2012-2013 Departmental Performance Report
Section I: Organizational Overview

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1.1 Raison d'être

THE CFIA'S LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY

CFIA Wide

  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food
    Administrative Monetary Penalties Act

Food Safety

  • Food and Drugs Act (as it relates to food)
  • Safe Food for Canadians Act (SFCA)
    (Once brought into force, the SFCA will replace the following):
    • Canada Agricultural Products Act
    • Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act (as it relates to food)
    • Fish Inspection Act
    • Meat Inspection Act

Plant

  • Fertilizers Act
  • Plant Breeders' Rights Act
  • Plant Protection Act
  • Seeds Act

Animal

  • Health of Animals Act
  • Feeds Act

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canada's largest science-based regulatory agency. It has approximately 7,120Footnote 1 employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal, and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy.

The CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services in order to:

  • prevent and manage food safety risks;
  • protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species;
  • prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases;
  • contribute to consumer protection; and
  • contribute to market access for Canada's food, plants, and animals.

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective risk management, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

1.2 Responsibilities

THE CFIA'S KEY FEDERAL PARTNERS

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Health Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Canadian Grain Commission
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada, including Canadian Forest Service
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
  • Environment Canada, including Canadian Wildlife Service

The CFIA is responsible for administrating and enforcing 13 federal statutes and 38 sets of regulations, for regulating the safety and quality of food sold in Canada, and for supporting a sustainable plant and animal resource base. In November 2012, the Safe Food for Canadians Act received Royal Assent. This new legislation, when in force, will allow the CFIA to create new regulations that provide the necessary legal framework for a single, consistent approach to strengthening food inspection in Canada. It updates and consolidates the Fish Inspection Act, the Canada Agricultural Products Act, the Meat Inspection Act, and the food provisions of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act.

The CFIA shares many of its core responsibilities with other federal departments and agencies, with provincial, territorial and municipal authorities, with private industry, and with other stakeholders. The CFIA works with its partners to implement food safety measures; manage food, animal, and plant risks, incidents and emergencies; and promotes the development of food safety and disease control systems to maintain the safety of Canada's high-quality agriculture, agri-food, aquaculture and fishery products. The CFIA's activities include verifying the compliance of imported products; registering and inspecting establishments; testing food, animals, plants, and their related products; and approving the use of many agricultural inputs. The CFIA also provides scientific advice, develops new technologies, provides testing services, and conducts regulatory research.

At the CFIA, decisions are based on high-quality, timely, relevant science. Science informs policy development and program design and delivery through foresight, advice, risk assessment, the influence of international standards, research and development, and testing.

1.3 Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

To effectively fulfill its responsibilities in safeguarding Canada's food and sustaining its animal and plant resource base, the CFIA aims to achieve its strategic outcomeFootnote 2 (A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base). The CFIA's Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), shown in Figure 1, illustrates how the Agency's strategic outcome aligns with those of the Government of Canada and reflects how the Agency plans to allocate and manage its resources to achieve the corresponding expected results. The Agency's priorities are reviewed annually to facilitate effective resource management within the context of the PAA framework. The four priority areas established for 2012–13 are detailed further in Section 1.4 and Section II.

Program Activity Architecture for the CFIA

Description for Flowchart – Program Activity Architecture for the CFIA

The CFIA's Vision
To excel as a science-based regulator, trusted and respected by Canadians and the international community

The CFIA's Mission
Dedicated to safeguarding Canada's food, animals and plants, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment and economy

GoC Outcome Areas

  • Healthy Canadians
  • Strong Economic Growth
  • A Clean and Healthy Environment
  • A Fair and Secure Marketplace
  • A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce

Strategic Outcome
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

Program Food Safety Program Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Plant Resources Program International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Internal Services*
Sub-Program
  • Meat & Poultry
  • Egg
  • Dairy
  • Fish & Seafood
  • Fresh Fruits & Vegetables
  • Processed Products
  • Imported and Manufactured Food Products
  • Terrestrial Animal Health
  • Aquatic Animal Health
  • Feed
  • Plant Protection
  • Seed
  • Fertilizer
  • Intellectual Property Rights
  • Governance and Management Support
  • Resource Management Services
  • Asset Management Services

The CFIA's Foundation

  • Sound Science
  • Effective Regulatory Base
  • Effective Inspection Programs
  • Effective Risk Management
  • Strong Partnerships
  • Transparent Timely Communications

The CFIA's Priorities

  • Strong Foundations
  • Working with Partners
  • Enhancing Services
  • Strengthening Internal Services

Key Risk Areas

  • Management Information and IM/IT Infrastructure
  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Managing Change
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships
  • Emergency Management

*The Internal Services program activity supports the CFIA's strategic outcome and all its programs.

