on the same accounting policies as described in the Summary of significant accounting policies in note 2. The following table presents the expenses incurred and revenues generated by program, by major object of expenses and by major type of revenues.

The segment results for the period are as follows:

(In thousands of dollars) 2013 2012
Food Safety Program Animal Health and
Zoonotics Program
Plant Resources Program International Collaboration and
Technical Agreements
Internal Services Total Total
Transfer Payments
Compensation payments $- $37,532 $777 $- $- $38,309 $4,989
Other - 586 - 900 - 1,486 1,179
Total transfer payments - 38,118 777 900 - 39,795 6,168
Operating Expenses
Salaries and employee benefits 297,293 107,874 75,508 32,482 100,192 613,349 668,230
Professional and special services 28,819 11,715 4,928 532 24,369 70,363 64,138
Accommodation 17,640 6,821 4,565 1,622 4,988 35,636 35,000
Amortization 15,526 7,779 3,995 1,515 5,580 34,395 37,640
Utilities, materials and supplies 8,449 6,453 3,312 266 969 19,449 18,420
Travel and relocation 9,539 4,006 2,606 963 1,944 19,058 18,652
Communications 5,063 2,474 1,275 480 1,940 11,232 12,399
Repairs 4,640 2,983 1,831 91 1,488 11,033 11,530
Furniture and equipment 3,619 1,417 566 26 996 6,624 8,648
Equipment rentals 536 277 431 16 665 1,925 1,838
Information 782 482 203 2 390 1,859 1,429
Miscellaneous 221 65 73 14 96 469 323
Loss of disposal of assets 15 8 4 1 6 34 113
Expenses incurred on behalf of Government - - - - (70) (70) (3)
Total operating expenses 392,142 152,354 99,297 38,010 143,553 825,356 878,357
Total expenses 392,142 190,472 100,074 38,910 143,553 865,151 884,525
Revenues
Inspection fees 29,609 972 5,423 6,112 - 42,116 43,088
Registrations, permits, certificates 2,900 816 795 4,318 - 8,829 8,478
Miscellaneous fees and services 360 1,662 1,891 239 700 4,852 3,959
Administrative monetary penalties - - - - 2,012 2,012 837
Establishment license fees 1,770 - 13 - - 1,783 1,888
Grading 171 - - 4 - 175 211
Interest - - - - 32 32 44
Revenues earned on behalf of Government - - - - (2,166) (2,166) (945)
Total revenues 34,810 3,450 8,122 10,673 578 57,633 57,560
Net cost of operations $357,332 $187,022 $91,952 $28,237 $142,975 $807,518 $826,965

13. Comparative information

Comparative figures have been reclassified to conform to the current year's presentation

Summary of the assessment of effectiveness of the systems of internal control over financial reporting and the action plan of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency for fiscal year 2012–13 (unaudited)

Annex to the Statement of Management Responsibility Including Internal Control over Financial

1. Introduction

This document provides summary information on the measures taken by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA or the Agency) to maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting (ICFR), including information on internal control management and assessment results and related action plans.

Detailed information on the CFIA's authority, mandate and program activities can be found in the Agency's Departmental Performance Report and Report on Plans and Priorities.

2. Agency system of internal control over financial reporting

2.1 Agency control environment relative to ICFR

The CFIA recognizes the importance of setting the tone at the top to help ensure that staff at all levels understand their roles in maintaining an effective system of ICFR and are well equipped to exercise these responsibilities effectively. The CFIA's focus is to ensure that risks are well managed through a responsive, risk-based control environment that enables continuous improvement and innovation.

2.1.1 Key positions, roles and responsibilities relative to ICFR

Below are the CFIA's key positions and committees with responsibilities to maintain and review the effectiveness of the Agency's system of ICFR.

President – As Accounting Officer, the CFIA's President assumes overall responsibility and leadership for the measures taken to maintain an effective system of internal control. In this role, the President chairs the Senior Management Committee and is supported by the Executive Vice-President.

Chief Financial Officer (CFO) – The CFIA's CFO reports directly to the President and provides leadership for the coordination, coherence of, and the focus on, the design and maintenance of an effective, integrated system of ICFR, which includes the annual ICFR assessment.

Vice-Presidents – The CFIA's Vice-Presidents are in charge of program delivery, and are responsible for maintaining and reviewing the effectiveness of their system of ICFR within their mandate.

Chief Audit Executive (CAE) – The CFIA's CAE reports directly to the President and provides assurance through periodic risk-based internal audits, which can be instrumental in maintaining an effective system of ICFR.

Agency Audit Committee (AAC) – The AAC is an advisory committee that provides objective views on the CFIA's risk management, control and governance frameworks. It includes three external members and meets on a quarterly basis.

2.1.2 Key measures taken by the organization

The CFIA's control environment also includes a series of measures to enable Agency staff to manage risks by raising awareness, providing appropriate knowledge and tools, and developing skills and capacities. Key measures include:

  • Establishment of the Office of Values, Integrity and Conflict Resolution;
  • The CFIA's Code of Conduct and Conflict of Interest and Post-Employment Code;
  • Adoption of the Values and Ethics Code for the Public Sector;
  • Annual performance agreements with senior managers, which set out clear financial management responsibilities;
  • Training program and communications in core areas of financial management;
  • Tailoring of Agency policies to the CFIA's control environment;
  • Documentation of the main business processes and related key risk and control points to support the management and oversight of the CFIA's system of ICFR;
  • Active monitoring, including quality assurance activities and quarterly reporting of results; and
  • Periodic updating of the delegation of financial signing authorities matrix.

2.2 Service arrangements relevant to financial statements

The Agency relies on other organizations for the processing of certain transactions that are recorded in its financial statements:

Common arrangements

  • Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) centrally administers the payment of salaries and the procurement of goods and services, as per the Agency's Delegation of Authority, and provides accommodation services;
  • The Treasury Board Secretariat provides the Agency with information used to calculate various accruals and allowances;
  • The Department of Justice provides legal services to the CFIA; and
  • Shared Services Canada (SSC) provides IT infrastructure services to the Agency in the areas of data centre and network services. The scope and responsibilities are addressed in the interdepartmental arrangement between SSC and the Agency.

Specific arrangements

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) provides the CFIA with:
    • The SAP financial system platform to capture and report all financial transactions;
    • The Enterprise data warehouse to report financial information; and
    • The PeopleSoft human resource system platform to manage pay and leave transactions.

3. Departmental assessment results for fiscal year 2012–13

During 2012–13, the Agency completed all remaining design and operating effectiveness testing of key control areas. In addition, the Agency conducted on-going monitoring activities in the areas of Revenue, Pay, and Operating and Maintenance Expenditures as per the plan. In 2013–14, the risk-based on-going monitoring plan, which covers all control areas, will be fully implemented to assess and sustain the management of internal controls in support of continuous improvement.

The key findings and adjustments required from the current year's assessment activities are summarized below.

3.1 Design effectiveness testing of key controls

In the current year, the Agency completed design effectiveness testing of the last remaining key control items – Capital Assets, Financial Management, SAP/Enterprise, PeopleSoft, Electronic Invoicing, and IT Access Control and Change Management. Remediation is in progress for these self-assessment areas.

As a result of design effectiveness testing, the Agency identified the following remediation requirements:

Capital Assets

  • Strengthen the physical asset validation process to include all capital asset categories and to reflect risk-based planning and analysis; and
  • Formalize and communicate policies and procedures for assets.

IT General Controls

  • Strengthen access control by formalizing procedures, performing more structured periodic reviews of user access and segregating incompatible duties; and
  • Clearly document and communicate CFIA roles and responsibilities in relation to IT service partners.

3.2 Operating effectiveness testing of key controls

In 2012–13, the Agency completed operating effectiveness testing of the last remaining key control items – Capital Assets, Financial Management, SAP/Enterprise, PeopleSoft, Electronic Invoicing, and IT Access Control and Change Management. Remediation is in progress for these self-assessment areas.

As a result of the operating effectiveness testing, the Agency identified the following remediation requirements:

Financial Management

  • Improve the quality of financial forecasts by enhancing manager training and the challenge function performed by financial management advisors.

3.3 On-going monitoring of key controls

In 2012–13, the Agency completed planned ongoing monitoring of Revenue, Pay, and Operating and Maintenance Expenditures.

As a result of ongoing monitoring, the Agency identified the following remediation requirements:

Pay

  • Improve procedures to ensure that Specimen Signature Records for Human Resources staff are reviewed and updated periodically.

Remediation is in progress for this self-assessment area.

4. Departmental Action Plan

4.1 Progress during fiscal year 2012–13

During 2012–13, the CFIA continued to make significant progress in assessing and improving its key controls. Below is a summary of the main progress made by the Agency based on the plans identified in the previous fiscal year's annex:

Element of previous year's action plan Status
Complete the documentation, design and operating effectiveness testing for Capital Assets and Financial Management.Completed as planned. Remediation is in progress and is expected to be completed in 2013–14.
Complete the design and operating effectiveness testing for IT General Controls (SAP/Enterprise, PeopleSoft, Electronic Invoicing, and CFIA IT Access Control and Change Management).Completed as planned. Remediation is in progress and is expected to be completed in 2013–14.
Complete on-going operating effectiveness testing for Revenue, Pay and Operating and Maintenance Expenditures.Completed as planned. Remediation is in progress and is expected to be completed in 2013-14.
Continue to follow up on outstanding improvement opportunities identified in previous years.Remediation from previous fiscal years is substantially completed for Pay and is in progress for Revenue.
Develop a multi-year monitoring plan to identify areas for continued or periodic observation, updating and testing on a defined rotational basis consistent with the level of risk.A comprehensive risk assessment and a risk-based on-going monitoring plan were developed in consultation with senior management and the Audit Committee and were approved by the President. This will guide the self-assessment work in future years.

4.2 Status and action plan for the next fiscal year and subsequent years

Building on progress to date, the Agency has completed the full assessment in all key control areas of its system of ICFR in 2012–13. Starting in 2013–14, the Agency will be applying its rotational on-going monitoring plan to reassess control performance on a risk basis across all control areas. The status and action plan for the completion of the identified control areas for the next fiscal year (2013–14) and subsequent years (2014–15 and 2015–16) is as follows:

Key Control Areas Assessment elements
Design effectiveness testing and remediationTable note 3 Operational effectiveness testing and remediationTable note 3 Ongoing monitoring rotationTable note 4
Entity level controls
Values and EthicsCompleteComplete2015–16
GovernanceCompleteComplete2015–16
Risk ManagementCompleteComplete2014–15
Financial ManagementCompleteTesting complete.
Remediation to be completed in 2013–14.
2014–15
People ManagementCompleteComplete2013–14 and 2015–16
IT general controls under Agency management
Access Control and Change ManagementTesting complete.
Remediation to be completed in 2013–14.
Complete2014–15
SAP/EnterpriseCompleteComplete2013–14
PeopleSoftCompleteComplete2015–16
Electronic InvoicingCompleteComplete2015–16
Business processes
PayCompleteTesting complete.
Remediation to be completed in 2013–14.
2013–14, 2014–15 and 2015–16
Operating and MaintenanceCompleteComplete2015–16
RevenueTesting complete.
Remediation to be completed in 2014–15.
Complete2014–15
Capital AssetsTesting complete.
Remediation to be completed in 2013–14.
Complete2014–15
Financial Closing and ReportingCompleteComplete2013–14, 2014–15 and 2015–16
Statutory Compensation PaymentsCompleteComplete2015–16

In addition to the risk-based on-going monitoring plan, the Agency will continue to address outstanding remediation and will also conduct assessment work to reflect the transfer of pay services to the PWGSC Public Services Pay Centre.

3.2 Supplementary Information Tables

Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

Name of transfer payment program: Statutory Compensation Payments

Start date: N/A

End date: N/A

Description: Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by regulations under the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act. These payments serve to compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for plants ordered to be destroyed for the purpose of disease control.

Strategic outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Results achieved: Four Canadians were compensated for plants ordered to be destroyed.

Program: Plant Resources Program ($ millions)
  2010-11 Actual spending 2011-12 Actual spending 2012-13 Planned spending 2012-13 Total authorities 2012-13 Actual spending Variance
Total grants
Total contributions
Total other types of transfer payments 0.70.20.30.80.80.5
Total program 0.70.20.30.80.80.5

Comments on variances: N/A

Audits completed or planned: N/A

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Name of transfer payment program: Statutory Compensation Payments

Start date: N/A

End date: N/A

Description: Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by regulations under the Health of Animal Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act. These payments are to compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for animals ordered to be destroyed for the purpose of disease control.

Strategic outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Results achieved: 115 Canadians were compensated for animals ordered to be destroyed.

Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program ($ millions)
  2010-11 Actual spending 2011-12 Actual spending 2012-13 Planned spending 2012-13 Total authorities 2012-13 Actual spending Variance
Total grants
Total contributions
Total other types of transfer payments 2.94.01.238.338.337.1
Total program 2.94.01.238.338.337.1

Comments on variances: Actual compensation payments made to Canadians were $37.1 million higher than the $1.2 million that was earmarked under Planned Spending. This increase is largely attributed to Infectious Salmon Anaemia ($32.5M) in Nova Scotia and Infectious Haematopo ($4.2M) in British Columbia.

Audits completed or planned: N/A

Evaluations completed or planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Name of transfer payment program: Federal Assistance Program (FAP)

Start date: N/A

End date: N/A

Description: FAP is the CFIA's only contribution program. Its objective is to support projects and initiatives that advance the Agency's strategic outcome—specifically, a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base. Since the total payment under FAP does not exceed $4.5 million per year, CFIA uses resources from its operating vote to fund this contribution program.

Strategic outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Results achieved: Contributed to the mitigation of risks to Canada's animal resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health.

Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program ($ millions)
  2010-11 Actual spending 2011-12 Actual spending 2012-13 Planned spending 2012-13 Total authorities 2012-13 Actual spending Variance
Total grants
Total contributions 1.60.20.10.60.60.5
Total other types of transfer payments
Total program 1.60.20.10.60.60.5

Comments on variances: The FAP is normally used to fund ad hoc, short-term projects.

Audits completed or planned: Audit of the Federal Assistance Program (2011) and Follow-up Audit of the Federal Assistance Program (2011)

Evaluations completed or planned: Evaluation of the Federal Assistance Program (2011)

Engagement of applicants and recipients: The CFIA's FAP has successfully engaged recipients by providing financial support related to the training of individuals in animal epidemiology in areas most relevant to the CFIA: surveillance, risk analysis, and disease modeling.

Name of transfer payment program: Federal Assistance Program (FAP)

Start date: N/A

End date: N/A

Description: FAP is the CFIA's only contribution program. Its objective is to support projects and initiatives that advance the Agency's strategic outcome—specifically, a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Strategic outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Results achieved: Contributed to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements related to importing other countries' food, animals and plants, and products thereof, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy.

Program: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements ($ millions)
  2010-11 Actual spending 2011-12 Actual spending 2012-13 Planned spending 2012-13 Total authorities 2012-13 Actual spending Variance
Total grants
Total contributions 0.01.00.00.90.90.9
Total other types of transfer payments
Total program 0.01.00.00.90.90.9

Comments on variances: The FAP is normally used to fund ad hoc, short-term projects.

Audits completed or planned: Audit of the Federal Assistance Program (2011) and Follow-up Audit of the Federal Assistance Program (2011)

Evaluations completed or planned: Evaluation of the Federal Assistance Program (2011)

Engagement of applicants and recipients: The CFIA's FAP has successfully engaged recipients by providing financial support with an objective of supporting international science-based guidelines that govern safe and competitive trade.

Greening Government Operations (GCO)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Target

8.5 The federal government will take action now to reduce levels of greenhouse gas emissions from its operations to match the national target of 17% below 2005 by 2020.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status Exceeded
Departmental GHG reduction target: Percentage of absolute reduction in GHG emissions by fiscal year 2020-21, relative to fiscal year 2005-06. 13% 13%
Departmental GHG emissions in fiscal year 2005-06, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. 6.43 Kt CO2e 6.43 Kt CO2e
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. FY 2011-2012 Not Available 5.26 Kt CO2e
FY 2012-2013 Not Available
FY 2013-2014 Not Available
FY 2014-2015 Not Available
FY 2015-2016 Not Available
FY 2016-2017 Not Available
FY 2017-2018 Not Available
FY 2018-2019 Not Available
FY 2019-2020 Not Available
FY 2020-2021 5.59 Kt CO2e
Percent change in departmental GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-2006 to the end of the given fiscal year. FY 2011-2012 Not Available -18%
FY 2012-2013 Not Available -19%
FY 2013-2014 Not Available
FY 2014-2015 Not Available
FY 2015-2016 Not Available
FY 2016-2017 Not Available
FY 2017-2018 Not Available
FY 2018-2019 Not Available
FY 2019-2020 Not Available
FY 2020-2021 -13%
Existence of an implementation plan to reduce GHG emissions. Yes Yes

Strategies/Comments

  1. This target only captures the CFIA's GHG emissions from its fleet sources (e.g. on-road vehicles, marine vessels, agricultural equipment, recreational vehicles and lawn and garden equipment).
  2. Excluded emission sources, in certain instances, are from operations during which the primary function is national safety or security.
  3. Indirect emission sources are excluded (e.g. business travel, employee commuting, movement of goods, private mileage and outsourced activities).
  4. The CFIA has developed a Ground Transportation Management Strategy. Emissions reductions were considered in the development of the strategy and will continue to be considered in the strategy's implementation.
  5. This target has been exceeded for a number of reasons, the first being the procurement of more fuel efficient vehicles since 2005. Also, the CFIA has considerably decreased its kilometers travelled over the years due to more efficient inspection planning, increased carpooling, and an increased use of videoconferencing and teleconferencing, thereby reducing travel to meetings.

Surplus Electronic and Electrical Equipment Target

8.6 By March 31, 2014, each department will reuse or recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status Achieved
Existence of implementation plan for the disposal of all departmentally-generated EEE. Yes
(Completed April 2012)
Yes
Total number of departmental locations with EEE implementation plan fully implemented, expressed as a percentage of all locations, by the end of the given fiscal year. FY 2011-2012 80% 100%
FY 2012-2013 90% 100%
FY 2013-2014 90%

Strategies/Comments

  1. The CFIA implementation plan has been executed in all CFIA locations across Canada.
  2. Location is defined as all CFIA locations where CFIA personnel maintain a physical presence.
  3. The number of locations within the Agency is 445.
  4. The process for proper disposal of EEE waste has been communicated to all CFIA staff.
  5. To have an "Exceeded" target status, the CFIA would have to have the capability to track and report on total weight or units disposed of through all designated streams at all locations. It is not structured to do so at this time.

Printing Unit Reuction Target

8.7 By March 31, 2013, each department will achieve an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units. Departments will apply target where building occupancy levels, security considerations, and space configuration allow.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status Opportunity for Improvement
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow. FY 2011-2012 Not Available 1.9:1
FY 2012-2013 Not Available 2.3:1
FY 2013-2014 8:1

Strategies/Comments

  1. Print units have been defined as: desktop printers, network printers, multifunctional devices (MFD), photocopiers, faxes and scanners. This definition has been expanded since the 2011-12 RPP, where we only included desktop printers, network printers, MFDs and photocopiers.
  2. Excluded are work locations with less than 20 CFIA employees due to minimal opportunities for increasing efficiency. Also, all laboratories will be excluded from the scope, as many of their units are connected to specialized equipment and cannot be replaced by an MFD.
  3. Excluded print units are plotters, label printers, and thermal printers.
  4. Print units will be inventoried using software that will count all networked printing units as well as units connected to networked computers at one point in time. Faxes are non-networked and will be counted manually. A physical count will also be done to exclude scoped-out locations.
  5. Office employees are defined as indeterminate staff.
  6. The CFIA's internal accommodation reports will be used to determine the number of office employees, with employees located in scoped-out facilities subtracted.
  7. The estimated number of employees subject to the target is approximately 4700, 74% of CFIA indeterminate staff.
  8. CFIA IMITB has been working across the portfolio and with HRSDC on a business case and subsequent RFP for a Managed Print Service with a proposed launch date of April 1, 2014. Through this service, the CFIA expects to meet the printer ratio targets by optimizing our existing environment. In the meantime, CFIA IMIT will work with business clients to optimize where possible, incurring little or no investment, while waiting for the outcome of the RFP.

Paper Consumption Target

8.8 By March 31, 2014, each department will reduce internal paper consumption per office employee (OE) by 20%. Each department will establish a baseline between 2005-2006 and 2011-2012, and applicable scope.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status Exceeded
Number of sheets of internal office paper purchased or consumed per office employee in the 2008-2009 fiscal year. Not Available 5825 sheets/OE
Cumulative reduction (or increase) in paper consumption, expressed as a percentage, relative to baseline year selected. FY 2011-2012 -10% -20% 4640 sheets/OE
FY 2012-2013 -15% -32% 3941 sheets/OE
FY 2013-2014 -20%

Strategies/Comments

  1. Office employees are defined as indeterminate, term, student, seasonal and as-required staff.
  2. Paper is defined as printer paper purchased in packages of 500 sheets.
  3. The method used for determining paper consumption is a manual count of printer paper packages purchased by canvassing CFIA locations with 30 employees or more. This accounts for approximately 71% of CFIA staff. The method used for calculating the other 29% is an extrapolation based on the known 71%, as this is a good representation of the employee base.  
  4. The CFIA Human Resources "Population Snapshot" website is used to determine the number of office employees. The year-end population totals will be used as the number of office employees for each fiscal year.
  5. The number of employees subject to the target changes in any given year, as it is based on employee numbers. For the baseline year 2008-2009, the count on March 31, 2009, was 7053 employees. For year 2012-2013, the employee count was 7091 employees.
  6. This target has been exceeded for a number of reasons:
    • IMIT defaulting all print jobs to double-sided printing;
    • Better use of electronics (email, text messaging) when sending messages and sharing documents;
    • Encouraging employees to double-side all copies.

Green Meetings Target

8.9 By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a guide for greening meetings.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status Achieved
Presence of a green meeting guide. Yes: Adopted March 31, 2012 Yes: Adopted March 31, 2012

Strategies/Comments

  1. Adoption of the green meetings guide is defined by its approval by senior management.
  2. The guide is applicable to all internal CFIA meetings as well as to external meetings with other government departments, industry and stakeholders. It provides green options in the areas of hospitality, paper use, procurement, accommodation, and travel.
  3. The guide defines the roles and responsibilities of CFIA managers, meeting planners and the National Environmental Office in the application and implementation of the guide.
  4. The guide has been posted to the National Environmental Management Office's website, and will be communicated to all staff via the internal CFIA newsletter.
  5. To obtain an "Exceeded" target status, the CFIA would have to develop and implement a comprehensive plan to maintain the adoption of the Green Meeting Guideline. This would include tracking its use and reporting on the reduced environmental impact resulting from its implementation. This is currently not in place.

Green Procurement Targets

8.10 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least 3 SMART green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts.

