2012-2013 Departmental Performance Report
Section II: Analysis of Programs and Sub-Programs by Strategic Outcome

This page has been archived

Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or record-keeping purposes. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Please contact us to request a format other than those available.

2.1 How the Agency Plans and Reports Outcome

In accordance with the Treasury Board Secretariat's (TBS) Management, Resources and Results Structure (MRRS) Policy, the CFIA planning and reporting framework is based on a desired strategic outcome, a PAA, and an associated governance framework. The PAA is aligned with desired Government of Canada (GoC) outcomes and takes into consideration the impact of several factors – including the global and national environment, GoC priorities, CFIA strategic risks, CFIA's human and financial resource capacity, and the outcomes of the CFIA's past performance and related lessons learned.

This report highlights key accomplishments and gives an account of the progress made in advancing the plans and priorities identified in the CFIA's 2012–13 Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP).

Section 2.2 of this report describes performance information, including highlights, challenges, lessons learned and expected results for the strategic outcome and measures it against targets through the use of compliance and other relevant performance indicators. Additionally, details are given on performance as it relates to special initiatives, risk mitigation strategies, and ongoing activities. Special focus is given to how this affects Canadians.

2.1.1 Assessment of Compliance and Performance Targets

Given the complexity and inherent variability of the agriculture, agri-food, forestry and fishery production, processing, and distribution sectors, the approach to assessing compliance varies across commodity groups. The CFIA uses a variety of tools to monitor and promote compliance, including inspections, audits, product sampling, and testing. The CFIA uses risk-based approaches that target the areas of highest risk. For example, the CFIA focuses its efforts on systems, processes, and facilities that directly affect the safety of food, animal, and plant health. The resulting compliance rates indicate the extent to which regulated parties have adhered to requirements specified in federal acts and regulations.

Qualitative and quantitative performance targets provide a basis for measuring the performance of regulated parties and of the CFIA in relation to how they achieve the results expected of them. The targets in this report are for critical program areas and are based either on historical averages of actual performance or on the expected results of effective programming (e.g. rate of industry compliance with regulatory standards). The CFIA has assessed the extent to which performance has met or exceeded established targets and provided analysis when performance fell below established targets. Targets for programs that monitor activities are set differently than those for programs that focus on specific areas of non-compliance. Where applicable, performance indicator results have been rounded to the nearest percentage.

2.2 Performance by Strategic Outcome

2.2.1 Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base

Mitigating risks to food safety is the CFIA's highest priority, and the health and safety of Canadians is the driving force behind the design and development of CFIA programs. The CFIA, in collaboration and partnership with industry, consumers, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, continues to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases.

The current and future economic prosperity of the Canadian agriculture and forestry sectors relies on a healthy and sustainable animal and plant resource base. As such, the CFIA is continually improving its program design and delivery in the animal health and plant resource areas in order to minimize and manage risks. In an effort to protect the natural environment from invasive animal and plant diseases and plant pests, the CFIA also performs extensive work related to the protection of environmental biodiversity.

The CFIA supports Canadian agriculture and the ability of agri-food businesses to enter domestic and global markets and complete successfully therein. The Agency works to develop and implement regulatory frameworks that: address risks to consumers; enforce labelling information requirements (ensuring the information is not misleading); and ensure that imports and exports meet Canadian and international requirements. To support these objectives, the CFIA engages in outreach and consultation activities with key stakeholders and partners (including those in industry), consumers, and international trade and standards organizations so that its regulatory frameworks are based on the most current and relevant information, thereby remaining as up to date as possible within this rapidly evolving, global environment. In so doing, the CFIA is able to maintain open and transparent communication with its stakeholder and consumer base.

In the fall of 2011, the CFIA began a systematic review of its regulatory frameworks for food safety and plant and animal health. This regulatory review will allow the Agency to modernize and maintain Canada's food safety and animal and plant health systems while adapting to consumer, global and scientific trends through such mechanisms as outcome based approaches. Further information on the CFIA's work in this area can be found in Sections 2.2.1.1, 2.2.1.2, 2.2.1.3, and 2.2.1.4.

To successfully deliver on its strategic outcome, the CFIA has developed a robust risk management discipline, and it fosters the use thereof throughout the Agency. As such, the CFIA continually monitors and assesses its operating environment in order to be aware of threats and opportunities concerning the achievement of its desired outcome. A cornerstone of its risk management process is the development of an Agency-wide Corporate Risk Profile (CRP). Key strategic risks, as identified in the Agency's CRP, are:

  • Management information and IM/IT infrastructure;
  • Inspection effectiveness;
  • Scientific capability;
  • Legislative, regulatory and program framework;
  • Managing change;
  • Transparency and leveraging relationships; and
  • Emergency management.

In order to mitigate these risks and achieve its strategic outcome, the Agency will, through the actions of its programs (Food Safety, Animal Health and Zoonotics, Plant Resources, International Collaboration and Technical Agreements), concentrate its efforts for 2012–13 on the delivery of key initiatives supporting the following four priorities:

  • Building a stronger foundation to enable effective and efficient program delivery;
  • Working closely with partners to optimize health and safety outcomes and economic objectives across jurisdictions;
  • Enhancing service to improve results for regulated parties and consumers; and
  • Strengthening internal management to enhance effectiveness.

2.2.1.1 Program 1: Food Safety Program

Program Activity 1. Description follows.
Description of image – Program Activity 1

Program: Food Safety Program

Expected Results:

  • Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated
  • Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements

GoC Outcome Areas:

  • Healthy Canadians

Key Risk Areas:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Program Level: Food Safety Program
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
(Planned
vs. Actual
Spending)
304.8 340.3 369.5 353.6 13.3
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Program: Food Safety Program
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
2997 3216 219
Table 2-1a: Summary of Performance by Program: Food Safety Program
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Number of commodity areas where federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targetsFootnote 6 6 out of 6 met 5 out of 6 met
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decisionleaf icon 100% 100% Met
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decisionFootnote 7 95% 96% Met
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where domestic food products meet established compliance targetsFootnote 8 6 out of 6 met 6 out of 6 met
Number of commodity areas where imported food products meet established compliance targetsFootnote 9 6 out of 6 met 5 out of 6 met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The increases from Planned to Actual Spending of $13.3 million and Planned to Actual FTEs of 219 are, in part, due to additional resources received from the government for various food safety activities. Actual Spending also reflects efficiencies in the implementation of the IMIT project under the Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan. These efficiencies came mainly from the use of commercially available sub-components, Government of Canada standard solutions, and capitalizing on internal shared services and infrastructure.