1.4 Organizational Priorities

For the 2012–13 fiscal year, the CFIA focussed on four strategic business priorities with the goal of strengthening the Agency's foundations, mitigating strategic risks and helping effectively deliver core program activities. The following table summarizes the Agency's performance with respect to achieving these priorities. Additional details are provided in Section II.

It should also be noted that during the 2012–13 fiscal year, the Agency's change agenda, and its priorities were further refined through the Agency's Long-Term Strategic Plan (LTSP). By defining the Agency's long-term vision and carefully considering its key strategic risks, the Long-Term Strategic Plan assists the CFIA in mitigating its risks, strengthening its foundations, and effectively delivering its core program activities.

Priority TypeFootnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Building a stronger foundation to enable effective and efficient program delivery New Link to Food Safety Program (2.2.1.1), Animal Health and Zoonotics Program (2.2.1.2), and Plant Resources Program (2.2.1.3)
Summary of Progress
Currently the CFIA manages twelve sets of regulations and eight specific programs related to the oversight of food safety in Canada. With the coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Act, which received Royal Assent in November 2012 and which will improve food safety oversight, these regulations and programs will be managed as a single set of food regulations. This new legislation which is expected to come into force in the near future, will allow for new regulations to be made that provide the necessary legal framework for a single, consistent approach to strengthening food inspection in Canada. As we move forward, the CFIA will consult stakeholders and other interested parties on the new Food Regulatory Framework.

Canada has one of the best inspection systems in the world. However, in response to pressures from increased globalization in the food industry and advances in science and technology, the CFIA continued to modernize its approach to food inspection in 2012–13. It consulted with stakeholders on the new improved food inspection model and redesigned many of its business functions in order to maintain a robust approach to food safety and consumer protection.

Finally, the CFIA recognizes that it must actively respond to changing demands on food related research and testing in order to support the early identification of hazards. Therefore in 2012–13, as part of Budget 2011, the CFIA began working with its partners to explore the concepts, processes, and mechanisms available to establish a national laboratory network for food safety. This collaboration will provide for a data sharing platform and harmonized laboratory methods and tools which will allow the CFIA and its partners to more effectively share and learn as food safety science evolves. It will also facilitate improved tracking and responses to food related illnesses.

Priority Type3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Working closely with partners to optimize health and safety outcomes and economic objectives across jurisdictions New Link to Food Safety Program (2.2.1.1), Animal Health and Zoonotics Program (2.2.1.2), Plant Resources Program (2.2.1.3), and International Collaboration and Technical Agreements (2.2.1.4)
Summary of Progress
As partners in the largest bilateral trading relationship in the world, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and President Barack Obama announced the Beyond the Border Declaration and the Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council in February 2011. Both initiatives seek to deepen our partnership and enhance our security, prosperity and economic competiveness while respecting each other's sovereignty. Specifically, in 2012–13, the CFIA worked with stakeholders and our US counterparts to conduct four joint assessments on commodities of common interest from third countries, and developed and announced a zoning protocol which, in the event of a contagious animal disease outbreak, will provide for continued bilateral trade from areas located outside the disease control and eradication zone.

The CFIA led Canada's efforts with the United States to launch pilot projects for simultaneous submissions for crop protection products and initiated a one-year pilot project aiming to streamline export certification and examine alternative approaches to import inspection activities.

In an effort to further protect consumers from Listeriosis, the CFIA entered into a partnership with Genome Canada and Alberta Innovates Bio Solutions. This partnership project aims to map the genome of Listeria bacteria so that more rapid tests can be developed as current test methods take at least five days. Genomic techniques could improve accuracy and cut testing time significantly, allowing the CFIA and industry to more effectively identify potentially unsafe foods and respond more quickly to protect consumers.