By April 1, 2013, the CFIA will utilize green consolidated procurement instruments for 95% of its photocopiers and printers procured in a given fiscal year.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status Exceeded
Number of photocopiers and printers procured in 2011-2012. Not Available 23
Percent of photocopiers and printers procured in a given fiscal year where green consolidated procurement instruments were used. FY 2011-2012 75% 87%
FY 2012-2013 95% 100%

Strategies/Comments

  1. The target only includes photocopiers and printers procured or leased by CFIA's Contracting and Procurement Policy Division.
  2. This target excludes any procurement of specialized/technical equipment where green products are not available.
  3. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Well defined achievement level of 95%;
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time;
    • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result;
    • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of photocopiers and printers and using green procurement instruments will reduce energy use and green house gas emissions;
    • Time-Bound: Date established for target implementation.
  4. Data is gathered manually from procurement records
  5. Environmental benefits are derived from these products as they are leased or purchased from PWGSC certified green suppliers which use minimum greenhouse gas emissions and non-fossil fuel products for manufacturing and machining these commodities. As well, these products are fully recyclable thus minimizing hazardous waste disposal.
  6. This target has been exceeded due to the CFIA's Contracting and Procurement Policy Division, which has a mechanism in place to ensure that available green procurement instruments for the procurement of photocopiers and printers are utilized.
By April 1, 2013, the CFIA will utilize green consolidated procurement instruments for 95% of its computers procured in a given fiscal year.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status Exceeded
Number of computers procured in 2011-2012. Not Available 10
Percentage of computers procured in a given fiscal year where green consolidated procurement instruments were used. FY 2011-2012 75% 100%
FY 2012-2013 95% 100%

Strategies/Comments

  1. The target only includes computers procured by CFIA's Contracting and Procurement Policy Division.
  2. This target excludes any procurement of specialized/technical equipment where green instruments are not available.
  3. Computers are defined as the CPUs of Personal Computers (PCs), as these have the most green procurement opportunities.
  4. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Well defined achievement level of 95%;
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time;
    • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve resul;t
    • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of computers and using green procurement instruments will reduce energy use and green house gas emissions;
    • Time-Bound: Date established for target implementation.
  5. Data is gathered manually from procurement records
  6. Estimated environmental benefits: PCs are purchased from PWGSC certified green suppliers list and are completely recyclable through the PWGSC (OGGO) EEE waste disposal program initiative.
  7. This target has been exceeded due to the CFIA's Contracting and Procurement Policy Division, which has a mechanism in place to ensure that available green procurement instruments for the procurement of photocopiers and printers are utilized.
By March 31, 2014, 75% of vehicles purchased annually will be from the CFIA Preauthorised Vehicle List (PAVL), where operational requirements allow.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status Exceeded
Number of vehicles procured in 2011-2012. Not Available 55
Percent of vehicles procured in a given fiscal year from the CFIA Preauthorised Vehicle List (PAVL). FY 2011-2012 Not Available 69%
FY 2012-2013 Not Available 98%
FY 2013-2014 75%

Strategies/Comments

  1. The target does not include farm equipment, boats, ATVs or snowmobiles.
  2. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Well defined achievement level of 75%;
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time;
    • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result;
    • Relevant: The CFIA develops a PAVL every year based on vehicles that are the most fuel efficient in their class in the Government Motor Vehicle Ordering Guide;
    • Time-Bound: Date established for target implementation.
  3. This target is tracked through a consolidated acquisition spreadsheet.
  4. The PAVL is distributed yearly via email to all stakeholders in advance of vehicle procurement.
  5. The CFIA has in place a Ground Transportation Management Strategy which considers how its decision-making impacts greenhouse gas emissions with respect to vehicle purchasing.

8.11 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision-making.

Training for select employees

As of April 1, 2011, 100% of new materiel managers, procurement personnel and acquisition card holders will complete the online course on Green procurement provided by the Canada School of the Public Service.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status Exceeded
Number of new materiel managers, procurement personnel and acquisition card holders in 2011-2012. Not Available 89
Percent of new materiel managers, procurement personnel and acquisition card holders who have completed the online course on Green procurement provided by the Canada School of the Public Service. FY 2011-2012 100% 25%
FY 2012-2013 100% 100%

Strategies/Comments

  1. Materiel managers and procurement personnel are identified only as those who work in CFIA's Contracting and Procurement Policy Division.
  2. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Well defined achievement level of 100%;
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time;
    • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result;
    • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of goods and procuring goods that are "green" minimizes CFIA's environmental footprint;
    • Time-Bound: Date established for target implementation.
  3. Data is collected manually from Procurement data.
  4. The CFIA has a procedure in place to ensure that all new AC Cardholders take the Green Procurement Course prior to receiving their AC card.

Employee performance evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management

By March 31, 2013, all identified procurement and materiel management functional specialists and their managers and functional heads will have environmental considerations clauses incorporated into their performance evaluations.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status Exceeded
Number of identified positions that have environmental consideration clauses in their performance evaluations. 2 2
Percentage of identified positions that have environmental consideration clauses incorporated into their performance evaluations. FY 2011-2012 Not Available 0
FY 2012-2013 100% 100%

Strategies/Comments

  1. The number of identified positions is two, both being procurement managers.
  2. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Well defined achievement level of all (100%);
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time;
    • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result;
    • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of goods and services and procuring goods or services that are "green" minimizes CFIA's environmental footprint;
    • Time-Bound: Date established for target implementation.
  3. This target has been exceeded because a mechanism is in place to ensure that the two identified positions have environmental consideration clauses incorporated into their performance evaluations.
By March 31, 2014, the CFIA Ground Transportation Management Strategy will be developed.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status Exceeded
Existence of Ground Transportation Management Strategy FY 2011-2012 No No
FY 2012-2013 No Yes
FY 2013-2014 Yes

Strategies/Comments

  1. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: The target identifies processes related to a specialized area of procurement;
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time;
    • Achievable: Resources and responsibilities for target completion have been identified;
    • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of vehicles and having a ground transportation management strategy that marries traditional fleet practices with green procurement principles will ensure CFIA's fleet is procured and managed in a manner that contributes to a sustainable Canada;
    • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation.
  2. The CFIA has developed a Ground Transportation Management Strategy. During the development of the strategy, mechanisms were built in to ensure that its implementation takes into consideration impacts to greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. purchasing, driving practices, vehicle sharing, carpooling, etc.).

Horizontal initiatives

Table A: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Program

Name of Lead Department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead Department Program Activity: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Start Date: 2003-04 (enhanced programming)

End Date: Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $3,601.1M (2003-04 to 2013-14) and $26.6M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Building on work commenced in the early 1990s, the BSE program protects human and animal health by conducting surveillance, performing research and risk assessments regarding BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), and minimizing the risk of exposure to infected materials; maintains consumer confidence by assessing the effectiveness of risk mitigation measures and having measures in place to control any potential outbreaks; and supports market access for cattle, beef, and products related thereto by promoting and explaining Canada's BSE program to domestic and international stakeholders.

Health Canada conducts research and risk assessments regarding human exposure to BSE and other TSEs, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) carries out surveillance of human TSEs and conducts targeted supporting research in this area as well. The CFIA enforces the requirement that specified risk material (SRM) be removed from the animal feed chain and the human food chain, monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country, monitors for the prevalence of BSE in the cattle population (through surveillance), verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place, and explains Canada's BSE control measures to domestic and international stakeholders (for example, through the veterinarians abroad program) in order to maintain confidence in Canada's BSE program. AAFC has been involved in supporting, stabilizing and repositioning Canada's beef and cattle industry, including through the provision of compensation payments to stakeholders impacted by BSE in Canada.

Year Departments Funding Period Intent of Funds
2003-04 CFIA, AAFC, HC2003-04 to 2007-08- measures to secure the future of the Canadian beef industry
2003-04 CFIA2003-04 to 2007-08- the removal of SRM from the food chain and re-entering export markets (referred to as the enhanced BSE initiative)
2004-05 CFIA2004-05 to 2008-09- reposition the Canadian beef and cattle industry to operate on a profitable and sustainable basis
2004-05 CFIA2004-05 to 2005-06- strengthen animal feed restrictions
2005-06 CFIA2005-06 to 2008-09- additional measures to address critical pressures facing the ruminant industry
2006-07 CFIA2006-07- continue the work the Agency was undertaking for the enhanced feed ban
2007-08 CFIAOn-going- implement the enhanced feed ban restrictions
2008-09 CFIA2008-09- extend sunsetting elements of the enhanced BSE initiative
2009-10 CFIA, PHAC, HC2009-10 to 2013-14- continue work on the core BSE activities

Shared Outcome(s): Contributing to the protection of human and animal health, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian cattle, beef and beef products.

Governance Structure(s): The CFIA is the federal lead for the delivery of the BSE Program. In 2008, a summative evaluation of the CFIA's BSE program was conducted, which noted that the governance of the program should be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication regarding BSE-related activities, both internally and with other partner organizations. The CFIA accepted this recommendation and agreed to develop options for an improved governance model to facilitate horizontal dialogue that is consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives. In 2010, the CFIA launched a new committee structure to bring the Agency's overall approach to governance more in line with evolving business needs. The new governance structure focuses on the importance of sharing information internally and ensures a more efficient and streamlined senior-level committee structure. It is expected that the renewed structure will foster a whole-of-Agency approach to decision-making and will support day-to-day operations across the Agency. To ensure business line perspectives are integrated into decision-making, the three senior executive-level committees are supported by four committees: Animal Health, Plant, Food and Horizontal Management.

Performance Highlights: For 2013-14, the key plans and priorities from a horizontal perspective are to continue to deliver the BSE Program to current standards as well as to continue to improve communication and coordination (for example, governance), performance measurement and reporting, and financial tracking.

Federal Partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing Activities / Programs Total Allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results (ER) Contributing Activities / Programs Results (RA)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Animal Health and Zoonotics Program / Internal Services SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain 91.5 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 9.5 6.1 ER 1 RA 1
Import Controls 2.8 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 0.3 0.5 ER 2 RA 2
BSE Surveillance 159.9 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 15.4 13.8 ER 3 RA 3
Cattle Identification 29.2 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 2.8 2.4 ER 4 RA 4
Export Certification 53.2 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 5.7 2.7 ER 5 RA 5
Technical Market Access Support 44.1 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 3.6 1.6 ER 6 RA 6
Enhanced Feed Ban 241.0 (2004-05 to 2013-14) and 26.6 ongoing 26.6 15.5 ER 7 RA 7
Establishment Review 2.3 (2004-05 to 2006-07) 0.0 Funding Sunsetted in 2007-08
Oversupply of Aged Cattle 0.3 (2004-05) 0.0
Meat Inspection Reform 9.2 (2005-06 to 2007-08) 0.0
Total 633.5 (2003-04 to 2013-14) and 26.6 ongoing 63.9 42.6

ER 1: SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain

Outcome: Safe food

Output: Compliance with current regulations

Activities: Continuation of the enforcement and verification of SRM removal, handling and disposal by CFIA inspection staff

IndicatorFootnote 1: Industry compliance rate for removal of SRM

TargetFootnote 1: 100% compliance

TrackingFootnote 1: Internal program files and documents.

RA 1: SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain

Federally inspected slaughter and boning establishments continue to be verified on-site by the CFIA. Record reviews are also performed by CFIA inspection staff to verify compliance with the control program and the effectiveness of the control program. In the 2012-13 fiscal year, a compliance rate of 100% was achieved in tasks delivered on the enforcement and verification of SRM removal.

Provincially inspected slaughter and boning establishments continue to be verified on-site and record reviews are performed by CFIA inspection staff to ensure that the removal, segregation and disposal of SRM are carried out to determine the adequacy of provincial oversight regarding plant controls.

These reviews have been and will continue to be a crucial part in our ongoing efforts to strive for continuous improvements to the consistency and overall quality of our inspection verifications and related activities in non-registered provincial establishments.

ER 2: Import Controls

Outcome: Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards

Output: Up-to-date import controls

Activities: Review and update of current import policies and conditions for BSE as required to reflect changes in international standards and evolving science

Indicator 1Footnote 1: Percentage of import policies verified and updated as required

TargetFootnote 1: 25% per year

TrackingFootnote 1: Internal program files and documents

Indicator 2Footnote 1: BSE Import Policy is verified and updated as required

TargetFootnote 1: Annually, when the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) updates the BSE risk status country lists.

TrackingFootnote 1: Internal program files and documents

RA 2: Import Controls

In the 2012-13 fiscal year, one quarter of import policies were verified and updated as required. The BSE Import Policy was updated in accordance with the OIE update of BSE risk country status lists.

ER 3: BSE Surveillance

Outcome: Safe animals and food and market access

Output: Measurement of BSE levels and distribution in cattle population

Activities: Analysis of options to redesign the BSE surveillance program and consultation with stakeholders to explore further targeting of surveillance.

IndicatorFootnote 1: Temporal trend in exposure to the BSE agent in the cattle population

TargetFootnote 1: Testing 30,000 samples from the high-risk category of cattle is the minimum national target

TrackingFootnote 1: Internal files / documents / databases (Laboratory Sample Tracking System, or LSTS; provincial lab data; National Livestock Identification Database; Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network).

RA 3: BSE Surveillance

In 2012-13, the CFIA continued to deliver surveillance activities along with the national reimbursement program on at-risk animals including clinical suspects and ‘over 30 months of age cattle' that are dead, down, dying, or diseased. Surveillance samples were collected from cattle on the farm, at rendering facilities, at dead stock facilities, and at provincial and federal abattoirs. The CFIA successfully collected and tested 29,024 samples, 19,914 of which were processed in CFIA laboratories. Monitoring the level and distribution of BSE in Canada through the weighing of surveillance samples with the OIE-recommended allocation of points has allowed Canada to maintain a controlled BSE risk status and to maintain and expand market access.

There were no cases of BSE detected in Canada during the 2012-13 fiscal year.

In 2012, a collaborative framework was placed around the CFIA BSE surveillance (CanSurvBSE), permitting ongoing consultation and consensus-based decision-making with provinces, industry, and other government departments on the BSE surveillance program.

Ongoing collaboration through CanSurvBSE has led to a shared vision, common goals and objectives for BSE surveillance, and a deeper understanding of the need for surveillance along with its associated challenges.

ER 4: Cattle Identification

Outcome:

  • Governments and other entities make informed decisions to manage animal and related human health issues.
  • Risks to Canadian livestock resource base are mitigated.
  • The Canadian livestock sector is compliant with regulations.

Output 1Footnote 1: Compliance verification and enforcement strategy; inspection reports; data quality audits; trace-out reports; letters of non-compliance; administrative penalties; prosecutions.

Activities: Inspections, compliance verification, investigations and enforcement actions

Output 2Footnote 1: Regulations; program and related policies; privacy impact assessment; threat risk assessment; Administrator agreement; tools for CFIA staff (e.g. program-related policy, positions, manuals, SOPs, etc.)

Indicator 1Footnote 1: Number and development status of inspection tools in place.

TargetFootnote 1: Training, tools and materials are relevant and up to date

TrackingFootnote 1: Internal program files and documents

Indicator 2Footnote 1: Number of inspectors trained

TargetFootnote 1: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained

TrackingFootnote 1: Internal program files and documents

Indicator 3Footnote 1: Ratio of non-compliances versus number of Compliance Verification System (CVS) tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage.

TargetFootnote 1: 95% compliance

TrackingFootnote 1: Internal program files and documents

Indicator 4Footnote 1: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards

TargetFootnote 1: 100%

TrackingFootnote 1: Internal program files and documents

RA 4: Cattle Identification

Indicator 1Footnote 1: Number and development status of inspection tools in place
Performance measurement: Target met

Indicator 2Footnote 1: Number of inspectors trained
Performance measurement: Target partially met. All inspectors verifying compliance under the program are trained; training in the CVS inspection tool is ongoing.

Indicator 3Footnote 1: Ratio of non-compliances versus number of CVS tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage.
Performance measurement: Target partially met. Compliance rate under the program is above 95%. However, as the incorporation of CVS into the program is ongoing, the assessment of compliance remains a manual activity.

Indicator 4Footnote 1: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards.
Performance measurement: Target met.

ER 5: Export Certification

Outcome: Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

Output: Export certification

Activities: Continue provision of export-related certification services to a wide range of affected industries.

Indicator 1: Percentage of exports meeting the standards of the importing country as required.

Target: 100%

Tracking: Internal program files and documents

RA 5: Export Certification

Performance measurement: Target met

ER 6: Technical Market Access Support:

Outcome: Maintain or improve confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets.

Output: Increased market demand and confidence

Activities: Continue the establishment and maintenance of strong relationships with trading partners, and the provision of global leadership and influence concerning international policies and standards development.

IndicatorFootnote 1: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.

TargetsFootnote 1: An ongoing record of markets that are open, and exports of Canadian beef and cattle.

TrackingFootnote 1: Internal program files and documents

RA 6: Technical Market Access Support

Target - has been met for 2012-13
As part of the Federal Market Access Team, a portfolio comprised of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT), the Agency continues to support the collaborative approach to advancing Canadian agricultural interests abroad. The Federal Market Access Team works closely with industry stakeholders to open, maintain, and expand international markets for the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector. The Federal Market Access Team focuses market access efforts, sets priorities, and allocates resources for markets and cross-commodity market access issues that have the greatest potential.

In 2012-13, the CFIA continued to support and undertake Market Access efforts; these included the re-opening of some markets that were closed due to concerns related to surveillance, the co-location of additional CFIA staff to the Market Access Secretariat, and collaboration on the creation of a single window for new or emerging market access issues.

In 2012-13, 12 new (or previously closed) markets that were opened for beef, beef products, genetics, or cattle included:

  • Japan,
  • China,
  • Russia, and
  • South Korea.

ER 7: Enhanced Feed Ban

Outcome: Safe feed, fertilizer, animals, and food

Output: Compliance with enhanced feed ban regulations

Activities: Continue enforcement of enhanced feed ban restrictions

IndicatorFootnote 1: Trends in compliance with regulations associated with the enhanced feed ban, including SRM removal, handling, and disposal; trends in the proportion of feed mills and renderers using prohibited materials / SRM and producing ruminant feeds.

Targets and TrackingFootnote 1: Currently being revised

RA 7: Enhanced Feed Ban

During the 2012 calendar year, the CFIA continued to verify compliance with the enhanced 2007 regulatory framework at facilities associated with the animal food and production chain (i.e. at rendering plants, commercial feed manufacturers, feed retail outlets, on-farm feed manufacturers and ruminant feeders, as well as at meat slaughter and processing establishments, cattle dead stock collectors, transporters and receivers of SRM, commercial composting, and fertilizer manufacturing facilities).

Some of the major achievements were as follows:

  • The CFIA renewed and issued a total of 1454 permits for the control of SRM in Canada;
  • Feed-ban-related inspections in the 2012 calendar year:
    • Commercial Feed Mills: 4842 tasks at 457 facilities;
    • On-Farm: 1022 tasks at 218 facilities;
    • Retail: 2198 tasks at 431 facilities;
    • Rendering Facilities: 772 tasks at 48 facilities.
Federal partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing activities / programs Total allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ Millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results (ER) Contributing activity / program results (RA)
Health Canada (HC) Health Products Risk Assessment and Targeted Research 44.0 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 2.6 2.0 ER 8 RA 8
Compliance and Enforcement 1.0 (2003-04 to 2007-08) 0.0 Funding sunsetted in 2007-08
Product Assessment 6.2 (2003-04 to 2007-08) 0.0
Tracking and Tracing 3.1 (2003-04 to 2007-08) 0.0
Food Safety and Nutrition Risk Assessment and Targeted Research 18.1 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 3.6 1.8 ER 9 RA 9
Total 72.4 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 6.2 3.8

ER 8: Health Products Risk Assessment and Targeted Research

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of surveillance/TSE science, risks, and product surveillance.

Indicator: Number of research publications related to surveillance/TSE peer-reviewed publications produced by Health Canada.

TargetsFootnote 2 and Tracking: Data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, internal records, proceeds of scientific meetings.

Intermediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making

Indicators:
Number and type of recommended and/or implemented changes to regulations, policies, and guidelines as a result of the identification of issues/gaps.
Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted.
Number of Master Files containing ingredients which may be at risk of TSE/surveillance contamination.
Number of Natural Health Product licence applications reviewed for products which contain ingredients sourced from bovine tissue.
Number of new DINs assigned for products which contain ingredients sourced from bovine tissue.

TargetsFootnote 2 and Tracking: Data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, risk assessments (including recommendations), internal records.

RA 8: Health Products: Risk Assessment and Targeted Research

A faster and more reliable method to produce labelled prion components was developed for our nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) study. We produced initial data to show that the cell membrane may induce the transformation of the normal prion protein into the disease-associated form. This information can be used to fill knowledge gaps required for decision-making related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy/transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (BSE/TSE) risk assessment.

The risk of transmitting a TSE disease through a biological product remains difficult to quantify. Validated analytical methods are needed to identify and measure prion protein contaminants in these products. Risk assessment depends, in part, on identifying products and/or processes that may contain the normal cellular prion protein and, therefore, the TSE agent. Over the last year, we have been exploring new methods involving label-free approaches which have been successful for some proteins. The next steps require method validation using stable isotope labelled proteins. Development of this method would permit evidence-based TSE risk classification of biological products.

The Annual Report "Canadian Batch Release Activities" published for 2012-2013 identified that all of the lots released had been negative for surveillance risk. This publication was submitted to the Official Medicines Control Laboratory as a peer review agency.

Although many biological drugs are manufactured using substances that are not sourced from bovine components, there remain a number of medically necessary products that still utilize bovine sourced components. BGTD has requested manufacturers to consider alternate sourcing and have required that sponsors use bovine sources from countries with no history of surveillance. For human blood products, surveillance measures for sponsors have been enhanced to avoid introduction of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) through the addition of supplementary manufacturing controls. Working in cooperation with Canada's Public Health Agency, donor screening measures have been reviewed and additional deferrals for high-risk countries have been added.

There have been 227 global reported cases of vCJD. The two cases in Canada have been well studied, and it is agreed that exposure to surveillance was in the UK and Saudi Arabia, not in Canada. The second case has led to expanding the donor deferral in Canada to protect blood component recipients.

The Biologics Program continued to review master files and product licence applications which may contain ingredients sourced from animals and which may be susceptible to surveillance/TSE. As part of the risk assessment, every application was reviewed for animal sourced ingredients.

In Fiscal Year 2012-13, the Biologics Program did not assign any Drug Identification Number (DIN) to biologic human products which contained bovine-sourced ingredients.

ER 9: Health Products Risk Assessment and Targeted Research

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of surveillance/TSE science, risks, and product surveillance.

Indicators:
Number of direct consultations/visits with stakeholders as a result of Canadian expertise.
Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by HC staff on surveillance/TSE topics.
Number of research publications related to surveillance/TSE, peer-reviewed publications produced by HC.
Number and amount of funds expended for external collaborations.

TargetsFootnote 2 and Tracking: Data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, incident reports, certificates, internal records.

Intermediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making.

Indicators:
Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted.
Number and description of policies/standards on surveillance/TSE contributed by HC to the international community.

TargetsFootnote 2 and Tracking: Data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, risk assessments (including recommendations), incident reports, certificates, internal records.

RA 9: Health Products Risk Assessment and Targeted Research

Health Canada continued the previously established research projects in collaboration with external partners (CFIA, European research Institutions) to generate critical data related to the pathogenesis of BSE, TSEs, and specified risk material to support hazard characterization, risk assessment and standard setting.

Funding was solely used to support targeted research projects. Preliminary data and progress reports on these on-going projects are regularly provided. All projects have met the milestones outlined in the MOAs or LOUs and the novel research progress is consistent with the anticipated expectations associated with TSE research.