In addition to the above, the variances in the financial resources and the FTEs are also related to the realignment of the Agency's PAA in 2011–12. This realignment saw the CFIA reduce from 8 Programs to 5. During this realignment, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its Planned Spending and FTEs to the revised Programs. However, while preparing the 2011–12 DPR, it was noticed that some Planned Spending and FTEs did not properly align with the corresponding actual amounts. This same issue affects the 2012–13 information. This issue was corrected in the 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Safe Food for Canadians Act

leaf iconFood in Canada is currently regulated under a suite of different statutes: the Food and Drugs Act, the Fish Inspection Act, the Meat Inspection Act, the Canada Agricultural Products Act, and the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act. While these food statutes have served Canadians well, the time has come to have stronger and more modern statutes to manage and mitigate today's risks to food safety, while ensuring that Canadian industry has continued opportunities in international trading markets. To achieve this, the Government of Canada tabled the Safe Food for Canadians Act on June 7, 2012. The Act received Royal Assent on November 22, 2012 and is expected to come into force in the near future. This Act consolidates the four existing Acts and will allow the CFIA to create new regulations that provide the necessary legal framework for a single, consistent approach to strengthening overall food inspection in Canada, including strengthening oversight of food commodities being traded inter-provincially or internationally. The Act focuses on three important areas:

  • improved food safety oversight to better protect consumers;
  • streamlined and strengthened legislative authorities; and
  • enhanced international market opportunities for Canadian industry.

In the near future, the CFIA will work with consumer groups and industry to develop new regulations to support the Act. During this period, the CFIA will also launch a number of significant food safety enhancements.

Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan

The passage of the Safe Food for Canadians Act in November 2012 set the stage for important changes to Canada's food safety system. These changes are aimed at better protecting consumers and Canadian families from food safety risks. To achieve this, the Government of Canada is taking further action to strengthen Canada's world-class food safety system with the launch of the Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan. The Action Plan builds on previous Government of Canada food safety enhancements and focuses on continuous improvement based on science, global trends, and best practices. The Action Plan also provides a strong footing upon which to base the Government's response to the recommendations of the Independent Advisory Panel that investigated the XL Food recall in the fall of 2012. This plan aims to modernize the Canadian food safety system, one of the best food safety systems in the world, through:

  • stronger food safety rules;
  • more effective inspection;
  • a commitment to service; and
  • more information for consumers.
Safe Food for Canadians Regulations

leaf iconIn 2012–13, as part of the Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan, the CFIA began a systematic review of the Meat Inspection Regulations, the Fish Inspection Regulations, the regulations under the Canada Agricultural Products Act and the food related provisions of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Regulations with the goal of developing a new regulatory framework under the Safe Food for Canadians Act. The proposed regulatory modernization will replace thirteen federal food inspection regulations with one single set of regulations. This will include:

  • horizontal provisions applying to all food imported and prepared for trade inter-provincially (e.g. licensing, preventive controls, traceability for exports and inter­provincial trade, and record-keeping);
  • commodity-specific food safety requirements (e.g. fresh fruit and vegetables);
  • commodity-specific trade requirements and consumer protection provisions (e.g. standards of identity, country or origin labelling, commodity specific consumer protection requirements, and horizontal labelling requirements); and
  • complementary regulations regarding disclosure of information and administrative monetary penalties.

The proposed regulatory framework was released for public consultation at the Food Safety Regulatory Forum in June, 2013. To support the consultation process, the CFIA developed a discussion paper that sets out a proposed framework for new regulations, including specific proposals to stimulate debate, generate ideas, and provide a starting point for discussions. The consultation period on the proposed regulatory framework will end on November 30, 2013.

As part of a comprehensive review of its regulatory frameworks, the CFIA continued to advance on other regulatory proposals, such as: repealing the regulatory requirements concerning pre-market registration of labels and recipes under the Meat Inspection Regulations, and the registration of labels under the Processed Products Regulations the requirements to use registered construction and packaging materials and chemicals in the Fish Inspection Regulations; and the requirements to use registered chemical agents and cleaning compounds under the Egg Regulations.

Food Inspection Modernization

leaf iconIn 2012–13 the Agency continued to leverage the funding announced in Budget 2011, which provided the CFIA with $100 million over five years to modernize its inspection system. The CFIA draFTEd a proposed improved food inspection model that establishes common inspection procedures and tools, regardless of the food commodity being inspected, and is founded on the premise of focusing inspection on the basis of ongoing scientific analysis of food safety risks. This first draft was developed through the involvement of key internal and external stakeholders. Between July and November 2012, the CFIA held internal and external consultations on the first draft of the proposed model. Consultations involved almost 50 agencies, departments, industry groups, unions, consumer associations and international communities.

A technical working group was formed in early July 2012 to develop and compile policies, procedures, protocols, forms, illustrations and detailed descriptions of the inspection procedures for the components of the proposed model framework. Feedback from the initial consultations with front-line inspectors, collective bargaining agents, industry groups and consumers informed the development of a second draft. Consultation on this second draft took place from November 2012 to March 2013, using webinars and face-to-face meetings.

Similar to other regulatory agencies around the world, the CFIA uses scientific knowledge to inform the planning of its oversight and inspection activities (inspection, audits, directed sampling and testing, surveillance, etc.) In 2012–13, the CFIA initiated the development of a Risk-Based Inspection Oversight Model (RBIO) that will improve the consistency of risk-based decisions when planning the use of its inspection resources. To support the ongoing implementation of this framework, the CFIA uses various information sources (environmental scanning, Codex Alimentarius standards, effectiveness of industry's preventive controls plans, etc.) and has implemented a number of monitoring and surveillance programs to expand its understanding of existing food-hazard combinations.

Pathogen Reduction Initiative

In an effort to improve detection of and response to foodborne threats, the CFIA continued the implementation of the pathogen reduction initiative. In 2012–13, in collaboration with provinces and territories, the CFIA advanced its national baseline study for Salmonella and Campylobacter in broiler chicken by completing the sampling phase and initiating the testing phase. The information collected through this baseline study will contribute to the development of pathogen reduction programs in poultry and serve as a benchmark to measure the effectiveness of intervention measures. This baseline study is part of the broader Federal/ Provincial/Territorial (FPT) Pathogen Reduction Initiative aimed at decreasing the health risks and economic impact of food-borne pathogens in Canadian meat and poultry.