Priority Type3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Enhancing service to improve results for regulated parties and consumers New Link to Food Safety Program (2.2.1.1), Animal Health and Zoonotics Program (2.2.1.2), and Plant Resources Program (2.2.1.3)
Summary of Progress
The reputation and credibility of the CFIA are vital to its ability to deliver its mandate. As always, the CFIA is committed to being accountable for how it does business. This includes informing stakeholders and the public of its regulatory activities and decisions and reporting publicly on its performance. It is from this commitment that the CFIA developed the "Statement of Rights and Service for Producers, Consumers and Other Stakeholders". The Statement articulates the Agency's commitment to stakeholders. As well, it provides a compendium of audience-specific guides to inspection to provide stakeholders with a better understanding of: their specific rights when interacting with the CFIA; how the CFIA works with that specific stakeholder group; and the standards of behaviour by which CFIA employees abide. In addition, an Office of Complaints and Appeals was established and became operational in April 2012. This office investigates stakeholder complaints and appeals related to the quality of service, administrative errors and regulatory decisions. For more information on this office please visit the website.

Further, in an effort to promote a fair and consistent approach to program funding and to encourage effective and responsive service delivery, the CFIA made significant progress on a multi-year plan to review all of its service standards and fees. The goal is to ensure that all CFIA service standards and fees are in line with the actual costs of delivering the services and that all industry sectors are being treated equally in terms of service standards and applicable fees. In support of this, the CFIA has engaged extensively with stakeholders and invited feedback on proposed amendments. In 2012–13 the CFIA completed consultations on the following user fee amendments: Destination Inspection Service, Overtime Fees, and Importer Licensing. For more information on this please visit the website.

Priority Type3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Strengthening internal management to enhance effectiveness New This management priority is part of Internal Services (2.2.1.5), which contributes to all Program Levels
Summary of Progress
To deliver on its mandate, the CFIA must be able to attract, retain, and develop talented, dedicated employees at all levels. With this in mind, the Agency continued to implement its 2008–13 Human Resources Renewal Plan and act on its human resources priorities through such vehicles as collective staffing, the development of a 1-888 HR function, and targeted training of CFIA inspectors.

The CFIA has also made significant progress in ensuring that the Agency has the controls in place to allow managers to administer and deliver effectively and efficiently. It has accomplished this through such measures as improving internal reporting capability for monitoring performance against plans and aligning agency resources towards Agency priorities and high risk-based activities. These outcomes were reached through the establishment of a Business Information Management Center (BIMC), a business-driven approach to capture, integrate, provide access to, and report on our business data and information to enhance decision making within the CFIA.

1.5 Risk Analysis

The CFIA is responsible for identifying and managing risks to the food supply and the plant and animal resource base on which safe food and a prosperous economy depends. As such, the Agency has developed a robust risk management discipline to be adopted by all parts of the CFIA as an integral part of policy, priority setting, planning, resourcing, delivery, review and reporting activities.

The vast majority of the risks that fall within the Agency's mandate are managed in concert with numerous partners and stakeholders, both domestic and international. Within that context, the Agency's risk environment is rapidly changing and increasingly complex. Factors influencing key strategic risks faced by the Agency include (but are not limited to):

  • the emergence of global supply chains, which have fundamentally changed the way agricultural products are produced, processed, packaged, distributed and sold;
  • an increase in both the volume and variety of goods coming into Canada;
  • increased export opportunities for Canadian producers, coupled with changing international standards and more stringent requirements;
  • rapid advances in processing and manufacturing technologies, resulting in significant increases in production speed, volume and diversity and the subsequent need for legislative and regulatory frameworks to keep pace;
  • an increasingly knowledgeable, demanding and risk-averse stakeholder base;
  • the ongoing emergence of new pathogens due to increases in international travel and trade, microbial adaptation, changes in production methods and distribution as well as human demographics and behaviour;
  • a greater understanding of the convergence of human, animal and ecosystem health issues; and
  • a growing international consensus around the need for common scientific equipment and approaches to support industry oversight and the global agri-food trade.