Federal partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing activities / programs Total allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ Millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results (ER) Contributing activity / program results (RA)
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) Surveillance and Population Health Assessment Prion Disease Program 7.9 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 0.8 0.8 ER 10 RA 10
Total 7.9 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 0.8 0.8

ER 10: Surveillance and Research for Human TSEs

Outcome: Risks of human TSEs in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled.

Output/Activities: Continued, detailed, case-by-case, laboratory-based investigation of all human TSEs across Canada; improved methods and strategies for efficient case investigation; surveillance data; research publications; provision of policy advice for food safety, healthcare and international trade.

Indicator: Alignment of PHAC data from human TSE surveillance with international benchmarks; application of policy advice in decision-making.

Targets and Tracking: Maintenance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance intensity at a level where the annual incidence of all confirmed human prion diseases in Canada is at least 1.0 per million in population.

RA 10: Prion Diseases Program

The Agency's Prion Diseases Program monitors and mitigates risks of zoonotic and non-zoonotic infectious propagation of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs) to humans in Canada. This is done through prospective, case-by-case epidemiological surveillance (including laboratory-based surveillance) of all human TSEs that occur in Canada, including variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), the human form of surveillance. In 2012-13 a total of 278 suspected cases of human TSEs were investigated by the Agency, with a total of 31 definite and probable cases confirmed. Despite this intensive surveillance, no cases of vCJD were identified, providing ongoing evidence to support the low risk of Canadians acquiring this disease from possible past exposure to domestic surveillance. The Agency's Prion Diseases Program remains at the forefront of improved laboratory-based diagnostic technology for human TSEs, as evidenced by a peer reviewed publication investigating TSE induced biomarkers in urine and participation in an international consortium aimed at optimizing and standardizing a novel TSE test.

Federal partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing activities / programs Total allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2013-14 ($ Millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results (ER) Contributing activity / program results (RA)
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) Food Safety and Biosecurity Systems (FSBRMS) Facilitating the Disposal of Specified Risk Material (SRM) 79.9 (2006-07 to 2009-10) 0.0 0.0 A summary outlining expected results for AAFC is not included in the RPP as their resources sunsetted in 2008-09.
Establishment 276.0 (2003-04) 0.0 0.0
Implementation 36.0 (2003-04) 0.0 0.0
Tracking and Tracing Systems 7.8 (2003-04 to 2004-05) 0.0 0.0
Transitional Industry Support Program 934.6 (2003-04) 0.0 0.0
Accelerating Implementation of Traceability in Livestock and Meat Sources 16.1 (2004-05 to 2006-07) 0.0 0.0
Farm Income Payment Program 999.8 (2004-05 to 2005-06) 0.0 0.0
Cull Animal Program 202.4 (2003-04 to 2005-06) 0.0 0.0
Loan Loss 38.4 (2004-05 to 2008-09) 0.0 0.0
Feeder/Fed Cattle Set-Aside Program 296.3 (2004-05 to 2005-06) 0.0 0.0
Total 2887.3 (2003-04 to 2009-10) 0.0 0.0
Total Allocation for All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
($ Millions)
Total Actual Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
($ Millions)
3601.1 (2003-04 to 2013-14) and 26.6 ongoing70.947.2

Comments on variances (if applicable)

CFIA: The CFIA has completed delivering the BSE program for the tenth year. Over the years, most of the program's activities have been integrated into the CFIA's ongoing work and are not reflected in the direct financial tracking of BSE-related activities. The CFIA is currently conducting an exercise that will cost the current expenditures for the BSE program. Also, some of the variance between planned spending and actual spending is related to the reallocation of resources to other agency priorities such as the expansion of animal identification into non-ruminant species (e.g. pigs).

Health Canada: N/A

PHAC: N/A

AAFC: N/A

Results achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact Information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Ian Alexander
Executive Director, Animal Health Directorate
613-773-7472

Public Health Agency of Canada
Dr. Michael B. Coulthart
Director, Canadian Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Surveillance System
Prion Diseases Program
204-789-6026

Health Canada
Diane Dowthwaite
Director General, Resource Management & Operations Directorate,
Health Products and Food Branch,
613-957-6690

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada
John Ross
Director, Animal Industry Division
613-773-0220

Table B: National Aquatic Animal Health Program

Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

Lead department program activity: CFIA: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program DFO: Aquatic Animal Health

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2005

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $59.0M (2005-06 to 2009-10) and $10.3M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The NAAHP's goal is to protect Canada's aquatic animal resources and productivity by preventing the introduction and spread of aquatic animal diseases and by maintaining the seafood industry's competitiveness in international markets. This is in line with the Government of Canada's priority to protect Canada's natural resources and economic stability. The Agency's priority in this area is a safe and sustainable animal aquatic resource base.

Shared outcome(s): Sustainable Aquatic Resource Productivity and Internationally Competitive Aquatic Animal Resource Base Industry, which will allow trade to continue and expand.

Governance structure(s): The CFIA is the federal lead for delivery of the NAAHP in collaboration with DFO; respective federal roles and responsibilities are outlined in a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The Animal Health Business Line and the Horizontal Steering Committee for Aquatic Animal Health are responsible for monitoring financial governance within the CFIA budget. At the federal, provincial, and territorial (F/P/T) level, the Canadian Council of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers (CCFAM) has oversight over the program through a working group with the CFIA. There is also an industry, federal, provincial, and territorial advisory committee, the Aquatic Animal Health Committee, which meets annually to guide the development of the program.

Performance Highlights: Implementation of the NAAHP is ongoing; this includes the implementation of the import controls for aquatic animals under the Health of Animals Regulations, which came into effect December 10, 2011. Prior to full enforcement of the Regulations, there was to be a one-year transition period supported by a Stream of Commerce Policy from December 2011 to December 2012. Full enforcement of the Regulations came into effect in March 2013.The development and implementation of surveillance initiatives in support of domestic or international trade, and development of domestic trade permitting the safe movement of susceptible species of finfish, molluscs, and crustaceans within Canada continues, and further consultations on the development and implementation of the domestic disease control program will be conducted in 2013-14. Other program functions, including certifying aquatic animal exports, engaging in emergency disease response activities, developing risk assessments, and developing disease surveillance plans, will continue as required.

Federal partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing activities / programs Total allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ Millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results (ER) Contributing activity / program results (RA)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Animal Health and Zoonotics Program / Internal Services National Aquatics Animal Health Programs 32.1 (2005-06 to 2009-10) and 6.3 ongoing 6.3 6.0 ER 11 RA 11
Total 32.1 (2005-06 to 2009-10) and 6.3 ongoing 6.3 6.0

ER 11:

Implementation of the Aquatic Animal Health Import Program for 405 regulated species; this included documentation development (policies and procedures), the creation of commodity-specific conditions for the issuance of permits, inspection and sampling plans for high-risk commodities, and quarantine procedure and inspection implementation. Implementation of the Aquatic Animal Health Compartmentalization Program; this program will support trade (import and export) in aquatic animals and replace Fisheries and Oceans Canada's Fish Health Protection Regulations, which was amended to accommodate amendments to the Health of Animals Regulations on December 10, 2011.

Discussions with stakeholders and right holders regarding Surveillance Delivery, Emergency Response, domestic movement permission, and Delineation of Domestic Disease Control zones.

Conduct of aquatic animal health risk assessments and country-wide evaluations related to: import/ export, aquatic animal health diseases, scientific advice, and the evaluation of the disease status of countries, zones and regions.

Development of survey plans to support domestic control and trade.

Development and implementation of plans to host foreign country audits (European Union (EU) completed in 2012 and Chile anticipated in 2013).

NAAHP integration into priority Information Management and Information Technology (IMIT) systems and linkage to Fisheries and Oceans Canada's Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) interfaces.

Changes to CFIA IMIT systems to accommodate the NAAHP, including updates to Import Permit System (IPS) / Automated Import Requirement System (AIRS) / Enterprise Reporting System (COGNOS) implementation.

Outcome 1: Certification of aquatic animal commodities exported from Canada to meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

Output/Activities: Negotiation of export certificates based on importing country requirements; documentation development for the delivery of each certificate; development of training modules to support delivery of export inspection and certification regarding aquatic animals; training of Animal Health Operations staff to deliver the program; analysis of industry trends and modifications to the system to meet new trade requirements and evolving country health statuses; publication of domestic disease status at the national, regional, and compartmental levels; performance of sampling required for export delivery; negotiations for continued and new market access.

Indicator: Development of negotiated certificates and dossiers to support market access; development of technical arrangements to support market access. Number of new certificates negotiated.

Target: Historical trends of certificates issued, new certificates negotiated and trade market access issues. An adequate number of staff is trained to perform inspections and issue certificate.

Outcome 2: Protection of the National Aquatic Animal Health Resources.

Output/Activities: Development of a zonation and national movement permission program and a licensing program, both of which are phased in. Training will be required for aquatic animal inspection and sample submissions. Development of survey plans to support domestic control and trade as required.

Indicator: Development of the zonation and national movement permission program and a licensing program, both of which will be phased in. Development of survey plans to support domestic control and international trade as required. Successful use of survey information and data for negotiations and technical arrangements.

Target: Historical trends of trade market access issues.

Outcome 3: Implementation of the Import and Compartmentalization Programs.

Output/Activities: Changes to CFIA IMIT systems to accommodate the NAAHP, including updates to Import Permit System (IPS) / Automated Import Requirement System (AIRS) / Enterprise Reporting System (COGNOS) implementation. Implement import controls (permits and zoosanitary certificates) for aquatic animals regulated under the Health of Animals Regulations, which came into effect December 10, 2011. Develop import conditions for all 405 species and related commodities. Negotiate export/zoosanitary certification by foreign countries to meet Canada's new import requirements. Analyze import data from Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) to evaluate resources for program implementation, and readjust design as required. Conduct import data analysis to reveal trends in terms of the delivery of import permits. Implement the Aquatic Animal Health Compartmentalization Program to support trade (import and export) in aquatic animals.

Indicator: Number of technical arrangements and export certificates negotiated with trade partners that meet Canada's new import requirements. Number of import permits issued, as compared to the number of regulated animal imports (total transactions) to determine potential compliance issues for 2012-2013. Program redesign and regulatory amendments as necessary to support program delivery with NAAHP-allocated resources.

Target: Development of technical arrangements and negotiated export certificates for 80% of regulated aquatic animal and commodity imports.

RA 11:

Results Achieved for Outcome 1: The number of export certificates issued (for a certain commodity to a certain country) increased from 274 in 2011-12 to 538 in 2012-13. Among these, the number of new negotiated certificates rose from 24 in 2011 to 43 in 2012 to 53 in 2013. Some trade market access issues were experienced with one country, Vietnam; these were due to Vietnamese legislative controls rather than CFIA program deficiencies.

Results Achieved for Outcome 2: Market access improved as a result of the CFIA program implementation, as indicated by an increase in total numbers of export certificates issued and by issues associated with limited market access.

Results Achieved for Outcome 3: As of March 2013, when the import program was finalized, Canada had negotiated export market access for 85% of the imported commodities regulated by the NAAHP. Technical arrangements with a few countries (India, Vietnam, the EU, Russia, Japan and China) are still to be made.

Federal partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing activities / programs Total allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ Millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results (ER) Contributing activity / program results (RA)
Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) Aquatic Animal Health National Aquatics Animal Health Programs 26.9 (2005-06 to 2009-10) and 4.0 ongoing 4.0 3.7Footnote 3 ER 12 RA 12
Total 26.9 (2005-06 to 2009-10) and 4.0 ongoing 4.0 3.7

ER 12:

DFO's NAAHP laboratories use standards and tracking systems that meet international requirements, such as the International Standards Organization (ISO) 17025 Standard for Laboratory Accreditation, and World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) standards for diagnostic testing.

Outcome 1: Diagnostic tests validated to World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Requirements

Output/Activities: Ongoing development and validation of diagnostic tests required to support NAAHP program activities. Priority disease list established collaboratively with the CFIA.

Indicator: Validated test methods incorporated into National Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory System diagnostic repertoire for the priority disease.

Target: End of Fiscal Year 2012-13.

Therefore, sometimes validated tests require more work. The above numbers do not reflect those tests for which additional validation, beyond the initial work is needed.

Outcome 2: Operational LIMS

Output/Activities: Implementation and development of the LIMS to facilitate tracking and management of sample testing and reporting.

Indicator: LIMS is fully operational.

Target: April 2012

Outcome 3: DFO NAAHP Laboratories are accredited to ISO 17025 standards

Output/Activities: Accredited laboratories can demonstrate compliance to internationally accepted standards. Laboratories are implementing controls and will be assessed individually as they are ready.

Indicator: One of three diagnostic laboratories has received ISO accreditation.

Target: End of Fiscal Year 2012-13.

Outcome 4: Ensure adequate capacity for diagnostic testing.

Output/Activities: In collaboration with the CFIA, establish a network of third-party testing laboratories to support NAAHP program activities.

Indicator: Network of approved provincial, territorial, and private laboratories providing specific diagnostic services.

Target: End of Fiscal Year 2012-13.

RA 12:

Results Achieved for Outcome 1: At the beginning of fiscal year 2012-13 there were 32 diseases prioritized for the NAAHP. The development and validation of diagnostic tests for these diseases have been ongoing and by the end of this fiscal year, 30 of these diseases were incorporated into the National Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory system.

It should be noted that additional validation is needed when improvements are made to the method, when new information is made available, or when the target species or tissues are changed.

Results Achieved for Outcome 2: The LIMS was fully operational by April 1, 2012, and all samples received for NAAHP were input into the system by the end of the fiscal year.

Results Achieved for Outcome 3: A multi-year plan was developed to have the three diagnostic laboratories work towards ISO accreditation in a staged approach. DFO was on-target to achieve the deliverables in the plan, with one laboratory applying for ISO accreditation by the end of fiscal year 2012-13.

Results Achieved for Outcome 4: The CFIA is the regulatory lead to achieve the deliverable for this activity. Early in fiscal year 2013-14 , the CFIA provided DFO with a draft policy for the approval of external laboratories for comment and consideration. DFO is continuing discussions with the CFIA on this draft policy.

Total Allocation for All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
($ Millions)
Total Actual Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
($ Millions)
59.0 (2005-06 to 2009-10) and 10.3 ongoing10.39.7

Comments on variances (if applicable):

Results achieved by non-Federal Partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact Information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Debbie Barr
A/Director
Animal Health, Welfare & Biosecurity Division
613-773-7028

Dr. Francine Lord
Director
Animal Import/Export Division
613-773-7451

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Stephen J. Stephen
Director
Biotechnology and Aquatic Animal Health Science
613-990-0292

Table C: Listeria (Ready-to-Eat Meat)

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Renewal of Government Response and Action Plan to the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak

Name of Lead Department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); Health Canada (HC); and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC).

Lead Departments Program Activity: Food Safety Program

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2012-13

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2015-16 (CFIA); 2016-17 and ongoing (HC and PHAC).

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $112.9M (2012 17) and $10.5M ongoing (HC and PHAC).

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The objective of this horizontal initiative is to continue to enhance the Government of Canada's ability to prevent, detect and respond to outbreaks of foodborne illnesses, pursuant to recommendations stemming from reviews of the 2008 listeriosis outbreak.

The three federal organizations, the CFIA, HC, and PHAC, received a total spending authority of $112.9 million for this initiative (CFIA: $60.4 million over four years, PHAC: $33 million over five years, and HC: $19.5 million over five years). PHAC and HC also received a total spending authority of $10.5 million ongoing ($6.6 million and $3.9 million respectively). Each federal organization identified the resource requirements, strategic outcomes, objectives, and implementation plan for each program area.

Shared Outcome(s):

Address Immediate Food Safety Risks by maintaining:

  • hired ready-to-eat meat inspection staff;
  • scientific and technical training programs for inspection staff;
  • technical support to continue enhanced connectivity for inspectors;
  • enhanced food safety program risk management; and
  • capacity for the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments.

Enhanced Surveillance and Early Detection by maintaining:

  • capacity to improve and validate test detection methods for Listeria;
  • scientific capacity to continue additional Listeria testing;
  • ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards;
  • national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the C-EnterNet Program; and
  • strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: continued implementation of whole genome sequencing; continued expansion of PulseNet Canada.

Improved Government Response to Foodborne Illness Outbreaks in Canada by maintaining:

  • support to the Food Safety Portal;
  • risk communication and social marketing strategies;
  • human illness outbreak response capacity; and
  • national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity.

Governance Structure(s): The CFIA, HC and the Public Health Agency of Canada currently work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates. Pursuant to existing trilateral memoranda of understanding, the three partners meet regularly to discuss food safety issues of mutual concern. This governance framework includes an ADM-level committee and is supported by a Director General (DG) level committee which meets regularly to discuss and plan approaches for addressing joint food safety issues. The ADM committee has been receiving support and direction from the Special Committee of Deputy Heads, comprised of AAFC, CFIA, Public Health Agency of Canada, and HC deputy heads. The work of the committees is also informed by the F/P/T Ministers of Health and Agriculture and their associated discussions on food safety.

Performance Highlights: The CFIA, HC and the Public Health Agency of Canada have acted on all of the recommendations put forward by the Independent Investigator. Organizations have achieved considerable success in carrying out the Government's 2009 action plan in response to the 2008 listeriosis outbreak. Sustained effort on critical activities regarding human resources, scientific capacity and communications will maintain this strengthened food safety system.

Federal Partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing Activities / Programs Total Allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results (ER) Contributing Activities / Programs Results (RA)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Food Safety and Nutrition / Internal Services Maintaining hired inspection staff in ready-to-eat meat establishments 29.2 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 7.3 6.1 ER 13 RA 13
Maintaining scientific and technical training programs 14.4 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 3.6 2.6 ER 14 RA 14
Maintaining enhanced connectivity for inspectors 2.4 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 0.6 0.2 ER 15 RA 15
Maintaining enhanced food safety program risk management 6.4 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 1.6 1.8 ER 16 RA 16
Maintaining capacity to improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazard 2.0 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 0.5 0.5 ER 17 RA 17
Maintaining scientific capacity to continue Listeria testing 5.2 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 1.3 1.3 ER 18 RA 18
Maintaining support to the Government of Canada Food Safety Portal 0.8 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 0.2 0.1 ER 19 RA 19
Total 60.4 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 15.1 12.6

ER 13: Maintaining Hired Inspection Staff in Ready-to-Eat Meat Establishments

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks in federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments.

Output/Activities: Maintain additional inspection capacity in order to continue delivering enhanced verification and inspection activities resulting from the mandatory Listeria testing and reporting requirements for federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments.

Targets and Tracking: Number of inspectors maintained, percentage of delivered tasks related to Listeria controls and sampling that were found to be acceptable.

RA 13: Maintaining Hired Inspection Staff in Ready-to-Eat Meat Establishments

In 2012-13, the CFIA was successful in maintaining the expanded workforce complement of 70 full time equivalents (FTEs). These additional FTEs continued to deliver enhanced verification and inspection activities resulting from mandatory Listeria testing and reporting requirements in federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments. Six different tasks were delivered with respect to Listeria controls and sampling. These six tasks were delivered 6320 times in 2012-2013 and 98.99% were found to be acceptable, demonstrating that food safety risks related to Listeria controls were and continue to be effectively managed in federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments.

ER 14: Maintaining Scientific and Technical Training Programs

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks in federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments.

Output/Activities: Continue to develop and deliver enhanced scientific and technical training programs to ensure that new and existing ready-to-eat meat products inspection staff are aware of the latest trends in science and technology related to meat processing and of updated policies.

Targets and Tracking: Number of training sessions delivered, number of new inspectors trained, number of existing inspectors trained, number of person days for this training.

RA 14: Maintaining Scientific and Technical Training Programs

In 2012-13, the CFIA delivered 18 sessions of enhanced scientific and technical training programs to CFIA meat processing inspectors. The total number of person days was 2770 for this training (310 training days were delivered to new meat processing inspectors, and 2460 training days were delivered to current meat processing inspectors).

The CFIA successfully completed the development of the eLearning course entitled "Introduction to Food Safety Enhancement Program." As well, the CFIA has advanced work to develop additional training materials to support Health Canada's recently revised Listeria and E. coli policies. Courses entitled "Listeria Policy Update" and "E. coli O157:H7 Policy and Sampling Plan" are nearly finalized. The CFIA also advanced work to integrate two courses (Meat Processing and Inspection Procedures/Controls in Meat Processing) to reduce duplication of effort and gain efficiencies in training. However, the cost of the delivery of training has increased because of higher travel and accommodation costs for inspectors. In some geographical areas, CFIA training rooms are no longer available due to amalgamation of office space.

ER 15: Maintaining Enhanced Connectivity for Inspectors

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks.

Output/Activities: Continue to provide frontline inspection staff with the ability to securely access the CFIA's network and applications through high speed internet connectivity.

Targets and Tracking: Number of inspectors with high-speed access, average amount of data used per aircard.

RA 15: Maintaining Enhanced Connectivity for Inspectors

The increased connectivity of inspectors is being sustained through ongoing support and maintenance of the aircards. The number of inspectors with high speed aircard access is now 477, with an average use of 17 megabits per week.

ER 16: Maintaining Enhanced Food Safety Program Risk Management

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks through the continued review of food safety programs and activities.

Output/Activities: Continue to modernize food safety standards, programs, policies and operational procedures to make them consistent and reflect current trends (e.g. rapid technological and scientific advancements in food production).

Targets and Tracking: List of reviews/updates/projects completed (e.g. risk-based sampling plans).

RA 16: Maintaining Enhanced Food Safety Program Risk Management

The CFIA has made adjustments as appropriate to reflect new and emerging priorities throughout the year. The CFIA has successfully reviewed, validated, and/or updated current standards/programs/policies/procedures in a number of areas within its food safety and inspection programs. As a result, the following chapters and annexes in the Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures were revised and updated:

  • Chapter 2: Guidelines for the Applicant/Operator in the Registration of an Establishment and Licensing of an Operator;
  • Chapter 3: Pre-requisite Programs;
  • Chapter 4, Annex C: Use of Phosphate Salts and Nitrites in the Preparation of Meat Products;
  • Chapter 4, Annex G: List of Accepted Starter Cultures;
  • Chapter 4, Annex 0: Policy on the Control of E. coli 0157 H7/NM Contamination in Raw Beef Products; and
  • Chapter 10, Annex A: Conditions for Importation of Meat Products.

ER 17: Maintaining Capacity to Improve Test Detection Methods for Listeria and other Foodborne Hazards

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks through improved detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards.

Output/Activities: Continue to provide greater availability and choice of testing methods for the detection of Listeria by industry and the CFIA, and faster turnaround time for reporting results.

Targets and Tracking: Completion of the validation protocol, completion of the validation project, technical review of validation project data, decisions made on new methods.

RA 17: Maintaining Capacity to Improve Test Detection Methods for Listeria and other Foodborne Hazards

The CFIA is continually improving its program design and delivery in order to minimize and manage risks to food safety. In April 2011, the CFIA implemented a revised policy for the control of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) in ready-to-eat (RTE) products. The RTE products and food-contact surfaces (FCS) are sampled under random sampling plans and qualitative risk-based sampling plans. Along with this, the design of a more data driven methodology (quantitative risk-based sampling) was initiated.