Integrated Laboratory Network

leaf iconIn an effort to improve laboratory responses to national foodborne emergencies, the CFIA and its provincial, territorial, academic and industrial partners continued to advance work on the development of a national network of laboratories. This network will allow for a more effective exchange of scientific, surveillance and monitoring information while harmonizing laboratory methods and tools. Specifically, a strong foundation for the initiative was established through the definition of a formal governance structure that includes a federal, provincial, and territorial steering committee supported by a technical working group. As well, an Integrated Laboratory Network Strategy was developed that focuses on:

  • standardizing and coordinating national laboratory capacity;
  • meeting increased demands for laboratory services;
  • managing and addressing food-related emergencies; and
  • providing future consideration of electronic sharing of scientific data and information nationally.
Enhanced Surveillance

In 2012–13, the CFIA continued leveraging funds from Budget 2012 to enhance surveillance of potential foodborne illness outbreaks. The CFIA participated in the federal, provincial, territorial surveillance task team that completed an inventory of Federal Provincial Territorial (F/P/T) food safety surveillance activities in Canada. The resulting analysis will form the basis for collaborative F/P/T priority setting improve information sharing among partners, and leverage existing food safety initiatives.

Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan

The CFIA continued making significant progress in implementing its portion of the Government of Canada's Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan and the associated user fee were published in Canada Gazette I and the proposed Imported Food Sector Regulations will enable better identification of unsafe foods and ingredients and allow the CFIA to identify and engage importers. In anticipation of the implementation of these regulations, pilot projects on both the compliance verification approach and a web-based licence management system were conducted to identify issues prior to roll-out.

Work also continued on food safety risk scanning and prioritization. Progress in this area included expanding the list of food hazard combinations to be included for risk ranking. These activities contribute to the Agency's risk mapping capability and enable the identification of gaps in food safety controls and potential intervention points in the farm to fork continuum. As an example, a risk profile, which is a compilation of scientific information on a specific food hazard combination, was completed for E. coli in spinach.

In support of transparency, the CFIA published the results of its chemical residue and microbiological targeted surveys and updated Product of Canada information on its website.

The CFIA also conducted twelve Product of Canada labelling investigations while continuing to monitor compliance with guidelines through its inspection and label verification activities and responding to inquiries, complaints and referrals related to the interpretation and implementation of the revised policy.

In 2012–13, the CFIA continued to engage with its regulatory counterparts in QUAD governments (Canada, US, Australia, New Zealand) to enhance regulatory cooperation and information exchange regarding food safety, to collaborate with its counterparts in other governments (e.g. China, Mexico, Guatemala, India) to advance relationship building as it concerns food safety. The CFIA also continued its participation in Codex Working Groups, including the review and development of the Codex Annexes on melons and berries.

Further efforts involved targeted oversight of imported products with the completion of 69 border blitz inspections and 550 import surveillance activities, as well as, IM/IT infrastructure and information enhancements for tracking imported food products.

With the CFIA's enhanced recall capacity, over 250 food recall incidents related to non-federally registered and fresh fruit and vegetable products were managed, this included responding to over 2,600 web-based enquiries. As for Service Canada, they received over 4,800 requests for information regarding recalls.

Sub-Program: Meat and Poultry

Financial Resources ($ millions) –  For Sub-Program Level: Meat and Poultry
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
177.2 191.2 14.0
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Meat and Poultry
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
1695 1819 124
Table 2-1b: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Meat and Poultry
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Federally registered meat and poultry establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered meat and poultry establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 94% Not Met
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met
Percentage of tested imported meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 99% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Although this year's compliance rate (94%) was below the target rate of 98%, this is a marked improvement over last year (92%). The performance improvement was most likely dampened due to the fact that, in 2012–13, the CFIA conducted intensified inspection activities in response to several high visibility food safety incidents. The intensified inspection activities may have resulted in a higher number of non-compliant establishments which would have reduced the overall improvement in the compliance rate for 2012–13. The CFIA will continue to work closely with industry to improve the compliance rate of federally registered meat and poultry establishments.

XL Food Recall

On September 4, 2012 the CFIA identified Escherichia Coli (E. Coli) 0157:H7 in products supplied by the XL Foods Inc. plant in Brooks, Alberta. The CFIA issued its first recall alert on September 16, 2012 and provided 20 consecutive expansions/updates until October 20, 2012. During this period, the CFIA continued its food safety investigation and CFIA inspectors also continued enhanced supervision of ongoing operations at the plant.

The Public Health Agency of Canada reported 18 confirmed cases of human illness due to this contamination of E. Coli 0157:H7. Following the recall by XL Foods Inc., the Government of Canada appointed an Independent Expert Advisory Panel to conduct a review of events and circumstances related to the XL Foods Inc. E. coli O157:H7 investigation and recall. The advisory panel completed its review and released the report on June 5, 2013.

The Panel found that all key players interviewed expressed a keen desire to ensure that the food Canadians eat is safe. However, the panel also found that responsibilities towards food safety programs were not always met. The Government has accepted all of the recommendations of the Independent Panel and the CFIA, and Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada are working together to address all 30 recommendations. Further progress on the implementation of the recommendations will be provided in future DPR's.

The recently announced Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan closely aligns with many of the panel's recommendations. For example, several of the recommendations are fully or partially addressed through enhancements to E. coli O157 controls, which were announced on May 17. Additionally, the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food announced the creation of Inspection Verification Teams (IVTs) to oversee the performance of the entire food safety system. The IVTs are meant to ensure that the overall food safety system is effective and that food safety rules and standards are consistently and thoroughly followed and enforced.

Meat Hygiene Pilot

The Meat Hygiene Pilot, a project aimed at simplifying requirements for establishments involved in the slaughter, processing or packaging of meat products traded inter-provincially, was completed in 2012–13. The pilot resulted in regulatory changes that will allow establishments to apply to become federally registered. This will facilitate the inter-provincial trade of meat, while maintaining food safety standards. The first set of the regulatory amendments were published in Canada Gazette II in November 2011 and complementary amendments to the Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures have been made and implemented. A second set of regulatory amendments were pre-published in Canada Gazette I in April 2012.

Listeria policy

In 2012–13, the CFIA continued work in relation to Health Canada's revised Listeria Policy. Guidance materials have been developed and communicated to industry sectors to promote the effective implementation of the new policy. Significant progress was made toward the validation of new laboratory methods for more rapid analysis of samples, while laboratory analytical capacity continued to be augmented. The Agency also integrated enhanced verification and inspection activities, as well as the collection and evaluation of environmental samples, into its existing inspection work plans.