A cornerstone of the CFIA's risk management process is the development of an Agency-wide Corporate Risk Profile (CRP). The Agency's 2012 CRP identifies the key strategic risks to which the Agency is exposed as a result of its internal and external operating environments, along with strategies aimed at reducing risk exposure to tolerable levels over the next several years. The results of the corporate risk profiling process have directly informed the priorities presented in Section 1.4 as well as the strategies presented throughout this report.

The following provides the highlights of the CFIA's key strategic risks, gives the planned responses to those risks, and links the risks to organizational priorities and program activities. The risks outlined below were identified in the 2012 RPP. Given that the Agency's corporate risks are currently static, and that response strategies are relatively long-term in nature, the risk responses were not significantly modified.

Table 1: Risk Summary

Detailed information on progress achieved under each of the mitigation strategies can be found in Section 2.2.1 where a leaf icon symbol has been included.

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture Linkage to Organizational Priority

Management Information and IM/IT Infrastructure:

Potential Threat:
The ability to make risk-based decisions due to the lack of timely, accurate and useful data and information.

The Agency's diverse information requirements and national presence has resulted in an IM/IT infrastructure containing a complex mix of new and old equipment that supports multiple IM/IT systems and databases. Differences in how information is collected analyzed and used across multiple systems and hardware may impede information sharing and timely operational and regulatory decision making.

Strategy: Strengthen planning, reporting and performance monitoring by increasing the level of horizontal collaboration between program design and operational delivery and by strengthening internal reporting mechanisms, tools and systems to create sustainable and reliable sources of information that can be used for reporting and decision making.

Achievement: The Agency has implemented a three year planning cycle. As well, a senior management reporting "dashboard" of the Agency's key performance data and semi-annual reporting on plans have been used to monitor progress against plans and ensure that the Agency maintains a reliable source of information for decision making.

Linked to the CFIA's main Strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Establish a Business Information Management Centre (BIMC) to improve the timeliness and accessibility of business data.

Achievement: The BIMC has promoted information sharing, fostered a culture of performance management, and supported sound decision making through the development of a quarterly senior management dashboard of the Agency's key performance indicators.

  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Consolidate and streamline IT infrastructure services through Shared Services Canada (SSC).

Achievement: SSC has confirmed that the CFIA/AAFC Data Centre will be one of the interim sites for the consolidation by theGovernment of Canada DataCentre. Work continues to evaluate overall requirements and future actions.

  • Working with Partners
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Inspection Effectiveness:

Potential Threat:
The ability to have appropriate inspection effectiveness to expeditiously prevent, detect, and respond to threats to food safety, animals and plants.

The Agency delivers 14 independently evolved inspection programs, each having diverse and complex requirements for training, information collection and industry compliance based on the commodity being regulated. Currently, the Agency's resource efficiency is impacted due to the maintenance of multiple training programs and IM/IT systems used to address distinct variations in inspection processes, tools, and information collection.

Strategy: Execute Inspection Modernization Initiative.

Achievement: The Agency has designed a new and improved risk-based inspection model which integrates a Risk-Based Inspection Oversight Model (RBIO) and is based on common inspection activities and standard processes. Implementation is planned over the next 2-3 years. Currently in the implementation phase.

Linked to the CFIA's main strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

  • Strong Foundation

Strategy: Strengthen planning, reporting and performance monitoring by increasing the level of horizontal collaboration between program design and operational delivery and by strengthening internal reporting mechanisms, tools and systems to create sustainable and reliable sources of information that can be used for reporting and decision making.

Achievement: The Agency has implemented a three year planning cycle. As well, a senior management reporting dashboard of the Agency's key performance indicators and semi-annual reporting against plans have been used to monitor progress on plans and ensure that the Agency maintains a reliable source of information for decision making.

  • Strengthen Internal Management

Scientific Capability:

Potential Threat: The ability to have the scientific capability to adapt and respond in a timely manner.

Advancements in science and technology have increased the complexity of the commodities the Agency regulates. Additionally, there is growing international consensus around the need for common scientific equipment and approaches to support industry oversight and the global agri-food trade. The Agency is expected to maintain an employee base and modern laboratory facilities that reflects these advancements in regulated products and international requirements.

Strategy: Laboratory infrastructure strategy.

Achievement: The Agency invested in new science technologies in key locations and upgraded critical laboratory infrastructure.