In 2013, the CFIA proposed a quantitative risk-based sampling approach for testing Lm in RTE meat products. This risk-based sampling approach is the result of a collaborative effort among scientists and food safety experts within the CFIA. This is a scientific risk-based approach which aims to allocate the annual number of targeted samples between and within establishments producing RTE food products. CFIA trend experts developed this risk-based algorithm which incorporates the interventions applied to minimize the risk of Lm and the factors which may have influence on the presence of Lm in certain products.

ER 18: Maintaining Scientific Capacity to Continue Additional Listeria Testing

Outcome: Early detection and faster response to potential foodborne illness outbreaks through enhanced laboratory testing capacity, contributing to improved decision-making.

Output/Activities: Continue early warning of potential contamination in the food processing environment.

Targets and Tracking: Number of product and environmental samples submitted to labs for Listeria versus 2008 baseline, reports produced on data trends at a defined frequency, number of experts dedicated to trend analysis.

RA 18: Maintaining Scientific Capacity to Continue Additional Listeria Testing

The CFIA continues to improve and validate detection methods for Listeria in meat products and in the meat processing environment to reduce the time required to test samples and enable more rapid response during food safety investigations. As planned for 2012-13, two analysts were maintained to continue their work improving test detection methods.

A new method for the rapid confirmation of Listeria from meat and environmental samples (validated in 2011/12) underwent a technical review in 2012-13. The conclusion of the review will be available early 2013-14, after which time the method will be submitted to the joint Health Canada / CFIA Microbiology Methods Committee to be considered for publication in the Health Canada Compendium of Analytical Methods.

Furthermore, a validation study was designed and implemented in 2012-13 to compare four internationally recognized reference methods to the Canadian reference method for Listeria in meat and meat processing environment samples. If the internationally recognized methods are found to be equivalent to Canada's reference method, this validation study will allow the CFIA to accept many more rapid Listeria methods for regulatory testing. The method protocol was designed, and multiple sample sets were analyzed throughout the fiscal year. The validation studies are ongoing in 2013-14.

ER 19: Maintaining Support to the Government of Canada Food Safety Portal

Outcome: Canadians are aware of food safety risks, and they contribute to the management thereof by sourcing their food safety information via several on-line Government of Canada resources, such as Healthy Canadians and the Food Safety portals.

Output/Activities: Continue to improve public access to integrated Government of Canada food safety information.

Targets and Tracking: Number of advertisements, number of enhancements, increase in number of webpage views.

RA 19: Maintaining Support to the Government of Canada Food Safety Portal

In 2012-13, the CFIA enhanced its web communications activities to expand the reach of food safety information. The CFIA implemented the Treasury Board Web Experience Toolkit web templates and made all food recalls fully searchable, eliminating the previous database that had limited search capacity. The CFIA also implemented real-time simultaneous publishing of recalls to the recalls and advisory section of the Healthy Canadians site. The CFIA continued to alert the public and media about recalls through public warnings for high-risk health hazard alerts and all classes of food allergy recalls through email and Twitter. The CFIA has 16,000 users following its food Twitter accounts and 52,000 email subscribers. There were 8.1 million visits to www.inspection.gc.ca in 2012-13. In addition, the CFIA continues to maintain foodsafety.gc.ca where visits and page views have remained constant.

Federal Partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing Activities / Programs Total Allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results (ER) Contributing Activities / Programs Results (RA)
Health Canada (HC) Food Safety and Nutrition Maintaining ability to respond within established service standards to the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments and food safety investigations 13.5 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 2.7 ongoing 2.7 1.6 ER 20 RA 20
Maintaining ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards 3.0 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.6 ongoing 0.6 1.2 ER 21 RA 21
Maintaining a Social Marketing Strategy 3.0 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.6 ongoing 0.6 0.7 ER 22 RA 22
Total 19.5 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 3.9 ongoing 3.9 3.5

ER 20: Maintaining ability to respond within established service standards to the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments and food safety investigations

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks.

Output/Activities: Provide risk assessments, based on the best available science and methods, within established service standards and strengthen the prevention of and response to food safety incidents.

Targets and Tracking:

  • Number of staffing actions (hired/allocated) and level of funding allocated over time, specifically targeting the enhancement of our capacity for health risk assessments (HRAs). Hire four new staff members in 2013-14.
  • Maintenance of FTEs to support HRA activities.
  • Number of HRAs completed within service standards.
  • Number of quality management practices implemented, including SOPs, templates, and inter-departmental HC-CFIA protocols.
  • National and international collaborations conducted related to risk modelling method development, refinement, testing, validation, and implementation.

RA 20: Maintaining ability to respond within established service standards to the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments and food safety investigations

  • Three FTEs hired, three staffing actions initiated;
  • 11 FTEs dedicated to Health Risk Assessment activities;
  • 279 Health Risk Assessments (100%) at the CFIA's request completed within the service standard;
  • Developed two Standard Operating Procedures (CFIA/HC and another for internal use);
  • Developed food hazard combination and weight of evidence templates;
  • Developed and implemented a Health Risk Assessment process flow diagram for outbreak investigations;
  • Developed and implemented a training program and tool box for after-hours Health Risk Assessments;
  • Established a F/P/T Food Safety Health Risk Assessment Consortium;
  • Collaborated with PHAC and other stakeholders in the risk assessment of mechanically tenderized beef;
  • Collaborated with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on a quantitative assessment of the risk of listeriosis from soft-ripened cheese consumption in the United States and Canada and the Norovirus in Shellfish near waste water treatment plants.

ER 21: Maintaining ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards

Outcome: Improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards.

Output/Activities: Have a suite of rapid validated tools available to industry and government partners to allow action to be taken at the earliest opportunity, thereby reducing exposure of Canadians to foodborne hazards.

Targets and Tracking:

  • Risk assessment modelling methods and IT tools that are current, accepted, validated, and meet international standards.
  • Number of improved test detection methods and other laboratory diagnostic tools developed for faster detection of Listeria and other hazards in foods.
  • Establishment of the Chemical Methods Committee and Compendium of Methods for the Chemical Analysis of Foods.
  • Number of validated methods published in Compendium of Analytical Methods or the Compendium of Methods for the Chemical Analysis of Food.
  • Number of FTEs hired/allocated to developing/improving microbiological and chemical methods.
  • Establishment of service standards and protocols for publishing microbiological or chemical methods according to the MMC and RCMC.
  • Establishment and description of criteria and processes to identify priority methods for validation by HC and CFIA according to the MMC and RCMC.
  • Number of methods prioritized for fast tracking and validation by MMC and RCMC.
  • Number of completed pilots and validated methodologies/prototypes for the detection of Listeria and other hazards in foods.

RA 21: Maintaining ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards

  • 6 FTEs allocated to method development;
  • Developed predictive modelling expertise that supported risk assessments;
  • Two risk assessments including methods and modelling were completed during this fiscal year (the comparison of public health risks of Listeriosis from the consumption of milk and soft-ripened cheese products, and the mathematical approach to determine whether a ready-to-eat food supports the growth of Listeria monocytogenes);
  • Developed an enhanced three-day culture method for the detection and isolation of Listeria from foods (including ready-to-eat meat and poultry, dairy, fruits and vegetables, fish, and seafood);
  • Two laboratory diagnostic tools developed for faster detection of Listeria and other hazards in foods;
  • Four new food microbiology methods were published, and nine were revised;
  • All Food Official methods are under systematic review to identify whether the methods are still relevant, whether they are in need of revision, whether they need to be replaced with other validated methods, whether (and which) alternatives are available, whether they may be removed from the regulations, and how these methods compare with other jurisdictions such as Codex and jurisdictions in the U.S. and the European Union (about 50% already assessed);
  • The Compendium of Allergen Methods is being revised to allow for the introduction of fully validated allergen methods from outside method developers to augment those posted under the joint Health Canada - CFIA allergen method program;
  • A process for the submitting methods to Health Canada for review against internationally recognised validation criteria has been drafted and is under review;
  • A prioritization exercise of the method submission was conducted by the Microbiological Methods Committee;
  • Two methods were fast tracked for review by HC, based on prioritisation of their food safety impacts.

ER 22: Maintaining a Social Marketing Strategy

Outcome: Canadians are aware of and contribute to the management of food safety risks.

Output/Activities: Continue to increase awareness and knowledge proactively of the health risks associated with unsafe food handling practices and foodborne illness.

Targets and Tracking:

  • Number of calls to 1-800 number.
  • Number of website page views per month/year for the HC food safety section.
  • Tracking of earned media and stakeholder media coverage - Number of articles and news reports on safe food handling.
  • Number of web links from outside organizations.
  • Feedback from stakeholders and Canadians.
  • Number and reach of food safety risk communication products developed, distributed and targeted at raising awareness of food safety by type of target population (e.g. vulnerable populations).

RA 22: Maintaining a Social Marketing Strategy

A Safe Food Handling marketing campaign was developed to inform pregnant women, people with a weakened immune system, adults over 60, and children ages 5 and under about safe food handling. The campaign advised on the increased risk of health complications due to foodborne illness and how to take direct action to reduce risk. Campaign deliverables such as private sector partnerships, advertising, social media, collateral materials, and pro-active media relations resulted in the distribution of the Safe Food Handling for Pregnant Women guides in all 72 Thyme Maternity locations; over 489,000 page views of food safety content on Healthy Canadians and Health Canada websites; and over 100 news items reported on safe food handling. In March 2012, Budget 2012 announced that Health Canada would receive $3.9M a year in ongoing funding for Listeria prevention efforts, including $600,000 a year for social marketing to reach vulnerable populations.

Outcome: Canadians are aware of and contribute to the management of food safety risks.

Output/Activities: Continue to increase awareness and knowledge, proactively, of the health risks associated with unsafe food handling practices and foodborne illnesses.

Targets and Tracking:

  • Strategic Partnership with Thyme Maternity. The 2012-2013 partnership with Thyme Maternity marked the third year that Health Canada worked with the clothing store to increase the reach of its Safe Food Handling information for pregnant women. Over 70,000 Safe Food Handling for Pregnant Women guides were distributed in all 72 Thyme Maternity stores at the point-of-sale cash counters.
  • Number of website page views per year for the Healthy Canadians and Health Canada food safety sections.
    • All Pages
      • English and French: 489,456
    • Food safety for vulnerable populations (landing page)
      • English: 47,450
      • French: 12,566
    • Food safety for Pregnant Women
      • English: 52,348
      • French: 20,869
  • Tracking of earned media and stakeholder media coverage - Number of articles and news reports on safe food handling.
    • Printed News Releases (distributed by News Canada) published in 148 Canadian media outlets with a 16.6M audience reach.
    • Video News Releases (distributed by News Canada) posted on 26 websites with a 12.8M audience reach and broadcasted on 16 television channels with a 608,000 audience reach.
  • Number of web links from outside organizations.
    • Over 15 links from outside organisations.
  • Feedback from stakeholders and Canadians.
    • Public Opinion Research (POR) was conducted with targeted audiences in 2009 [Survey of Canadians' Knowledge and Behaviour Related to Food Safety: Final Report (HC POR 070-09)]
      Key findings include:
      • Pregnant women
        • "I don't think I'm at greater risk for complications from food-borne illness" (73%)
        • "I don't always use a food thermometer" (91%)
        • "I don't know the fridge's minimum internal temperature" (90%)
      • Older adults 60+
        • "I don't think I'm at greater risk for complications from food-borne illness" (89%)
        • "I don't always use a food thermometer" (88%)
        • "I don't know the fridge's minimum internal temperature" (81%)
        • "I always rinse poultry before cooking it" (76%)
      • People with a weakened immune system
        • "I don't think I'm at greater risk for complications from food-borne illness" (72%)
        • "I don't always use a food thermometer" (83%)
        • "I don't know the fridge's minimum internal temperature" (80%)
        • "I always rinse poultry before cooking it" (66%)
      • Parents and guardians of children ages 5 and under
        • "I don't think young children are at greater risk for complications from food-borne illness" (72%)
        • "I don't always use a food thermometer" (83%)
        • "I don't know the fridge's minimum internal temperature" (80%)
  • Number and reach of food safety products developed, distributed and targeted at raising awareness of food safety by type of target population (e.g. vulnerable populations).
    • Pregnant women
      • Safe Food Handling Guide order fulfillment through Health Canada Distribution Centre
        • Pregnant women: 35,931 requested and shipped
    • Children ages 5 and under
      • Safe Food Handling Guide order fulfillment through Health Canada Distribution Centre
        • Children ages 5 and under: 15,947 copies requested
      • Distribution of Safe Food Handling Guide for parents and guardians of children ages 5 and under
        • 175,378 guides were distributed.
    • Adults 60+
      • Safe Food Handling Guide order fulfillment through Health Canada Distribution Centre
        • Adults 60+ : 44,991 copies requested
    • People with a Weakened Immune System
      • Safe Food Handling Guide order fulfillment through Health Canada Distribution Centre
        • People with Weakened Immune Systems: 31,587 copies requested
  • Number of calls to 1-800 number
    • Safe Food Handling for Adults 60+ (Period: June 27-July 13, 2013)
      • 291 calls received resulting in a shipment of 813 copies of the guide.
    • Safe Food Handling for Children Ages 5 & Under (Period: March 11 to April 12, 2013)
      • 151 calls received resulting in a shipment of 1392 copies of the guide
Federal Partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing Activities / Programs Total Allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results (ER) Contributing Activities / Programs Results (RA)
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; Health Security; Public Health Infrastructure Maintain national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the C-EnterNet program 7.9 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 1.6 ongoing 1.6 1.7 ER 23 RA 23
Maintain strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued implementation of whole genome sequencing 4.5 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.9 ongoing 0.9 0.5 ER 24 RA 24
Maintain strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued expansion of PulseNet Canada 1.9 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.4 ongoing 0.4 0.2 ER 25 RA 25
Maintain human illness outbreak response capacity 14.5 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 2.9 ongoing 2.9 1.2 ER 26 RA 26
Maintain national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity 4.2 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.8 ongoing 0.8 0.4 ER 27 RA 27
Total 33.0 (2012-13 to 2015-16) and 6.6 ongoing 6.6 4.0

ER 23: Maintaining national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the C-EnterNet program

Outcome: Enhanced foodborne disease surveillance.

Output/Activities: Improved surveillance tools through the expansion of C-EnterNet to include at least three functional sentinel sites in Canada.

Targets and Tracking: Sampling conducted for at least two commodities at Sentinel Site #2; active surveillance for the on-farm and surface water components implemented at Sentinel Site #2.

RA 23: Maintaining national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the C-EnterNet program

Budget 2012 identified funding to expand C-EnterNet to three sites to support better understanding of the links between sources and enteric illnesses. C-EnterNet is a proactive foodborne illness surveillance program that tracks food- and water-borne gastrointestinal illnesses and their likely sources (e.g., food, water, and livestock) to identify risks, to prevent diseases from occurring, and to lessen the impact of these illnesses on Canadians. In 2012-13, PHAC completed its implementation of a full site in British Columbia with the addition of the water and on-farm components, including the establishment of agreements to conduct sampling of two on-farm commodities. In 2012-13, PHAC produced the C-EnterNet 2011 annual short report, as well as 12 other C-EnterNet publications. PHAC initiated the expansion of a third sentinel site, identification and implementation of which will occur in 2013-14.

ER 24: Maintaining strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued implementation of whole genome sequencing

Outcome: Canada's ability to rapidly detect and trace the origins of food hazards is enhanced.

Output/Activities: Modern genomic technologies will continue to be implemented to provide substantially more detailed information and evidence on foodborne pathogens during outbreak investigations.

Targets and Tracking: Number of pathogen genomes sequenced; collaborative genomic investigations launched with F/P/T partners.

RA 24: Maintaining strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued implementation of whole genome sequencing

During fiscal year 2012-2013, 98 Listeria genomes were sequenced (total to date is 137), primarily representing historical outbreak isolates. Sequencing a wide variety of clinical, environmental, and food isolates is necessary for developing whole genome sequencing as a routine tool for surveillance and outbreak response in real time. Additionally, whole genome sequencing was performed on 98 isolates of E. coli O157:H7 (total to date is 214), including during three outbreaks associated with beef products, frozen burgers, and fast food restaurants in fiscal year 2012-2013.

Sequencing is performed in collaboration with F/P/T partners submitting their isolates to PHAC's National Microbiology Laboratory. In addition to the Listeria and E. coli O157:H7 historical and real-time outbreak sequencing, four additional collaborative genomic investigations were launched in fiscal year 2012-2013. Pathogens covered by these investigations included E. coli O157:H7 necrotizing fasciitis, Legionella, Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia, and a national project on Listeria genomics.

ER 25: Maintaining strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued expansion of PulseNet Canada

Outcome: Canada's ability to rapidly detect and trace the origins of food hazards is enhanced.

Output/Activities: The expansion of the PulseNet Canada laboratory network will increase outbreak detection capacity and information sharing amongst F/P/T partner laboratories.

Targets and Tracking: Number of PulseNet Canada partner laboratories participating in testing proficiency programs; number of technicians within PulseNet Canada partner laboratories that successfully completed testing proficiency programs.

RA 25: Maintaining strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued expansion of PulseNet Canada

There were 28 staff members from nine participating PulseNet laboratories certified by PulseNet Canada for Listeria this fiscal year, compared to nine staff members from four laboratories at the time of the 2008 listeriosis outbreak. To support this expansion, the PHAC's National Microbiology Laboratory has developed a multimedia training program.

ER 26: Maintaining human illness outbreak response capacity

Outcome: Enhanced effectiveness and efficiency of response activities, as well as improved coordination and capacity to respond to multi-jurisdictional foodborne illness outbreaks.

Output/Activities: The development and maintenance of tools for multi-jurisdictional outbreak response, as well as the maintenance of protocols to ensure F/P/T partners' awareness of processes, roles, and responsibilities.

Targets and Tracking: Percentage of relevant Health Portfolio staff participating in Food-borne Illness Emergency Response Plan (FIERP) training and exercises.

RA 26: Maintaining human illness outbreak response capacity

PHAC began development of a web-enabled outbreak communications platform, Outbreak Central, which consists of a series of tools that will facilitate the coordination and sharing of information amongst F/P/T food safety and public health partners during an outbreak investigation. This tool was used successfully in 2012-2013 by F/P/T partners during outbreak investigations. Further, PHAC has stabilized its epidemiological baseline capacity through the hiring of six new staff members for the purposes of outbreak detection and response. In the fall of 2012, a FIERP training session was held with all relevant PHAC staff, thus continuing to ensure public health readiness for emergency response.

ER 27: Maintaining national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity

Outcome: Improved coordination and capacity to control and mitigate an outbreak which poses a public health threat to Canadians.

Output/Activities: Efficient and effective federal surge capacity to support outbreak response and mitigate the public health impact of a foodborne illness outbreak.

Targets and Tracking: Develop a strategy to develop and maintain tools and resources for maintaining surge staff on an ongoing basis; implement two of seven components of the surge model, including deployment of staff; percentage of FTEs and/or budget allocated to:

  • develop and maintain competency-based training materials;
  • deliver training; and
  • initiate and maintain a list of surge staff.

RA 27: Maintaining national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity

The surge management database previously developed (Applied Epidemiology Resource Operations, or AERO) is undergoing testing for implementation by fall 2013. Further, PHAC is exploring mechanisms to better manage the availability of specific skills on an ongoing basis so that when surge mobilization is required, baseline data will already be available. The expected benefit is that by better managing our public health competencies as part of regular operations, the specific skills that may be required in a surge mobilization will be more easily identified and mobilized. Training of epidemiologists on foodborne outbreak response is being delivered, including participation in outbreak investigations. Other expected results for Year 1 were not achieved due to delayed staffing processes.

Total Allocation for All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
($ Millions)
Total Actual Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
($ Millions)
112.9 (2012-17) and 10.5 ongoing (HC and PHAC)25.620.1

Comments on variances:

CFIA: N/A

PHAC: Delays in the staffing process affected the Public Health Agency of Canada's ability to expend its full funding authority. The majority of the Agency's lapse is directly attributable to salaries (approximately $2M), with the remainder being operating costs related to planned work that could not be completed in the absence of staff.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact Information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Theresa Iuliano
Executive Director
Strategic Policy and International Affairs Directorate
613-773-5867

Health Canada
Diane Dowthwaite
Director General, Resource Management & Operations Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
Health Canada
613-957-6690

Public Health Agency of Canada
Dr. Mark Raizenne
Director General
Centre for Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch
613-948-6883

Table D: Invasive Alien Species

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Invasive Alien Species (IAS)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: Plant Resources Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2010-11

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $95.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $19.0M ongoing

Description of Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Invasive alien species (IAS) are species introduced through human action from outside their natural distribution (past or present), that threaten the environment, economy, or society - including human health. Annually, IAS results in billions of dollars in direct losses, control costs, increased production costs and lost market access. The annual impact of IAS is estimated to be as much as $20 billion to the forest sector, $7 billion for aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes, and $2.2 billion for invasive plants alone in the agricultural sector. IAS have gained international attention as globalization, climate change, and international trade increases have elevated IAS introduction risks.

In recognition of the fact that responding to IAS is a shared responsibility, An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada was adopted in 2004 by F/P/T resource ministers as a national coordinated approach toward prevention and management of IAS. The Strategy's objective is to initiate implementation of priority objectives (i.e. prevention, early detection and rapid response to new invaders, and management of established and spreading invaders), which will be met via work contributions in five thematic areas: Risk Analysis, Science and Technology, Legislation, Regulation and Policy, Engaging Canadians, and International Cooperation. Environment Canada is the lead department for invasive animal species; Fisheries and Oceans Canada leads the aquatic invasive species issues; the Canadian Food Inspection Agency leads in the field of invasive plants and other plant pests; and Natural Resources Canada leads in regard to forest pests.

Budget 2010 allocated $19 million per year to Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, National Resources Canada, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to continue the Government of Canada's implementation of the IAS Strategy as well as for the maintenance and enhancement of advances made in the previous five years in terms of invasive alien species activities. Ongoing implementation of the IAS Strategy is critical to continue the protection of Canada's ecosystems and resource-based economy.

Shared outcome(s): Continuing the implementation of the Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada is essential for the protection of Canada's aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; this includes the protection of native biological diversity as well as domestic plants and animals from the risks of invasive alien species. The key outcome of the Strategy is to make Canada a leader in the prevention and management of IAS in a manner that ensures environmental sustainability, economic competitiveness, and societal well-being.

Governance structure(s): The government-wide IAS Strategy involves Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Departments and agencies are committed to ongoing collaboration on IAS issues. At a federal-level, coordination continues to be discussed as necessary through the Directors' General Interdepartmental Committee on Invasive Alien Species. Inter-jurisdictionally, F/P/T cooperation for IAS issues continues under the auspices of the annual joint meeting of Resource Ministers' Councils for Wildlife, Forests, Fisheries and Aquaculture, and Endangered Species, as well as within associated meetings with Deputy Ministers and Assistant Deputy Ministers. The Minister of Agriculture is the lead federal minister responsible for responding to invasive alien plants and plant pests; efforts are on-going to seek the full engagement of F/P/T ministers of agriculture and facilitate their participation in addressing invasive alien species.