Sub-Program: Egg

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Egg
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
9.7 9.6 (0.1)
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Egg
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
79 85 6
Table 2-1c: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Egg
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Federally registered shell egg establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered shell egg establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 98% Met
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 97% Met
Percentage of tested imported shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 100% Met

Sub-Program: Dairy

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Dairy
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
12.9 12.8 (0.1)
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Dairy
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
109 117 8
Table 2-1d: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Dairy
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Federally registered dairy establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered dairy establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 100% Met
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 97% Met
Percentage of tested imported dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 96% Met

Sub-Program: Fish and Seafood

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Fish and Seafood
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
46.0 45.8 (0.2)
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Fish and Seafood
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
387 415 28
Table 2-1e: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Fish and Seafood
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Federally registered fish and seafood establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fish and seafood establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 98% Met
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 99% Met
Percentage of tested imported fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 91% Not Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The fish and seafood program's risk-based sampling approach resulted in the rejection of 16 lots of imported fish with 6 of those lots rejected due to veterinary drug residues in farmed fish from one specific market. The CFIA is currently working on a strategy to address this compliance issue. If those 6 cases are removed from the data set the resulting compliance rate is 94.4%, very close to the target and an improvement over last year's compliance rate.

Sub-Program: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
26.1 26.0 (0.1)
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
207 222 15
Table 2-1f: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Federally registered fresh fruit and vegetables establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fresh fruit and vegetable establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 99% Met
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fresh fruit and vegetable samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met
Percentage of tested imported fresh fruit and vegetables samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 95% Met

Sub-Program: Processed Products

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Processed Products
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
12.1 12.1 0.0
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Processed Products
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
99 106 7
Table 2-1g: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Processed Products
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Federally registered processed products establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered processed products establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 98% Met
Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met
Percentage of tested imported processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met

Sub-Program: Imported and Manufactured Food Products

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Imported and Manufactured Food Products
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
56.3 56.1 (0.2)
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Imported and Manufactured Food Products
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
421 452 31
Table 2-1h: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Imported and Manufactured Food Products
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food (IMF) products are mitigated Percentage of major health risks in the imported and manufactured food sector that are addressed through the annual update to food safety inspection programs 95% 100% Met
Percentage of inspected IMF products with accurate net quantity, composition, labelling and advertising 70%Footnote 10 94% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned Food Labelling Modernization

To respond to emerging trends and challenges, and to address Canadian's interest for more information about the products they buy, the CFIA explored ways to improve Canada's food labelling system. More specifically, the CFIA developed a proposed approach that responds to recommendations to move toward a more modern and innovative food labelling system through alignment with the Safe Food for Canadians Act. The Food Labelling Modernization initiative will require engagement and input from external stakeholders, including consumers. Public consultations were launched in June 2013.

The CFIA also undertook preliminary work towards the development of an online labelling tool that will provide industry and consumers with a way to easily access information regarding regulatory requirements for labelling food. The intent of this tool is to create greater industry awareness of, understanding of, and compliance with labelling requirements for a broad range of information (e.g. net quantity; date markings; nutrition labelling; bilingual labelling, and legibility and location). The CFIA expects to launch the labelling tool in 2014–15. During its development, industry and other stakeholders will be consulted to ensure that this new tool meets its desired outcome.

Additionally, the CFIA developed the regulatory proposal necessary to implement the Budget 2012 decision to increase efficiency by eliminating the mandatory pre-approval of labels for meat and processed products for industry. The CFIA continues to enforce compliance of regulatory requirements for labelling and claims through inspection and enforcement activities.

2.2.1.2 Program 2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Program Activity 2. Description follows.
Description of image – Program Activity 2

Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Expected Results:

  • Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized
  • Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated
  • Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases
  • Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to

GoC Outcome Areas:

  • Strong Economic Growth
  • A Clean and Healthy Environment

Key Risk Areas:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, mitigating and managing risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instils confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Program Level: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
(Planned vs.
Actual Spending)
132.5 132.5 210.7 175.4 42.9
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
1524 1118 (406)
Table 2-2a: Summary of Performance by Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathwaysFootnote 11 0 Entries 0 Entries Met
Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic diseaseFootnote 12 100% 100% Met
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirementsFootnote 13 99% 100% Met
Canada's status on the OIEFootnote 14 disease risk status lists remains either free, controlled risk, or negligible riskFootnote 15 Status
maintained
Status
maintained
Met
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal diseaseFootnote 16 100% 100% Met
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as neededFootnote 17 All necessary manual updates are completed All necessary manual updates were scompleted Met
Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises in which CFIA participatesFootnote 18 9 10 Met
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashionFootnote 19 100% There were no cases of transboundary and significant emerging diseases Not Applicable
Percentage of cases where CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging diseaseFootnote 200 100% There were no cases of transboundary and significant emerging diseases Not Applicable
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $42.9 million is mainly due to an increase in statutory compensation payments as well as resources received to continue the Growing Forward Program Suite.

In addition to the above, the variances in the financial resources and the FTEs are also related to the realignment of the Agency's PAA in 2011–12. This realignment saw the CFIA reduce from 8 Programs to 5. During this realignment, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its Planned Spending and FTEs to the revised Programs. However, while preparing the 2011–12 DPR, it was noticed that some Planned Spending and FTEs did not properly align with the corresponding actual amounts. This same issue affects the 2012–13 information. This issue was corrected in the 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

During the 2012–13 fiscal year, the Agency modernized its program policy framework as it relates to animal health:

  • The CFIA led a working group consisting of representatives from F/P/T governments, and industry that developed criteria for categorizing animal disease in Canada. This will allow the Agency to enhance its system of animal disease control and provide a more seamless response to emerging zoonotic disease threats;
  • With regards to feed, the Agency identified and engaged stakeholders in an effort to align feed regulations with strategic objectives, reduce unnecessary burden on stakeholders, and support innovation by keeping pace with changes in science and technology. In terms of program delivery, this improves the CFIA's consistency and reduces complexity; and
  • The Agency also promoted global harmonization and collaboration among international animal health product regulatory agencies, with the objective of streamlining regulatory processes and facilitating timely access to veterinary biologics. This facilitates Canada's market access.

Sub-Program: Terrestrial Animal Health

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Terrestrial Animal Health
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
104.9 114.9 10.0
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program: Terrestrial Animal Health
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
1139 836 (303)
Table 2-2b: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Terrestrial Animal Health
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Federally registered veterinary biologics establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered veterinary biologics establishments in compliance with federal regulations 90%Footnote 21 100% Met
Veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations Percentage of tested veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations 100% 100% Met
Animals in Canada are transported humanely Percentage of inspected live loads in compliance with humane transport standards 100% 99% Not Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Traceability

leaf iconIn an effort to promote compliance, the CFIA developed and distributed communication products to regulated parties across Canada. This communication campaign had a particular focus on the new pig traceability requirements, which were published in Canada Gazette I during 2012–13. In order to maintain inspection quality and consistency, the CFIA updated the program's manual of procedures and required all inspectors verifying compliance with traceability met training obligations. The CFIA also developed additional traceability information sharing agreements with the provinces. Using these agreements, the CFIA worked collaboratively with provinces and industry to launch the Traceability National Information Portal (TNIP), which provides single window access to traceability information. The completion of this initiative will improve the CFIA's service delivery and ensure that regulators at all levels can make informed decisions to effectively manage issues related to animal health. Additionally, the CFIA successfully solicited feedback from stakeholders on proposed changes to the Health of Animals Act intended to strengthen livestock and poultry traceability in Canada. These amendments to the Health of Animals Act came into force during 2012–13 with the passage of Bill S-11.