Linked to the CFIA's main strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

  • Strong Foundation

Strategy: Enhance laboratory response capacity.

Achievement: The Agency has initiated two collaborative agreements: one with Genome Canada and the other with Genome Alberta Innovates Bio Solutions, which focus on developing rapid detection methods for Listeria. As well, staffing processes have been finalized for additional laboratory personnel at various locations across the Agency.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Working with Partners

Strategy: Provide both new and experienced inspection staff with consistent and relevant training that reflects the new inspection model.

Achievement: The Agency developed an HR Strategy that targets recruitment, training and retention for new hires and experienced staff. A part of this plan is a new six week training program for all new CFIA inspectors. To date, it has completed three pilots (two English, one French) with 54 participants.

  • Enhancing Service
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Integrate Laboratory Network.

Achievement: The Agency developed a plan for an integrated network of laboratories to improve food safety response. Governance and a strategy have been developed to support the federal provincial and territorial efforts toward standardization and coordination of food safety surveillance activities.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Working with Partners

Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework:

Potential Threat:
The ability of the current legislative, regulatory and program framework to support the effective delivery of the Agency's mandate.

Rapid advances in processing and manufacturing technologies have resulted in significant increases in production speed, volume and diversity, requiring the subsequent need for updated legislative and regulatory frameworks. Statutes and authorities impact the design and delivery of programs that regulate new commodities and support economic competitiveness within the industry.

Strategy: Legislative renewal through the development and passage of regulations under the Safe Food for Canadians Act and the coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Act and its regulations.

Achievement: The Safe Food for Canadians Act received Royal Assent on November 22, 2012.

Linked to the CFIA's main strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

  • Strong Foundation
  • Enhancing Service

Strategy: Implement a Multi-Year Regulatory Plan.

Achievement: The Agency laid the foundation for the development of a modernized risk and outcome-based regulatory framework. Over the coming months, the Agency will be consulting with stakeholders on the proposed new regulatory framework.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Enhancing Service

Managing Change:

Potential Threat:
The ability to effectively manage change on an ongoing basis.

The global evolution of economic, social and environmental factors influences the regulatory and business environment within which the Agency operates. Consequently, fiscal restraint is growing in importance, as is the subsequent need for greater innovation to achieve efficiency while maintaining or increasing effectiveness in the way the Agency does its business and delivers its mandate.

Strategy: Provide both new and experienced inspection staff with consistent and relevant training that reflects the new inspection model.

Achievement: The Agency developed an HR Strategy that targets recruitment, training and retention for new hires and experienced staff. Part of this plan is a new six-week training program for all new CFIA inspectors. To date, it has completed three pilots (two English, one French) with 54 participants.

Linked to the CFIA's main strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

  • Enhancing Service
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Reinforce values and ethics to ensure ongoing dialogue between managers, supervisors, and employees and to provide guidance and advice within respective areas/ branches.

Achievement: Value and Ethics was added as a standing agenda item for many management teams and staff meetings, encouraging open dialogue. Comprehensive Value and Ethics training was provided, emphasizing the importance of ethical dialogue. The Senior Value and Ethics Officer made regular presentations to various Branch Management Teams (this year representing 50% of the Agency) and sent out messages and tools to support dialogue between managers, and supervisors and their staff.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Strengthen planning, reporting and performance monitoring by increasing the level of horizontal collaboration between program design and operational delivery and by strengthening internal reporting mechanisms, tools and systems to create sustainable and reliable sources of information that can be used for reporting and decision making.

Achievement: The Agency has implemented a three year planning cycle. As well, a senior management reporting dashboard of the Agency's key performance indicators and semi­annual reporting on plans have been used to monitor progress against plans and ensure that the Agency maintains a reliable source of information for decision making. Additionally internal governance processes have been implemented to better support planning and decision making.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Enhance project management. Design, deliver and establish, accessible and user friendly project management services for all employees.

Achievement: The CFIA conducted an independent assessment of project management maturity and has developed strategies/ approaches to further mature project management within the Agency.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Enhance internal and public engagement by enabling greater accountability for compliance, as well as improved service delivery and information sharing through the provision of quality online information and access to services in a context that the public wants and expects.