Performance Highlights: For 2013-14, the key horizontal plans are to continue to develop, advance and implement concrete and practical prevention, detection, response and management activities for the IAS Strategy and to continue to enhance coordination mechanisms across jurisdictions and issues.

Federal Partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing Activities / Programs Total Allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results (ER) Contributing Activities / Programs Results (RA)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Plant Resources Program / Internal Services Risk Analysis 15.5 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 3.1 ongoing 2.9 2.3 ER 28 RA 28
Science and Technology 33.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 6.6 ongoing 4.2 3.5 ER 29 RA 29
Legislation Regulation and Policy 6.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.2 ongoing 1.2 0.3 ER 30 RA 30
Engaging Canadians 3.5 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.7 ongoing 0.7 0.7 ER 31 RA 31
International Cooperation 2.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.4 ongoing 0.4 0.2 ER 32 RA 32
Total 60.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 12.0 ongoing 9.4 7.0

ER 28: Risk Analysis

The development and use of risk assessment tools and models to identify potential IAS and their associated pathways of introduction. These activities also include the design and implementation of appropriate programs to prevent, detect, and manage current and potential IAS risks and pathways.

Outcomes: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed in a risk-based manner.

Outputs/Activities: The CFIA will continue to identify highest-risk-potential IAS, their pathways, and appropriate means by which to mitigate identified risks by continuing to conduct pest and weed risk analyses, developing import controls and initial response to early detections. For example, pathways of focus for 2012-2013 include pet toys, grain, ethno-botanical (food and medicinal plants) and internet sales.

The Agency will also continue to facilitate risk identification and analysis information-sharing among federal and provincial partners to ensure efficient information generation and communication.

Indicator: To Be Developed (TBD)Footnote 4

Target: TBDFootnote 4

RA 28: Risk Analysis

The CFIA continued to identify highest risk potential invasive alien species, their pathways, and appropriate means by which to mitigate identified risks through pest and weed risk analyses, import control measures, and initial response to early detections (e.g., jointed goat grass in British Columbia).

The Agency continued to facilitate the sharing of information among federal departments to ensure information flows among departments (e.g., the CFIA and AAFC collaborate on research needs for invasive plants, the CFIA worked with Transport Canada to provide Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM), information to China's marine industry).

The CFIA completed 43 pest risk assessments (insects, fungi, nematodes, viruses) and related technical evaluations in 2012-13. Assessments were completed for forest pests, grain and field crop pests, pests threatening the horticulture sector, and newly proposed imports of commodities and new crops. The scientific advice provided was incorporated into the delivery, renewal, or development of plant health policies and programs as well as negotiations between Canada and its international trading partners.

Weed risk assessments were conducted for potential quarantine pest plants, to analyze their ability to establish, spread, and impact the economy, environment, and society. These risk assessments were conducted to ensure the ongoing protection of agriculture and ongoing market access to Canadian commodities. The CFIA completed 41 preliminary assessments of plant species for their potential to be quarantine pests, as well as three full weed risk assessments and three commodity risk assessments regarding the potential of containing seeds of quarantine pests.

The CFIA provides the secretariat role for the National Early Detection Rapid Response (EDRR) Forum. The purpose of the National EDRR Forum is to develop and implement an early detection rapid response model for invasive plants in Canada that can inform national, provincial and territorial strategies. Discussion during fiscal year 2012-13 focused on the registration process for using herbicides to control weeds in aquatic environments as well as provincial noxious weed acts and their role in EDRR.

The CFIA continued the development of the Risk-Based Decision Support Framework with Canadian Forest Service as well as consultation with several provincial partners.

Over 450 requests for information related to pest alerts from other sources, pest interceptions, detained shipments, or export certification were processed; this included information on the kudzu bug as a potential economic and nuisance pest for Canada for grains and field crops, cold treatment for Rhagoletis pomonella in cherries, and weed contaminants in fresh pineapples.

The Agency conducted environmental scanning using literature searches, web alerts, and other resources to identify issues of potential significance. The CFIA issued 68 plant pathology and 21 entomology science alerts and maintained the Science Scan Index. The Agency contributed 32 entomology or plant pathology articles for publication in Science Scan and reviewed 10 petitions for the release of biological control organisms. 300 applications to import 943 organisms were evaluated, including 144 entomology requests and 158 plant pathology requests. The CFIA also initiated development of standardized guidelines for the evaluation of living organisms other than plants.

ER 29: Science and Technology

Information gathering, the performance of verification activities and the development of scientific tools and expertise, and program delivery to support prevention, early detection, and rapid response to IAS.

Outcomes: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.

Outputs/Activities: The Agency will support IAS prevention, detection and response through continued efforts to develop scientific tools and expertise. Ongoing projects for 2012-2013 include: development of weed molecular identification methods and reference sequence databases; genetic barcoding of invasive plant-eating beetles for rapid pest identification; pest diagnostics; illustrated identification; Lucid Key; genetic barcode and transpacific capacity building for Emerald Ash Borer and its relatives; weed biology and seed identification features for foreign weedy species that are a risk to Canadian biosecurity.

The CFIA will also minimize the impact of IAS introductions by continued foresight projects and early detection efforts, such as import monitoring and inspection, and continuing to develop diagnostic methods and tools for the rapid and accurate identification of high-risk IAS. Specific activities include the development of invasive weed seed identification fact sheets; acquisition of reference material for IAS species that are or will be regulated in the near future; monitoring of seed and grain samples to determine the presence and frequency of alien weed species; and inspection and auditing of facilities importing grain and other plant products.

The CFIA will continue to work with North American and international scientific partners towards the improvement of our current IAS detection tools, and the offshore evaluation of new methods for organisms not present in North America.

Domestically, the CFIA will continue to work with provincial and municipal partners on collaborative IAS plant pest surveys. Domestic regulatory response plans, including surveys, inspection, and monitoring, will continue to be developed and delivered for specific pests such as jointed goatgrass.

Indicator: TBDFootnote 4

Target: TBDFootnote 4

RA 29: Science and Technology

The Agency continued to support invasive alien species prevention, detection, and response through continued foresight projects and early detection efforts, such as import monitoring, inspection, and the continued development of diagnostic methods and tools for rapid and accurate identification of high risk IAS.

The CFIA conducted 21 plant pest surveys in 2012. These included pests in horticulture and forestry, invasive plants, and a diverse array of taxa such as viruses, insects, fungi and nematodes. In many cases, the surveys targeted specific regulated organisms, but some surveys, such as the invasive forest insect survey and the invasive plants survey, focused on risk pathways in order to detect a range of pests. These surveys support regulatory decisions, import and export policies, and eradication and control programs, such as Asian long-horned beetle and woolly cup grass response. In many cases, the surveys are collaborative efforts, integrated with provincial and municipal partners.

The CFIA has engaged in various international collaborations (e.g., with China and the United States) as part of the CFIA's foresight efforts. These collaborations provide programs/risk assessment initiatives with information on potential invasive species and laboratories with reference specimens to assist future diagnosis. For example, in conjunction with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service and the Northeast Forestry University, the CFIA continues to implement a sentinel tree monitoring program in China to determine pests of maple, poplar and oak that could be potentially introduced into Canada. This project will provide reference specimens to CFIA plant laboratories which will enhance diagnostic capabilities and reduce reliance on international diagnosticians. It will also provide a clear list of target pests to conduct detection surveys for invasive alien species.

Twenty-nine internally funded plant research projects were conducted in 2012-13 to develop new detection and identification methods, tools, and high-throughput diagnostic protocols for plant pests and the differentiation of agricultural crop varieties.

The CFIA collaborated on scientific research projects related to IAS prevention and control. For example, the CFIA reviewed the outcomes of a project conducted to develop control options for erosion-prone sites infested with invasive plants, as well as a project on machinery cleaning to reduce the spread of invasive plants such as woolly cup grass.

Two interdepartmental plant research initiatives were conducted to enhance federal scientific capacity for the identification and management of regulated plant pests. These include a research component of the Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program (PPMMP) which supports ongoing Agency survey and monitoring activities as well as the development of virus elimination methods, strain characterization research, and enhanced detection tools. The other initiative is a collaborative research project with NRCan supporting the development of tools and strategies for the management of the Brown Spruce Longhorn Beetle (BSLB).

A sequencing method was established to collect DNA sequence information (DNA barcodes) on different DNA key regions that allow identification of weed plants at the family, genus and/or species level. The data generated by this initiative is used as a reference when potential invasive alien plant parts are submitted for identification and where morphological traits are insufficient due to the quality or quantity of material submitted. The method allows the CFIA to manage potential invasive alien plants rapidly and effectively. A microsatellite assay and a new Allele Specific Oligonucleotide (ASO) assay were developed to genotype Phytophthora ramorum.

Entomology Research continues to focus on enhancing the Agency's diagnostic capacity with respect to invasive and potentially invasive phytophagous beetle species. For example, taxonomic revisions and illustrations of 70 flee-beetle Chaetochema species have been compiled as a joint venture with USDA Entomology. A treatment of 270 Agrilus species native to East Asia, including Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) and its relatives, some 70 of them described as new to science, culminated a multi-year research project. The CFIA completed a paper indicating the distributional status of many exotic and native weevils and bark beetles in Canada. This information ensures rapid diagnostics and provides a better understanding of distribution in a given province.

The CFIA delivered over 5000 IAS-specific tasks related to import monitoring programs for risk evaluation and program verification, including sampling for weed seeds in grains, for horticultural pests, and for imported traditional food and medicine. Inspection and detection activities resulted in the expansion of known EAB infested areas and the detection of AGM egg masses on vessels entering Canada.

The CFIA posted 10 North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO) Phytosanitary Alerts on behalf of Canada, including an update on the Brown Spruce Longhorn Beetle in Nova Scotia, Canada, Emerald Ash Borer confirmed in Papineau, Quebec, new reports of Potato Wart in Prince Edward Island, Canada, and detection and eradication of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in Etobicoke, Ontario.

ER 30: Legislation, Regulation and Policy

Creating and updating legislation, regulations, policies and programs to support the effective implementation of CFIA commitment to the IAS Strategy.

Outcomes: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed, and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.

Outputs/Activities:

The Agency will continue legislative framework modernization by updating regulations, creating new regulations, and harmonizing approaches (where possible) in consultation with stakeholders.

To ensure consistency with international standards and legislated mandate, the CFIA will continue to develop new science-based programs and policies and update existing ones, while focusing on higher risk pathways of introduction. These will support the implementation and delivery of associated import and domestic measures to protect Canada's resource base from potential IAS.

The CFIA will continue to collaborate with federal and provincial partners to coordinate implementation of An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada, to maintain strong lines of communication, engage stakeholders, and contribute to interdepartmental governance as well as the strengthening of internal governance across branches.

Indicator: TBDFootnote 4

Target: TBDFootnote 4

RA 30: Legislation, Regulation and Policy

The CFIA continued modernizing the legislative framework and harmonizing approaches, where possible, in consultation with stakeholders. To ensure consistency with international standards and legislated mandate, the Agency will continue to develop new science-based program policies and update existing ones with a focus on higher risk pathways of introduction (e.g., risk-based end-use grain import framework, Asian Gypsy Moth certification program).

Development and implementation of the invasive plants program continued with the drafting and consultation on the Invasive Plants Directive which describes the Invasive Plants Policy and lists invasive plants species that are prohibited in Canada.

The CFIA continues to partner with provincial government representatives to develop response plans for invasive plants that are federally regulated, or under consideration for federal regulation, and present domestically. For example, the CFIA, the Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec (MAPAQ) and AAFC are working with the parties affected by woolly cup grass (WCG) infestations in Quebec to identify acceptable risk mitigation measures to reduce the spread and impact of WCG. The CFIA developed and is consulting on a Risk Management Document on options for the domestic phytosanitary requirements for WCG in Quebec. Response plans and/or directives are also currently under development for jointed goatgrass, Paterson's curse and kudzu.

The CFIA has engaged with AAFC on a technical working group to enhance collaboration on IAS issues with emphasis on policy and program development as well as research to support regulatory decisions (e.g. devitalization, seed bank dynamics and harvesting) in the plant agriculture sector. The Agency has taken steps to prevent the entry of invasive pests, specifically khapra beetle and weed seeds, in the grain pathway. Risk profiling for specific crops has been initiated for invasive weeds in the grain pathway in order to develop import measures that correspond with the associated risk of introducing these pests.

The Agency revised the Emerald Ash Borer Infested Places Order in April 2012 and the Asian Long-Horned Beetle Infested Place Order was officially repealed in February 2013.

Revisions were made to the AGM Directive based on stakeholder consultation, strengthening the vessel certification program and further mitigating the risk of introduction of AGM to Canada. The CFIA continues to work on a response plan for this pest in consultation with the provinces and industry.

The CFIA continued to focus programs on preventing the entry of plant pests prior to importation and by regulating the handling and use of the material after importation when appropriate. The CFIA put in place interim import requirements to prevent the entry of the Lobesia pest into Canada, and finalization of its import policy directive was completed.

ER 31: Engaging Canadians

Increase public awareness and access to IAS information, prevention, and control strategies, as well as activities that seek to maintain partnerships with governments and stakeholders.

Outcomes: Increased stakeholder and partner cooperation, and stakeholder and partner awareness of plants and plant pests, and compliance with policies and regulations.

Output/Activities: The Agency will continue to work collaboratively with stakeholders and government partners to raise awareness about IAS, their potential pathways, and associated policies and programs, thereby promoting early reporting of IAS, best management practices, and compliance with regulations to reduce risks to Canada's plant resources. The CFIA will continue to develop and participate in IAS training and outreach sessions for municipal and provincial staff as well as regional IAS organizations. The former will be supported by inspection tools and publications intended to broaden surveillance reach.

Broad stakeholder consultation will continue, and cooperation will be sought when new policies and programs-such as the invasive plants program-are implemented.

Indicator: TBDFootnote 4

Target: TBDFootnote 4

RA 31: Engaging Canadians

The Agency continued to work collaboratively with stakeholders and other government departments to raise awareness about IAS, their potential pathways, and associated policies and programs, thereby promoting early reporting of IAS, best management practices, and compliance with regulations for reducing the risk to Canada's plant resources.

The CFIA continued to promote education and awareness of invasive species by distributing material such as, the Invasive Plants Field Guide, 19 invasive plant fact sheets, a general invasive plants fact sheet, forest pest brochures, and Asian Gypsy Moth identification posters. This material was developed to increase the awareness of invasive plants among industry stakeholders, CFIA inspection staff, provincial representatives, and the public. It was also used to educate the public of the role they can play in helping to keep these invasive plants out of Canada by assisting the CFIA in determining the presence and distribution of invasive plants that are or will be regulated by the CFIA.

The CFIA participated in face-to-face meetings with producers, importers, processors, and provincial weed specialists to maintain and enhance support and develop innovations for implementation of the import program to prevent IAS (e.g., presentation on the Invasive Plant Program at the 2012 Canadian Weed Science Society meeting, presentation at the Canadian Federation of Agriculture annual meeting).

Further to the World Trade Organization notifications on Canada's intention to regulate the import of grains to protect against the introduction of pests and invasive weed seeds, the CFIA continued to consult with the Canadian grain industry on the proposed end-use risk-based grain import framework. Additionally, CFIA staff visited various facilities across Canada to consult with stakeholders and gain information on how grain is handled and processed to assist with implementing the framework in the least trade-restrictive manner.

As part of that process, the CFIA hosted a Grain Biosecurity Symposium in March 2013 in an effort to garner feedback from Canadian industry and federal and provincial partners on the proposed grain import framework. An industry advisory committee has been created to assist the CFIA in further designing effective and practical risk mitigation strategies.

The CFIA continued to collaborate with federal and provincial partners to coordinate the implementation of the Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada, to maintain strong lines of interdepartmental communication, and to engage stakeholders. Notable activities are listed below.

The Agency participated on the boards of several invasive plant/species councils and a forum to engage Canadians on invasive species. Federal, provincial and municipal government, industry, academia, environmental groups, and the general public participate in these councils. The CFIA actively participates on the Board of Directors and Operations and Advisory Committee of the Invasive Species Centre (ISC) in Sault Ste. Marie. The ISC provides a forum for sharing information and coordinating the research necessary for implementing the National IAS Strategy. The CFIA works with the Centre to identify suitable projects and student candidates for an internship program that helps the CFIA advance key IAS activities (e.g., domestic transportation of firewood). The Agency also participates in working groups with the provinces (i.e., Ontario Critical Plant Pest Management Committee) and in advisory committees (i.e., British Columbia Plant Protection Advisory Committee, or BCPPAC, and the Ontario Plant Pest Management Committee).

The CFIA drew on knowledge gathered by CFIA surveys, AAFC, the Canadian Museum of Nature, the NRCan Atlantic Forestry Centre, and the amateur insect collector communities of Quebec and New Brunswick to develop a paper on the distributional status of exotic and native weevils and bark beetles in Canada.

A Field Guide to the Jewel Beetles of Northeastern North America was completed and printed in 2012. This book provides diagnoses and colour illustrations to allow for the rapid identification of 160 species of Buprestids, including three invasive Agrilus species: A. planipennis (the Emerald Ash borer), A. sinuatus (the Sinuate Peartree Borer), and A. sulcicollis (the European Oak Borer).

The CFIA continues to work with stakeholders, including municipal, provincial, and federal partners and industry, on slowing the spread of destructive forestry pests, such as Emerald Ash Borer, Brown Spruce longhorn beetle and Asian long-horned beetle, and on developing domestic regulatory measures to mitigate the spread of WCG.

In addition, the Agency conducted residential communications to inform of the risks posed by Plum Pox Virus and the prohibition of movement and propagation of regulated articles.

The Agency continued broad stakeholder consultations and engagement on the risk associated with AGM through an AGM Summit in December 2012, which provided the opportunity for the CFIA to engage stakeholders in the review of proposed changes to the AGM program. In order to reduce the risk of AGM introduction to Canada, educational material was distributed to the shipping industry (i.e., British Columbia Chamber of Shipping) and other stakeholders domestically to improve compliance with the CFIA's AGM program.

ER 32: International Cooperation

Collaborate with key international phytosanitary organizations and trading partners to reduce risks of IAS introduction from imported products and to maintain access to foreign markets for Canadian exports through the development and implementation of harmonized standards and guidelines.

Outcomes: Increased international engagement, cooperation and awareness of invasive species and compliance with policies and regulations. A key objective of international cooperation is ensuring that international standards and processes reflect Canadian interests.

Output/Activities:

The CFIA will continue its active participation in the establishment of international standards, negotiations, and bilateral meetings with key trading partners to mitigate IAS introduction risks through trade pathways and to maintain access to foreign markets. The CFIA anticipates enhanced sharing of risk analysis information, notification, and discussion of new policies and programs as well as approach harmonization where appropriate and feasible.

Indicator: TBDFootnote 4

Target: TBDFootnote 4

RA 32: International Cooperation

A main goal of international cooperation is to ensure that international standards and processes reflect Canadian interests. The CFIA continued its active participation in international standard setting, harmonization of approaches, negotiations, and bilateral meetings with key trading partners such as the United States, Mexico, and China, to mitigate the risk of invasive alien species introduction through trade pathways while maintaining access to foreign markets.

Collaboration is fostered through participation in scientific activities and knowledge transfer to international phytosanitary organizations such as the North American Plant Protection Organization and the International Forestry Quarantine Research Group, which provides internationally coordinated research analyses to the International Plant Protection Convention's Technical Panel on Forest Quarantine and Commission of Phytosanitary Measures.

The CFIA is an active member of various QUADS working groups (i.e. international committees representing the United States, New Zealand, Australia, and Canada). Two of these working groups, AGM and Survey Lures and Protocols, are excellent vehicles for sharing methods in the prevention and detection of invasive alien species. Various institutions in Australia, New Zealand and the United States collaborated with the CFIA on scientific and technical projects of mutual interest

The CFIA participated in international standard-setting, harmonization of approaches, negotiations, and bilateral meetings with key trading partners. Specifically, the CFIA continued to work with the USDA and National Plant Protection Organizations in areas regulated for AGM (China, Japan, Korea, and Russia) to enhance the AGM pre-departure certification program. Communication material on AGM was shared with trading partners and industry to increase awareness of the risks associated with AGM and identification of this pest.

Ongoing discussions with the USDA are taking place regarding a collaborative approach to off-continent invasive plants. The CFIA continues to collaborate with the USDA on risk assessment methodologies for invasive plants. Officers from the CFIA have been trained and developed expertise in the USDA weed risk assessment methodology with the capacity to share components of the weed risk assessment.

An example is the ongoing consultation with the USDA on end-use risk based import requirements to limit the introduction and spread of woolly cup grass in grain commodities imported from the US. Another is the initiation of shared risk assessment for pest plants.

The CFIA is drafting an International Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures protocol for identification of world Ips bark beetles (with collaborators from the Netherlands, Brazil, and China) and is helping to develop one for Dendroctonus.

The CFIA developed the apple pest list, incorporating information provided by the EU and reported on EPPO PQR as a resource for Canadian pest risk assessments of EU products.

Numerous technical documents were shared with the USDA and other trading partners, as well as industry (Flowers Canada); these include the Chrysanthemum Stem Necrosis Virus factsheets.

The Agency developed new system approach requirements to harmonize with U.S. requirements that will serve to update the import policy directive on tomato fruits and further reduce the risk of introducing Tuta absoluta into Canadian greenhouses. A feasibility study was completed to identify gaps and make recommendations on advancing the Canada-US perimeter inspection approach to wood packaging.

The Agency also participated in technical meetings with EU staff as needed and provided technical advice related to pest risk assessment (PRA), and Canada's plant health program.

Federal Partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing Activities / Programs Total Allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results (ER) Contributing Activities / Programs Results (RA)
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) Protection for Canadians and Natural Resources Risk Analysis 3.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.6 ongoing 0.6 0.6 ER 33 RA 33
Science and Technology 5.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.0 ongoing 1.0 1.0 ER 34 RA 34
Legislation, Regulation and Policy 1.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.2 ongoing 0.2 0.2 ER 35 RA 35
Engaging Canadians 0.5 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.1 ongoing 0.1 0.1 ER 36 RA 36
International Cooperation 0.5 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.1 ongoing 0.1 0.1 ER 37 RA 37
Total 10.0 (2010-11 to 2014-14) and 2.0 ongoing 2.0 2.0

ER 33: Risk Analysis

Outcome: The capacity to identify and address forest invasive alien species risks and prevent their introduction is increased.

Output/Activities: Continued improvement in the understanding of forest invasive alien species pathways, assessment of human-assisted introduction, and impact of invasive alien forest pests. Development and facilitation of a cooperative of national risk models, pest models, embellishment of the forest alien species historical database and national and cross-border risk maps for forest invasive alien species and high-risk commodities.

Indicator: Scientific publications and other products, including government publications and reports, on pathway and pest risk analyses, ecological risk assessments, risk maps, and FIAS economic impact assessments.