Surveillance

To support and maintain a modernized and efficient surveillance system that supports animal health programs and facilitates market access, the CFIA has created an inventory of animal disease surveillance and testing activities. Based on this, the Agency developed a prioritized Animal Disease Surveillance Plan, which utilizes an internationally recognized prioritization approach. For example, following the detection of Schmallenberg virus in Europe, (where it is causing a range of symptoms in cattle including fever, diarrhea, reduced milk yield and birth defects), the CFIA implemented a new import measure. This import control mandates that animals must test negative for Schmallenberg virus before their semen or embryos can enter Canada from countries in the European Union. Through this policy, the CFIA is working to protect the national herd from production losses and economic consequences associated with this emergent animal disease.

In 2012–13, as part of its ongoing commitment to maintaining the effectiveness and efficiency of its operational program delivery, the animal health program updated its manuals of procedures and hazard specific plans. In support of this, and due in part to the 2010 OAG report on animal diseases, the CFIA developed hazard-specific plans and procedures for higher risk diseases such as Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) and Avian Influenza. The CFIA strengthened its approach to controlling avian influenza in domestic poultry by adding low pathogenicity H5 and H7 avian influenza viruses to the list of reportable diseases. The updated manuals and procedures have been posted on the CFIA's internal website for reference and use by CFIA staff and will be continually reviewed and revised as needed.

Humane Transportation

As part of the management response and action plan for the Evaluation of Administrative Monetary Penalties (2012), a review was done of Schedule 1 of the Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Regulations to ensure the clarity of the language used and that the classification of violations represent current practice. Additionally, regulations that will enhance animal welfare controls remain under revision. Upon finalization, these regulations will provide the CFIA with increased enforcement capacity to better protect the health and welfare of animals being transported. The CFIA is also continuing to work toward providing operational training to inspectors in order to strengthen awareness regarding the humane transport of animals. The CFIA is also a member of the National Farm Animal Care Council (NFACC) and, as a participating member worked to:

Sub-Program: Aquatic Animal Health

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Aquatic Animal Health
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
6.4 39.0 32.6
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program: Aquatic Animal Health
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
106 77 (29)
Table 2-2c: Summary of Performance by Program: Aquatic Animal Health
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Domestic aquatic animals and their products are compliant with Canadian regulations and meet the standards of international agreements Percentage of certified aquatic animal and aquatic animal product shipments that meet the receiving country's import requirements 99% 99% Met
Risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base are mitigated Number of reportable aquatic animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 0 Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

To ensure that domestic aquatic animals and products are compliant with Canadian legal requirements and meet the standards of international agreements, the CFIA continued development of the National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP). This involved a phased-in implementation approach of import controls for aquatic animals under the Health of Animals Regulations. Additionally, for the majority of aquatic animal trade covered by the new import requirements, export certificates have been negotiated with Canada's largest trade partners.

Program efficiencies within the Aquatic Animal Health Import Program are being realized through various strategic approaches such as the implementation of a compartmentalization program, biosecurity measures, and regionalization. These strategic approaches have helped reduce the costs of testing and inspections, and also reduced the workload, for both the federal government and industry, associated with the implementation of import controls. Additionally, an information sharing and engagement process with Aboriginal groups on the proposed Domestic Movement Control Programs under NAAHP has been developed and implemented.

Lastly, in order to get a more complete picture of the health profile of the salmon populations in British Columbia, the NAAHP, in collaboration with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), the Province of British Columbia and industry, have implemented a surveillance initiative targeting both cultured and wild salmon species to investigate the presence of infectious salmon anaemia (ISA), infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) and infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN). During the 2012–13 year, the CFIA began collecting and testing wild salmon off the coast of British Columbia. Through this initiative, approximately 5,000 wild salmon will be collected and studied annually for a minimum of two years.

Sub-Program: Feed

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Feed
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
21.2 21.5 0.3
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program: Feed
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
279 205 (74)
Table 2-2d: Summary of Performance by Program: Feed
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Feed establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed establishments in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, not including labelling tasks 95% 97% Met
Feed labels meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed facilities in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, when assessed against inspection tasks associated with labelling 95% 97% Met

2.2.1.3 Program 3: Plant Resources Program

Program Activity 3. Description follows.
Description of image – Program Activity 3

Program: Plant Resources Program

Expected Results:

  • Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated
  • Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders)
  • Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained

GoC Outcome Areas:

  • Strong Economic Growth
  • A Clean and Healthy Environment

Key Risk Areas:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instils confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Program Level: Plant Resources Program
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
(Planned vs.
Actual Spending)
84.4 86.6 93.5 89.0 2.4
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Program: Plant Resources Program
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
830 849 19
Table 2-3a: Summary of Performance by Program Level: Plant Resources Program
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselvesFootnote 22 0 0 Met
Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreementsFootnote 23 90%Footnote 24 93% Met
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders)Footnote 25 Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issuedFootnote 26 100% 100% Met
Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner 90%Footnote 27 100% Met
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirementsFootnote 28 99% 99% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $2.4 million is, in part, due to the resources received to continue the Growing Forward Program Suite as well as an increase in statutory compensation payments.

In addition to the above, the variances in the financial resources and the FTEs are also related to the realignment of the Agency's PAA in 2011–12. This realignment saw the CFIA reduce from 8 Programs to 5. During this realignment, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its Planned Spending and FTEs to the revised Programs. However, while preparing the 2011–12 DPR, it was noticed that some Planned Spending and FTEs did not properly align with the corresponding actual amounts. This same issue affects the 2012–13 information. This issue was corrected in the 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

In 2012–13, the CFIA continued to deliver the Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program (PPMMP) aimed at managing the Plum Pox Virus (PPV), a plant disease that drastically reduces yields of stone fruit. Specifically, the CFIA's survey and monitoring activities determined that the virus had not spread beyond the established quarantine area. Additionally, in an effort to further contain PPV, the CFIA continued to communicate the risks related to the movement and propagation of regulated plant materials to residents and stone fruit growers in and around the quarantine region.