Achievement: The CFIA has completed and published its Transparency Policy which, along with the Statement of Rights and Service and the Complaints and Appeals Office, has enhanced the CFIA's reputation for fairness, accountability, and transparency.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Working with Partners
  • Enhancing Service
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Transparency and Leveraging Relationships:

Potential Opportunity:
Opportunity for the Agency to increase its transparency and accountability to stakeholders.

Information sharing enables regulated parties to take steps to ensure compliance and also helps to increase public awareness and confidence in the Canadian marketplace. Diverse methods exist to engage and collaborate with industry, other governmental stakeholders and the public to enhance the development of outputs that are mutually beneficial and agreed-upon.

Strategy: Enhance Service and Communication: Transparency Policy; Web Communication Strategy; Complaints/Appeals Mechanism; Access to Information and Privacy ATIP Modernization.

Achievement: The Transparency Policy was completed and published on April 1, 2013. The Implementation of the Complaints and Appeals Office was completed and launched in April 2012. Training sessions were delivered to increase ATIP awareness.

Draft Privacy Governance Framework developed.

Linked to the CFIA's main strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

  • Strengthen Internal Management

Strategy: Electronic Service Delivery Platform.

Achievement: E-business and e-certification now integrated with electronic service delivery platform (ESDP). The projects are managed under one project management office in order to gain efficiencies and leverage commonalities of the desired systems.

  • Strong Foundation

Strategy: User Fees/Service Standards Modernization.

Achievement: The review and modernization of user fees and service standards is making progress;

  • Destination Inspection draft proposal was completed;
  • Importer licensing proposal, for the non-federally registered sector, was approved;
  • Animal Export Certificates and Overtime Fees Proposals progressed as planned.
  • Strong Foundation

Strategy: Red Tape Reduction Initiatives.

Achievement: Initiatives contributing to the Red TapeReduction objectives are progressing well. e.g. legislative and regulatory renewal; inspection modernization strategy; training to support professional delivery of services; Transparency Agenda; ethical relationships; user fees and service standards; issuance of export certificates; etc.

  • Strong Foundation

Strategy: International Engagement: International Program Framework; International Strategic Framework; FDA Comparability and Border Initiatives with the US.

Achievement: The Agency made contributions to a common CFIA/AAFC database which will track on-going, emerging, and priority international issues.

Progress has been made with respect to Trans Pacific Partnership negotiations and free trade negotiations with the EU, India, and China.

Mutual recognition of zoning decisions between Canada and the US in the event of a highly contagious animal disease outbreak was arranged developed and announced.

Four joint assessments on third countries were conducted by Canada and the US to better protect both countries from off shore animal and plant risks.

  • Strong Foundation
  • Working with Partners
  • Enhancing Service
  • Strengthen Internal Management

Emergency Management:

Potential Threat:
The ability to respond to multiple simultaneous or large-scale emergencies.

The CFIA has a well-planned emergency preparedness and response capacity. However threat environments continue to evolve, requiring regular updating of plans and responses to reflect changes and find efficiencies to ensure the Agency maintains a minimum of essential business functions during emergencies.

Existing risk mitigation strategies resulted in a tolerable level of residual risk. The currently established Risk Response Strategy will be monitored.

Linked to the CFIA's main strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

  • Strong Foundation
  • Working with Partners
  • Enhancing Service
  • Strengthen Internal Management

1.6 Summary of Performance

The increase from Planned Spending to Actual Spending reflects funding received during 2012–13 via supplementary estimates and from Treasury Board Votes. Some of this funding was related to initiatives that sunsetted and been renewed, but the renewed resources were not reflected in the Agency's Planned Spending, as it had not yet been approved by Parliament. The Agency also received: funding transferred from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada as part of a multi-year Memorandum of Understanding to continue the Growing Forward Program Suite; funding carried forward from the previous fiscal year; funding related to increased statutory compensation payments; and takes into account recent savings initiatives undertaken by the government.

The decrease of 283 from Planned to Actual Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) is related to delays in certain projects and some initiatives as well as an acceleration in the application of reductions related to savings initiatives.

For variance analysis at the Program Level, please see the applicable Program in Section II of this document.