Targets and Tracking: Address existing and emerging knowledge gaps relating to potential new pests and new IAS introduction pathways

RA 33: Risk Analysis

NRCan continued to develop models and maps that contribute to a better understanding of the risks related to the movement of forest invasive alien species (FIAS) and their potential introduction and spread in Canada. Building on sound science and technology, these achievements result in an increased capacity for pest management agencies to focus prevention and response efforts where and when the risks are the highest. In 2012-13, NRCan contributed to the publication of more than 10 peer-reviewed scientific articles addressing multiple aspects of the risk associated with FIAS, which notably included:

  • Modeling the arrival of invasive organisms via the international marine shipping network;
  • Analyzing the dispersal of invasive forest insects via recreational firewood;
  • Working on a new approach for building integrated risk maps to prioritize risks for anticipated invasive pests;
  • Building phenology models to aid in analyzing insect population behaviour and response to changing climatic conditions;
  • Evaluating ecological niche modeling methods to model the potential range extension of Emerald Ash Borer, to inform risk assessments;
  • Analyzing invasion pathways for FIAS, like the European wood wasp, using modern techniques that include molecular tools;
  • Performing estimates of the potential cost of the emerald ash borer in Canadian municipalities;
  • Providing decision support for the treatment of emerald ash borer in urban centres.

ER 34: Science and Technology

Outcome 1: Knowledge of forest invasive alien species taxonomy, biology, and ecology is improved.

Output/Activities: Continued scientific research addressing knowledge gaps in taxonomy, biology, ecology, distribution, and pest-host and forest-pathogen relationships, including development and testing of molecular and genetic tools to identify non-native insects and pathways and historical patterns of pest invasions.

Indicator: Scientific publications and other products, including government publications and reports, on IAS biology, taxonomy and ecology.

Targets and Tracking: Address knowledge gaps regarding forest invasive alien species taxonomy, biology, and ecology.

Outcome 2: Likelihood of establishment or spread of forest invasive alien species is minimized, and their impacts are mitigated.

Output/Activities: Production of detection, diagnostic and surveillance tools and strategies including molecular, pheromonal and chemical attractant methods for forest invasive alien species. Development of response tools and methods including communication to responsible agencies of scientific recommendations to address the control and eradication of forest invasive alien species. Investigation of mechanisms of action, integration and environmental assessment of systematic insecticides.

Indicator: Science and technology tools, methodologies, and strategies developed and delivered to clients and stakeholders.

Targets and Tracking: Provide tools to advance the control and eradication of forest invasive alien species.

RA 34: Science and Technology

NRCan experts contributed to documenting the biology, taxonomy, ecology, and interaction between pests and their hosts for critical FIAS in Canada. By filling important knowledge gaps, these achievements contribute to strengthen the assumptions behind predictive risk models and, in turn, inform decision-making more accurately. The knowledge provided by NRCan is also the foundation for the development and provision of more practical tools, techniques, and scientific advice to the pest management community in order to enhance the capacity to detect, identify, and respond to FIAS threats. The following research areas were notably addressed in more than 45 peer-reviewed publications NRCan contributed to in 2012-13:

  • Further describe a native pathogen to control emerald ash borer and brown spruce longhorn beetle populations and steps towards the development of a system to disseminate said pathogen.
  • Use of insect parasites to control EAB.
  • National registration of TreeAzin as a natural, botanical insecticide for control of EAB and protection of high value ash trees (initially developed in partnership with industry).
  • Further describe the efficacy of attractant lures to enhance early detection of FIAS in low density populations.
  • Document the emerald ash borer's overwintering ecology to enhance our ability to predict survival and population dynamics in Canada.
  • Description of the occurrence and distribution of the European wood wasp symptoms of injury on pine trees to improve detection and survey guidelines and predict its impact on forest stands.
  • Contribution to the identification of the first records of the beech leaf mining weevil in North America, a pest affecting the American beech.
  • Trapping studies to improve FIAS surveillance resulting in the "by-catch" of 39 non-native species in New Brunswick.
  • Development of molecular tools for rapid identification of exotic plant pathogens (e.g. DNA barcoding).
  • Contribution to the development of molecular diagnostic tools that can effectively determine the presence of pinewood nematode in wood, providing Canada with a powerful method of certifying that our forestry products are free of live nematodes, hence reducing potential trade barriers for Canadian wood exports.
  • Contribution to evaluate the efficacy of biocontrol measures and fungicides to mitigate the risk associated with sudden oak death in Canada.
  • A book that synthesizes information about the extent of invasion and characteristics to identify 156 non-native rove beetle species in Canada

ER 35: Legislation, Regulation and Policy

Outcome 1: Decision-making related to forest invasive alien species management by regulatory agencies and other organizations is informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Output/Activities: Continued provision of science and policy expertise on forest invasive alien species prevention, detection, and response to regulatory agencies, other federal departments, provinces and territories, municipalities, industry and First Nations. Expansion and implementation of a framework for forest invasive species decisions has been initiated and is ongoing in partnership with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and stakeholders. Availability of risk information is being enhanced.

Indicator: Stakeholder engagement in Canadian Forestry Service (CFS) FIAS strategies, frameworks, or facilitation activities, participation and input into relevant fora.

Targets and Tracking: Distribute CFS science expertise and strategies to all regulatory agencies and partner organizations in support of decision-making.

Outcome 2: Canadian positions in national and international discussions on phytosanitary trade issues are informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Output/Activities: Continued provision of science and policy advice that support phytosanitary trade negotiations and the development of national and international forest phytosanitary standards. Development of training material and guidance for the implementation of phytosanitary standards and forest education. Continued communication to the forest sector of strategies to maximize operational flexibility and reduce barriers to the international trade of forest products.

Indicator: CFS science and policy participation in Canadian positions on phytosanitary trade negotiations and national and international phytosanitary standards, including through engagement with and guidance to industry representatives and regulators.

Targets and Tracking: Provide expert input to all relevant national and international forest phytosanitary trade groups and organizations.

RA 35: Legislation, Regulation and Policy

Outcome 1 and 2: NRCan continued to provide science-based advice to pest management and regulatory agencies on questions related to the current and future management of significant FIAS in Canada. NRCan contribution informs the discussion and recommendations of various stakeholder fora and technical working groups reporting to those agencies. NRCan also continued to provide scientific evidence to support the development of Canadian forest sector strategies to reduce international phytosanitary trade barriers to forest products. These activities are essential to maintain healthy forests and market access for Canadian forest products. Specific 2012-13 achievements related to legislation, regulation, and policy include:

  • Continued participation in the Canadian Forestry Phytosanitary Working Group to advance Canadian forest sector interests. Emphasis in 2012-13 has been placed on providing scientific advice on resolving phytosanitary-based market restrictions on ash lumber to the European Union.
  • Scientific contribution to phytosanitary trade arrangements negotiated with China and India for some Canadian wood commodities to minimize quarantine problems associated with pinewood nematode.
  • Chairing the emerald ash borer, brown spruce longhorn beetle, and Asian longhorn beetle science subcommittees, advisory to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).
  • Co-chairing the Brown Spruce Longhorn Beetle Steering Committee with the CFIA; a mutli-stakeholder forum seeking the best response approaches to this pest in the Maritimes region, taking into consideration multiple forestry values and interests.
  • Contribution to the official eradication of the Asian longhorn beetle from Canada through collaboration with the CFIA, the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, the Cities of Vaughan and Toronto, York Region, the forestry industry, and the public. These efforts led to the repeal of the Asian Long-horned Beetle Infested Place Order by the CFIA.
  • Continued development of a nationally consistent interaction model promoting collaborative responses to FIAS in a multijurisdictional context.

ER 36: Engaging Canadians

Outcome: Scientific information on forest invasive alien species (FIAS) is made available to agencies, researchers, and the public.

Output/Activities: Publications and presentations to enable stakeholder use of the CanFIAS Database, continued enhancement and expansion of database capabilities and information. Literature-based analysis of CanFIAS gaps. Ongoing development of National Forest Insect Outbreak Atlas. Increased access to Canadian forest pest information for stakeholders and the public. Publication of new records of beetle species for New Brunswick.

Indicator: Information products made available to agencies, researchers and the public regarding forest invasive alien species and issues.

Targets and Tracking: Inform Canadians as to FIAS dangers and best practices.

RA 36: Engaging Canadians

NRCan continued its ongoing effort to transfer knowledge, tools and expertise to actors in the forest sector and the public in a timely and effective way. The activities achieved in 2012-13 were essential in raising awareness about FIAS research and application among forest professionals and the public and were a step toward enhancing the collective ability to mitigate their risk and impact. Specific examples of achievement in this area include:

  • Knowledge and technology transfer events were held, notably with city arborists and urban foresters, on emerald ash borer sampling and management. Guidance was provided on how to incorporate various methods into normal operations and how to evaluate results.
  • Participation on the Ontario Invasive Species Centre advisory board. The Centre primarily focuses on enhancing collaboration and coordination of natural and socio-economic scientific research, as well as technology and knowledge transfer to mitigate the ecological and economic threats of invasive species.
  • A renewed three-year knowledge transfer strategy on FIAS for the Quebec area, leading to media interviews, conferences and magazine articles in non-technical language, intended for professionals and the general public.
  • Maintenance of insect and fungal specimen collections and delivery of species identification in support of local programs and collaboration with the CFIA, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and others.
  • Contribution to a pamphlet on best management practices for brown spruce longhorn beetle, developed in partnership with multiple government and industry stakeholders.

ER 37: International Cooperation

Outcome: International cooperation with phytosanitary organizations and trading partners is facilitated.

Output/Activities: Continued engagement in international forest sector consultations including the North American Plant Protection Organization, International Plant Protection Convention, and International Forest Quarantine Working Group. Research and analysis to respond to Canadian export trade issues and develop national and international phytosanitary standards that reduce global movement of forest pests. Support to knowledge transfer of science-based decision-making in stakeholder agencies, advisory committees, and international fora to facilitate international cooperation, exchange best practices and scientific information, reduce threats to Canadian forests, and minimize disruption of Canadian forest products by phytosanitary concerns.

Indicator: CFS participation in international forest research and forest product phytosanitary consultations.

Targets and Tracking :Provide knowledge to inform science-based decision-making in international fora.

RA 37: International Cooperation

NRCan has advanced cooperation with other countries, shared best management practices, and built on collective capacity to address the global challenge of FIAS. Department experts participated in various international scientific networks to promote Canadian research and facilitate synergy for collaboration initiatives. As part of its activities, NRCan also continued to provide technical advice to international and intergovernmental organizations in support of phytosanitary standard development and FIAS management with the objective of mitigating risks and facilitating trade. Examples of achievements in 2012-13 include:

  • Continued provision of scientific advice and research to the International Plant Protection Convention's Technical Panel on Forest Quarantine in support of the publication of new international phytosanitary standards. A concrete outcome of the ongoing technical input has been the recent adoption by the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures of dielectric heat treatment in the International Standard for Phytosanitary Measure for the regulation of wood packaging material in international trade.
  • Continued provision of policy advice, research results and analysis to the North American Plant Protection Organization in support of new regional phytosanitary standards.
  • Scientific advice to a Canada-United States delegation to Japan to address an emergency situation regarding Asian gypsy moth interceptions in North American ports.
Federal Partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing Activities / Programs Total Allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results (ER) Contributing Activities / Programs Results (RA)
Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) Science for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture Risk Analysis 2.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.4 ongoing 0.4 0.38 ER 38 RA 38
Science and Technology 5.1 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.02 ongoing 1.02 1.01 ER 39 RA 39
Legislation, Regulation and Policy 1.1 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.21 ongoing 0.21 0.12 ER 40 RA 40
Engaging Canadians 0.4 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.09 ongoing 0.09 0.09 ER 41 RA 41
International Cooperation 11.4 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 2.28 ongoing 2.28 2.28 ER 42 RA 42
Total 20.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 4.0 ongoing 4.0 3.88

ER 38: Risk Analysis

Outcome: Decision-makers and legislative authorities have science information and tools to manage AIS domestically and internationally.

Output/Activities: Biological Risk Assessments, Socio-economic Risk Assessment Framework.

Indicator: Percentage of approved requests for science advice on aquatic invasive species that are completed within the required timelines.

Targets and Tracking: 90% Canadian Science Advice Secretariat; access database- not currently available.

RA 38: Risk Analysis

Bi-national risk assessment on bigheaded carps completed.

Zebra and Quagga Mussel risk assessment completed.

Peer-reviewed risk assessment finalized for the ship-mediated pathway (ballast- and hull-fouling vectors) in Atlantic and Pacific.

Screening Level Risk Assessment tools evaluated and high priority species lists developed for freshwater fishes, molluscs, and plants.

ER 39: Science and Technology

Output/Activities: Research, Monitoring

Indicator: TBD; Percentage of Fisheries and Oceans Canada publications compared to Canadian totals in the field of aquatic invasive species.

Targets and Tracking: TBD; Maintain or improve five-year average.

RA 39: Science and Technology

Result: 24.7% Improved compared to five-year average of 19.8% (2007-11) and 14 year average of 16.8% (1998-2011). Also improved compared to the 2011-12 result of 19%.

Ongoing funding for science monitoring and research activities to identify, among other things, (1) trends and status in the presence, abundance, and ranges of new and existing AIS; (2) ecological impacts; (3) high-risk species though peer-reviewed risk assessment frameworks; and (4) pathways of introduction and spread, leading to publication (including in primary literature).

Specifically, research in marine ecosystems on impacts of tunicates on native species and ecological processes, and impacts of green crabs on native ecosystems.

Continuing evaluation and refinement of ballast water management techniques in concert with Transport Canada.

Evaluation of the effectiveness of management techniques for European Green Crab, tunicates, and smallmouth bass.

Ongoing monitoring for high-priority species and pathways in the Great Lakes (Welland Canal movement monitoring, bloody red shrimp, round goby).

ER 40: Legislation, Regulation and Policy

Output/Activities: Regulatory policy.

Indicator: TBD.

Targets and Tracking: TBD.

RA 40: Legislation, Regulation and Policy

Development of regulations for Aquatic Invasive Species is ongoing. Consultations with provinces and territories are complete.

Originally, the regulations were expected to be finalized by the spring of 2013. These timelines have been delayed. The regulations are now expected to be published in Canada Gazette I in the fall of 2013, with subsequent publication in Canada Gazette, Part II in the spring of 2014. The regulations would come into force during the early part of the 2014-15 fiscal year.

ER 41: Engaging Canadians

Output/Activities: Communications, Outreach products.

Indicator: TBD.

Targets and Tracking: TBD.

RA 41: Engaging Canadians

Output/Activities:

Newfoundland Region

Newfoundland Region's communications branch developed the following products:

  • brochures and rack cards on the types of Aquatic Invasive Species to watch out for and what to do if you see them, which were distributed to harbour authorities;
  • signs on Aquatic Invasive Species, which were erected at harbour authorities;
  • several web pages related to Aquatic Invasive Species for the Newfoundland website.

Maritime Region

Maritime Region's communications branch coordinated five media interviews with scientists on Aquatic Invasive Species.

Gulf Region

Gulf Region's communications branch updated and re-published the "Aquatic Invasive Species – Information Booklet". This 26 page booklet contains information on major species that have invaded marine environments of eastern Canada, how to identify them and what to do to prevent their spread and establishment. The booklet was produced in March 2013, distributed, and posted on the DFO website. (DFO/2013-1856 Fs124-5/2013E ISBN: 978-1-100-21773-4 March 2013)

Quebec Region

Quebec Region's communications branch assisted in updating and distributing the Aquatic Invasive Species Information Booklet (lead by Gulf Region).

National Headquarters

National Headquarters' communications branch supported the consultation of Canadians related to a regulatory proposal being developed under the Fisheries Act to manage the threat of Aquatic Invasive Species. The document, "A Canadian Action Plan to Address the Threat of Aquatic Invasive Species", and a backgrounder were posted online. Public comments were collected online. A communications approach and media lines were developed to support this process.

Central and Arctic Region

Central and Arctic Region's communications branch produced a factsheet on bighead and silver carps and produced various communications products (media Lines, key messages and questions and answers) surrounding a funding announcement for the prevention of Asian Carp in the Great Lakes.

In regards to outreach, the Sea Lamprey Control Centre set up public displays at the National Fish and Wildlife Conservation Congress in Ottawa in May 2012, the Toronto Sportsman's show in February 2013, and the Aquatic Invasive Species Conference in Niagara Falls in April 2013 (the bulk of the planning for this event took place in the 2012-13 fiscal year).

Pacific Region

Pacific Region's Communications Branch developed the following products:

  • a three-year communications plan (2012-2015) to support public outreach to educate individuals about the impacts of introducing foreign species into Canada's natural environment;
  • web material on Aquatic Invasive Species for the Pacific Region website;
  • media lines on the risks posed by various invasive aquatic species in B.C. waters;
  • text for a brochure targeted toward those who intentionally or unintentionally release fish, invertebrate or plant species into aquatic ecosystems; and
  • a "Stop Aquatic Invasive Species" poster in collaboration with the Canada Border Services Agency. This poster was printed and distributed along the Canada-US border.

Media Enquiries

In addition to proactive communications products and outreach activities, the Department responded to approximately 81 media enquiries across the county concerning Aquatic Invasive Species.

Indicator: TBD

Targets and Tracking: TBD

ER 42: International Cooperation

Outcome: Sea lamprey abundance in Great Lakes falls within individual lake targets.

Output/Activities: Sea Lamprey Control Program, National Aquatic Invasive Species Committee.

Indicator: Number of Great Lakes with sea lamprey abundance within the lake target.

Targets and Tracking: Target = 5, Annual program reporting to the Great Lakes Fishery Commission and Research and development expert panels.

RA 42: International Cooperation

Target not achieved, all five lakes Sea Lamprey Abundance estimates are higher than the lake targets.

Abundance [95% confidence intervals]: Targets
Lake Superior 71,846 [56,880-99,941]37,000 [18,000-56,000]
Lake Michigan 87,887 [82,325-95,028]57,000 [44,000-70,000]
Lake Huron 275,006 [236,999-332,782]76,000 [56,000-96,000
Lake Erie 17,211 [13,444-23,949]3,000 [2,000-4,000]
Lake Ontario 57,270 [51,290-63,314]31,000 [27,000-35,000]

Contrasting abundance with targets for a single year can be misleading, it is more relevant to look at trends over time, there are many factors that affect sea lamprey abundance in the lake beyond the SLCP, such as the increasing availability of host species, and; the SLCP is conducted by both DFO and USFWS and contrast to targets is a function of the efforts of both agencies.

Given these observations DFO will be revising the target for this activity in future years.

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans effectively delivered the Sea Lamprey Control Program in Canadian waters of the Great Lakes and US waters of Lake Ontario, as part of Canada's commitment to a bi-national initiative administered by the Great Lakes Fishery Commission. This included: treating sea lamprey populations in 41 tributaries and 6 lentic areas, including 268 ha of the St. Marys River, with lampricide; conducting larval surveys on 270 tributaries and 11 lentic areas; operating and maintaining 27 sea lamprey barriers, and; operating spawning-phase traps at 22 sites.

Federal partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing activities / programs Total allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ Millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results (ER) Contributing activity / program results (RA)
Environment Canada (EC) Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat Engaging Canadians-Invasive Alien Species Partnership Program 5.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.0 ongoing 1.0 0Footnote 5 ER 43 RA 43
Total 5.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.0 ongoing 1.0 0

ER 43: As per the Updated 2012-13 Departmental Program Performance Framework

Expected Result: Canadians increasingly participate in priority activities set out in An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada (IASSC).

Indicator: Number of participants in IASPP funded projects (Target: 1000).

Output: Funding for locally-initiated projects that meet eligibility criteria.

Indicator: Ratio of funding leveraged from non-federal partners for program funding (Target: Partner $: Federal $ = 3:1).

Targets and Tracking: Target = 5, Annual program reporting to the Great Lakes Fishery Commission and Research and development expert panels.

RA 43: As per the Updated 2012-13 Departmental Program Performance Framework

Funding for the Invasive Alien Species Partnership was terminated as of March 31, 2012, as part of the Government of Canada's priority to balance the federal budget.

Total Allocation for All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
($ Millions)
Total Actual Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
($ Millions)
95.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 19.0 ongoing16.412.88

Comments on Variances:

CFIA: The programs are ongoing and in various stages of realization - initiation, development, validation, implementation, re-evaluation. In 2012-2013, as expected, the CFIA delivered on activities in each of the five thematic areas to commensurate with the resources spent on IAS. As spending comprises both salary and operating activities, the large variance  in the Legislation, Regulation and Policy thematic area is not unexpected, as it  reflects staff vacancies during 2012-2013. The variance between the IAS funding allotment and spending on specific activities can, in part, be explained by resources that were allocated to other Agency priorities. It is essential to note that some activities carried out as part of the overall plant program are related to IAS, but were not recorded exclusively as IAS work.

Results achieved by non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

Contact Information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Wendy Asbil
National Manager
Invasive Alien Species and Domestic Plant Health Programs
Biosecurity and Forestry Division
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
613-773-7236

Natural Resources Canada
Jacques Gagnon
Director
Innovation and Integration Division
Science Program Branch
Canadian Forest Service
613-947-9043

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Sophie Foster
Science Advisor
Aquatic Invasive Species Program
Environment and Biodiversity Science
Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Environment Canada
Ken Harris
Manager
Species Conservation Policy

Wildlife Program Policy
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environmental Stewardship Branch
819-956-4721

Table E: Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program (PPMMP)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: Plant Resources Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2015-16 (CFIA and Agriculture and Agri-food Canada); 2016-17 and ongoing (CFIA)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $17.2M (2011-12 to 2015-16) and $1.3M ongoing (CFIA)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Plum Pox Virus (PPV) is a viral plant disease that infects Prunus species including peach, plum, apricot and other stone fruit plants. PPV does not affect human or animal health but reduces fruit yields, mottles leaves, and causes visual symptoms on stone fruit, thus reducing their marketability. The virus is spread locally by aphids (insects) and through the movement of infected propagative material, including live trees of all age classes, rootstock, bud wood, cuttings or other green branches and twigs, and tissue cultures.

PPV was first discovered in Ontario and Nova Scotia in 2000. The Government of Canada responded in 2001 with a three-year, $49.3 million PPV program to suppress PPV, and to evaluate the feasibility of eradication. Based on the recommendations of a PPV International Expert Panel, the seven-year Plum Pox Eradication Program (PPEP) was launched in 2004 ($85 million) and augmented in 2007 with an additional $58.6 million totalling $143.6 million in federal and Ontario government funding. The PPEP expired on March 31, 2011.

Eradication of PPV has been achieved in six of the seven quarantine areas established at the beginning of the eradication program. These six quarantine areas are Blenheim, Fonthill, Stoney Creek and Vittoria in Ontario, and the Annapolis Valley and Wolfville in Nova Scotia. All of the regions continue to be surveyed and monitored, and no new virus cases have been found outside the Niagara quarantine area. Although eradication was not achieved in Niagara, the infection rate has been reduced from 1.9% of tree samples to less than 0.02% in 2010.

By implementing a PPV management and monitoring strategy, PPV will remain in the Niagara region perpetually, and the industry will thus need to manage the risks it poses to the production and marketability of products.

The PPMMP consists of regulatory plant protection activities, and for the first five years of the program, significant research will be carried out to develop PPV risk mitigation tools and educational and awareness program components to build the capacity within the industry to implement best management practices.

CFIA and AAFC funding was obtained from Budget 2011, which allocated $17.2 million over five years for the PPMMP, to transition to a management and monitoring strategy to contain and mitigate the spread of plum pox.

Shared outcome(s):

The outcome of the Government's PPMMP is to fulfill the Government of Canada's plant protection obligations and international responsibilities through implementation of measures to mitigate the spread of PPV on a national and international level. The PPMMP's other outcome is to facilitate industry management of PPV.