An increase in the number of interceptions and regulatory actions being taken against non­compliant commodities led the CFIA to take steps to prevent the entry of pests through field crop pathways. Following World Trade Organization (WTO) notification and consultation guidelines, the CFIA advised member countries of Canada's intent to require that all exports be certified free of the khapra beetle and wooly cupgrass (WCG) prior to importation to Canada. The proposed new requirements recognize that the U.S. is officially as free of the khapra beetle, and will allow U.S. grain to be imported uncertified into Canada– provided the Canadian importer can demonstrate how they can mitigate pests risks either through treatments or processes. Imports from countries other than the U.S. would be required to be certified as pest-free for all end uses in Canada.

The Agency also developed new system approach requirements to harmonize with U.S. requirements. They will serve to update the import policy directive on tomato fruits and further reduce the risk of introducing Tuta absoluta into Canadian greenhouses. Under this system approach, countries wishing to export tomatoes to Canada will be required to meet additional phytosanitary requirements, including pest exclusionary measures, pest surveys, record keeping, safeguarding of shipments, and staff training.

Sub-Program: Plant Protection

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Plant Protection
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
69.2 71.1 1.9
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Plant Protection
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
657 672 15
Table 2-3b: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Plant Protection
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Pre-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of inspected shipments from off-shore system approaches or pre-clearance programs in compliance with federal regulations 85%Footnote 29 99%Footnote 30 Met
At-Border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of pre-arrival documentation in compliance with Canadian import requirements 90%Footnote 31 99% Met
Post-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of new pest detections that have a science based management plan initiated within one year 90%Footnote 32 No new pests were detectedFootnote 33 Not Applicable
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The CFIA saw strong compliance of pre-arrival documentation in relation to Canadian import requirements which demonstrates that foreign countries and importers appear to have a solid understanding of the Canadian requirements. In addition, cases where deficiencies were identified, importers were able to readily address the deficiencies in order to permit the import of their plant or plant product shipment.

There was also high compliance rates for shipments from off-shore systems approaches or pre-clearance programs which indicates that the investment in communication of our Canadian requirements to foreign countries and resources in developing and auditing the systems-based programs in the countries of origin is showing positive results.

Invasive Alien Species (IAS) Strategy

Invasive species can be harmful when introduced into new areas. These species can invade agricultural and natural areas, causing serious damage to Canada's economy and environment.

As part of its ongoing response to invasive plants, the CFIA drafted an Invasive Plants Directive which describes the CFIA's invasive plants policy and provides a list of pest plants that are prohibited in Canada. The intended outcome of the directive is to control the importation and domestic movement of plants considered as pests in Canada. Comments from domestic and international stakeholder consultations on the invasive plants policy, a list of proposed pest plants, and the directive itself were considered in developing this directive. Additional collaborative work with stakeholders and partners on WCG and kudzu supported the ongoing management and/or eradication of these, and other, invasive plants. Specific to WCG, a government-industry working group was created to develop domestic regulatory measures aimed at mitigating the spread of this pest.

Further, the Agency continued communication and collaboration with provinces and stakeholders. Specifically, invasive plant surveys were conducted that focussed on high-risk pathways and facilities (e.g. bird seed facilities). As well, the CFIA worked to develop and implement new import-related phytosanitary measures aimed at reducing risk associated with those high-risk pathways. On the science front, the CFIA continued the development of diagnostic methods and tools that would improve the ability to identify high-risk invasive plants.

Finally, the CFIA participated in international standard-setting, harmonization of approaches, negotiations, and bilateral meetings with key trading partners, specifically with the United States, Korea, and Japan to discuss the risks associated with Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM).

Work towards eradicating AGM included broad stakeholder consultations and engagement, including an AGM Summit in December, 2012. As a result, revisions were made to strengthen the AGM program. The effect of these revisions will help mitigate the risk of introduction of AGM to Canada.

Sub-Program: Seed

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Seed
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
11.3 11.6 0.3
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Seed
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
117 120 3
Table 2-3c: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Seed
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic pedigreed seed lots in compliance with federal regulations 95% 96% Met
Percentage of authorized confined releases of Plants with Novel Traits (PNTs) into the Canadian environment that are in compliance with the authorized conditions 90%Footnote 34 97% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Canada's seed certification system provides a robust foundation for nearly $30 billion in grain, feed, seed and crop production industries. The CFIA, working in close collaboration with two industry partners, the Canadian Seed Growers' Association (CSGA) and the Canadian Seed Institute (CSI), ensures that pedigreed seed produced in Canada meets and exceeds domestic and international standards. Because of the rigorous system in place, this key performance indicator has consistently exceeded its target year after year and Canadian seed maintains an excellent reputation in international markets.

The CFIA's Confined Research Field Trial Program allows proponents to conduct in-field testing of a PNT (generally including plants with traits developed through biotechnology) under conditions of confinement. The CFIA verifies that these conditions are being met, and any sites that are found to be non-compliant must return to compliance within a short period of time. In 2012–13, the target was exceeded for several reasons: highly educated applicants and field managers were included in the program requirements; good communication practices were held between the CFIA, applicants, and field managers; and no extreme weather patterns occurred during the growing season. Trials are designed to minimize risk to the environment (including wildlife) and potential spread from the site, for example, soil incorporation of plant material after the completion of the trial.

Work with industry continued on the transfer of seed crop inspection services to an alternative service delivery (ASD) system. This transfer will allow the Agency to target its resources more effectively to address its core mandate. Work included consultation and communication with stakeholders on an industry model to transition to ASD and the establishment of authorized seed crop inspection services and licensed seed crop inspectors in anticipation of its implementation in April, 2014.

Sub-Program: Fertilizer

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Fertilizer
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
5.2 5.3 0.1
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Fertilizer
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
47 48 1
Table 2-3d: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Fertilizer
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected fertilizer and supplement products in compliance with federal regulations (Fertilizers Regulations) 90% 92% Met
Percentage of submissions reviewed within the prescribed service delivery standards 90% 92% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Fertilizer Modernization

leaf iconWork towards modernizing the Agency's Fertilizer Regulations continued, and included focusing regulatory oversight on the safety of fertilizers and supplements, implementing risk-based approaches and strengthening industry's leadership role in quality assurance and verification. The CFIA's work included extensive consultations with stakeholders, including the Canadian Fertilizer Products Forum, to address efficacy, safety, and labelling provisions, as well as definitions and exemptions. The modernization will also provide industry with greater flexibility, reduced costs, and less red tape.