Financial Resources – Total Agency ($ millions)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities
(available for
use) 2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
(Planned vs.
Actual Spending)
685.5 723.9 846.7 782.1 58.2
Human Resources (FTEsFootnote 4)
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
6729 6446 (283)Footnote 5
Performance Summary Table for Strategic Outcome and Programs ($ millions)
Strategic Outcome 1:
A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base
Program Total
Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates 2012–13)
Planned Spending Total
Authorities
(available
for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
Alignment to
Government
of Canada
Outcomes
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2012–13 2011–12 2010–11
Food Safety Program 304.8 340.3 352.7 330.5 369.5 353.6 328.9 313.8 Healthy Canadians
Animal Health and Zoonotics 132.5 132.5 132.0 89.2 210.7 175.4 140.3 133.9

Healthy Canadians

Plant Resources Program 84.4 86.6 84.7 74.4 93.5 89.0 84.0 80.1

A Clean and Healthy Environment

International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 45.4 45.4 31.7 25.6 35.2 33.4 34.8 33.3

A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce

Strategic Outcome 1
Sub-Total
567.1 604.8 601.1 519.7 708.9 651.4 588.0 561.1
Performance Summary Table for Internal Services ($ millions)
Internal Services Total
Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates
2012–13)
Planned Spending Total
Authorities
(available
for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2012–13 2011–12 2010–11
118.4 119.1 130.3 116.9 137.8 130.7 149.7 160.7
Sub-Total 118.4 119.1 130.3 116.9 137.8 130.7 149.7 160.7
Total Performance Summary Table ($ millions)
Strategic Outcome(s)
and Internal Services
Total
Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates
2012–13)
Planned Spending Total
Authorities
(available
for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2012–13 2011–12 2010–11
685.5 723.9 731.4 636.6 846.7 782.1 737.7 721.8
Total 685.5 723.9 731.4 636.6 846.7 782.1 737.7 721.8

1.7 Expenditure Profile

The Agency's overall spending has increased from 2009–10 to 2012–13 by approximately 9%. This is as a result of additional funding received for the following: Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan: to increase the frequency of food inspections in meat processing establishments; the Government's response to Listeriosis; Modernizing Federal Laboratories (Under Canada's Economic Action Plan); the Pork Industry Recovery and Expansion Strategy; Food Safety Modernization; transfers from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada for the Traceability National Information Portal (TNIP) and Growing Forward; as well as for increased expenditures under statutory compensation. This also takes into account resources that the Agency transferred to Shared Services Canada (SSC) in 2011–12 to consolidate, streamline and improve Government information technology and information management services as well as the first year of reductions stemming from savings initiatives. In the first year, the majority of the savings of $2.0 million were related to administrative efficiencies.

Planned Spending resources for 2013–14 to 2015–16 are scheduled to decline over this three-year period. This is as a result of the following: the implementation of incremental savings initiatives; the transfer of resources to Public Works and Government Services Canada for the Consolidation of Pay Services Project; a reduction starting in 2015-16 in funding for Food Safety Modernization projects which is in line with the approved investment plan; as well as the sunsetting of resources that the Agency received for other initiatives. The CFIA plans to seek renewal of these sunsetting resources either alone, or in collaboration with another department. Until the renewals are approved by Parliament, the CFIA cannot include these initiatives in Planned Spending.

With respect to the implementation of specific savings initiatives, on-going savings in the amount of $56 million will be achieved through: administrative efficiencies, such as sharing common administrative services between the CFIA and AAFC; as well as program changes to improve services and facilitate trade such as implementing agreed upon changes with the provinces with respect to the delivery of certain inspection activities under provincial jurisdiction and more effective response to animal diseases and plant pests. None of the measures affect delivery of the CFIA's front-line food safety services.

Agency Spending Trend
Figure 3: The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's past spending trend and future spending within the context of a seven-year trend. Description follows.
Description of Figure 3: The CFIA's past spending trend and future spending within the context of a seven-year trend
Actual Spending
2009–10 718.1
2010–11 721.8
2011-12 737.7
2012–13 782.1
Planned Spending
2013–14 731.4
2014–15 636.6
2015-16 619.9

1.8 Estimates by Vote

For information on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's organizational votes and/ or statutory expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2013 (Volume II). An electronic version of the Public Accounts 2013 is available on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.

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