Governance structure(s):

The CFIA's PPMMP activities and deliverables are managed and governed by the Plant Business Line Committee, as PPV is an established, regulated plant pest requiring ongoing decision-making to protect Canada's plant resource base. Also, AAFC's A-Base activities are managed and governed by a committee of Science Directors from the Science and Technology Branch who report to the DG of the Mixed Wood Plains directorate. The DG has the final "sign-off" authority for AAFC Science and Technology Branch activities, including the PPMMP. An AAFC Science Director has been assigned as responsible for ensuring that PPV research activities are implemented, managed and reported as required.

A PPV Steering Group (PPV-SG), consisting of CFIA and AAFC director-level officials, was established for the first five years to make recommendations about program delivery to the above CFIA and AAFC governance committees. The PPV-SG liaises with internal and external stakeholders as required, including international plant protection bodies, to provide updates and seek input about program and research parameters at stakeholder conferences and meetings. After a period of five years, when AAFC's role in the PPMMP has concluded, the CFIA's Plant Business Line Committee will be responsible for managing the PPMMP on an ongoing basis.

Performance Highlights:

For 2013-14, the key horizontal plans are: implement appropriate sampling and detection of PPV host material to update, as required, the quarantine area boundary; enforce restrictions to mitigate the spread of PPV; and undertake research activities to improve the regulatory program.

Federal Partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing Activities / Programs Total Allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results (ER) Contributing Activities / Programs Results (RA)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Plant Resources Program / Internal Services Monitoring and Detection 4.2 (2011-12 to 2015-16) and 0.5 ongoing 1.0 0.9 ER 44 RA 44
Regulatory Enforcement 4.6 (2011-12 to 2015-16) and 0.7 ongoing 1.0 0.6 ER 45 RA 45
PPV Regulatory Research 1.1 (2011-12 to 2015-16) and 0.1 ongoing 0.3 0.2 ER 46 RA 46
PPV Suppression Research 0.7 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 0.2 0.4 ER 47 RA 47
Total 10.6 (2011-12 to 2015-16) and 1.3 ongoing 2.5 2.1

ER 44: Monitoring and Detection

Outcome: Mitigate the spread of PPV on a national and international level.

Outputs/activities: Monitoring activities will be carried out by the CFIA to confirm and adjust the boundaries of the Niagara quarantine area as necessary. In accordance with NAPPO guidelines, the CFIA will conduct detection activities annually by taking samples along the Niagara quarantine area perimeter. Laboratory testing of the samples to determine the presence of PPV will be conducted by the CFIA. To detect whether PPV has spread beyond the quarantine area, samples will be collected annually as required from commercial orchards and nurseries from PPV-susceptible species in other regions of Ontario, Nova Scotia, Quebec, and British Columbia.

Indicator: Established quarantine areas and areas with PPV-susceptible species will determine the location where sampling will occur. Samples will be collected from these species (peach, plum, nectarine, apricot) located inside and outside of the quarantine area.

Target: An estimated 22,850 samples will be taken and tested annually until 2015 and reduced to 17,000 samples in 2016 and onward.

RA 44: Monitoring and Detection

A total of 11,845 samples were collected from the quarantine area perimeter and surrounding area. Variance in the number of collected samples was due to a reduced number of orchards along the quarantine area perimeter and the determination that samples are not required to be collected in certain parts of the quarantine area. In addition, samples were not required to be collected from British Columbia, Nova Scotia, or Quebec in 2012-13 as per international recommendations stating that samples should be collected once every three years in former quarantine areas. All samples tested free from PPV through laboratory testing. As a result, no quarantine area boundary changes were required.

ER 45: Regulatory Enforcement

Outcome: Mitigate the spread of PPV on a national and international level.

Outputs/activities: Through its inspection activities, the CFIA will monitor and assess regulated parties' compliance with the PPMMP regulatory requirements. Monitoring activities include issuing movement certificates for regulated material (dormant root stock, seedlings, seeds, and plant material for research) and conducting audits and compliance verifications of retail outlets, nurseries and other facilities that may sell or distribute susceptible Prunus species. When non-compliance is identified, the CFIA will take the most appropriate response to obtain compliance in view of factors such as potential or actual harm, the compliance history of the regulated party, and intent.

To help maintain a lower level of virus prevalence within the quarantine area, prohibition and restriction  regarding propagation of regulated Prunus plants within the quarantine area will continue. The prohibition on propagation will ensure that only PPV-free or certified clean stock (planting material that is free of all viruses including PPV) is used within the Niagara quarantine area.

Indicator: Growers, residents and retailers within the quarantine area.

Target: Annual inspection of a sub-set of growers, residents and retailers to determine if movement of material or propagation has occurred. Property scouting will commence during the 2012-13 fiscal year, which will determine the number of properties to be annually scouted.

RA 45: Regulatory Enforcement

Inspectors issued movement certificates for approved material following compliance verification of regulated parties. Information regarding the continued propagation ban was distributed through local newspapers and targeted audiences. Commercial production areas and residential properties were inspected (1/3 of quarantine area sub-set) to ensure compliance with the propagation ban. Inspectors issued Restriction of Activity/Prohibition Notices to non-compliant individuals.

ER 46: PPV Regulatory Research

Outcome: Restrain the prevalence of PPV in the Niagara region, mitigate the spread on a national and international level.

Outputs/activities: To support the clean stock program, a research study is being conducted by the CFIA to develop strategies for eliminating PPV from rootstock. This program supports the enforcement of the propagation prohibition. The most effective method(s) for eliminating PPV from infected nursery stock materials will be evaluated so that desirable foreign varieties may become eligible for use by industry through clean stock services.

Regulatory research will also develop improved detection tools and more extensive knowledge about PPV to support PPV surveillance, monitoring and detection. CFIA research projects include characterizing genetic variation within individual strains of PPV found in Canada, monitoring for the introduction of new strains, and mapping the movement of the virus in Canada.

Beyond 2016, the CFIA will conduct similar research, such as evaluating the host range for newly discovered strains of PPV to determine the range of Prunus hosts to be regulated in Canada. This research will ensure that the ongoing regulatory program remains effective in mitigating the spread of PPV.

Indicator: In total, three indicators are identified: 1) protocol for the production of virus-free nursery stock for domestic and export clean stock programs using virus elimination techniques; 2) a genetic map to understand the movement of PPV strains and isolates to allow for continuous improvement of regulatory surveillance protocols; and 3) identification of and protocols for the detection of any new strains and isolates of PPV not previously reported in Canada.

The requirement of a comprehensive list of host plants for new strains of PPV detected in Canada is to enhance surveillance protocols and industry awareness.

Target: Genetic mapping and identification of new strains create a protocol for virus elimination and are dependant on the number of samples collected that test positive. Host range target is variable depending on the identification of new strains and isolates in Canada during routine surveillance activities.

RA 46: PPV Regulatory Research

1) Evaluation of effective and efficient methods for eliminating PPV and other viruses from infected stock is currently underway. Four of five identified methods have shown promising results. These methods will continue to be monitored and repeated in 2013-14. This is a long-term project, and specific results will be forthcoming as the project further progresses.

2) Approximately 110 Canadian isolates of PPV detected in commercial orchards during the 2009-2010 survey, and an additional 10 PPV Dideron isolates from the initial discover of 2000 PPVs in Canada are being characterized molecularly in detail. Isolates analysed to date have been confirmed as members of the Dideron strain (one of 9 PPV strains found worldwide), and most isolates fall within the two known subgroups of PPV Dideron found in Canada.

3) No new strains have been identified in Canada.

ER 47: PPV Suppression Research

Outcome: Screening of foreign plant material for pests and diseases and conduct of field pre-evaluations.

Outputs/activities: AAFC will identify foreign varieties with potential resistance to PPV. The CFIA has phytosanitary measures in place to mitigate pest movement into Canada from imported products. The CFIA will screen identified foreign plant material for its use in growth trials in Canada.

Indicator: Plant material identified by AAFC and imported into Canada.

Target: Variable, based on the number of identified potential candidate varieties and laboratory capacity.

RA 47: PPV Suppression Research

AAFC identified three plant varieties (plum) from Germany that may show promise of PPV resistance. The The CFIA, Sidney Lab has completed initial assays of the material and has moved the material into the field for observation and further study. It is anticipated that the material will obtain provisional release to AAFC in 2013. This material will be challenged for PPV resistance in greenhouse studies once sufficient budwood material is available from field plantings.

Federal Partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing Activities / Programs Total Allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results (ER) Contributing Activities / Programs Results (RA)
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) Science, Innovation and Adoption PPV Regulatory Research 0.4 (2011-12 to 2013-14) 0.15 0.1 ER 48 RA 48
Virus Resistance Research 3.0 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 0.65 0.62 ER 49 RA 49
PPV Suppression Research 2.9 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 0.65 0.62 ER 50 RA 50
Education and Awareness Activities 0.3 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 0.15 0.06 ER 51 RA 51
Total 6.6 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 1.6 1.4

ER 48: PPV Regulatory Research6

Development of technologies to assist both regulatory and industry requirements for a tool to rapidly test for PPV presence. Efficient detection of PPV in infected trees is fundamental for effective management of PPV infection. Technology will include the development of a sensitive broad spectrum diagnostic tool for detecting PPV.

RA 48: PPV Regulatory Research6

Purification of the helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) protein was completed along with the production of applicable antibodies. Research into the development of a detection platform has commenced, with results expected in future years.

ER 49: Virus Resistance Research

Research will develop virus resistance strategies to help protect against PPV and manage the virus over the long term. Specific research projects to support virus resistance include 1) developing a new PPV-resistant peach tree line through gene silencing (switching off a gene to make susceptible hosts resistant to infection); 2) developing transferable resistance in rootstock that can be transmitted through grafting to existing fruit trees; and 3) developing a virus vector which will act like a vaccine to induce resistance by gene silencing.

RA 49: Virus Resistance Research

Progress continues in all long-term projects. Research initiatives have continued from prior years with results expected by 2016. Project specific updates:

Project #1: A protocol for the efficient in vitro multiplication of pests was expanded to create a protocol for the generation of chemical-induced peach mutants. Approximately 1500 peach seedlings have been developed and are in the process of testing for PPV resistance. Research is also progressing in the development of gene silencing technology to produce resistant peach trees.

Project #2: Research in the transmission of PPV resistance from plum rootstock is ongoing. Various combinations of plant material are being tested and will be evaluated in future years.

Project #3: The identified virus vector has been utilized in two model plant species. Research continues to determine the effectiveness of this technology in inducing resistance to PPV in established trees.

ER 50: PPV Suppression Research

PPV suppression will be pursued through research to reduce PPV transmission in orchards. Research projects include assessing practices and processes, specifically the use of oil sprays on Prunus plant leaves, to suppress PPV transmission by aphids; evaluating the influence of tree variety and age on the level of seasonal resistance to natural infection by aphids; determining the efficacy of newly registered insecticides on the transmission of PPV, which will result in the development of application guidelines for use by industry; examining the impact of PPV infection in young peach tree growth, hardiness and productivity in subsequent years; and evaluating foreign material for use in Canada (in collaboration with the CFIA).

RA 50: PPV Suppression Research

Project: Impact of PPV infection on the growth, production, and viability of young and mature peach trees - a screen house was modified and certified by the CFIA for PPV use, and 75 two-year old peach trees (four varieties) were established. Half of the trees of each variety were inoculated with PPV to be monitored for the impact of PPV on growth, yield, and fruit quality in future years. Twelve thousand mature trees in commercial orchards were tested for the presence of PPV in 2012; however, only 11 trees from two varieties located in one orchard that tested positive were available to assess the impact of PPV on mature tree growth, production and viability. This work will be discontinued in 2013 due to the small sample size (limited number of trees available for field assessment). Funding will be reallocated to augment the work on examining the impact of PPV on young peach trees, which is of major concern to the industry.

Project: Influence of environmental conditions, tree variety and tree age on seasonal resistance of peach to PPV infection - research progressing regarding trees' increasing resistance to PPV as the growing season progresses or through various cultural orchard management practices. Understanding the process of seasonal resistance may assist future breeding programs or provide information on effective orchard management against PPV.

Project: Oil spray management of PPV - research continuing regarding foliar oil spray application to inhibit the transmission of PPV. No negative effects on tree growth or fruitfulness were found, and future research will determine effects on fruit maturity and quality.

ER 51: Education and Awareness Activities

Outcomes: an increased industry understanding and awareness of PPV best management practices along with increased industry uptake of PPV best management practices, which will also help prevent the spread of PPV.

Implementation Plan: Several activities will be conducted to increase industry knowledge and awareness of PPV management practices and to facilitate the transition from eradication to long-term management. These activities will be conducted in collaboration with Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA), which is responsible for providing PPV management crop advice and training to Ontario growers and nurseries. AAFC will also liaise with the OTFPMB and the Canadian Nursery Landscape Association (CNLA) to develop and promote an effective educational and awareness campaign.

Indicators: AAFC will collaborate with OMAFRA to distribute information to Ontario tender fruit industry members about the PPV best management practices by publishing pamphlets and articles. An AAFC-OMAFRA fact sheet and web postings relating to the management of PPV will provide information on the disease, including symptom recognition, proper use of treatments, virus testing methods, and contact information for service providers. Information will be shared with producers through presentations at grower meetings, conferences, and information sessions. European tender fruit producers and crop advisors who have experience managing the disease will be invited to participate in the conferences, meetings, and information sessions to leverage their expertise. Information and research findings will also be provided by local crop advisors and researchers.

RA 51: Education and Awareness Activities

Best management practices and information posters were developed, printed, and distributed to the local industry to assist in the identification of PPV symptoms and to help the Prunus fruit industry manage the disease. Best Management Practices for Reducing the Spread and Impact of Plum Pox in Prunus Producing Nurseries is currently in development. An International Plum Pox Symposium and International Plum Pox Meeting were held to provide the latest information on the status and management of Plum Pox in various countries around the world.

Total Allocation for All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) ($ Millions) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13 ($ Millions) Total Actual Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13 ($ Millions)
17.2 (2011-12 to 2015-16) and 1.3 ongoing4.13.5

Comments on variances:

Results achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact Information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

David Bailey
Director - Horticulture Division
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
613-773-7181

Patricia McAllister
A/National Manager - Greenhouse and Nursery
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
613-773-7166

Eric Wierenga
Horticulture Specialist - Greenhouse and Nursery
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
226-217-8396

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Gary Whitfield
Director - Research & Development
Mixed Wood Plains directorate
519-738-1218

Lorne Stobbs
Research Scientist - Vineland
905-562-2018

Table F: Food Safety Modernization

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Food Safety Modernization (FSM)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: Food Safety Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2015-16

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $99.8M (new funding) and $40.0M (internal reallocation) (2011-12 to 2015-16)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The CFIA was created in 1997 to enhance food safety systems through the consolidation of inspection and quarantine services that were being delivered by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Health Canada (HC), Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and Industry Canada. The current inspection system comprises numerous independent inspection delivery models.

In Budget 2011, the Government of Canada committed funding amounting to $96.8 million to the CFIA to improve and modernize its food safety inspection system. A number of CFIA initiatives were identified to modernize Canada's food safety inspection system. In support of the Agencies modernization initiatives, HC received $3.0M for enhanced health risk assessment capacity.

The main objectives of this modernization initiative are to move the CFIA away from a system of independent commodity-specific inspection approaches and inspector training, and paper-based record keeping and interactions with stakeholders, to that of a single-inspection approach consistent across the food safety program, supported by standardized training, technology information solutions, enhanced proactive science capacity and improved service to stakeholders.

The plan consists of three elements:

  1. inspection system modernization, including the development of an improved inspection model which will provide standardized activities across the food program, national training for inspectors, enhanced Listeria control in high-risk ready-to-eat foods, enhanced HC health risk assessment capacity in support of CFIA modernization activities, and the development of an electronic service delivery platform;
  2. supporting risk-based decision-making through enhanced scientific capacity, including a proposal for a food laboratory network, enhanced capacity for scientific testing and improved facilities and equipment; and
  3. increasing efficiency through improved information management and information technology, including data storage and back-up capacity; enhanced connectivity, and more support for inspector tools such as wireless devices and laptops.

Shared outcome(s): Modernize the CFIA's inspection system by providing up-to-date and relevant training and necessary technology support. This shared outcome will address the increasing complexity of inspection associated with industry advancements in food production and international advancements to improve food safety systems.

Governance structure(s): The CFIA has imposed an internal governance framework for the delivery of activities related to Food Safety Modernization. The CFIA's Senior Management Committee, chaired by the President, will provide direction for initiatives and is accountable for overall implementation. Three VP-level advisory committees responsible for each of the three elements (inspection system modernization, science, and IMIT) will report to the Agency's Senior Management Committee and will be accountable for ensuring that activities are on track and on budget. Each will operate individual governance structures, led by a business sponsor and a dedicated project manager, with representation from all implicated areas. The Project Governance and Investment Board provides the forum to ensure horizontal integration among the three elements.

Performance Highlights: For 2013-14, consultations will be held for the drafting of an improved food inspection model (formerly known as the improved inspection delivery model). Project approval will be sought for the IMIT solution to support the implementation of the draft model as well as the electronic service delivery platform. The food inspection modernization system and electronic service delivery platform project team will develop the required project documentation for project approval, and work with stakeholders will be initiated to develop detailed business requirements. With respect to the implementation of Health Canada's Listeria policy for non-meat ready-to-eat food, the Agency will continue staffing actions to provide additional inspection staff for inspection activities in high-risk areas, validate new laboratory methodologies for Listeria in non-meat commodities, and analyze additional food and environmental samples. CFIA subject matter experts will also provide refresher training to existing staff to keep inspectors current with emerging trends and developments related to their work. Adjustments to the core training program will occur as the new inspection model is developed and refined.

To enhance scientific capacity in 2013-14, the CFIA will assemble a small team to work in collaboration with partners and explore with experts the concepts, processes, and mechanisms available to conduct a laboratory systems analysis of the Canadian food laboratory system. Partners will be engaged in exploring data and information requirements and opportunities in anticipation of future feasibility assessments, with respect to the use of existing feasibility assessments, or in the creation of an IMIT platform for secure data sharing. The Modernizing Equipment and Laboratories sub-projects at the GTA and St-Hyacinthe Food laboratories will move into the Project Planning stage with the awarding of contracts for the engineering/design phase of the projects. This will provide support in moving to the execution stage of the projects with construction beginning in 2014-15. Additionally, highly skilled scientists will be hired in targeted laboratories.

Planned activities to increase efficiency in IMIT will include a collaborative effort with Shared Services Canada (SSC) to create a new Data Centre Backup/Restore site to handle the increased requirements of modernized inspection systems. Improvements to end-user assets will continue with the distribution of more portable end-user devices and improved wireless network connectivity. The IMIT Branch will continue consultations with their business partners in the Agency to modernize various components of the IMIT infrastructure of the organization to better meet the needs of the inspectors in the field. The Agency will strengthen its information integration capability by introducing Agency-wide data standards. Planning will commence for desktop operating system and tool upgrading and standardization as well as for increased data storage and backup capacity.

Federal Partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing Activities / Programs Total Allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results (ER) Contributing Activities / Programs Results (RA)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Food Safety Program / Internal Services Inspection Modernization 100.2 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 16.2 12.0 ER 52 RA 52
Enhancing Scientific Capacity 19.8 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 2.4 1.4 ER 53 RA 53
Improved IMIT 16.8 (2013-14 to 2015-16) 3.8 1.9 ER 54 RA 54
Total 136.8 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 22.4 15.3

ER 52: Inspection System Modernization

Improved Food Inspection Model (formally known as the Improved Inspection Delivery Model)

Development of improved food inspection model and IMIT solutions to support the model.

Outcome: The development of an improved inspection delivery model, with supporting IMIT solutions that will result in the improved management of food safety risks.

Outputs/activities: A single food inspection program will be developed, supported by IMIT solutions for food inspection. The improved inspection delivery model will include standard collection, reporting and analysis across food commodities and will provide a more consistent inspection and enforcement approach for regulated parties.

Indicator: TBD7

Target: TBD7

Verifying Compliance with HC's Revised Listeria Policy

Outcome: Fewer illnesses caused by Listeria monocytogenes resulting from the consumption of high-risk, non-meat RTE foods.

Outputs and Activities: The Agency will enhance inspection and testing activities to verify industry control of Listeria in all high-risk, non-meat RTE food. The Agency will increase the number of inspections and samples taken and analyzed and provide technical support for risk assessments resulting from positive findings. Sampling data will be used to support risk-based decision-making. Industry will be encouraged to implement preventative Listeria control programs. New Listeria testing methods will be validated and trend analysis will be developed.

Indicator: TBD7

Target: TBD7

Electronic Service Delivery Platform

Outcome: The CFIA can interact with business and international trading partners in an effective, transparent, and timely fashion.

Outputs and Activities: The Agency will develop an electronic service delivery platform (ESDP) to enable regulated parties to more readily access CFIA programs and information. Secure service delivery applications will be developed and integrated within an electronic portal. The first deliverable under the ESDP will be electronic export certification.

Indicator: TBD7

Target: TBD7

Recruitment and Training of Inspectors

Outcome: The recruitment and training process for inspection staff within the CFIA will be designed to meet the requirements of the modernized inspection model.

Outputs and Activities: A comprehensive national recruitment, selection, and training strategy based on a core, competency-based curriculum for inspection staff will be developed. Core training to new recruits as well as enhanced ongoing training for existing inspection staff will be provided.

Indicator: TBD7

Target: TBD7

Developing a Laboratory Network Strategy

Outcome: Improved CFIA food laboratory capacity and improved ability to detect and respond to food safety related hazards.

Outputs and Activities: Collaborative opportunities between partners will be identified. Best practices from existing laboratory networks will be reviewed, and an analysis of gaps and needs within the food laboratory system will be completed. Commitment from partners to build and implement a food laboratory network will be sought. Feasibility studies describing a system to share laboratory information will be completed. A plan and steps to implement a food laboratory network will be developed and put in place.

Indicator: TBD7

Target: TBD7

Modernizing Equipment and Laboratories

Outcome: Improved CFIA food laboratory capacity to detect and respond to food safety related hazards.

Outputs and Activities: Laboratory expansion and renovation of targeted laboratories will be completed. Laboratory equipment will be upgraded with the procurement of modern testing equipment.

Indicator: TBD7

Target: TBD7

RA 52: Inspection System Modernization

Development of an improved food inspection model

Consulted on Draft A of the Improved Food Inspection Model with 49 agency, industry or international communities between April 2012 and November 2012.

A manual of procedures technical working group developed and compiled policies, procedures, protocols, forms, illustrations and detailed descriptions of the inspection procedures for the components of the proposed inspection model framework.

Consultations on Draft B were initiated from November to March, using webinars and face-to-face meetings across the country.

An Agency-wide process was initiated in December to examine and develop the business processes that will support the improved food inspection model.

Undertake pre-planning work that will result in a submission to Treasury Board for project approval in year two.

The Treasury Board submission with draft supporting documentation was shared with Treasury Board Secretariat on January 7 for iterative review. Documentation includes: Business Case, Project Charter, Preliminary Project Management Plan, Project Complexity and Risk Assessment, Project Brief, and TB Submission.

Enhance inspection and testing activities to verify industry control of Listeria in all high-risk, non-meat RTE food.