The Fertilizer Program is re-directing activities to focus on safety-related inspections. Historically compliance rates with safety standards have been higher than with quality standards. Over the last two years, the Program has been transitioning out of quality, reducing quality-related marketplace monitoring activities.

Sub-Program: Intellectual Property Rights

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Sub-Program Level: Intellectual Property Rights
Planned Spending
2012–13
Actual Spending
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
0.9 1.0 0.1
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Sub-Program Level: Intellectual Property Rights
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
9 9 0
Table 2-3e: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Intellectual Property Rights
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Plant breeders develop new varieties for the Canadian market Percentage of Plant Breeders' Rights applications that reach approval and are granted rights 100% 100% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the 2012 calendar year, the number of approved applications was 386, and the number of approved applications that were granted Plant Breeders' Rights (PBR) was 201. For more information on PBR please visit the following website.

PBRs are a form of intellectual property protection which gives plant breeders exclusive rights to produce and sell reproductive material of their new plant varieties. The PBR program administers the Plant Breeders Rights Act to enable the granting of PBR to breeders. The granting of this intellectual property encourages investment in plant breeding and improves access to protected foreign varieties.

2.2.1.4 Program 4: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Program Activity 4. Description follows.
Description of image – Program Activity 4

Program:International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Expected Results:

  • Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC
  • International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products
  • International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate

GoC Outcome Areas:

  • A Fair and Secure Marketplace
  • A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce

Key Risk Areas:

  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through actively participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.

Based on market demand, the CFIA will also continue to negotiate and certify against export conditions in order to access export markets. The Agency, working with industry and interested stakeholders, will continue to develop and maintain export certification standards (which vary from country to country and commodity to commodity), conduct inspections and issue export certificates.

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Program Level: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
(Planned vs.
Actual Spending)
45.4 45.4 35.2 33.4 (12.0)
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Program: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
363 338 (25)
Table 2-4a: Summary of Performance by Program: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance
Status
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interestsFootnote 35 24 50 Met
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products Number of unjustified non-tariff barriers resolved 24Footnote 36 33 Met
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA-led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 5 9 Met
Number of CFIA-led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments 6Footnote 37 12 Met

Please note: Five indicators found in the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements section of the 2012–13 RPP have been omitted from this report. These indicators reported on performance at a low-level of detail which would not have added to the strategic performance story presented herein.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The decrease between Planned and Actual Spending of $12.0 million and Planned and Actual FTEs of 25 are related to the realignment of the Agency's PAA in 2011–12. This realignment saw the CFIA reduce from 8 Programs to 5. During this realignment, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its Planned Spending and FTEs to the revised Programs. However, while preparing the 2011–12 DPR, it was noticed that some Planned Spending and FTEs did not properly align with the corresponding actual amounts. This same issue affects the 2012–13 information. This issue was corrected in the 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

On February 4, 2011 Prime Minister Stephen Harper and President Barack Obama announced the Beyond the Border Declaration and the Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council. As a contributing partner in these agreementsFootnote 38 the CFIA has made significant progress over the past year. More specifically, in 2012–13, the CFIA worked with stakeholders and our US counterparts to achieve the following results:

  • Conducted four joint assessments on commodities of common interest from third countries. The joint assessments provided an opportunity: to consolidate resources; a chance for both Canada and the US to learn from each other's respective approaches to assessment; and the occasion to present a consolidated approach to foreign country assessments;
  • Developed, in consultation with industry stakeholders, a common approach to the process of classifying meat cuts and realize a common nomenclature for meat cuts for Canada and the US;
  • Developed and announced a zoning protocol which, in the event of a contagious animal disease outbreak, will provide for continued bilateral trade from areas located outside the disease control and eradication zone; and
  • Undertook two pilot projects for a Canada-United States perimeter approach to plant protection. The goal is to align regulatory policies and science-based approaches which will inform how both countries can work towards an increased consistency on import requirements, increase communication between the two countries, and develop equivalent or harmonized plant quarantine systems.

In January 2013, the Government of Canada reached an agreement with Japan to expand market access for Canadian beef to include products derived from animals under 30 months of age (UTM) – an improvement over the previous requirement which only permits beef exports from animals under 21 months of age.

The expansion of Canada's beef market access is but one illustration of how the CFIA technical experts posted in Beijing, Brussels, Mexico, Moscow, and Tokyo have contributed to Canada's trade agenda. These positions have:

  • led to stronger relationships with regulatory counterparts thereby maintaining the momentum of negotiations;
  • enabled face-to-face real time discussions; and
  • allowed the CFIA to project a Canadian perspective on common issues raised with the competent authorities by key trading partners.

leaf iconFrom a multilateral perspective, in the fall of 2012, Canada joined the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) – a free trade agreement comprised of twelve countries. While the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) is the overall lead, the CFIA co-led the sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations, and provided input into Canada's negotiating positions in the areas related to the CFIA's mandate. These included technical barriers to trade (TBT), regulatory cooperation, the environment, biotechnology, and intellectual property. The CFIA also continued to co-lead SPS negotiations with the European Union and India and contributed to the development of positions/strategies for free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations.

Additionally, the CFIA continued to lead Canada's participation in: the World Trade Organization (WTO) SPS Committee meetings; at the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC); the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE); and in certain committees of the Codex Alimentarius Commission to promote the development of science-based international rules and standards.

Further, the CFIA continued to engage through international standard setting bodies in support of the development and revision of science-based international standards. For example, in 2012–13, the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) produced a draft specification for the development of a standard on the international movement of grain. The CFIA, with the participation of the Canadian grain industry, provided significant input into the development of the draft specification. Additionally, the CFIA, as Head of Canada's delegation at the July 2012 session of the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC), worked closely with like-minded countries to promote the successful adoption of maximum residue limits (MRLs) for ractopamine (a feed ingredient promoting growth).

Finally, the CFIA continued to work closely with the Canadian Forest Service (CFS) to develop sound scientific and technical justifications in support of several bilateral market access discussions. This partnership included the review, by CFIA and other stakeholders, of a technical paper developed by the CFS. The technical paper corroborates an existing international standard on heat treatment approaches for the export of pest-free wood products. Once this paper is finalized, it will form the basis for technical discussions with trading partners; for the expansion of the trade in wood products demanding higher levels of treatment prior to export.