The CFIA implemented new sampling plans for Listeria in non-meat foods and non-meat food processing environments. Under these new sampling plans, CFIA inspectors collected 525 end-product and environmental samples which were tested in CFIA laboratories for the presence of Listeria.

A method validation study was undertaken to evaluate four different Listeria testing methods for the detection of Listeria in non-meat food and environmental samples. Multiple samples sets were analyzed throughout 2012-13 and validation is complete on three sample sets. Validation studies are ongoing throughout 2013-14.

Implement a national approach to recruitment, closely linked with consistent, competency-based core training for inspection staff.

Three six-week Pre-Requisite Employment Program (PREP) core training sessions were held at the CBSA Rigaud complex.

A multi-year refresher training plan for existing inspection staff was created and implemented, starting with Foundations of Inspection and Regulations and Note Taking for Regulatory Personnel.

ER 53: Enhancing Laboratory Response Capacity

Outcome: The CFIA is able to detect and respond faster to food safety hazards.

Outputs and Activities: The number of highly skilled scientists in targeted laboratories will be enhanced through hiring additional scientists. New rapid, scientific, and sensitive food safety testing methods will be developed.

Indicator: TBD7

Target: TBD7

RA 53: Enhancing Laboratory Response Capacity

The CFIA held negotiations with Health Canada to identify space for expansion in the Greater Toronto Area laboratory. For the St-Hyacinthe Laboratory, the completion of the Functional Program and Options Analysis was received in January 2013.

Staffing processes were finalized for positions at the Ottawa Laboratory Carling.

CFIA initiated two collaborative agreements, one with Genome Canada and the second with Genome Alberta Innovates Bio Solutions. In addition, a collaborative project between CFIA Dartmouth Laboratory and Health Canada on Campylobacter genomics work was approved.

Established internal Secretariat responsible for the development of a strategy and business case for a Food Safety Integrated Surveillance Network. The proposed network will help governments anticipate, detect, and respond to food-borne threats and hazards in an integrated, collaborative, and timely manner. Launched Federal, Provincial and Territorial Steering Committee and supporting technical working groups to develop the strategy and ensure that F/P/T needs were identified and addressed.

ER 54: Improved IMIT

Outcome: Foundational IMIT elements in place to support business needs in the delivery of food safety management risks.

Outputs and Activities: Increase connectivity for front-line staff. Acquisition and deployment of modern devices to inspection staff. Provide the Agency and Agency staff with stable and up-to-date information management and integration capabilities. Negotiate with Shared Services Canada for the provision of additional data storage and backup capacity.

Indicator: TBD7

Target: TBD7

RA 54: Improved IMIT

Development of an IMIT Business Continuity Plan was initiated and is expected to be completed in the fall of 2013.

In collaboration with Shared Services Canada, the Agency procured hardware and software for a CITRIX environment which will improve remote connectivity for remote CFIA users. Additional server access licenses and virus detection software were procured to support the enhanced CITRIX environment.

Federal Partners Program activity (PAA) Contributing Activities / Programs Total Allocation (from start date to end date) ($ Millions) 2012-13 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results (ER) Contributing Activities / Programs Results (RA)
Health Canada (HC) Food Safety and Nutrition Enhancing Health Risk Assessment Capacity to Support CFIA Food Safety Inspection Activities 2.6 (2013-14 to 2015-16) 0.517 0.44 ER 55 RA 55
Total 2.6 (2013-14 to 2015-16) 0.517 0.44

ER 55: Inspection System Modernization

Enhanced Health Risk Assessment Capacity

Outcome 1: CFIA-led food safety investigations will be supported by timely health risk assessments that will further support swift action being taken to minimize/mitigate the potential exposure of Canadians to hazards in food associated illnesses.

Outputs/Activities: Health Canada will build additional flexibility in its health risk assessment capacity to sustain its current level of service through the hiring of additional employees, ongoing training, review and analysis of health risk assessment activities, and the proactive development of new policies and guidelines, where appropriate.

Indicator: TBD

Target: TBD

RA 55: Inspection System Modernization

24/7 HRA capacity; responded to all CFIA-generated HRAs within the service standard as well as to requests for technical advice (e.g., sampling plans, interpretation of standards and guidelines, etc.).

Trend analysis of HRAs data to identify risks that may require further food safety interventions has been initiated; this includes qualitative and quantitative risk assessments of priority pathogen-food combinations.

Total Allocation for All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) ($ Millions) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13 ($ Millions) Total Actual Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13 ($ Millions)
99.8 (new funding) and 40.0 (Internal reallocation) (2011-12 to 2015-16)22.91715.74

Comments on variances:

In regards to the $7.1M variance for the FSM Horizontal Initiative, $5.5M was re-profiled to outer years to align with the IMIT projects' planned expenditures and the remaining $1.6M lapsed is being carried forward and reallocated to other high priority areas within the FSM HI.

Results achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact Information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Steven Yafalian
Portfolio Coordinator
Portfolio Coordination Office, Agency Transformation
613-773-5153

Health Canada
Amanda Whitfield
Senior Policy Analyst
Director General's Office, Food Directorate
613-948-2761

Internal Audits and Evaluations

Internal Audits Table

Departments and agencies must provide a list of key internal audits that pertain to the department's work during the reporting period. Departments and agencies should also provide electronic links to completed internal audits.

Internal Audits (current reporting period)
Name of Internal Audit Audit Type Status Completion Date
2011-2012
Contracting and Procurement Assurance Completed September 2012
Corrective Action Requests Assurance Completed May 2013
2012-2013
Safeguarding of Moveable Assets8 Assurance In Progress June 2013
Business Continuity Planning Assurance In Progress September 2013
Quality Management System Assurance In Progress September 2013
Occupational Safety and Health Assurance In Progress March 2014
HR Audit Assurance Deferred 2014-2015
IMIT Governance - Follow-Up Audit Assurance Cancelled N/A
Food Safety Action Plan Assurance (SUD) Cancelled N/A
Area TBD Assurance Cancelled N/A

View the CFIA Audit Reports.

Evaluations Table

Departments and agencies must provide a list of all evaluations that pertain to the department's work during the reporting period. Departments should also provide electronic links to completed evaluation reports or a single link to the page that houses all evaluation reports for the department.

Evaluations (current reporting period)
Name of Internal Evaluation Program Activity Status Completion Date
2011-2012
Evaluation of the Food Safety Action Plan Food Safety Program In Progress June 2013
Evaluation of CFIA's Enhanced Feed Ban (surveillance) Animal Health and Zoonotics Program In Progress May 2013
Fertilizer Program Evaluation Plant Resources Program In Progress June 2013
Evaluation of CFIA's Research and Development Programming Food Safety Program Cancelled N/A
2012-2013
Evaluation of Continuing a Comprehensive Strategy for Managing surveillance in Canada, 5-year funding Animal Health and Zoonotics Program In Progress March 2014
Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Program Evaluation Food Safety Program In Progress December 2013
Evaluation of the Plant Protection program activity Plant Resources Program Planned March 2014
Evaluation of CFIA Regulations Food Safety Program
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Plant Resources Program
Cancelled N/A
Evaluation of the CFIA Evaluation Function as per Evaluation Policy Internal Services Cancelled N/A

View the CFIA Evaluation Reports.

Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue

Respendable Revenue
($ millions)
Program Activity Actual 2010-119 Actual 2011-12 2012-13
Main Estimates Planned Revenue Total Authorities Actual
Food Safety Program 32.5 34.9 30.6 30.6 35.2 35.2
Meat & Poultry 0.0 21.8 19.1 19.1 22.0 22.0
Egg 0.0 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0
Dairy 0.0 1.1 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.0
Fish & Seafood 0.0 5.6 4.6 4.6 5.3 5.3
Fresh Fruit & Vegetables 0.0 3.5 3.2 3.2 3.7 3.7
Processed Products (inc. Hokey & Maple products) 0.0 1.3 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2
Imported and Manufactured Food Products 0.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 2.8 3.5 2.8 2.8 3.4 3.4
Terrestrial Animal Health 0.0 3.3 2.6 2.6 3.2 3.2
National Aquatics Animal Health Program (NAAHP) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Feed 0.0 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
Plant Resources Program 7.1 7.3 6.4 6.4 7.7 7.7
Plant Protection 0.0 4.6 3.9 3.9 4.7 4.7
Seed 0.0 2.7 2.4 2.4 2.9 2.9
Fertilizer 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
International Collaboration & Technical Agreements 11.7 12.5 13.2 13.2 10.6 10.6
Internal Services 0.1 0.8 0.2 0.2 1.3 1.3
Total Respendable Revenue 54.2 59.0 53.2 53.2 58.2 58.2
Non-Respendable Revenue
($ millions)
Program Activity Actual 2010-119 Actual 2011-12 2012-13
Main Estimates Planned Revenue Total Authorities Actual
Food Safety Program 0.0 0.0 N/A N/A N/A 0.0
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 0.0 0.0 N/A N/A N/A 0.0
Plant Resources Program 0.0 0.0 N/A N/A N/A 0.0
International Collaboration & Technical Agreements 0.0 0.0 N/A N/A N/A 0.0
Internal Services10 0.9 1.3 N/A N/A N/A 2.0
Total Non-Respendable Revenue 0.9 1.3 N/A N/A N/A 2.0

Status Report on Projects Operating with Specific Treasury Board Approval

Project Original Estimated Total Cost ($ millions) Revised Estimated Total Cost ($ millions) Actual Total Cost ($ millions) 2012-13 ($ millions)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Expected date of close-out
Program Activity: Food Safety
Food Safety Action Plan IMIT Enabled Business Project 40.0 35.5 24.7 1.7 1.7 9.0 7.8 December 2013
Traceability National Information Portal 12.7 12.7 8.6 0.0 0.0 2.0 4.5 March 2013

2012-13 User Fees Reporting

Table A: User Fee

Program Activity: Food Safety Program

Fee Type11: R

Fee-setting Authority: CFIA Act

Year Last Modified: 1998

Performance Standards:

Performance Results:

2012-13 ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost12
33,847 34,558 387,595
Planning Years ($ thousands)
Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost13
2013-14 32,901 364,611
2014-15 32,901 321,748
2015-16 32,901 314,198

Other Information: Not Applicable

Program Activity: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Fee Type11: R

Fee-setting Authority: CFIA Act

Year Last Modified: 1998

Performance Standards:

Performance Results:

2012-13 ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost12
3,033 3,012 192,377
Planning Years ($ thousands)
Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost13
2013-14 2,867 180,888
2014-15 2,867 159,623
2015-16 2,867 155,877

Other Information: Not Applicable

Program Activity: Plant Resources Program

Fee Type11: R

Fee-setting Authority: CFIA Act

Date Last Modified: 1998

Performance Standards:

Performance Results:

2012-13 ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost12
7,063 7,647 97,535
Planning Years ($ thousands)
Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost13
2013-14 7,280 91,754
2014-15 7,280 80,967
2015-16 7,280 79,067

Other Information: Not Applicable

Program Activity: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Fee Type11: R

Fee-setting Authority: CFIA Act

Date Last Modified: 1998

Performance Standards:

Performance Results:

2012-13 ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost12
12,541 10,617 36,543
Planning Years ($ thousands)
Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost13
2013-14 10,109 34,377
2014-15 10,109 30,336
2015-16 10,109 29,624

Other Information: Not Applicable

Program Activity: Internal Services

Fee Type11: R

Fee-setting Authority: CFIA Act

Date Last Modified: 1998

Performance Standards:

Performance Results:

2012-13 ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost12
4 4 142,007
Planning Years ($ thousands)
Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost13
2013-14 4 133,831
2014-15 4 118,098
2015-16 4 115,326

Other Information: Not Applicable

Program Activity: Internal Services

Fee Type11: O

Fee-setting Authority: Access to Information Act14

Date Last Modified:

Performance Standards:

Performance Results:

2012-13 ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost12
7 7 1,006
Planning Years ($ thousands)
Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost13
2013-14 7 947
2014-15 7 835
2015-16 7 816

Other Information: Not Applicable

User Fees Totals
2012-13 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
Subtotal Regulatory 56,488 55,838 856,057 2013-14 53,161 805,461
2014-15 53,161 710,772
2015-16 53,161 694,092
Subtotal Other Products and Services 7 7 1,006 2013-14 7 947
2014-15 7 835
2015-16 7 816
Total 56,495 55,845 857,063 2013-14 53,168 806,408
2014-15 53,168 711,607
2015-16 53,168 694,908

Table B: External Fee

2012-2013 The CFIA's Performance Report on External Fees
External Fee Service Standard Performance Results Stakeholder Consultation
Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act (ATIA) Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension to be sent within 30 days of receipt of request. Of the 355 requests completed under the ATIA last fiscal year, 155 (44%) were completed in under 30 days; 38 (11%) were completed in 31 to 60 days; 103 (29%) were completed in 61 to 120 days; and 59 (16%) were completed in 121 days or more. The service standard is established by the ATIA and the Access to Information Regulations. Consultations with stakeholders were undertaken by the Department of Justice and the Treasury Board Secretariat for amendments made in 1986 and 1992.
Canadian Centre for Veterinary Biologics Service Standards (CCVB)
(The service standards refer to CCVB calendar days, unless specified otherwise)
The CCVB made significant progress in eliminating backlogs and is now meeting service standards for all key indicators, with very few exceptions. To address stakeholders' concerns about capacity and timeliness of the regulatory approval process for animal health products, the CCVB has participated in the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee (CAHPRAC) since 2008 in collaboration with Health Canada's Veterinary Drugs Directorate.
Dossier Review (new submission, change in product formulation or change in label claim) Met
Canadian Manufacturers
1. Review initial submission and prepare response 1) Maximum response time is four months
Average response time is three months
Met To address stakeholder concerns, a phased review system is in place, allowing for submission review and response while information and data are pending.
2. Review supplemental data and prepare response 2) Maximum response time is six weeks
Average response time is four weeks
Met
American Manufacturers
3. Review initial submission and prepare response 3) Maximum response time is four months
Average response time is three months
Met To address stakeholder concerns about timely availability of U.S. manufactured products, a concurrent review system was introduced to allow for submission review and response while U.S. licensure is being finalized.
4. Review supplemental data and prepare response 4) Maximum response time is six weeks
Average response time is four weeks
Met
Manufacturers from other countries
5. Review initial submission and prepare response 5) Maximum response time is six months
Average response time is four months
Met
6. Review supplemental data and prepare response 6) Maximum response time is six weeks
Average response time is four weeks
Met
Laboratory Testing
7. Each master cell line 7) Maximum response time is four months
Average response time is three months
Met
8. Each master seed culture 8) Maximum response time is four months
Average response time is three months
Met 
9. Each pre-licensing serial tested, to a maximum of three 9) Maximum response time is four months
Average response time is three months
Met
Facility Inspections/Audits
10. Canadian manufacturers 10) Annual
Average is annual.
Met
11. Canadian importers 11) Minimum every three years
Average is every three years
Met
12. American manufacturers 12) Minimum every three years
Average is every three years
Met For facilities inspected annually and licensed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS), CCVB may inspect when the product is first licensed in Canada. Subsequent inspections will be arranged as necessary. CCVB may request copies of inspection reports from USDA-APHIS.
13. Other non-Canadian manufacturers 13) Minimum every four years
Average is every four years
Met For facilities inspected regularly for Good Manufacturing Practices, CCVB may inspect when the product is first licensed in Canada. Subsequent inspections will be arranged as necessary.
14. Issuance of Permits, Licenses and Export Certificates 14) Maximum response time is two weeks
Average response time is two weeks
Met
Serial Release
15. If not tested 15) Maximum response time is five days
Average response time is two to three days
Met
16. If tested 16) Maximum response time is 35 days
Average response time is two weeks
Met
Due to test scheduling and set up requirements, the average response time has consistently approached the maximum response time of 35 days.
17. Label Review and Approval 17) Maximum response time is four weeks
Average response time is two weeks
Met
18. Advertising Review and Approval 18) Maximum response time is four weeks
Average response time is two weeks
Met To address stakeholder concerns, CCVB is no longer reviewing and approving advertising.
19. Protocol Review for Efficacy/Safety Studies 19) Maximum response time is 45 days
Average response time is 30 days
Met
20. Production Outline Revisions 20) Maximum response time is four weeks
Average response time is two weeks
Met
21. Suspected Adverse Reactions 21) Maximum response time is four weeks
Average response time is two weeks
Met
Application for Feed Registration and Ingredient Approval
(i) Timeliness: For 90 percent or more of the applications received
  (a) Feed Section screens applications within ten days of receiving them. N/A
  (b) For products requiring a review of efficacy data, a preliminary review is conducted within 10 days of the screening date, and results are communicated to the applicant. N/A
  (c) Animal Feed Division conducts efficacy, livestock, human, and environmental safety reviews and responds to applicants within 90 days. 28.6% of applications were completed within 90 days. To address stakeholder concerns about capacity and timeliness of the regulatory approval process, the CFIA is working through the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee (CAHPRAC).
  (d) The laboratory does a desk review of proposed methods of analysis within four weeks of receiving them. If laboratory testing is required, it will be done within 12 weeks of receiving a suitable method and test samples depending on availability of specialized equipment. N/A
(ii) Quality
  (a) The Feeds Regulations are consistently interpreted and applied in registration/approval decisions. Met
  (b) Information is openly exchanged between clients and evaluation specialists. Met
  (c) Analytical methods are evaluated for specificity, selectivity, reliability and accuracy, using internationally standardized method validation procedures. Met
Destination Inspection Service
(Fresh Fruits and Vegetables)
The service standard is to respond to 80% of inspection requests within eight working hours of receiving a request and 100% of inspection requests within 24 hours. National Results: 98.4% within eight hours and 99.6% within 24 hours. Service standards were established for Destination Inspection Service, in consultation with the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable sector. The CFIA consults with the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable sector on an ongoing basis by holding annual meetings with its National Advisory Board for destination inspection services.

Other Information:

Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

Response to Parliamentary Committees

Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food

Growing Forward 2 (GF2)

The report was adopted by the Committee and presented to the House of Commons on May 28, 2012. A Government Response was requested by the Committee and was presented to the House of Commons on September 21, 2012. The response was in the spirit of the report and shared the Committee's commitment to an agricultural sector that is competitive and innovative; that contributes to society's priorities; and that is proactive in managing risks.

The response is available on the Parliament of Canada's website.

Response to the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

No Response to the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development) was provided by the CFIA during the 2012 2013 fiscal year.

External Audits: (Note: These refer to other external audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages)

No audits by either the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages were conducted at the CFIA during the 2012-2013 fiscal year.

3.3 Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Other Items of Interest

4.1 Performance Indicators by Operational Priority

Associated SO(s) Operational Priorities Performance Indicators
All Strategic Outcomes
  1. Focus on Programs
  2. Strengthen Strategic Directions, performance measurement and Transparency
  3. Focus on People
  4. Focus on Stewardship
Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base
  • Number of countries imposing justifiable standards-related restrictions on exports of Canadian commodities (food, animals, plants, and their products)
  • Canada's status on the OIE disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk"
  • Percentage of Canadians who have confidence in the Canadian food supply system

Program Activity: Food Safety Program

  • Percentage of inspected federally registered establishments in compliance with federal regulations
  • Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision
  • Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision
  • Percentage of domestic food products in compliance with federal regulations
  • Percentage of imported food products in compliance with federal regulations

Program Activity: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

  • Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways
  • Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease
  • Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements
  • Canada's status on the OIE disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk"
  • Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease
  • Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed
  • Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises in which CFIA participates
  • Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion
  • Percentage of cases where CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease

Program Activity: Plant Resources Program

  • Number of new foreign reportable plant diseases and pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves.
  • Percentage of domestic plants and plant products in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Percentage of confirmed cases of quarantine pest for which notices were issued.
  • Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner.
  • Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination regulatory requirements

Program Activity: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

  • Number of Canadian positions on key rules and standards affecting trade in food, animal, plant, and their products that are effectively promoted
  • Number of actions taken to resolve issues identified through the Market Access Secretariat
  • Number of cooperation initiatives achieved

4.2 Further Information on the Assessment of Compliance

As a regulatory agency, the principal means by which the CFIA carries out its mandate is by measuring rates of compliance with Canadian food, animal, and plant legislative requirements. The CFIA promotes compliance by conducting inspections, audits, product sampling and verifications. The CFIA also carries out education and awareness activities to increase regulated parties' understanding of statutory requirements and standards. Compliance rates are an indicator of the extent to which regulated parties have adhered to federal acts and regulations. The CFIA takes the following approaches to assessing compliance:

  • Monitoring: Establishments or products are inspected, sampled and tested in such a way that the resulting compliance rates are representative of the CFIA-regulated population. Monitoring programs provide an accurate overview of compliance in the marketplace in general.
  • Targeting: In cases where monitoring has identified significant compliance problems, the CFIA takes a targeted approach to inspections, sampling and testing by focusing on the problem area and areas of highest risk. Non-compliant establishments or products are often sought out for targeting to better define problem areas and reasons for non-compliance. For this reason, compliance rates of targeted programs are typically lower. Improved compliance is promoted through enforcement actions.
  • Investigating: Investigations are undertaken for the purposes of prosecution for non-compliance, which includes gathering evidence and information from a variety of sources considered relevant to a suspected violation or offence.

The methods for determining compliance reflect the level and type of risks associated with the food or agricultural products being assessed. The specific methods the CFIA uses to determine compliance are outlined below:

  • Compliance results are determined during the initial inspection;
  • Compliance results are determined during the CFIA follow up visit conducted after the initial inspection;
  • Compliance results are determined during the initial testing of food and product samples; and
  • Compliance results are determined on an annual basis, following a correction period after the end of the fiscal year.

Varying by program, non-compliance can be determined if:

  • There is a violation that poses a significant health and safety concern; and
  • There is any violation even if it is not health and safety related.

Where compliance rates appear in this report, the relevant method used to assess compliance has been noted.

When CFIA inspectors determine that a regulated party is non-compliant, that party is required to take corrective action. If non-compliance persists, Agency inspectors have a variety of tools at their disposal. In a graduated approach, these tools range from procedural actions including letters of non-compliance, seizure and detention, suspension/cancellation of licences/registrations/permits and recommending prosecution.

The complexity of the agri-food sector and the inherent variability of the biological and production systems underpinning it are such that some degree of non-compliance is inevitable. A compliance rate of less than one hundred per cent means that some proportion of the facilities or products inspected by the CFIA has failed to meet certain requirements or standards as defined by the legislation. Major variances have the potential to pose a significant risk to human, animal or plant health and/or other program objectives. These are always met with vigorous enforcement actions to assure protection of Canadians and the plant and animal resource base. Some deficiencies represent minor variances and do not pose a significant risk to human, animal or plant health.

It is critical to note that the nature of the CFIA's mandated responsibilities is dynamic, given their basis in biological and production systems that are ever-changing. The inherent variability of these systems makes them difficult to predict and it is reasonable to expect some shift in compliance from year to year. The specificity of targets and reported results must be considered in this context.

4.3 Organizational Contact Information

Contact the Canadian Food Inspection Agency via:

Telephone from Monday to Friday 08:00 to 20:00 Eastern time:
Toll Free: 1-800-442-2342
NCR: 1-800-442-2342 / 613-773-2342
TTY: 1-800-465-7735

Internet:
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/util/contact/commene.shtml

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