2.2.1.5 Internal Services

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Planning Highlights

Financial Resources ($ millions) – For Program Level: Internal Services
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13
Difference
(Planned vs.
Actual Spending)
118.4 119.1 137.8 130.7 11.6
Human Resources (FTEs) – For Program: Internal Services
Planned
2012–13
Actual
2012–13
Difference
2012–13
1015 925 (90)
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The variances in the financial resources and the FTEs are related to the realignment of the Agency's PAA in 2011–12. This realignment saw the CFIA reduce from 8 Programs to 5. During this realignment, the CFIA worked hard to accurately align its Planned Spending and FTEs to the revised Programs. However, while preparing the 2011–12 DPR, it was noticed that some Planned Spending and FTEs did not properly align with the corresponding actual amounts. This same issue affects the 2012–13 information. This issue was corrected in the 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities. Actual Spending for the Internal Services Program has decreased by $30 million over the past two years.

Citizen-Focused Services

leaf iconThe Agency's new Transparency Policy came in effect on April 1st, 2013 and has been posted on the CFIA's website. The policy provides a basis for improved, open communication with respect to CFIA activities and services. Its goal is to facilitate awareness and increase the positive engagement of the Agency's stakeholder community. To complement and support the Transparency Policy, the Agency had undertaken a number of transparency-related initiatives and has made significant progress in this regard:

  • In order to effectively communicate the CFIA's values and expected employee behaviours to the Agency's regulated parties, stakeholders and partners, the Agency developed and distributed The Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Our Regulated Parties, Stakeholders and Partners: An Ethical Relationship;
  • A Statement of Rights and Service for Producers, Consumers and Other Stakeholders and a compendium of guides for producers, consumers, processors, animal transporters, importers and exporters were developed to formally establish the principles that govern our interaction with stakeholders.
  • A Complaints and Appeals Office was created and has been operational since April 1, 2012. Outreach meetings with a number of internal and external stakeholders have taken place to share information about the Statement of Rights and Service and its accompanying guides, as well as the complaints and appeals process.
  • To increase awareness with respect to the nature and results of public opinion research (POR), the Agency defined and implemented a process for posting executive summaries of CFIA-related POR online;
  • The CFIA published Working for Canadians – an annual report of Agency activities told largely from the perspective of the CFIA's stakeholders;
  • The Agency developed and made public a policy entitled Transparency in Regulatory Decision Making; and
  • ATIP training on the new process and updated reporting mechanism was provided in Quebec, Ontario and Western Areas as well as with various groups as requested in the NCR. The ATIP Office also worked closely with Branch ATIP Advisors to increase awareness. Privacy Framework under development is scheduled to go through governance for approval in fiscal year 2013–14.
People

In support of its ongoing focus on its people, the CFIA worked to further its human resource priorities and support the contribution, productivity and satisfaction of its employees. A significant contribution towards this goal was the CFIA's move to replace the 2008–13 Renewal Plan with a three year Integrated HR/Business Plan. This plan paves the way forward for the Agency by providing the framework necessary to integrate various HR strategies so the Agency may meet its business requirements and better utilize the productive capacity of its employees.

leaf iconFor the hiring of new employees, the CFIA began using technology to administer existing paper-based assessment tools in an online environment. This eased the burden placed on employees during hiring processes. As well, the CFIA conducted research on the potential use of multiple standardized tools which would allow the Agency to increase its predictive ability for future job success, removing subjectivity and situations of potential bias. Additionally, a six week pre-requisite employment program was developed, three core training sessions were held, and a multi-year refresher training plan for existing inspection staff was created and implemented.

The CFIA emphasizes training initiatives that develop future leaders because they play a role in both employee training and employee retention, both of which are essential to the health of the Agency. The 2011 Public Service Employee Survey provided the CFIA with feedback which highlighted these areas. Based on this feedback, the CFIA's Learning Division initiated an Inspector School that was launched in 2012–13. The curriculum made efforts to ensure consistent orientation and cultural awareness for new CFIA inspectors and has led to the creation of an inspector-specific training strategy to ensure that the Agency's scientific and technical training is delivered consistently across the country.

Lastly, the effectiveness and efficiency of HR service delivery in the Agency has been improved by an extensive re-organization. The re-organization included the creation of a new Business Line Support Directorate, the implementation of the new 1-888 HR Service Centre and other internal re-structuring.

Stewardship

In order to provide a clear vision and guidance for the Agency's future, the CFIA internally published its Long-Term Strategic Plan (LTSP). The plan embodies:

  • The vision for the CFIA in 2025;
  • Focus areas – general strategic direction for the next five years;
  • Goals – broad outcomes within each focus area; and
  • Strategies – specific actions the Agency has committed to undertake in the next five years to achieve these goals.

This LTSP is now used to guide CFIA decision making and planning, as well as management accountability and its relationship with stakeholders.

leaf iconAs part of the evaluation of its spending, the CFIA has identified a number of opportunities across all programs to reduce costs associated with management, administration and other internal functions. This includes sharing services with other government departments, streamlining processes, simplifying regulatory requirements, and providing single window access to specialized expertise.

leaf iconAs part of the project management agenda, the CFIA continued implementation of its Project Management Framework. This included a continued focus on project management training which included the delivery of 32 sessions attended by 734 employees.

The CFIA also developed its Investment Plan, which provides a five-year (2012/13 – 2016/17) outlook describing planned investment in assets, acquired services and projects supporting its strategic outcome, priorities and objectives. The Investment Plan's key focus is to develop Agency-wide strategies to maintain its aging core infrastructure while advancing the Agency's modernization agenda which includes: inspection system modernization; enhanced science capacity and capability; and information management and information technology which support inspection services.

As a part of the IM/IT Campaign Plan the CFIA began the process to upgrade its document management and its third party business intelligence system and developed a senior management reporting dashboard of Agency key performance indicators which will assist in priority based decision making. Additionally the CFIA is currently enriching its Data Warehouse, Implementation data extracting tools and reports, leading in report development for Senior Management.

In accordance with the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, the CFIA considers the environmental effects of initiatives through its strategic environmental assessment process. This process is supported by the CFIA Environmental Policy commitment to apply sound environmental principles and practices in the development and delivery of its programs and the management of its facilities.

Risk Management

The CFIA made significant progress at integrating risk into its ongoing planning and reporting. Through the implementation of a focused business line portfolio approach that is enabled by corporate risks and planning resources, Integrated Risk Management (IRM) better supports strategic decision-making by ensuring that risk information is integrated within, and supports, existing business planning and priority-setting.

Additionally, the CFIA has successfully implemented 14 of the 17 security control measures that were foreseen in the Agency Security Plan (ASP) for the 2012–13 fiscal year. These security control measures include various enhancements to security-related compliance instruments, tools and awareness activities. The 2013–14 ASP deliverables will continue to strengthen the CFIA's Security Program by managing security risks and improving the overall security of its employees, the control and protection of CFIA information, physical infrastructures, and other valuable assets.

Date modified: