2013–14 Estimates Report on Plans and Priorities

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Minister's Message

The Honourable Gerry Ritz, Privy Councillor, Member of Parliament

The Honourable Gerry Ritz, PC, MP
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Canada has one of the best food safety and animal and plant health regulatory systems in the world. But the world in which the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) operates is changing and the Agency must continually evolve to ensure a high level of protection for Canadian families and support for our vital agri-food sector and plant and animal resource base.

Shaping the CFIA for the future means adapting to advances in science and technology and responding to changes in the environment, global agricultural trade patterns, available food products and consumer demands. The CFIA's 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities outlines how the Government of Canada will respond to these changes while continuing to move forward the Agency's day-to-day business.

The CFIA recently marked a significant milestone in its history. The Safe Food for Canadians Act (Bill S-11) was passed in Parliament and received Royal Assent. This new legislation consolidates the authorities of multiple food statutes into one Act. It also serves to complete the Government's response to the recommendations found in the Report of the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak. Moreover, the Agency, Canada's largest science-based regulator, is now supported by legislation that will strengthen food safety oversight, better protect consumers and enhance industry compliance.

Over the coming year the CFIA will continue to update its food, animal and plant regulations and modernize its inspection systems. A new and improved single food inspection model will be phased in starting in 2013.

As we move forward, the CFIA will increase its focus on prevention, consumer protection and transparency. For example, the Agency will begin consultations on its Food Labelling Modernization Initiative. In addition, the CFIA will continue to build on the progress it has already made in providing the public with useful and timely information about the work that it does and how it does it.

The CFIA will also remain active internationally, seeking to develop and maintain relationships globally. This includes continuing the important work initiated last year with the United States on the Beyond the Border and Regulatory Cooperation Council initiatives and supporting new trade and information-sharing relationships with other countries and international organizations.

The CFIA is meeting the challenges of a complex and ever-changing food safety, animal and plant health landscape. This is thanks in large measure to its highly-skilled and adaptive workforce. I continue to rely on the collaborative efforts of the CFIA and the entire Agriculture and Agri-Food portfolio to help meet the needs of consumers and the agri-food sector and to protect Canada's plant and animal resource base.

The CFIA will report on its progress in the Agency's 2013–14 Performance Report.

The Honourable Gerry Ritz, PC, MP
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Section I – Agency Overview

1.1 Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canada's largest science-based regulatory agency. It has over 7,100Footnote 1 employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal, and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy.

The CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services in order to:

  • prevent and manage food safety risks;
  • protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species;
  • prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases;
  • contribute to consumer protection; and
  • contribute to market access for Canada's food, plants, and animals.

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective risk management, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

The CFIA's Legislative Authority

CFIA Wide
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
Food
  • Safe Food for Canadians Act
  • Canada Agricultural Products Act
  • Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act (as it relates to food)
  • Fish Inspection Act
  • Food and Drugs Act (as it relates to food)
  • Meat Inspection Act
Plant
  • Fertilizers Act
  • Plant Breeders' Rights Act
  • Plant Protection Act
  • Seeds Act
Animal
  • Health of Animals Act
  • Feeds Act
  • Seeds Act

1.2 Responsibilities

The CFIA is responsible for administering and enforcing 13 federal statutes and 38 sets of regulations, for regulating the safety and quality of food sold in Canada, and for supporting a sustainable plant and animal resource base. As of November 2012, the Safe Food for Canadians Act received Royal Assent. Prior to the Safe Food for Canadians Act, food safety in Canada was regulated under a suite of different statutes. This new legislation completes the CFIA's response to the recommendations found in the Report of the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak and serves to better position the Agency to evolve along with the rapidly changing food safety landscape by, among other things, strengthening oversight of food commodities being traded inter-provincially or internationally in order to better protect consumers. The CFIA shares many of its core responsibilities with other federal departments and agencies, with provincial, territorial and municipal authorities, and with other stakeholders.

The CFIA's Key Federal Partners

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Health Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Canadian Grain Commission
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada, including Canadian Forest Service
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
  • Environment Canada, including Canadian Wildlife Service

The CFIA works with its partners to implement food safety measures; manage food, animal, and plant risks and emergencies; and promote the development of food safety and disease control systems to maintain the safety of Canada's high-quality agriculture, agri-food, aquaculture and fishery products. The CFIA's activities include verifying the compliance of imported products; registering and inspecting establishments; testing food, animals, plants, and their related products; and approving the use of many agricultural inputs. The CFIA also provides scientific advice, develops new technologies, provides testing services, and conducts regulatory research.

At the CFIA, decisions are based on high-quality, timely, relevant science. Science informs policy development and program design and delivery through foresight, advice, risk assessment, the influence of international standards, research and development, and testing.

1.3 Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

To effectively fulfill its responsibilities in safeguarding Canad's food and sustaining its animal and plant resource base, the CFIA aims to achieve one strategic outcomeFootnote 2: a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base. The CFIA's Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), shown in Figure 1, illustrates how the Agency's strategic outcome aligns with those of the Government of Canada and reflects how the Agency plans to allocate and manage its resources to achieve the corresponding expected results. The Agency's priorities are reviewed annually to facilitate effective resource management within the context of the PAA framework. The four priority areas established for 2013–14 are detailed further in Section 1.6 and Section II.

Click on image for larger view
Figure 2: Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) for the CFIA. Description follows.

Description for - Program Alignment Architecture for the CFIA

The CFIA's Vision
To excel as a science-based regulator, trusted and respected by Canadians and the international community

The CFIA's Mission
Dedicated to safeguarding Canada's food, animals and plants, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment and economy

GoC Outcome Areas

  • Healthy Canadians
  • Strong Economic Growth
  • A Clean and Healthy Environment
  • A Fair and Secure Marketplace
  • A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce
Strategic Outcome
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base
Program Food Safety Program Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Plant Resources Program International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Internal Services
Sub-Program Meat & Poultry Terrestrial Animal Health Plant Protection

Governance and Management Support

Resource Management Services

Asset Management Services

Egg Aquatic Animal Health Seed
Dairy Feed Fertilizer
Fish & Seafood Intellectual Property Rights
Fresh Fruits & Vegetables
Imported and Manufactured Food Products

The CFIA's Foundation

  • Sound Science
  • Effective Regulatory Base
  • Effective Inspection Programs
  • Effective Risk Management
  • Strong Partnerships
  • Transparent Timely Communications

The CFIA's Priorities

  • Prevention
  • Services Excellence
  • Performance Excellence
  • People

Key Risk Areas

  • Management Information and IM/IT Infrastructure
  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Managing Change
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships
  • Emergency Management

1.4 Contribution of Priorities to the Strategic Outcome

In 2012–13, the CFIA's activity planning was guided by four (4) overarching priorities: strong foundation, working closely with partners, enhancing services, and strengthening internal management. These priorities were rooted in the Agency's strategic change agenda. During the 2012–13 fiscal year, the change agenda, and its priorities were further refined through the Agency's ongoing Long-Term Strategic Planning (LTSP) exercise. By defining the Agency's long-term vision and carefully considering its key strategic risks, the Long-Term Strategic Plan assists the CFIA in mitigating its risks, strengthening its foundations, and effectively delivering its core program activities. The following table outlines the CFIA's priorities for 2013–14, based on the Agency's LTSP. As these priorities are refinements to the Agency's 2012–13 LTSP, they have been categorized as 'previously committed to' for the sake of clarity.

Table 1-1: Summary of Priorities

Priority TypeFootnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program(s)
An increased focus on prevention which will provide an opportunity to minimize risks to human, animal and ecosystem health Previously committed to Food Safety Program, Animal Health and Zoonotics Program, Plant Resource Program and International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Description
Integrating proactive and preventive risk management approaches into all CFIA programs, including focus on partnerships and sharing of information, will help the CFIA to anticipate, prevent, prepare, and manage issues, including emergencies. Under this priority, the CFIA has established the following goals:
  • stakeholders have a clear and common understanding of the primary role that they play in managing risk;
  • proactive and preventive risk management approaches are integrated into all CFIA programs;
  • industry's prevention systems are verified; and
  • partnerships, networks and intelligence sharing help the CFIA anticipate, prevent, and prepare.
Priority TypeFootnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program(s)
The CFIA's role as an effective regulator will be enhanced by a focus on service excellence Previously committed to Food Safety Program, Animal Health and Zoonotics Program, Plant Resource Program and International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Description
Strengthening the citizen-centred service delivery culture will result in enhanced program delivery and domestic and international stakeholders who have confidence in the CFIA as a trusted and credible regulator. Under this priority, the CFIA has established the following goals:
  • robust inspection systems provide advice and oversight;
  • service culture is embedded within the Agency;
  • the CFIA is a trusted, transparent and credible regulator with adaptable, predictable and consistent program delivery; and
  • CFIA services support efficient and effective regulation of the marketplace.
Priority TypeFootnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program(s)
Adapt and evolve to meet new demands and expectations with a focus on internal performance excellence Previously committed to All Programs
Description
Optimizing performance will enable the CFIA to evaluate the effectiveness of the Agency's policies and programs and to allocate resources to areas of highest risk. Under this priority, the CFIA has established the following goals:
  • strong internal management systems and governance that support risk-based planning and allocation of resources; and
  • a performance management mindset is embedded in the Agency.
Priority TypeFootnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program(s)
Focusing on people who are supported by training and tools Previously committed to All Programs
Description
Focusing on diverse talent, supported by training and modern tools will result in a stable and skilled CFIA workforce and adaptable and satisfied employees. Under this priority, the CFIA has established the following goals:
  • the CFIA continues to retain and attract competent, qualified, and motivated personnel;
  • individuals have the tools, training and information they need to support the Agency and progress in their careers; and
  • the CFIA has the culture it needs to achieve the Long-Term Strategic Plan – a culture of engagement.

1.5 Risk Analysis

The CFIA strives to fulfill its mandate and responsibilities by balancing both risks and opportunities when designing its policies, programs and services. The CFIA's implementation of integrated risk and opportunity management supports informed decision-making and continuous improvement.

Through the Corporate Risk Profile (CRP) exercise and other various management practices, tools, and guides, the CFIA is fostering a responsible, risk-smart and opportunity-driven culture that focuses on informed decision-making, integrated business planning, and strategic resource allocation.

The CFIA recognizes that continuous improvement and maturity of practices are required. To ensure that its risk management approach remains effective and relevant, the CFIA has held discussions with its External Advisory Committee (EAC) and others to strengthen and validate its processes. Thus, the CFIA is constantly reviewing and updating its integrated risk management process and tools to reflect leading best practices.

The following table provides an overview of the most significant, overarching corporate risks and their corresponding response strategies, as identified in the 2012–13 CRP. The implementation of key mitigation strategies for each risk will reduce residual risk to levels deemed tolerable by the Agency. Further, given the convergent nature of the Agency's corporate risks, they are directly linked to all programs.

In pursuit of its strategic objective, the CFIA continues to support a foundation for sound business practices where integrated risk management is embedded in its planning, decision-making and management.

Table 1-2: Risk Summary

Risk Area Key Mitigation Strategies and Activities Linkage to Organizational Priority
Prevention Service Excellence Performance Excellence People
Management Information and IM/IT Infrastructure
There is a threat that the Agency will be unable to make risk-based decisions due to a lack of timely, accurate and useful data and information. The fast- paced environment within which the Agency must operate means that decision-makers' information needs and expectations are increasingly complex and time-sensitive. Differences in how information is collected, analyzed and used across multiple systems may impede information sharing and timely operational and regulatory decision-making. Similarly, aging infrastructure limits capacity to take full advantage of available information.
Strengthen planning, reporting & performance monitoring checkmark
Centre for Business Information Management checkmark checkmark
Knowledge Workspace Program checkmark checkmark
IM/IT Campaign Plan checkmark
Inspection Effectiveness
There is a threat that the Agency will lack the appropriate inspection effectiveness to expeditiously prevent, detect and respond to threats to food safety, animals and plants. The Agency delivers 14 inspection programs that have evolved independently, each with diverse and complex requirements. Further, CFIA inspectors must maintain ever-increasing levels of scientific and technical expertise as a result of changing methods of production, processing and distribution. Ensuring inspectors have the appropriate knowledge, tools and direction is increasingly challenging in this complex environment.
Legislative renewal checkmark checkmark checkmark
Inspection Modernization initiative checkmark checkmark checkmark checkmark
Food Program framework and redesign checkmark checkmark checkmark checkmark
Scientific Capability
There is a threat that the Agency will not have the scientific capability to adapt and respond in a timely manner. This, along with the globalization of the marketplace and the resulting increased demand to meet the diverse science-based inspection and testing requirements of international partners, challenges the CFIA to ensure that its inspectors, scientists and program specialists are able to keep pace and that laboratory infrastructure, tools and methodologies are able to meet demands. At the same time, the Agency has an opportunity to leverage scientific capability; this includes the improvement of knowledge, information sharing and emergency response through enhanced engagement with partners.
Laboratory infrastructure strategy checkmark
Human Resources Modernization Strategy checkmark
Enhance laboratory response capacity checkmark checkmark
Enhance surveillance and foresight checkmark
Laboratory Network checkmark
Legislative, Regulatory and Program Frameworks
There is a threat that the current legislative, regulatory and program framework will be unable to support the effective delivery of the Agency's mandate. This risk is driven by the CFIA's rapidly changing operating environment coupled with an aging regulatory base. Significant advances in science and technology have impacted the production, processing and testing options available; consumers want more, better-quality and easily accessible information; industry continues to raise concerns about regulatory burden; and international partners are increasingly requiring the demonstration of comprehensive safety systems.
Legislative renewal checkmark checkmark checkmark
Multi-Year Regulatory Plan checkmark checkmark checkmark
Food Program framework and redesign checkmark checkmark checkmark checkmark
E-business and e-certification checkmark
User fee / service standard modernization checkmark
Red tape reduction initiatives checkmark
Managing Change
There is a threat that the Agency will be unable to effectively manage change on an ongoing basis. The fiscal, regulatory and scientific environment within which the Agency operates requires on-going, carefully managed change as a regular part of business. The Agency faces the challenge of ensuring that it has the capacity to take timely advantage of opportunities for innovation while continuing to maintain or increase effectiveness and efficiency.
Human Resources Modernization Strategy checkmark
Reinforce values and ethics checkmark
Strengthen planning, reporting and performance monitoring checkmark checkmark
Enhance project management checkmark
Enhance engagement – internal and public checkmark
Transparency and Leveraging Relationships
There is an opportunity for the Agency to increase its transparency and accountability to stakeholders. Canadians, industry, and our international partners are consistently demanding greater amounts of timely, understandable information. The broad use of technology is providing new opportunities to better engage and collaborate with industry, other governmental stakeholders and the public. This enables regulated parties to take steps to ensure compliance and helps to increase public awareness and confidence in the Canadian marketplace. The Agency has an opportunity to modernize its cost recovery regime to make it fairer and to reduce regulatory burden for industry, and it has the chance to adopt a more strategic approach to addressing increases in demand related to market access.
Open and Transparent communication checkmark
E-business and e-certification checkmark
User fee / service standard modernization checkmark
Red tape reduction initiatives checkmark
US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) comparability & border initiatives checkmark
Emergency Management
There is a threat that the Agency is inadequately prepared for multiple, simultaneous or large-scale emergencies. The CFIA has a well-developed emergency preparedness and response capacity for individual emergencies. That said, critical incidents and more complex emergencies could increase due to changes in human, animal and plant movement, complex processing and distribution chains, climate change, and changing production methods. The health of the population, the resource base, trade, and critical infrastructure could all be affected by a large-scale emergency such as a pandemic.
Existing risk mitigation strategies result in a tolerable level of residual risk.

1.6 Planning Summary

Taking a comprehensive and proactive approach to its annual planning and priority-setting exercises, and aligning these to Government of Canada outcomes, the Agency considers the impact of several factors. These include the global, national and economic environment; Government priorities; Agency strategic risks; its human and financial resource capacity; and past performance outcomes and related lessons learned. The plans and priorities presented in this report are based on a comprehensive assessment of the Agency's strategic risks (Section 1.7 Risk Analysis). Planning and performance assessment activities are carried out at all levels of the Agency; as such, these exercises form a part of its ongoing business.

1.6.1 Financial Resources and Human Resources

The following tables present the Agency's 2013–14 Main Estimates as well as the planned spending levels and full-time equivalents for the next three fiscal years (2013–14 to 2015–16) excluding funding extensions that the Agency will pursue. The 2013–14 Planned Spending is approximately $43.5 million higher than the Main Estimates for the same time period and includes the following resources that are not included in the Main Estimates: Renewal of resources for two years (2012–13 to 2013–14) to maintain increased frequency of food inspections in meat processing establishments; renewal of resources for four years (2012–13 to 2015–16) related to Listeriosis; new resources related to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) led initiatives such as the Single Window Initiative and Trusted Traders and Trusted Travellers programs as outlined in the Beyond the Border Action Plan; as well as resources that are earmarked in the fiscal framework related to Food Safety Modernization.

Planned Spending is declining by $111.5 million and 931 FTEs from 2013–14 to 2015–16. The major items contributing to this decrease are:

  • Budget 2012 Strategic Operating Review reductions. As part of this Review, the Agency has identified a number of opportunities across all Programs to reduce costs associated with management, administration and other internal functions; shared services with other government departments; as well as streamlining processes, simplifying regulatory requirements and providing single window access to specialized expertise. Administrative efficiencies will be found in the areas of management and administration, based largely in Ottawa. These administrative efficiency reductions are allocated proportionally across all programs. None of these efficiencies affect front-line food safety inspection staff.
  • A decrease in funding for Food Safety Modernization. The decrease in funding is in line with approved investment plans related to the implementation of these projects (i.e. the level of required funding decreases as the projects near completion) and will not decrease the number of front-line food safety inspection staff. The funding will sunset in 2015-16.
  • A transfer of resources to Public Works and Government Services Canada for the Consolidation of Pay Services Project.
  • Certain funds which are scheduled to sunset; the CFIA plans to seek renewal of these sunsetting funds.
Table 1-3: Financial Resources
Financial Resources ($ Millions)
Total Budgetary
Expenditure
(Main Estimates)
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
687.9 731.4 636.6 619.9
Table 1-4: Human Resources
Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents – FTEsFootnote 4)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
6,438 5,535 5,507

1.6.2 Planning Summary Tables

The following tables (1-5 to 1-7) highlight the Agency's strategic outcome and present a summary of the Agency's performance indicators and targets. Table 1-5 presents the Agency's forecasted spending for 2012–13 and planned spending over the next three fiscal years for each program.

Table 1-5: Planning Summary Table for Strategic Outcome and Programs ($ Millions)
Strategic Outcome Program Actual
Spending
2010–11
Actual
Spending
2011–12
Forecast
Spending
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2013–14
Planned
Spending
2014–15
Planned
Spending
2015–16
Alignment to Government
of Canada Outcomes
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Food Safety Program 313.8 328.9 360.9 352.7 330.5 314.5 Healthy Canadians
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 133.9 140.3 144.9 132.0 89.2 89.1 Healthy Canadians
Plant Resources Program 80.1 84.0 92.0 84.7 74.4 74.1 A Clean and Healthy Environment
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 33.3 34.8 35.9 31.7 25.6 25.6 A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce
Subtotal 561.1 588.0 633.7 601.1 519.7 503.3
Table 1-6 Planning Summary Table for Internal Services ($ Millions)
Program Actual
Spending
2010–11
Actual
Spending
2011–12
Forecast
Spending
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2013–14
Planned
Spending
2014–15
Planned
Spending
2015–16
Internal Services 160.7 149.7 143.9 130.3 116.9 116.6
Subtotal 160.7 149.7 143.9 130.3 116.9 116.6
Table 1-7 Planning Summary Totals ($ Millions)
Strategic Outcome(s) Program(s), and Internal Services Actual Spending
2010–11
Actual Spending
2011–12
Forecast Spending
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2013–14
Planned
Spending
2014–15
Planned
Spending
2015–16
Total 721.8 737.7 777.6 731.4 636.6 619.9

1.7 Expenditure Profile

Figure 2: Percentage of 2013–14 Planned Spending by Program Activity. Description follows.

Description for - Pie Chart – Percentage of 2013–14 Planned Spending by Program Activity
Figure 2: Percentage of 2001–12 Planned Spending by Program Activity
Food Safety Program 48%
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 18%
Plant Resources Program 12%
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 4%
Internal Services 18%

1.7.1 The CFIA's Spending Trend

Figure 3: The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's past and future spending within the context of a seven-year trend. Description follows.

Description for - Bar Graph – The CFIA's past and future spending within the context of a seven-year trend
Figure 3: The CFIA's past and future spending within the context of a seven-year trend
Actual Spending ($ Millions)
2009–10 718.1
2010–11 721.8
2011–12 737.7
Forecast Spending ($ Millions)
2012-13 4%
Planned Spending ($ Millions)
2013–14 731.4
2014–15 636.6
2015-16 619.9

1.7.2 Voted and Statutory Items

For information on our organizational appropriations, please see the 2013–14 Main Estimates publication.

Section II – Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

2.1 Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base

Mitigating risks to food safety is the CFIA's highest priority. Safeguarding the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy are the driving force behind the design and development of the CFIA's programs. The CFIA, in collaboration and partnership with industry, consumers, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, continues to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases.

The CFIA supports Canadian agriculture and the ability of agri-food businesses to enter domestic and global markets and compete successfully therein. To support this objective, the CFIA develops and enforces regulatory and program frameworks for imports and exports that meet both Canadian and international requirements. Regulatory and program frameworks are based on the most current and relevant information, and that they keep pace with a rapidly evolving, global environment; the CFIA engages in outreach and consultation activities with key stakeholders and partners (including those in industry), consumers, and international trade and standards organizations. In so doing, the CFIA is also able to maintain open and transparent communication with its stakeholder and consultative groups.

The CFIA is also focused on several horizontal initiatives aimed at contributing to consumer protection. Over the next year, the CFIA plans on implementing a new import licensing system as part of the Food Safety Action Plan, continuing to advance its food labelling modernization and transparency initiatives and continuing to deliver on many of its daily to day operational activities; these include public recall notices and import border blitzes designed to catch imported food items that may pose a health threat to Canadians.

Over the next few years, in an effort to offer greater consistency in program interpretation and delivery the CFIA will begin work towards establishing 16 centres of expertise (CoE) across Canada. Each CoE will operate as a single window and will provide consistent technical advice, interpretation, guidance and specialized knowledge to the CFIA front-line inspectors and regulated parties. Specific CoEs will deal with such subjects as processed meat and poultry, forestry, and aquatic animals among others subjects. CoEs will consolidate program and administrative expertise to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, consistency and quality of service delivery.

The performance tables listed in the preceding pages describes the performance indicators used to measure the extent to which the CFIA is achieving its single strategic outcome. (See Tables 2-1, 2-2, 2-3 and 2-4).

To be successful in delivering on its strategic outcome, the CFIA has developed a robust risk management discipline, fostering its use throughout the Agency. As such, the CFIA continually monitors and assesses its operating environment in order to be aware of the threats and opportunities concerned with the achievement of its desired outcome. A cornerstone of its risk management process is the development of an Agency-wide Corporate Risk Profile (CRP) are articulated in Table 1-5.

In order to mitigate these risks and achieve its strategic outcome, the Agency will, through the actions of its program activities (Food Safety, Animal Health and Zoonotics, Plant Resources, International Collaboration and Technical Agreements), concentrate its 2013–14 efforts on the delivery of key initiatives supporting the following four priorities:

  • An increased focus on prevention which will provide an opportunity to minimize risks to human, animal and plant health;
  • The CFIA's role as an effective regulator will be enhanced by a focus on service excellence;
  • Adapt and evolve to meet new demands and expectations with a focus on internal performance excellence; and
  • Focusing on people who are supported by training and tools

2.1.1 Program Summary

2.1.1.1 Food Safety Program

Food Safety Program - description follows

Description for Food Safety Program image
Program Activity Expected Results GoC Outcome Areas
Food Safety Program
  • Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated
  • Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
Healthy Canadians

Key Risk Areas

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships
Program Description

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Planning Highlights

In recognition of the rapidly evolving food safety environment, and in an effort to modernize and simplify federal legislation and regulations affecting food safety, the Government enacted the Safe Food for Canadians Act in November 2012. Prior to the Safe Food for Canadians Act, food safety in Canada was regulated under a suite of different statutes: the Food and Drugs Act, Fish Inspection Act, Meat Inspection Act, Canada Agricultural Products Act, and the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act. The new Safe Food for Canadians Act legislation completes the CFIA's response to the recommendations found in the Report of the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak and serves to better position the Agency to evolve along with the rapidly changing food safety landscape by, among other things, strengthening oversight of food commodities being traded inter-provincially or internationally so as to better protect consumers.

To support this new Act, the CFIA will work towards the development of a Single Food Program including new food safety regulations. By moving to an integrated food safety program that provides a consistent approach to inspections, the CFIA will be able to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of its service delivery. The CFIA will be carrying out a number of complementary initiatives to support the design and implementation of a Single Food Program: regulatory reform, stakeholder education and compliance promotion, service delivery improvements, and modernizing science capacity modernization.

Modernization

In 2013–14 specifically, the CFIA expects to have a draft regulatory framework available for consultation. Underlying the development of this new set of regulations will be a set principles to improve consistency and reduce complexity in regulation, while supporting innovation and reducing unnecessary burdens on stakeholders. Building on successful stakeholder engagement, the CFIA will engage regulatory partners from both the domestic and importing sectors at different stages of the process.

Aligned with the development of a Single Food Program, in the coming year the CFIA will continue to leverage the $100 million announced in Budget 2011 over five years as well as the $40 million reallocated internally, to support the modernization of its inspection system. In recognition of the importance of hearing from all stakeholders potentially affected by changes to the food safety program, beginning in December 2011, the CFIA held a series of engagement sessions with unions, internal managers, frontline staff, and industry stakeholders. These discussions were designed to initiate dialogue and improve understanding of inspection modernization; overall, feedback has been positive.

As a result of these discussions, five common components of food inspection were identified, and related design principles were articulated and used in the development of an improved food inspection model. In 2013–14, the CFIA will begin to phase in the implementation of its new food inspection model (developed in 2012–13). This phased-in implementation will include exploring options for the development of an IM/IT solution to deliver the new inspection model and the development of a Risk-based Inspection Oversight (RBIO) framework and risk tool. During this phased-in implementation process, the CFIA will continue communicating and engaging with government and industry partners. This process will also combine effective engagement with foreign governments to enable the recognition of the new food inspection model.

To help facilitate the modernized food safety inspection model, refresher training for existing inspection staff will continue to roll out. In addition, the six-week Pre-requisite Employment Program (PREP) Core Training will be launched April 2014, training approximately 200 new inspection staff. The CFIA will also implement a Learning Content Management System (LCMS) which will be used to manage course content and support ongoing inspection learning and training through an increased blended approach (e-learning/classroom).

Budget 2011 also provided the CFIA with $19.8 million over five years to strengthen its scientific capacities in support of the new food inspection model. In 2013–14, the CFIA will complete the contracting process for making improvements to the food laboratory structure at its Toronto and St-Hyacinthe laboratories and it will continue to hire scientists in key areas to enhance CFIA's food science capacity.

Programs

The CFIA will continue to work towards modernizing its food labelling system. In 2013–14, the CFIA will begin consultations with stakeholders, which will provide the basis for modernization strategy recommendations on a modernization strategy. The Food Labelling Modernization Initiative will focus on areas of food labelling that are the responsibility of the CFIA, including roles and responsibilities, partnerships, regulations, policy and program development and service delivery. This modernization initiative will strive to balance the needs of Canadian consumers, industry and government.

Under the Food Safety Action Plan (FSAP) initiative, the Imported and Manufactured Food Program (IMFP) is developing and preparing to deliver training associated with the revised compliance verification (CVS) inspection process. The training of current staff in the CVS-IMFP process will be completed by July 31, 2013, and will be complemented by on-the-job coaching as well as other technical training deliveries. Training developed in response to the Weatherill Report (nine weeks of Meat Processing School) will continue with an ongoing focus on the training of current meat processing inspectors using the updated materials.

Federal and provincial governments remain committed to working together and with industry to enhance meat and poultry product safety. Specifically, the CFIA will build on work (completed in 2012–13) relating to the Pathogen Reduction Initiative the goal of which was to reduce the health risks and the economic impact of food-borne pathogen in Canadian meat and poultry. In 2013–14, the CFIA will focus its efforts on completing the Microbiological Baseline Study (MBS) in broiler chicken to assess current pathogens levels in Canadian meat and poultry and form the basis of to establish pathogen reduction targets and strategies. Additionally, the CFIA will implement changes agreed-upon by provinces by returning provincial meat inspection activities to the provinces of British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. There will be no impact on food safety, as provinces will be delivering the required inspection services.

The CFIA will continue ensuring industry's adherence to Health Canada's updated Listeria Policy (released in April 2011) by conducting inspections to verify the effectiveness of industry controls related to Listeria; conducting expanded environmental sampling for high-risk ready-to-eat (RTE) foods; evaluating industry studies and validating safety measures taken to limit or prevent the growth of Listeria in RTE foods. As per the additional money received in Budget 2012, the CFIA will continue its sustained effort on these critical activities.

Finally, an in-depth review will be of the incident and recall of XL Food Inc. products contaminated with E. coli 0157 that occurred in September 2012. This will allow the CFIA to assess how the incident unfolded and identify what went well and areas that must be improved to strengthen the Canadian food safety system.

Did You Know

The website Food Safety provides the most up-to-date information to consumers in Canada about recalls, for safe food handling and preparation, food allergies, information on food about poisoning, and food facts.

Table 2-1: Planning Summary – Food Safety Program
Financial Resources ($ Millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
312.2352.7330.5314.5
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTE)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
3,2182,8972,897

Planned Spending for the Food Safety Program is declining by $38.2 million from 2013–14 to 2015–16. The major items contributing to this decrease are:

  • The Budget 2012 Strategic Operating Review. Included in the Review is the return of meat inspection activities within provincially registered establishments to the provinces of British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. This measure was previously announced as a priority for the CFIA and its provincial partners. Oversight within these establishments will be provided by provincial authorities, as is the case in all other provinces. Agency front-line food safety inspection staff currently doing this work will be given guaranteed job offers to stay with the CFIA.
  • A decrease in funding for Food Safety Modernization. The decrease in funding is in line with approved investment plans related to the implementation of these projects (i.e. the level of required funding decreases as the projects near completion). The funding will sunset in 2015–16.
  • The sunsetting of resources relating to some inspection activities; the CFIA plans to seek renewal of these sunsetting resources.

Discrepancies identified in the 2011–12 Departmental Performance Report regarding the alignment of authorities and FTEs by Program as a result of the renewal of the Program Alignment Architecture in 2011–12, have now been addressed.

Program – 1.1 Food Safety Program
Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Number of commodity areas where federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 100% of Class I recalls are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 95%
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where domestic food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6
Number of commodity areas where imported food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6
Additional information:

The CFIA's Food Safety Action Plan

Listeria Policy update

Compliance Verification System Procedures

Sub-Program – 1.1.1 Meat and Poultry
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally registered meat and poultry establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered meat and poultry establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98%
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Percentage of tested imported meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Sub-Program – 1.1.2 Egg
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally registered shell egg establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered shell egg establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98%
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Percentage of tested imported shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Sub-Program – 1.1.3 Dairy
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally registered dairy establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered dairy establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98%
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Percentage of tested imported dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Sub-Program – 1.1.4 Fish & Seafood
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally registered fish and seafood establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fish and seafood establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98%
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Percentage of tested imported fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Sub-Program – 1.1.5 Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally registered fresh fruits and vegetables establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fresh fruit and vegetable establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98%
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fresh fruit and vegetable samples in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Percentage of tested imported fresh fruits and vegetables samples in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Sub-Program – 1.1.6 Processed Products
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally registered processed products establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered processed products establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98%
Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Percentage of tested imported processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Sub-Program – 1.1.7 Imported and Manufactured Food Products
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food (IMF) products are mitigated Percentage of major health risks in the imported and manufactured food sector that are addressed through the annual update to food safety inspection programs 95%
Percentage of inspected IMF products with accurate net quantity, composition, labelling and advertising 70%
2.1.1.2 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

flowchart of Animal Health and Zoonotics Program - description follows

Description for flowchart - Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Program Expected Results GoC Outcome Areas
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized
  • Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated
  • Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases
  • Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to
Strong Economic Growth

A Clean and Healthy Environment

Key Risk Areas

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships
Program Description

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, mitigating and managing risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instils confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Planning Highlights

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program will continue its core activities in support of animal disease prevention, preparedness, response and recovery. The development and delivery of these core activities will be based on effective relationships with stakeholders and partners. The CFIA will continue to follow a collaborative approach with stakeholders by sharing best practices, information, and expertise in support of a strong and healthy farmed animal industry. These core activities will support market access for the export of animals and animal products by demonstrating adequate control of, or freedom from, regulated diseases.

The CFIA will be developing a performance measurement framework to support the Animal Health Program Framework with the long-term goal of improving the delivery of the Animal Health Program. Additionally, the CFIA is committed to developing five-year strategic plans for each of the three Animal Health Divisions to improve accountability and better support decision-making within the animal health sector.

Did You Know

Approximately 50% of the overall complete feed equivalent volume required to feed all livestock and poultry in Canada is manufactured in on-farm mixing establishments.

Programs

The CFIA will work with other federal departments, provinces, territories, and the private sector to determine appropriate levels of regulation for certain animal diseases. For example, the Agency has initiated a study to develop objective criteria to categorize animal diseases, which will be used to develop an updated animal health system with clearly defined roles and responsibilities among federal and provincial governments, and the private sector. This will help determine which disease prevention and response activities are appropriately led by the federal government, the provincial and territorial governments and the private sector. Animal Health is also implementing an Alternative Service Delivery (ASD) program to identify additional opportunities to achieve greater efficiency between the CFIA and the private sector. The objective of this program is to build a shared responsibility model for effectively managing risk with industry.

In 2013–14 the CFIA, in conjunction with the United States Department of Agriculture, industry, and state and provincial governments, will develop a common guidance framework for the recognition of zoning decisions in the event of a highly contagious Foreign Animal Disease (FAD) outbreak. This guidance framework will apply to both Canada and the United States to allow both countries to be collectively protected from disease while permitting the continuation of bilateral trade between zones which remain from disease-free.

With respect to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base, the CFIA will implement the new Import Program for Aquatics. Additionally, the CFIA is implementing a new Domestic Movement Control program for aquatic animals as well as Information Management projects to further support the aquatics program. These initiatives will ensure that the Canadian aquatic animal sector is compliant with regulations, that inspection staff are well positioned to deliver services, and that risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base are mitigated.

To support and maintain a modernized and efficient animal health surveillance system, the CFIA will update its animal health surveillance plan using an internationally recognized approach to prioritization. Once fully implemented, the plan will assist in maintaining accurate intelligence on the movement and emergence of animal disease threats to the Canadian herd. This work is part of an ongoing effort to build the national surveillance capacity for ongoing, rapid responses to emerging animal health issues.

In an ongoing effort to strengthen its program delivery, the Animal Health Program will continue to update its manuals of procedure manuals, hazard specific plans, guidance documents for industry, and other communications. These updates will facilitate effective preparedness to prevent, control and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases.

Modernization

The ability to trace pathogens that move among wildlife, domestic animals, and humans is critical to the CFIA's ability to anticipate, prevent, track, respond to, and recover from zoonotic outbreaks. Traceability systems allow organizations to track an animal or plant from one point in the supply chain to another. The CFIA will continue the development of a robust traceability system by building strong information management and information technology systems. This work includes the development of a traceability data integrity framework to help ensure that data used by the system is accurate and complete. Enhancements further enabling authorities with respect to traceability were included in the Health of Animals Act at the same time as the Safe Food for Canadians Act was enacted. Finally, in support of the development of a single-window traceability tool, the CFIA will continue to work with its provincial partners and industry to sign traceability data sharing agreements.

As per the findings of the 2012 internal evaluation of the Agency's Enhanced Feed Ban Program, the CFIA, in consultation with stakeholders, will develop a Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) roadmap as a communication tool to explain its approach to long-term BSE management planning. Any adjustments conveyed in the roadmap will be science- and outcome-based. As part of the CFIA's regulatory modernization initiative, in 2013–14 the Agency will consult with regulated parties, interest groups, trading partners and other stakeholders on an updated regulatory framework proposal for livestock feed. Additionally, as part of this project, the Agency will consult with stakeholders to update user fees associated with the livestock feed program. In 2013–14 the CFIA will also strengthen planning for the allocation of enhanced Feed Ban resources (both human and financial) within the current governance process by adjusting the frequency of the program inspection based on risk.

Table 2-2: Planning Summary – Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Financial Resources ($ Millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
131.6132.089.289.1
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTE)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
1,128804804

Planned Spending for the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program is declining by $42.9 million from 2013–14 to 2015–16. The major items contributing to this decrease are:

  • The Budget 2012 Strategic Operating Review, which includes a more effective response to animal diseases such as moving from eradication to management (for example, Chronic Wasting Disease) in consultation with industry and provinces.
  • The sunsetting of a portion of the resources for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE); the CFIA plans to seek renewal of these sunsetting resources.

Discrepancies identified in the 2011–12 Departmental Performance Report regarding the alignment of authorities and FTEs by Program as a result of the renewal of the Program Alignment Architecture in 2011–12, have now been addressed.

Program – 1.2 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0
Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease 100%
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements 99%
Canada's status on the OIE disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk" Status maintained
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease 100%
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed All necessary manual updates are completed
Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises conducted versus planned 9
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion 100%
Percentage of cases where CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease 100%
Additional information:

BSE Enhanced Surveillance Program

Animal Diseases

Aquatic Animal Health Export Program

Livestock Traceability

Sub-Program – 1.2.1 Terrestrial Animal Health
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally registered veterinary biologics establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered veterinary biologics establishments in compliance with federal regulations 90%
Veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations Percentage of tested veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations 100%
Animals in Canada are transported humanely Percentage of inspected live loads in compliance with humane transport standards 100%
Sub-Program – 1.2.2 Aquatic Animal Health
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Domestic aquatic animals and their products are compliant with Canadian regulations and meet the standards of international agreements Percentage of certified aquatic animal and aquatic animal product shipments that meet the receiving country's import requirements 99%
Risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base are mitigated Number of reportable aquatic animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0
Sub-Program – 1.2.3 Feed
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Feed establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed establishments in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, not including labelling tasks 95%
Feed labels meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed facilities in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, when assessed against inspection tasks associated with labelling 95%
2.1.1.3 Plant Resources Program

flowchart - Food Safety Program - description follows

Description for Flowchart – Plant Resources Program
Program Expected Results GoC Outcome Areas
Plant Resources Program
  • Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated
  • Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through tine issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders)
  • Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained
Strong Economic Growth

A Clean and Healthy Environment

Key Risk Areas

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships
Program Description

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instils confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Planning Highlights

Prevention is the most effective way for the CFIA to protect the plant resource base. However, should a pest be introduced into Canada, the Agency's goal is to reduce its impact. Work under the Agency's Plant Health Resources Program includes pre-market assessments, import and safety inspections, ensuring compliance with plant program policies, processing of inspection samples, and scientific research to enhance detection across all commodities and inspection methodologies. These activities are also important for market access support.

Did You Know

In Canada, estimates of annual agricultural sector crop loss and control costs due to weeds are in excess of $2 billion. Preventing weed introduction protects agricultural and environmental sustainability and also has direct impact on maintaining market access and the successful export of Canadian products.

Modernization

The CFIA will continue to strengthen and modernize its programs by clarifying policies, updating manuals and pursing advanced risk mitigation, as well as incorporating new scientific information. As part of this work, the CFIA will be taking a risk-based approach to its prevention activities with the goal of increasing program effectiveness, efficiency and adaptability.

In keeping with its commitments under Budget 2012, the CFIA will continue to work in partnership with federal, provincial and private sector stakeholders to address plant health emergencies, to investigate alternative service delivery approaches (such as the Seed Potato Quality Management program and the Authorized Seed Crop Inspection program), to review de-regulation processes, and to work to align regulations with the United States. The CFIA will maintain regulatory responsibilities and provide strong oversight of alternative service delivery providers through recognition processes such as licensing or registration and the regular monitoring and auditing of the service delivery providers.

In addition, the CFIA will focus its efforts on product safety and on streamlining pre-market assessments to facilitate and expedite access of Canadian producers to safe and innovative agricultural inputs.

As part of the CFIA's overarching regulatory modernization strategy, the Plant Resources Program will be focusing on holding national consultations on Plant Breeder's Rights (PBR) involving farmers, horticulturalists, orchardists, seed companies, and provincial ministries of agriculture.

Programs

In 2013–14, the CFIA will continue to deliver the Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program (PPMMP). The Plum Pox Virus (PPV) is a plant disease that drastically reduces yields of stone fruit. Specifically, surveys and monitoring activities will continue with the additional goal of creating a baseline of genetic data to help identify new introductions of the PPV in contrast to the existing strains of PPV.

Under the Growing Forward initiative, the Agency will implement the Biosecurity Standards for Potato and Grains & Oilseeds. In addition, work will continue on the review and adoption of biosecurity principles, practices, and standards. This will lead to a policy on an overarching biosecurity approach for plant.

International Support

Plant and plant product imports and exports are an important part of the Canadian economy and actively support – and are dependent upon – a strong Canadian plant resource base. As such, the CFIA will actively participate in the work of the joint US-Canada Beyond the Borders (BTB) and Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) initiatives focusing on plant related issues such as:

  • risks associated with Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) in Asia and Russia;
  • wood Packaging Materials from 3rd world countries and in-transit feasibility studies;
  • harmonized North America approach to Chrysanthemum White Rust (CWR);
  • greenhouse certification systems (including MOU renewal).
Table 2-3: Planning Summary – Plant Resources Program
Financial Resources ($ Millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
84.384.774.474.1
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTE)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
856765762

Planned Spending for the Plant Health Program is declining by $10.6 million from 2013–14 to 2015–16. The major items contributing to this decrease is the Budget 2012 Strategic Operating Review, which includes shifting from eradication to management of certain plant pests such as the Emerald Ash Borer, as well as transferring non-safety activities to other fully qualified organizations to make more effective use of CFIA resources. This includes vehicle washing activities at ferry terminals in Newfoundland.

Discrepancies identified in the 2011–12 Departmental Performance Report regarding the alignment of authorities and FTEs by Program as a result of the renewal of the Program Alignment Architecture in 2011–12, have now been addressed.

Program – 1.3 Plant Resources Program
Program - Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves 0
Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements 90%
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issued 100%
Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner. 90%
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirements 99%
Additional information:

December 2008 OAG report on "Managing Risks to Canada's Plant Resources"

Sub-Program – 1.3.1 Plant Protection
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Pre-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of inspected shipments from off-shore system approaches or pre-clearance programs in compliance with federal regulations 85%
At-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of pre-arrival documentation in compliance with Canadian import requirements 90%
Post-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of new pest detections that have a science based management plan initiated within one year 90%
Sub-Program – 1.3.2 Seed
Sub-program
Expected Results
Performance Indicators Targets
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic pedigreed seed lots in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of authorized confined releases of Plants with Novel Traits (PNTs) into the Canadian environment that are in compliance with the authorized conditions 90%
Sub-Program – 1.3.3 Fertilizer
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected fertilizer and supplement products in compliance with federal regulations (Fertilizers Regulations) 90%
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of submissions reviewed within the prescribed service delivery standards 90%
Sub-Program – 1.3.4 Intellectual Property Rights
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Plant breeders develop new varieties for the Canadian market Percentage of Plant Breeders' Rights applications that reach approval and are granted rights 100%
2.1.1.4 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

flowchart - Food Safety Program - description follows

Description for Flowchart – International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Program Expected Results GoC Outcome Areas
  • Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE and IPPC
  • International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants and their products
  • International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with theCFIA's mandate
A Fair and Secure Marketplace

A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce

Key Risk Areas

  • Scientific Capacity
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships
Program Description

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through actively participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.

Based on market demand, the CFIA will also continue to negotiate and certify against export conditions in order to access export markets. The Agency, working with industry and interested stakeholders, will continue to develop and maintain export certification standards (which vary from country to country and commodity to commodity), conduct inspections and issue export certificates.

Planning Highlights

As an active player in the international arena, Canada stays abreast of current activities and approaches taken by foreign countries and aims to enhance partnerships with foreign regulators to build global approaches. In partnership with other countries' regulatory agencies, the CFIA utilizes a variety of engagement strategies to strengthen capacity in the international regulatory framework, increase awareness of regulatory systems within the broader economic development context, and promote information sharing.

In 2013–14 the CFIA will continue to engage international partners in the development and maintenance of bilateral regulatory cooperation. This engagement will support efforts to help identify best practices in food safety, animal, and plant health regulatory approaches, including those targeted at managing the risks associated with imports into Canada, advance resolution of potential issues that may occur and promoting of science-based approaches. This includes work by the Canada-European Union (EU) Veterinary Joint Management Committee (Vet JMC) where regulatory equivalency for red meat traded between Canada and the EU is determined, and Canadian recognition of EU Member States' meat inspection systems is advanced. This engagement also includes continued work with Chinese regulators to address food safety issues of mutual interest under a joint working group. In addition, successful outreach by the CFIA with the Indian Export Inspection Council has created an opportunity to pursue a food safety arrangement in 2013.

The US has been the primary and immediate focus of Canada's international regulatory cooperation efforts. Strengthening regulatory cooperation through the establishment of permanent alignment mechanisms with the US remains a priority for Canada. As a result, the CFIA will continue to implement the initiatives introduced on February 4, 2011 by the Prime Minister of Canada and the President of the United States as part of the Beyond the Border Initiative and Regulatory Cooperation Council. They include, for example:

  • development of common approaches to food safety;
  • meat cut nomenclature;
  • zoning for foreign animal diseases;
  • perimeter approach to plant protection; and
  • creation of mutual reliance on jointly acceptable food safety laboratory recognition criteria, test results, and methodologies.

The North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO) has been instrumental in developing regional phytosanitary standards that facilitate the trade of plants and plant products within North America. The NAPPO Executive Committee (EC) is embarking on a review of NAPPO processes and objectives, with the aim of ensuring that they continue to serve the needs and priorities of the governments of the three NAPPO member countries (Canada, Mexico and the United States). Through an active role on the NAPPO EC and in the special working group that will undertake this project, the CFIA will be a key player in this review, which will start in early 2013 and which will result in the development of an updated NAPPO strategic plan.

In an increasingly competitive and integrated world economy, Canada must effectively influence the development and implementation of coherent and predictable international rules. Participation in international organizations allows Canada to influence the development of rules and standards, play a leadership role, advance our regulatory practices and systems, and encourage the overall adoption of science-based regulation and regulatory best practices on an international level. Continued leadership at the World Trade Organization Sanitary and Phytosanitary (WTO SPS) Committee, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) and, partnership with Health Canada at Codex Alimentarius permits the CFIA to shape global rules surounding products movement. Current and future growth and prosperity depend on open world markets and a stable, predictable and transparent trading environment.

Finally, as part of the Global Commerce Strategy and as announced in Budget 2012, the Government of Canada has committed to pursuing an ambitious regional and bilateral free trade agreement agenda to identify new opportunities for Canadian businesses in world markets. As part of this approach, the CFIA, along with the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT), will continue to provide technical sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) expertise to co-lead or engage in the negotiation of the SPS component of free trade agreements as well as other areas related to the CFIA's mandate (i.e. technical barriers to trade, regulatory cooperation, environment, and intellectual property). These efforts include but are not limited to the current free trade agreements being negotiated with the EU, Japan, India, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, South Korea, Morocco, and Ukraine. Additionally, Canada is exploring ways to enhance its trade ties with China.

Did You Know

Canadian exports of pork and pork products to China rose from $58.8 million in 2010 to $201.8 million in 2011.

Table 2-4: Planning Summary – International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Financial Resources ($ Millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
31.731.725.625.6
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTE)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
338299299

Planned Spending for the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements is declining by $6.1 million from 2013–14 to 2015–16. The major items contributing to this decrease are:

  • The Budget 2012 Strategic Operating Review which includes administrative efficiencies in the areas of management and administration, based largely in Ottawa;
  • The sunsetting of resources for the Pork Industry Recovery and Expansion Strategy; the CFIA plans to seek renewal of these sunsetting resources.

Discrepancies identified in the 2011–12 Departmental Performance Report regarding the alignment of authorities and FTEs by Program as a result of the renewal of the Program Alignment Architecture in 2011–12, have now been addressed.

Program – 1.4 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Program - Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests. 10/Year
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products Number of unjustified non-tariff barriers resolved 10/Year
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA-led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 5/Year
Number of CFIA led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments 10/Year
Additional information:

AAFC's Market Access Secretariat (MAS)

2.1.1.5 Internal Services
Program Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Planning Highlights
Stewardship

As a means of ensuring project success and reducing project risk, the CFIA is committed to implementing an Agency-wide approach to project management for all CFIA projects. During the 2013–14 fiscal year, the CFIA will continue to implement its four-year project management improvement agenda, with particular attention paid to the implementation of the project management policy framework and project management enhancement across the Agency. This will be achieved by continued project management training, direct coaching, and mentoring of CFIA project staff by seasoned project management officers.

The Agency has developed a medium-term strategic plan (IM/IT Campaign Plan) to guide IM/IT activities. Another key initiative within this plan is information management. The objective of this initiative is to better enable active management of the Agency's information holdings in order to fulfill the growing need for timely, consistent, accessible, and trusted information, and to ensure foundational systems are in place to support the Agency's modernization efforts

All organizations at both the federal and provincial level, in Canada as well as other countries are increasingly looking at shared service models to maximize efficiency, reduce cost and eliminate duplication. The CFIA and Agriculture and Agri-food Canada (AAFC) share national headquarter facilities and will share support services in the areas of IM/IT, facilities management, security, parliamentary affairs, ministerial correspondence, and some human resources activities. For example, collaboration with AAFC has always been a priority for the Agency's IM/IT domain as they have been a service provider for several large enterprise applications within the Agency. Recently, the Client Services Centres of both organizations have merged into one consolidated group which leverages resources and provides better service to clients of both the CFIA and AAFC. In 2013–14, collaboration the sharing of services will continue as additional IM/IT functions will be consolidated. The CFIA and AAFC will continue to implement these new shared service models and continue to explore areas where shared services could benefit both organizations.

CFIA procures goods, services, and construction services in support of the Agency's mandate. This involves among other things, purchasing vehicles for the transportation of samples to laboratories, securing protective clothing for staff involved in quarantine situations, performing infrastructure maintenance on custodial laboratories and providing test kits used by our scientific community (e.g. Listeria, BSE, scrapie, etc.). As a result in 2013–14 the CFIA will enhance our strategic procurement planning by linking procurement planning to project and program planning on an Agency-wide basis.

Additionally, in order to effectively manage the CFIA's custodial facilities and non-custodial accommodations portfolios the CFIA will develop and implement a Real Property Management Framework that supports timely, informed real property management decisions and the strategic outcome of programs. By articulating accountability and decision-making structure, roles and responsibilities, and policies and practices, this framework will provide the blueprint for how CFIA senior executives, managers and employees view, approach, and apply the management of the Agency's significant, custodial and non-custodial real property holdings.

Risk Management

Under the Emergency Management Act, all government departments and agencies are mandated to develop, test, and maintain mandate-specific emergency management plans and identify risks within or related to their area of responsibility. In 2013–14, as part of the Agency's commitment to develop the Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP), the CFIA will conduct a risk assessment in an effort to balance and prioritize investments and actions and identify interdependencies across the Agency. From these identified risk elements the CFIA will develop mitigation strategies to help strengthen the National Security Program.

People

In 2013–14 the CFIA will continue to promote values and ethics which enables continued public trust in our ability to deliver our mandate. More specifically we will review and update the CFIA's Conflict of Interest (COI) program which includes certification documents and forms, the establishment of standard operating procedures, and the updating of the Conflict of Interest and Post-Employment Code.

The implementation of a new Staffing Framework and Service Delivery Model will leverage HR staffing expertise to improve staffing time and diminish overall costs while ensuring the quality of hiring and creating a bias-free selection process. The new framework and model will innovate staffing through the use of technology, assessment tools and the automation of staffing processes. Staffing service standards will also be implemented, and regular evaluation of staffing compliance and quality will be monitored.

The Agency will be introducing a multi-channel HR contact centre (i.e. telephone, e-mail, mail), that will streamline service delivery for managers and employees to increase efficiency and effectiveness. The Centre's service mandate will be based on five pillars of service:

  • transactional processing and access to qualified candidates;
  • general HR enquiries;
  • intranet navigation guidance;
  • life events advice and counselling; and
  • advisory services from subject matter experts.
Citizen-Focused Service

Transparent and open communications are becoming an increasingly significant expectation for organizations, including modern regulators like the CFIA. The Agency is committed to providing the public with useful and timely information about the work we do and how we do it. We will continue to improve transparency by making more information widely available to our stakeholders and the public via our website, the Consumer Association Roundtable and social media. The CFIA will also produce an annual report that will highlight the important work undertaken by the CFIA and how that work affects the lives of Canadians.

Moreover, for 2013–14 the CFIA will continue to expand the release of information with a number of projects aimed at consumers and other stakeholders, such as:

  • posting targeted food safety survey results as part of the Food Safety Action Plan (FSAP);
  • expanding compliance and enforcement data posted on our website; and
  • reporting on consumer complaints.

In support of the Agency's commitment to improved service delivery for stakeholders, the Complaints and Appeals Office (created in April 2012), will conduct an analysis of data collected during 2012–13 to identify trends and systemic issues that could present opportunities for improvement.

Additionally, the CFIA will continue to work towards completing a series of Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Modernization improvements by developing and implementing a Privacy Policy Framework. Although work began in 2012–13, with respect to this initiative, the new Policy will be finalized and communicated to CFIA staff through information sessions in 2013–14.

Table 2-5: Planning Summary – Internal Services
Financial Resources ($ Millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
128.1 130.3 116.9 116.6
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTE)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
898770745

Planned Spending for Internal Services is declining by $13.7 million from 2013–14 to 2015–16. The major items contributing to this decrease are:

  • The Budget 2012 Strategic Operating Review which includes: administrative efficiencies in the areas of management and administration, based largely in Ottawa;
  • Sharing services between CFIA and AAFC including the consolidation of physical locations to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, consistency and quality of service delivery; and
  • The transfer of resources to Public Works and Government Services Canada for Consolidation of Pay Services Project.

Discrepancies identified in the 2011–12 Departmental Performance Report regarding the alignment of authorities and FTEs by Program as a result of the renewal of the Program Alignment Architecture in 2011–12, have now been addressed.

Additional information:

CFIA Renewal Plan

CFIA Management Accountability Framework assessment

Section III – Supplementary Information

3.1 Financial Highlights

Future-Oriented Financial Statements

The future-oriented financial highlights presented within this RPP are intended to serve as a general overview of the CFIA's future-oriented financial statements, and are prepared on an accrual basis to strengthen accountability and improve transparency and financial management.

Future-oriented financial statements can be found on the CFIA's website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Financial Position ($ Millions)
Future-oriented Condensed Statement of Financial Position For the Year (Ended March 31) $
Change
Planned Results
2013–14
Estimated Results
2012–13
Total net liabilities (99) 132 231
Total net financial assets 3 45 42
Agency – net debt (102) 87 189
Total non-financial assets 3 207 204
Agency – net financial position 105 120 15
Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position ($ Millions)
Future-oriented Condensed Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position For the Year (Ended March 31) $
Change
Planned Results
2013–14
Estimated Results
2012–13
Total expenses (29) 854 883
Total revenues 52 52
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers (29) 802 831
Net cost of operations after government funding and transfers (117) (105) 12
Agency – net financial position – beginning of year (12) 15 27
Agency – net financial position 105 120 15

3.2 List of Supplementary Information Tables

Details on Transfer Payment Programs

Disclosure of TPPs under $5 Million
Name of Transfer Payment Program Main Objective End Date of TPP, if Applicable Type of TP (G,C) Planned Spending for 2013-14 ($ Thousands) Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation General Targeted Recipient Group
(S) Compensation payment in accordance with requirements established by Regulations under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act (S.C., 1997, c.6) - Statutory To compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.N/AContribution3,500N/ACanadians who have had animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control. Canadians who have had plants ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Federal Assistance Program (FAP) - Voted The FAP supports projects and initiatives that advance the CFIA's strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.N/AContribution7002010-11Eligible recipients include those whose goals and objectives are complementary to and supportive of the CFIA's mission and strategic outcome. This includes individuals, groups of individuals, agriculture and commodity organizations and conservation districts.
Contribution to the provinces in accordance with the Rabies Indemnification Regulations of the Governor in Council of amounts not exceeding two-fifths of the amounts paid by the provinces to owners of animals dying as a result of rabies infection - Voted To forward the objective of Canadians to notify the existence of a zoonotic reportable disease as required under the Health of Animals Act and work with the provinces and public health organizations in a truly collaborative approach to disease response anN/AContribution112N/ACanadians whose animal has already died due to rabies as motivation to report this zoonotic disease.
Contribution under terms and conditions approved by the Governor in Council to owners of animals that have died as a result of anthrax - Voted To forward the objective of Canadians to notify the existence of a zoonotic reportable disease as required under the Health of Animals Act.N/AContribution7N/ACanadians whose animal has already died due to anthrax as motivation to report this zoonotic disease.

Greening Government Operations

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Target
8.5 The federal government will take action now to reduce levels of greenhouse gas emissions from its operations to match the national target of 17% below 2005 by 2020.
Target Status Performance Measure
RPP
Performance Measure
DPR
Departmental GHG reduction target: Percentage of absolute reduction in GHG emissions by fiscal year 2020-21, relative to fiscal year 2005-06. 13%
Departmental GHG emissions in fiscal year 2005-06, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. 6.43
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. - FY 2011-12 Not Available
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. - FY 2012-13 Not Available
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. - FY 2013-14 Not Available
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. - FY 2014-15 Not Available
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. - FY 2015-16 Not Available
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. - FY 2016-17 Not Available
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. - FY 2017-18 Not Available
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. - FY 2018-19 Not Available
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. - FY 2019-20 Not Available
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. - FY 2020-21 5.59
Percent change in departmental GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-2006 to the end of the given fiscal year. - FY 2011-12 Not Available
Percent change in departmental GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-2006 to the end of the given fiscal year. - FY 2012-13 Not Available
Percent change in departmental GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-2006 to the end of the given fiscal year. - FY 2013-14 Not Available
Percent change in departmental GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-2006 to the end of the given fiscal year. - FY 2014-15 Not Available
Percent change in departmental GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-2006 to the end of the given fiscal year. - FY 2015-16 Not Available
Percent change in departmental GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-2006 to the end of the given fiscal year. - FY 2016-17 Not Available
Percent change in departmental GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-2006 to the end of the given fiscal year. - FY 2017-18 Not Available
Percent change in departmental GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-2006 to the end of the given fiscal year. - FY 2018-19 Not Available
Percent change in departmental GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-2006 to the end of the given fiscal year. - FY 2019-20 Not Available
Percent change in departmental GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-2006 to the end of the given fiscal year. - FY 2020-21 -13%
Existence of an implementation plan to reduce GHG emissions. Yes
Strategies / Comments
  1. This target only captures CFIA's GHG emissions from its fleet sources (e.g. on-road vehicles, marine vessels, agricultural equipment, recreational vehicles and lawn and garden equipment).
  2. Excluded emission sources, in certain instances, are those from operations during which the primary function is national safety or security.
  3. Indirect sources of emissions are excluded (e.g. business travel, employee commuting, movement of goods, private mileage and outsourced activities).
  4. CFIA is developing a Ground Transportation Management Strategy. This strategy will include emissions reduction action items.
Surplus Electronic and Electrical Equipment Target
8.6 By March 31, 2014, each department will reuse or recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner.
Target StatusPerformance Measure
RPP
Performance Measure
DPR
Existence of implementation plan for the disposal of all departmentally-generated EEE. Yes (Completed April 2010)
Total number of departmental locations with EEE implementation plan fully implemented, expressed as a percentage of all locations, by the end of the given fiscal year - FY 2011-12 80%
Total number of departmental locations with EEE implementation plan fully implemented, expressed as a percentage of all locations, by the end of the given fiscal year - FY 2012-13 90%
Total number of departmental locations with EEE implementation plan fully implemented, expressed as a percentage of all locations, by the end of the given fiscal year - FY 2013-14 90%
Strategies / Comments
  1. The CFIA implementation plan has been implemented in all CFIA locations across Canada.
  2. Location is defined as all CFIA locations where CFIA personnel maintain a physical presence.
  3. Number of locations within the Agency is 445.
  4. The process for proper disposal of EEE waste has been communicated to all CFIA staff.
Printing Unit Reduction Target
8.7 By March 31, 2013, each department will achieve an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units. Departments will apply target where building occupancy levels, security considerations, and space configuration allow.
Target Status Performance Measure
RPP
Performance Measure
DPR
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow - FY 2011-12 Not Available
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow - FY 2012-13 Not Available
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow - FY 2012-13 8:1
Strategies / Comments
  1. Print units have been defined as: desktop printers, network printers, multifunctional devices (MFD), photocopiers, faxes and scanners. This definition has been expanded since the 2011-12 RPP where we only included desktop printers, network printers, MFDs and photocopiers.
  2. Excluded are work locations with less than 20 CFIA employees because opportunity for increasing efficiencies is minimal. Also, all laboratories will be excluded from the scope as many of their units are connected to specialized equipment and cannot be replaced by a MFD.
  3. Excluded print units are plotters, label printers and thermal printers.
  4. Print unit inventories will be determined using software that will count all networked printing units as well as units connected to networked computers at one date in time. Faxes are non-networked and will be counted manually. A physical count will also be done to exclude locations scoped-out.
  5. Office employees are defined as indeterminate staff.
  6. The method used for determining number of office employees will be CFIA's internal accommodation reports with employees located in scoped-out facilities subtracted.
  7. The estimated number of employees subject to the target is approximately 4,700, 74% of CFIA indeterminate staff.
  8. An integrated CFIA-AAFC IM/IT governance model is being developed which will lay the foundation for management and decisions for IM/IT at CFIA and AAFC, including policy on procurement and use of IT infrastructure.
Paper Consumption Target
8.8 By March 31, 2014, each department will reduce internal paper consumption per office employee by 20%. Each department will establish a baseline between 2005-2006 and 2011-2012, and applicable scope.
Target Status Performance Measure
RPP
Performance Measure
DPR
Number of sheets of internal office paper purchased or consumed per office employee in the 2008-2009 fiscal year. Not Available
Cumulative reduction (or increase) in paper consumption, expressed as a percentage, relative to baseline year selected - FY 2011-12 -10%
Cumulative reduction (or increase) in paper consumption, expressed as a percentage, relative to baseline year selected - FY 2012-13 -15%
Cumulative reduction (or increase) in paper consumption, expressed as a percentage, relative to baseline year selected - FY 2013-14 -20%
Strategies / Comments
  1. Office employees are defined as indeterminate, term, student, seasonal and as required staff.
  2. Paper is defined as printer paper purchased in packages of 500 sheets.
  3. The method used for determining paper consumption is a manual count of printer paper packages purchased by canvassing CFIA locations with 30 employees or more. This accounts for approximately 70% of CFIA staff. The method used for calculating the other 30% is an extrapolation based on the known 70% as this is a good representation of the employee base.
  4. The method used for determining number of office employees is by using the CFIA Human Resources "Population Snapshot" website. The year end population totals will be used as the number of office employees for each fiscal year.
  5. The number of employees subject to the target, changes in a given year as it is based on employee numbers. For the baseline year 2008-2009, the count on March 31, 2009 was 7,053 employees.
Green Meetings Target
8.9 By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a guide for greening meetings.
Target Status Performance Measure
RPP
Performance Measure
DPR
Presence of a green meeting guide. Yes: Adopted March 31, 2012
Strategies / Comments
  1. Adoption of the green meetings guide is defined by its approval from senior management.
  2. The guide is applicable to all internal CFIA meetings as external meetings with other government departments, industry and stakeholders. It provides green options in the areas of hospitality, paper use, procurement, accommodation and travel.
  3. The guide defines the roles and responsibilities of CFIA managers, meeting planners and the National Environmental Office in the application and implementation of the guide.
  4. The guide will be communicated to all staff via the CFIA internal newsletter.
Green Procurement Targets
8.10 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least 3 SMART green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts. By April 1, 2013, the CFIA will utilize green consolidated procurement instruments for 95% of its photocopiers and printers procured in a given fiscal year.
Target Status Performance Measure
RPP
Performance Measure
DPR
Number of photocopiers and printers procured in 2011-2012. Not Available
Percent of photocopiers and printers procured in a given fiscal year where green consolidated procurement instruments were used - FY 2011-2012 75%
Percent of photocopiers and printers procured in a given fiscal year where green consolidated procurement instruments were used - FY 2012-2013 95%
Strategies / Comments
  1. The target only includes photocopiers and printers procured or leased by CFIA's Contracting and Procurement Policy Division.
  2. This target excludes any procurement of specialized/technical equipment where green products are not available.
  3. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Well defined achievement level of 95%
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time
    • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result
    • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of photocopiers and printers and using green procurement instruments will reduce energy use and green house gas emissions
    • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation
  4. Data is gathered manually from procurement records
  5. Environmental benefits are derived from these products as they are leased or purchased from PWGSC certified green suppliers which use minimum greenhouse gas emissions and non-fossil fuel products for manufacturing and machining these commodities. As well, these products are fully recyclable thus minimizing hazardous waste disposal.
By April 1, 2013, the CFIA will utilize green consolidated procurement instruments for 95% of its computers procured in a given fiscal year.
Target Status Performance Measure
RPP
Performance Measure
DPR
Number of computers procured in 2011-2012. Not Available
Percent of computers procured in a given fiscal year where green consolidated procurement instruments were used - FY 2011-2012. 75%
Percent of computers procured in a given fiscal year where green consolidated procurement instruments were used - FY 2012-2013. 95%
Strategies / Comments
  1. The target only includes computers procured by CFIA's Contracting and Procurement Policy Division.
  2. This target excludes any procurement of specialized/technical equipment where green instruments are not available.
  3. Computers are defined as the CPUs of PCs, as these have the most green procurement opportunities.
  4. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Well defined achievement level of 95%
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time
    • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result
    • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of computers and using green procurement instruments will reduce energy use and green house gas emissions
    • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation
  5. Data is gathered manually from procurement records.
  6. Estimated environmental benefits: Personal Computers (PCs) are purchased from PWGSC certified green suppliers list and are completely recyclable through the PWGSC (OGGO) EEE waste disposal program initiative.
By March 31, 2014, 75% of vehicles purchased annually will be from the CFIA Preauthorised Vehicle List (PAVL), where operational requirements allow.
Target Status Performance Measure
RPP
Performance Measure
DPR
Number of computers procured in 2011-2012. Not Available
Percent of vehicles procured in a given fiscal year from the CFIA Preauthorised Vehicle List (PAVL) - FY 2011-2012 Not Available
Percent of vehicles procured in a given fiscal year from the CFIA Preauthorised Vehicle List (PAVL) - FY 2012-2013 Not Available
Percent of vehicles procured in a given fiscal year from the CFIA Preauthorised Vehicle List (PAVL) - FY 2013-2014 75%
Strategies / Comments
  1. The target does not include farm equipment, boats, ATVs or snowmobiles.
  2. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Well defined achievement level of 75%
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time
    • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result
    • Relevant: The CFIA develops a PAVL every year based on vehicles that are the most fuel efficient in their class in the Government Motor Vehicle Ordering Guide.
    • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation
  3. The tracking for this target is done through a consolidated acquisition spreadsheet.
  4. The PAVL is distributed via email to all stakeholders every year in advance of vehicle procurement.
Training for select employees
8.11 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision-making. As of April 1, 2011, 100% of new materiel managers, procurement personnel and acquisition card holders will complete the online course on Green procurement provided by the Canada School of the Public Service.
Target Status Performance Measure
RPP
Performance Measure
DPR
Number of new materiel managers, procurement personnel and acquisition card holders in 2011-2012. Not Available
Percent of new materiel managers, procurement personnel and acquisition card holders who have completed the online course on Green procurement provided by the Canada School of the Public Service - FY 2011-2012 100%
Percent of new materiel managers, procurement personnel and acquisition card holders who have completed the online course on Green procurement provided by the Canada School of the Public Service - FY 2012-2013 100%
Strategies / Comments
  1. Materiel managers and procurement personnel are identified only as those who work in CFIA's Contracting and Procurement Policy Division.
  2. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Well defined achievement level of 100%
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time
    • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result
    • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of goods and procuring goods that are "green" minimizes CFIA's environmental footprint
    • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation
  3. Data is collected manually from Procurement data.
  4. CFIA is in the process of ensuring that all new AC Cardholders take the Green Procurement Course prior to receiving their AC card.
Employee performance evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management
By March 31, 2013, all identified procurement and materiel management functional specialists and their managers and functional heads will have environmental considerations clauses incorporated into their performance evaluations.
Target Status Performance Measure
RPP
Performance Measure
DPR
Number of identified positions that have environmental consideration clauses in their performance evaluations 2
Percentage of identified positions that have environmental consideration clauses incorporated into their performance evaluations - FY 2011-2012 N/A
Percentage of identified positions that have environmental consideration clauses incorporated into their performance evaluations - FY 2012-2013 100%
Strategies / Comments
  1. The number of identified positions is two, both procurement managers.
  2. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Well defined achievement level of all (100%)
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time
    • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result
    • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of goods and services and procuring goods or services that are "green" minimizes CFIA's environmental footprint
    • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation
By March 31, 2014, the CFIA Ground Transportation Management Strategy will be developed.
Target Status Performance Measure
RPP
Performance Measure
DPR
Existence of Ground Transportation Management Strategy - FY 2011-2012 No
Existence of Ground Transportation Management Strategy - FY 2012-2013 No
Existence of Ground Transportation Management Strategy - FY 2013-2014 Yes
Strategies / Comments
  1. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: The target identifies processes related to a specialized area of procurement
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time
    • Achievable: Resources and responsibilities for target completion have been identified.
    • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of vehicles and having a ground transportation management strategy that marries traditional fleet practices with green procurement principles will ensure CFIAs fleet is procured and managed in a manner that contributes to a sustainable Canada.
    • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation
  2. The Ground Transportation Management Strategy (GTMS) working group has developed a draft plan which identifies deliverables, responsibilities and timelines. The GTMS working group has also developed an options document which analyses the current system against 3 options with an objective of achieving utilization and cost efficiencies, meeting operational needs and achieving reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The completion of the strategy is anticipated by March 31, 2014.

Horizontal initiatives

Table A: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Program

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-04 (enhanced programming)

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $3,601.1M (2003-04 to 2013-14) and $26.6M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Building on work commenced in the early 1990's, the BSE program protects human and animal health by conducting surveillance, research and risk assessments regarding BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and minimizing the risk of exposure to infected materials; maintains consumer confidence through assessing the effectiveness of the risk mitigation measures and having measures in place to control any potential outbreaks; and supports market access for cattle, beef and related products through promoting and explaining Canada's BSE program to domestic and international stakeholders.

Health Canada conducts research and risk assessments regarding human exposure to BSE and other TSEs, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) carries out surveillance of human TSEs and targeted supporting research in this area as well. The CFIA enforces the requirement that specified risk material (SRM) is removed from the animal feed chain and the human food chain, monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country, monitors for the prevalence of BSE in the cattle population (through surveillance), verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place and explains Canada's BSE control measures to domestic and international stakeholders (for example, through the veterinarians abroad program) in order to maintain confidence in Canada's BSE program. AAFC has been involved in supporting, stabilizing and repositioning Canada's beef and cattle industry, including through the provision of compensation payments to stakeholders impacted by BSE in Canada.

Year Departments Funding Period Intent of Funds
2003-04 CFIA, AAFC, HC2003-04 to 2007-08-measures to secure the future of the Canadian beef industry
2003-04 CFIA2003-04 to 2007-08-the removal of SRM from the food chain and re-entering export markets (referred to as the enhanced BSE initiative)
2004-05 CFIA, AAFC2004-05 to 2008-09-reposition the Canadian beef and cattle industry to operate on a profitable and sustainable basis
2004-05 CFIA2004-05 to 2005-06-strengthen animal feed restrictions
2005-06 CFIA2005-06 to 2008-09-additional measures to address critical pressures facing the ruminant industry
2006-07 CFIA2006-07-continue the work the Agency was undertaking for the enhanced feed ban
2007-08 CFIAOn-going-implement the enhanced feed ban restrictions
2008-09 CFIA2008-09-extend sunsetting elements of the enhanced BSE initiative
2009-10 CFIA, PHAC, HC2009-10 to 2013-14-continue work on the core BSE activities

Shared outcome(s): Contributing to the protection of human and animal health, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian cattle, beef and beef products.

Governance structure(s):
The CFIA is the federal lead for the delivery of the BSE Program. In 2008, a summative evaluation of the CFIA's BSE program was conducted, which noted that the governance of the program should be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication regarding BSE-related activities, both internally and with other partner organizations. The CFIA accepted this recommendation and agreed to develop options for an improved governance model to facilitate horizontal dialogue that is consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives.

In 2010, the CFIA launched a new committee structure to bring the Agency's overall approach to governance more in line with evolving business needs. The new governance structure focuses on the importance of sharing information internally and ensures a more efficient and streamlined senior-level committee structure. It is expected that the renewed structure will foster a whole-of-Agency approach to decision-making and will support day-to-day operations across the Agency. To ensure business line perspectives are integrated into decision-making, the three senior executive-level committees are supported by five committees: Animal Health, Plant, Food International Coordination Committee and Science Policy Forsight Committee.

Planning Highlights: For 2013-14, the key plans and priorities from a horizontal perspective are to continue to deliver the BSE Program to current standards as well as to continue to improve communication and coordination (for example, governance), performance measurement and reporting, and financial tracking.

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14
($ Millions)
Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/Internal Services SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain 91.5 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 9.5 ER 1
Import Controls 2.8 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 0.3 ER 2
BSE Surveillance 159.9 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 15.4 ER 3
Cattle Identification 29.2 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 2.8 ER 4
Export Certification 53.2 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 5.7 ER 5
Technical Market Access Support 44.1 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 5.0 ER 6
Enhanced Feed Ban 241.0 (2004-05 to 2013-14) and 26.6 ongoing 26.6 ER 7
Establishment Review 2.3 (2004-05 to 2006-07) 0.0 Funding sunsetted in 2007-08
Oversupply of Aged Cattle 0.3 (2004-05) 0.0 Funding sunsetted in 2007-08
Meat Inspection Reform 9.2 (2005-06 to 2007-08) 0.0 Funding sunsetted in 2007-08
Total 633.5 (2003-04 to 2013-14) and 26.6 ongoing 65.3
ER 1: SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain

Outcome: Safe food

Output: Compliance with current regulations

Activities: Continuation of the enforcement and verification of SRM removal, handling and disposal by CFIA inspection staff.

Indicator: Compliance rate of industry for removal of SRM.

Target: 100% compliance.

Tracking: Internal program files & documents.

ER 2: Import Controls

Outcome: Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards.

Output: Up-to-date import controls.

Activities: Review and update of current import policies and conditions for BSE as required, to reflect changes in international standards and evolving science.

Indicator 1: Percentage of import policies verified and updated as required.

Target: 25% per year.

Tracking: Internal program files & documents.

Indicator 2: BSE Import Policy is verified and updated as required.

Target: Annually, when the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) updates the BSE risk status country lists.

Tracking: Internal program files & documents.

ER 3: BSE Surveillance

Outcome: Safe animals and food.

Output: Measurement of BSE level and distribution in cattle population.

Activities: Analysis of options to redesign the BSE surveillance program and consultation with stakeholders to explore further targeting of surveillance.

Indicator: Temporal trend in exposure to the BSE agent in the cattle population.

Target: Testing 30,000 samples from the high-risk category of cattle is the minimum national target.

Tracking: Internal files / documents / databases (Laboratory Sample Tracking System, (LSTS); provincial lab data; National Livestock Identification Database; Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network).

ER 4: Cattle Identification

Outcome: Governments and other entities make informed decisions to manage animal and related human health issues, risks to the Canadian livestock resource base are mitigated, the Canadian livestock sector is compliant with regulations.

Output 1: Compliance verification and enforcement strategy; inspection reports; data quality audits; trace-out reports; letters of non-compliance; administrative penalties; prosecutions.

Activities: Inspections, compliance verification, investigations and enforcement actions.

Output 2: Develop and administer program and related policies.

Activities: Regulations; program and related policies; privacy impact assessment; threat risk assessment; administrator agreement; tools for CFIA staff (e.g. program-related policy, positions, manuals, Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)).

Indicator 1: Number and development status of inspection tools in place.

Target: Training, tools and materials are relevant and up-to-date.

Tracking: Internal program files & documents.

Indicator 2: Number of inspectors trained.

Target: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained.

Tracking: Internal program files & documents.

Indicator 3: Ratio of non-compliances versus number of Compliance Verification System (CVS) tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage.

Target: 95% compliance.

Tracking: Internal program files & documents.

Indicator 4: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards.

Target: 100%.

Tracking: Internal program files & documents.

ER 5: Export Certification

Outcome: Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

Output: Export certification.

Activities: Continue provision of export-related certification services to a wide range of affected industries.

Indicator 1: Percentage of exports meeting the standards of the importing country as required.

Target: 100%.

Tracking: Internal program files & documents.

ER 6: Technical Market Access Support

Outcome: Maintain to improve confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets.

Output: Increased market demand and confidence.

Activities: Continue the establish and maintain of strong relationships with trading partners, and the provision of global leadership and influence concerning international policies and standards development.

Indicator: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.

Targets: An ongoing record of markets that are open, and exports of Canadian beef and cattle.

Tracking: Internal program files & documents.

ER 7: Enhanced Feed Ban

Outcome: Safe feed, fertilizer, animals and food.

Output: Compliance with enhanced feed ban regulations.

Activities: Continue enforcement of enhanced feed ban restrictions.

Indicator: Trends in compliance with regulations associated with the enhanced feed ban, including SRM removal, handling and disposal; trends in the proportion of feed mills and renderers using prohibited materials / SRM and producing ruminant feeds.

Targets and Tracking: Currently being revised.

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14
($ Millions)
Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Health Canada (HC) Health Products Risk Assessment and Targeted Research 44.0 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 2.6 ER 8
Compliance and Enforcement 1.0 (2003-04 to 2007-08) 0.0 Funding sunsetted in 2007-08
Product Assessment 6.2 (2003-04 to 2007-08) 0.0 Funding sunsetted in 2007-08
Tracking and Tracing 3.1 (2003-04 to 2007-08) 0.0 Funding sunsetted in 2007-08
Food Safety and Nutrition Risk Assessment and Targeted Research 18.1 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 3.6 ER 9
Total 72.4 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 6.2
ER 8: Health Products: Risk Assessment and Targeted Research

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSE science, risks and product surveillance

Indicator: Number of research publications related to BSE/TSE peer reviewed publications produced by Health Canada

TargetsFootnote 5 and Tracking: Data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, internal records, proceeds of scientific meetings

Intermediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making

Indicators: Number and type of recommended and /or implemented changes to regulations, policies and guidelines as a result of the identification of issues/gaps
Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted
Number of Master Files containing ingredients which may be at risk of TSE/BSE contamination
Number of Natural Health Product licence applications reviewed for products which contain ingredients sourced from bovine tissue
Number of new DINs assigned for products which contain ingredients sourced from bovine tissue

TargetsFootnote 5 and Tracking: Data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, risk assessments (including recommendations), internal records

ER 9: Food Safety and Nutrition: Risk Assessment and Targeted Research

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSE science, risks and product surveillance

Indicator: Number of direct consultations/visits with stakeholders as a result of Canadian expertise
Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by HC staff on BSE/TSE topics
Number of research publications related to BSE/TSE peer reviewed publications produced by HC
Number and amount of funds expended for external collaborations

TargetsFootnote 5 and Tracking: Data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, incident reports, certificates, internal records

Intermediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making

Indicators: Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted
Number and description of policies/standards on BSE/TSE contributed by HC to the international community

TargetsFootnote 5 and Tracking: Data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, risk assessments (including recommendations), incident reports, certificates, internal records

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14
($ Millions)
Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Public Health Infrastructure Prion Diseases Program 7.9 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 0.8 ER 10
Total 7.9 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 0.8
ER 10: Prion Diseases Program

Outcome: Risks of human TSEs in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled

Output/Activities: Continued, detailed, case-by-case, laboratory-based investigation of all human TSEs across Canada; improved methods and strategies for efficient case investigation; surveillance data; research publications; provision of policy advice for food safety, healthcare and international trade.

Indicator: Alignment of PHAC data from human TSE surveillance with international benchmarks; application of policy advice in decision-making.

Targets and Tracking: Maintenance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance intensity at a level where annual incidence of all confirmed human prion diseases in Canada is at least 1.0 per million population.

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14
($ Millions)
Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) Food Safety and Biosecurity Systems Facilitating the Disposal of Specified Risk Material (SRM) 79.9 (2006-07 to 2009-10) 0.0 A summary outlining expected results for AAFC is not included in the RPP as their resources sunsetted in 2008–09
Establishment 276.0 (2003-04) 0.0
Implementation 36.0 (2003-04) 0.0
Tracking and Tracing Systems 7.8 (2003-04 to 2004-05) 0.0
Transitional Industry Support Program 934.6 (2003-04) 0.0
Accelerating Implementation of Traceability in Livestock and Meat Sources 16.1 (2004-05 to 2006-07) 0.0
Farm Income Payment Program 999.9 (2004-05 to 2005-06) 0.0
Cull Animal Program 202.4 (2003-04 to 2005-06) 0.0
Loan Loss 38.4 (2004-05 to 2008-09) 0.0
Feeder/Fed Cattle Set-Aside Program 296.3 (2004-05 to 2005-06) 0.0
Total 2,887.3 (2003-04 to 2009-10) 0.0
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2013–14
$3,601.1M (2003-04 to 2013-14) and $26.6M ongoing$72.3M

Results achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact Information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Ian Alexander
Executive Director, Animal Health Directorate
613-773-7472

Public Health Agency of Canada
Dr. Michael B. Coulthart
Director, Canadian Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Surveillance System
Prion Diseases Program
204-789-6026

Health Canada
Robin Chiponski
Director General, Resource Management & Operations Directorate, (RMOD)
Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB),
613-957-6690

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada
John Ross,
Director
Animal Industry Division
613-773-0220

Table B: Listeria (Ready-to-Eat Meat)

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Renewal of Government Response and Action Plan to the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); Health Canada (HC); and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

Lead department program activity: Food Safety Program

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2012-13

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2015-16 (CFIA); 2016-17 and ongoing (HC and PHAC)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $112.9M (2012-17); $10.5M ongoing (HC and PHAC)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The objective of this horizontal initiative is to continue to enhance the Government of Canada's ability to prevent, detect and respond to outbreaks of foodborne illness, pursuant to recommendations stemming from reviews of the 2008 listeriosis outbreak.

The three federal organizations – CFIA, HC, and PHAC – received a total spending authority of $112.9 million for this initiative (CFIA: $60.4 million over four years, PHAC: $33 million over five years, and HC: $19.5 million over five years). The PHAC of Canada and HC also received a total spending authority of $10.5 million ongoing ($6.6 million and $3.9 million respectively). Each federal organization identified the resource requirements, strategic outcomes, objectives and implementation plan for each program area.

Shared Outcome(s):

Address Immediate Food Safety Risks by maintaining:

  • hired ready-to-eat meat inspection staff;
  • scientific and technical training programs for inspection staff;
  • technical support to continue enhanced connectivity for inspectors;
  • enhanced food safety program risk management; and
  • capacity for the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments.

Enhanced Surveillance and Early Detection by maintaining:

  • capacity to improve and validate test detection methods for Listeria;
  • scientific capacity to continue additional Listeria testing;
  • ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards;
  • national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the C-EnterNet Program; and
  • strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: continued implementation of whole genome sequencing; continued expansion of PulseNet Canada.

Improved Government Response to Foodborne Illness Outbreaks in Canada by maintaining:

  • support to the Food Safety Portal;
  • risk communication and social marketing strategies;
  • human illness outbreak response capacity; and
  • national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity.

Governance Structure(s): The CFIA, HC and the Public Health Agency of Canada currently work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates. Pursuant to existing trilateral Memoranda of Understanding, the three partners meet regularly to discuss food safety issues of mutual concern. This governance framework includes an ADM-level committee and is supported by a DG level committee which meets regularly to discuss and plan approaches for addressing joint food safety issues. The ADM committee has been receiving support and direction from the Special Committee of Deputy Heads, comprised of AAFC, CFIA, Public Health Agency of Canada, and HC deputy heads. The work of the committees is also informed by the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Ministers of Health and Agriculture and their associated discussions on food safety.

Planning Highlights: The CFIA, HC and the Public Health Agency of Canada have acted on all of the recommendations put forward by the Independent Investigator. Organizations have achieved considerable success in carrying out the Government's 2009 action plan in response to the 2008 listeriosis outbreak. Sustained effort on critical activities regarding human resources, scientific capacity and communications will maintain this strengthened food safety system.

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14
($ Millions)
Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Food Safety and Nutrition

Internal Services

Maintaining hired inspection staff in ready-to-eat meat establishments 29.2 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 7.3 ER 11
Maintaining scientific and technical training programs 14.4 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 3.6 ER 12
Maintaining enhanced connectivity for inspectors 2.4 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 0.6 ER 13
Maintaining enhanced food safety program risk management 6.4 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 1.6 ER 14
Maintaining capacity to improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards 2.0 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 0.5 ER 15
Maintaining scientific capacity to continue Listeria testing 5.2 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 1.3 ER 16
Maintaining support to the Government of Canada Food Safety Portal 0.8 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 0.2 ER 17
Total 60.4 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 15.1
ER 11: Maintaining Hired Inspection Staff in Ready-to-Eat Meat Establishments

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks in federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments.

Output/Activities: Maintain additional inspection capacity in order to continue delivering enhanced verification and inspection activities resulting from the mandatory Listeria testing and reporting requirements for federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments.

Targets and Tracking: Number of inspectors maintained, percentage of delivered tasks related to Listeria controls and sampling that were found acceptable.

ER 12: Maintaining Scientific and Technical Training Programs

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks in federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments.

Output/Activities: Continue to develop and deliver enhanced scientific and technical training programs to ensure that new, as well as existing inspection staff of ready-to-eat meat products are aware of the latest trends in science and technology related to meat processing and the updated policies.

Targets and Tracking: Number of training sessions delivered, number of new inspectors trained, number of existing inspectors trained, number of person days for this training.

ER 13: Maintaining Enhanced Connectivity for Inspectors

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks.

Output/Activities: Continue to provide frontline inspection staff with the ability to securely access the CFIA's network and applications through high speed internet connectivity.

Targets and Tracking: Number of inspectors with high-speed access, average amount of data used per aircard.

ER 14: Maintaining Enhanced Food Safety Program Risk Management

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks through the continued review of food safety programs and activities.

Output/Activities: Continue to modernize food safety standards, programs, policies and operational procedures to make them consistent and reflect current trends (e.g. rapid technological and scientific advancements in food production).

Targets and Tracking: List of reviews/updates/projects completed (e.g. risk-based sampling plans).

ER 15: Maintaining Capacity to Improve Test Detection Methods for Listeria and other Foodborne Hazards

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks through improved detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards.

Output/Activities: Continue to provide greater availability and choice of testing methods for the detection of Listeria by industry and the CFIA, and faster turn around time for reporting results.

Targets and Tracking: Completion of validation protocol, completion of validation project, technical review of validation project data, decisions made on new methods.

ER 16: Maintaining Scientific Capacity to Continue Additional Listeria Testing

Outcome: Early detection and faster response to potential foodborne illness outbreaks through enhanced laboratory testing capacity, contributing to improved decision making.

Output/Activities: Continue early warning of potential contamination in the food processing environment.

Targets and Tracking: Number of product and environmental samples submitted to lab for Listeria versus 2008 baseline, reports produced on data trends at defined frequency, number of experts dedicated to trend analysis.

ER 17: Maintaining Support to the Government of Canada Food Safety Portal

Outcome: Canadians are aware of and contribute to the management of food safety risks by sourcing their food safety information via several on-line Government of Canada resources, such as Healthy Canadians and the Food Safety portals.

Output/Activities: Continue to improve public access to integrated Government of Canada food safety information.

Targets and Tracking: Number of advertisements, number of enhancements, increase in number of webpage views.

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14
($ Millions)
Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Health Canada (HC)

Food Safety and Nutrition

Maintain ability to respond within established service standards to the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments and food safety investigations 13.5 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 2.7 ongoing 2.7 ER 18
Maintaining ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards 3.0 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.6 ongoing 0.6 ER 19
Maintaining a Social Marketing Strategy 3.0 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.6 ongoing 0.6 ER 20
Total 19.5 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 3.9 ongoing 3.9
ER 18: Maintaining ability to respond within established service standards to the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments and food safety investigations

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks.

Output/Activities: Provide risk assessments, based on the best available science and methods, within established service standards and to strengthen the prevention of and response to food safety incidents.

Targets and Tracking:

  • Number of staffing actions (hired/allocated) and level of funding allocated over time, specifically targeting the enhancement of our capacity for HRAs. Hire 4 new staff in 2013-14.
  • Maintenance of FTEs to support HRA activities.
  • Number of HRAs completed within service standards.
  • Number of quality management practices, including SOPs, templates, inter-departmental HC-CFIA protocols, implemented.
  • National and international collaborations conducted related to risk modelling method development, refinement, testing, validation and implementation.
ER 19: Maintaining ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards

Outcome: Improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards.

Output/Activities: Have a suite of rapid validated tools available to industry and government partners to allow action to be taken at the earliest opportunity, thereby reducing exposure of Canadians to foodborne hazards.

Targets and Tracking:

  • Risk assessment modelling methods and IT tools that are current, accepted, validated and meet international standards.
  • Number of improved test detection methods and other laboratory diagnostic tools developed for faster detection of Listeria and other hazards in foods.
  • Establishment of the Chemical Methods Committee and Compendium of Methods for the Chemical Analysis of Foods.
  • Number of validated methods published in Compendium of Analytical Methods or the Compendium of Methods for the Chemical Analysis of Food.
  • Number of FTEs hired/allocated to developing/ improving microbiological and chemical methods.
  • Establishment of service standards and protocols for publishing microbiological or chemical methods according to the MMC and CMC.
  • Establishment and description of criteria and processes to identify priority methods for validation by HC and CFIA according to the MMC & CMC.
  • Number of methods prioritized for fast tracking and validation by MMC and CMC.
  • Number of completed pilots and validated methodologies/prototypes for the detection of Listeria and other hazards in foods.
ER 20: Maintaining a Social Marketing Strategy

Outcome: Canadians are aware of and contribute to the management of food safety risks.

Output/Activities: Continue to increase awareness and knowledge proactively of the health risks associated with unsafe food handling practices and foodborne illness.

Targets and Tracking:

  • Number of calls to 1-800#.
  • Number of website page views per month/year for the HC food safety section.
  • Tracking of earned media and stakeholder media coverage - Number of articles and news reports on safe food handling.
  • Number of web links from outside organizations.
  • Feedback from stakeholders and Canadians.
  • Number and reach of food safety risk communication products developed, distributed and targeted at raising awareness of food safety by type of target population (e.g. vulnerable populations).
Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14
($ Millions)
Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; Public Health InfrastructureMaintain national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the C-EnterNet program 7.9 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 1.6 ongoing 1.6ER 21
Public Health InfrastructureMaintain strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued implementation of whole genome sequencing 4.5 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.9 ongoing 0.9ER 22
Public Health InfrastructureMaintain strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued expansion of PulseNet Canada 1.9 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.4 ongoing 0.4ER 23
Health Promotion and Disease PreventionMaintain human illness outbreak response capacity 14.5 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 2.9 ongoing 2.9ER 24
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; Health Security; Public Health InfrastructureMaintain national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity 4.2 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.8 ongoing 0.8ER 25
Total 33.0 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 6.6 ongoing 6.6
ER 21: Maintaining national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the C-EnterNet program

Outcome: Enhanced food-borne disease surveillance.

Output/Activities: Improved surveillance tools through the expansion of C-EnterNet to include at least three functional sentinel sites in Canada.

Targets and Tracking: Sampling conducted for at least two commodities at Sentinel Site #2; Signed agreements with Public Health Unit and Provincial Lab at Sentinel Site #3; Sentinel Site #3 human and retail products test results acquired.

ER 22: Maintaining strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued implementation of whole genome sequencing

Outcome: Canada's ability to rapidly detect and trace the origins of food hazard is enhanced.

Output/Activities: Modern genomic technologies will continue to be implemented to provide substantially more detailed information and evidence on foodborne pathogens during outbreak investigations.

Targets and Tracking: Number of pathogen genomes sequenced; Collaborative genomic investigations launched with F/P/T partners.

ER 23: Maintaining strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued expansion of PulseNet Canada

Outcome: Canada's ability to rapidly detect and trace the origins of food hazard is enhanced.

Output/Activities: The expansion of the PulseNet Canada laboratory network will increase outbreak detection capacity and information sharing amongst partner federal, provincial, and territorial laboratories.

Targets and Tracking: Number of PulseNet Canada partner laboratories participating in testing proficiency programs; Number of technicians within PulseNet Canada partner laboratories that successfully completed testing proficiency programs.

ER 24: Maintaining human illness outbreak response capacity

Outcome: Enhanced effectiveness and efficiency of response activities, as well as improved coordination and capacity to respond to multi-jurisdictional foodborne illness outbreaks.

Output/Activities: The development and maintenance of tools for multi-jurisdictional outbreak response, as well as maintenance of protocols to ensure awareness of processes, roles and responsibilities of F/P/T partners.

Targets and Tracking: Completion of identified revisions to the Food-borne Illness Emergency Response Protocol; Percentage of planned Foodborne Illness Outbreak Response Protocol exercises completed.

ER 25: Maintaining national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity

Outcome: Improved coordination and capacity to control and mitigate an outbreak which poses a public health threat to Canadians.

Output/Activities: Efficient and effective federal surge capacity to support outbreak response and mitigate the public health impact of a foodborne illness outbreak.

Targets and Tracking: Develop a strategy to develop and maintain tools and resources for maintaining surge staff on an ongoing basis; Implement two of seven components of the surge model, including deployment of staff; Percentage of FTEs and/or budget allocated for:

  • development and maintenance of training materials;
  • delivery of training; and
  • maintenance of the list of surge staff;
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2013–14
$112.9M (2012-17) and $10.5M ongoing (HC and PHAC)$25.6M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Theresa Iuliano
Executive Director
Strategic Policy and International Affairs Directorate
613-773-5867

Health Canada
Robin Chiponski
Director General, Resource Management and Operations Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
Health Canada
613-957-6690

Public Health Agency of Canada
Dr. Mark Raizenne
Director General
Centre for Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch
613-948-6883

Table C: Invasive Alien Species

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Invasive Alien Species (IAS)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: Plant Resources Program

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2010-11

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $95.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $19.0M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Invasive alien species (IAS) are species introduced through human action from outside their natural distribution (past or present), that threaten the environment, economy, or society - including human health. Annually, IAS results in billions of dollars in direct losses, control costs, increased production costs and lost market access. The annual impact of IAS is estimated to be as much as $20 billion to the forest sector, $7 billion for aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes, and $2.2 billion for invasive plants alone in the agricultural sector. IAS have gained international attention as globalization, climate change, and international trade increases have elevated IAS introduction risks.

In recognition of the fact that responding to IAS is a shared responsibility, An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada was adopted in 2004 by federal, provincial and territorial resource ministers as a national coordinated approach toward prevention and management of IAS. The Strategy's objective is to initiate implementation of priority objectives (i.e. prevention, early detection and rapid response to new invaders, and management of established and spreading invaders), which will be met via work contributions in five thematic areas: Risk Analysis, Science and Technology, Legislation, Regulation and Policy, Engaging Canadians and International Cooperation. Environment Canada is the lead for invasive animal species; Fisheries and Oceans Canada leads the aquatic invasive species issues; the Canadian Food Inspection Agency leads for invasive plants and other plant pests; and Natural Resources Canada leads for forest pests.

Budget 2010 allocated $19 million per year to Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Natural Resources Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to continue the Government of Canada's implementation of the IAS Strategy as well as for the maintenance and enhancement of advances made in the previous five years in terms of invasive alien species activities. Ongoing implementation of the IAS Strategy is critical for the continuation of the protection of Canada's ecosystems and resource-based economy.

Shared Outcome(s): Continuing the implementation of the Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada is essential for the protection of Canada's aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; this includes the protection of native biological diversity, as well as domestic plants and animals, from the risks of invasive alien species. The key outcome of the Strategy is to make Canada a leader in the prevention and management of IAS in a manner that ensures environmental sustainability, economic competitiveness and societal well-being.

Governance Structure(s): The government-wide IAS Strategy involves Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Departments and agencies are committed to ongoing collaboration for IAS issues. At a federal-level, coordination continues to be discussed as necessary through the Directors' General Interdepartmental Committee on Invasive Alien Species. Inter-jurisdictionally, federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) cooperation for IAS issues continues under the auspices of the annual joint meeting of Resource Ministers' Councils for Wildlife, Forests, Fisheries and Aquaculture, and Endangered Species, as well as within associated meetings with Deputy Ministers and Assistant Deputy Ministers. The Minister of Agriculture is the lead federal Minister responsible for responding to invasive alien plants and plant pests; efforts are on-going to seek the full engagement of federal, provincial, and territorial ministers of agriculture and facilitate their participation in addressing invasive alien species.

Planning Highlights: For 2013-14, the key horizontal plans are to: continue to develop, advance and implement concrete and practical prevention, detection, response and management activities for the IAS Strategy; continue to enhance coordination mechanisms across species, jurisdictions and issues.

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14
($ Millions)
Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Plant Resources Program Internal Services Risk Analysis 15.5 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 3.1 ongoing 2.9 ER 26
Science and Technology 33.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 6.6 ongoing 4.2 ER 27
Legislation, Regulation and Policy 6.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.2 ongoing 1.2 ER 28
Engaging Canadians 3.5 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.7 ongoing 0.7 ER 29
International Cooperation 2.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.4 ongoing 0.4 ER 30
Total 60.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 12.0 ongoing 9.4
ER 26: Risk Analysis

The development and application of risk assessment tools and models to identify potential IAS and their associated pathways of introduction, including the evaluation and identification of appropriate mitigation measures and the design and implementation of programs to prevent, detect and manage current and potential IAS risks and pathways.

Outcome: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed in a risk-based manner.

Output/Activities: The CFIA will continue to identify highest-risk potential IAS, their pathways, and appropriate means by which to mitigate identified risks by continuing to conduct pest and weed risk analyses, developing import controls for unintentional (i.e., contaminants in field crops) and intentional (i.e., plants for planting) pathways and initial response to early detections as well as domestic response plans. For example, pathways of focus for 2013-2014 include grain and seed, ethno-botanical (food and medicinal plants), wooden handicrafts and ornamentals.

The Agency will also develop its tools and capabilities for modeling of pest risk and spread, and continue to facilitate identification-sharing among federal and provincial partners to ensure efficient information generation, communication and response to new invasive species.

Indicator:

  1. Percentage of plants and plant products entering Canada in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements governing introduced plant pests.
  2. Commodities and pests identified as potential IAS risks.

Targets and Tracking:

  1. 90%
  2. Categorisations, risk assessment and risk analysis documents that reflect those potential IAS risks.
ER 27: Science and Technology

Information gathering, the performance of verification activities and the development of scientific tools and expertise, and program delivery of programs which support the prevention, early detection and rapid response to IAS.

Outcome: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.

Output/Activities: The Agency will support IAS prevention, detection and response through continued efforts to develop scientific tools and expertise. Projects on-going for 2013-2014 include: development of weed molecular identification methods, reference sequence databases and reference collections (i.e., herbaria); genetic barcoding of invasive plant-eating beetles for rapid pest identification; pest diagnostics; illustrated identification guides; Lucid Key; genetic barcode and trans-Pacific capacity building for emerald ash borer and its relatives; weed biology and seed identification features for Chinese weedy species that are a risk to Canadian biosecurity.

The CFIA will also minimize the impact of IAS introductions by continued foresight projects and early detection efforts, such as import monitoring and inspection for pests such as invasive plants, molluscs, Asian gypsy moth (AGM) and Asian longhorned beetle (ALHB), and continuing to develop diagnostic methods and tools for the rapid and accurate identification of high risk IAS. Specific activities include the development of invasive weed seed identification fact sheets; acquisition of reference material for IAS species that are or will be regulated in the near future; monitoring of seed and grain samples to determine the presence and frequency of alien weed species; assessment of potential treatment options (e.g., treatments for AGM egg masses) inspection and auditing of facilities importing grain and other plant products.

The CFIA will continue to work with North American and international scientific partners towards the improvement of our current IAS detection tools, and the offshore evaluation of new methods for organisms not present in North America.

Domestically, the CFIA will continue to work with provincial and municipal partners on collaborative IAS plant pest surveys. Domestic regulatory response plans, including surveys, inspection and monitoring will continue to be developed and delivered for specific pests such as jointed goatgrass. The CFIA will continue to actively participate, along with federal partners, on the Operations Committee of the Invasive Species Centre to share information and coordinate research on IAS.

Indicator: Number of interceptions of invasive species in Canada, new invasive species that enter through regulated pathways and/or establish domestic spread of selected regulated invasive species that is controlled, samples tested/identified and non-compliances with Plant Protection Act and/or Seeds Act.

Targets and Tracking: Same or less than historical trends based on survey and inspection data, Import Control Tracking System, updates to the Automated Import Reference System (AIRS), laboratory test results and notices of non-compliances.

ER 28: Legislation, Regulation and Policy

Creating and updating legislation, regulations, policies and programs to support the effective implementation of CFIA commitment to the IAS Strategy.

Outcome: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed, and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.

Output/Activities: The Agency will continue legislative framework modernization by updating regulations, creating new ones and harmonizing approaches (where possible) in consultation with stakeholders.

To ensure consistency with international standards and legislated mandate, the CFIA will continue to develop new science-based programs and policies as well as to update existing ones, while focusing on higher risk pathways of introduction. These will support the implementation and delivery of associated import and domestic measures to protect Canada's resource base from potential IAS (e.g., treatment manual, domestic phytosanitary manual and on-farm biosecurity standards).

The CFIA will continue to collaborate with federal and provincial partners to coordinate implementation of the Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada, to maintain strong lines of communication, engage stakeholders, and contribute to interdepartmental governance as well as strengthening internal governance across branches.

Indicator: Number of regulatory, program and policy (e.g., Directives, response plans) documents developed, revised and/or notices of confirmed quarantine pests issued.

Targets and Tracking: Completion, revision and/or posting of directives, policies, standards, response plans and Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) and/or regulatory amendments are accepted and implemented.

ER 29: Engaging Canadians

Increase public awareness and access to IAS information, prevention, and control strategies, as well as activities that seek to maintain partnerships with governments and stakeholders.

Outcome: Increased stakeholder and partner cooperation, stakeholder and partner awareness of plants and plant pests, and compliance with policies and regulations.

Output/Activities: The Agency will continue to work collaboratively with stakeholders and government partners to raise awareness about IAS, their potential pathways and associated policies and programs, thereby promoting early reporting of IAS, best management practices and compliance with regulations to reduce risks to Canada's plant resources. The CFIA will continue to develop and participate in IAS training and outreach sessions for municipal and provincial staff as well as regional IAS organizations. The former will be supported by inspection tools and publications intended to broaden surveillance reach.

Broad stakeholder consultation will continue, and cooperation will be sought as new policies and programs - such as the invasive plants program - are implemented.

Indicator: Number of communication documents and activities completed.

Targets and Tracking: Attendance at meetings/conferences, distribution of outreach material, consultation with Canadian stakeholders, posting of fact sheets and media releases, responses to media queries and updates to the IAS webpage and stakeholder "hits".

ER 30: International Cooperation

Collaborate with key international phytosanitary organizations and trading partners to reduce risks of IAS introduction from imported products, and to maintain access to foreign markets for Canadian exports through the development and implementation of harmonized standards and guidelines.

Outcome: Increased international engagement, cooperation and awareness of invasive species and compliance with policies and regulations. A key objective of international cooperation is ensuring that international standards and processes reflect Canadian interests.

Output/Activities: The CFIA will continue its active participation in the establishment of international standards, negotiations and bilateral meetings with key trading partners to mitigate IAS introduction risks through trade pathways (e.g., AGM introductions via marine vessels and forest IAS in wood packaging and wooden handicrafts), and the maintenance of access to foreign markets. The CFIA anticipates enhanced sharing of risk analysis information, notification, and discussion of new policies and programs as well as approach harmonization where appropriate and feasible.

Indicator:
  1. Percentage of certified plant and plant product shipments certified by Canada that meet foreign country import requirements with respect to invasive alien species.
  2. Number of planned, proposed or needed standards or agreements initiated or revised and international consultations.

Targets and Tracking:

  1. 99%
  2. Participation at workshops, expert panels, negotiations, missions and delegations.

Note: The CFIA, DFO, EC, and NRCan will report ongoing implementation and effectiveness of the Strategy through their respective annual Report on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports. In addition, the CFIA, DFO, EC, and NRCan are reviewing the IAS Logic Model to assess IAS Strategy performance for Canada, in which indicators and targets are jointly reviewed by the four partners.

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14
($ Millions)
Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)

Protection for Canadians and Natural Resources

Risk Analysis 3.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.6 ongoing 0.6 ER 31
Science and Technology 5.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.0 ongoing 1.0 ER 32
Legislation, Regulation and Policy 1.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.2 ongoing 0.2 ER 33
Engaging Canadians 0.5 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.1 ongoing 0.1 ER 34
International Cooperation 0.5 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.1 ongoing 0.1 ER 35
Total 10.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 2.0 ongoing 2.0
ER 31: Risk Analysis

Outcome: The capacity to identify and address forest invasive alien species risks and prevent their introduction is increased.

Output/Activities: Continued improvement in understanding of forest invasive alien species pathways, assessment of human-assisted introduction and impact of invasive alien forest pests. Development and facilitation of cooperative of national risk models, pest models, embellishment of forest alien species historical database and national and cross-border risk maps for forest invasive alien species and high-risk commodities.

Indicator: Scientific publications and other products, including government publications and reports, on pathway and pest risk analyses, ecological risk assessments, risk maps and FIAS economic impact assessments.

Targets and Tracking: Address existing and emerging knowledge gaps relating to potential new pests and new IAS introduction pathways

ER 32: Science and Technology

Outcome 1: Knowledge of forest invasive alien species taxonomy, biology, and ecology is improved.

Output/Activities: Continued scientific research addressing knowledge gaps in taxonomy, biology, ecology, distribution, and pest-host and forest-pathogen relationships, including development and testing of molecular and genetic tools to identify non-native insects and pathways and historical patterns of pest invasions.

Indicator: Scientific publications and other products, including government publications and reports, on IAS biology, taxonomy and ecology.

Targets and Tracking: Address knowledge gaps regarding forest invasive alien species taxonomy, biology and ecology.

Outcome 2: Likelihood of establishment or spread of forest alien forest species is minimized and their impacts are mitigated.

Output/Activities: Production of detection, diagnostic and surveillance tools and strategies including molecular, pheromone and chemical attractant methods for forest invasive alien species. Development of response tools and methods including communication to responsible agencies of scientific recommendations to address control and eradication of forest invasive alien species. Investigation of mechanisms of action, integration and environmental assessment of systematic insecticides.

Indicator: Science and technology tools, methodologies and strategies developed and delivered to clients and stakeholders.

Targets and Tracking: Provide tools to advance the control and eradication of forest invasive alien species.

ER 33: Legislation, Regulation and Policy

Outcome 1: Decision-making related to forest invasive alien species management by regulatory agencies and other organizations is informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Output/Activities : Continued provision of science and policy expertise on forest invasive alien species prevention, detection and response to regulatory agencies, other federal Departments, Provinces and Territories, Municipalities Industry and First Nations. Expansion and implementation of a decision framework for forest invasive species decisions has been initiated and is ongoing in partnership with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and stakeholders. Availability of risk information is being enhanced.

Indicator : Stakeholder engagement in CFS FIAS strategies frameworks or facilitation activities, participation and input into relevant fora.

Targets and Tracking : Distribute CFS science expertise and strategies to all regulatory agencies and partner organizations in support of decision-making.

Outcome 2: Canadian positions in national and international discussions on phytosanitary trade issues are informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Output/Activities : Continued provision of science and policy advice that support phytosanitary trade negotiations and the development of national and international forest phytosanitary standards. Development of training material and guidance for implementation of phytosanitary standards and forest education. Continued communication to the forest sector of strategies to maximize operational flexibility and reduce barriers to the international trade of forest products.

Indicator : CFS science and policy participation in Canadian positions on phytosanitary trade negotiations and national and international phytosanitary standards, including through engagement with and guidance to industry representatives and regulators.

Targets and Tracking: Provide expert input to all relevant national and international forest phytosanitary trade groups and organizations.

ER 34: Engaging Canadians

Outcome: Scientific information on Forest Invasive Alien Species (FIAS) is made available to agencies, researchers and the public.

Output/Activities: Publications and presentations to enable stakeholder use of the CanFIAS Database, continued enhancement and expansion of database capabilities and information. Literature-based analysis of CanFIAS gaps. Ongoing development of National Forest Insect Outbreak Atlas. Increased access to Canadian forest pest information for stakeholders and the public. Publication of new records of beetle species for New Brunswick.

Indicator: Information products made available to agencies, researchers and the public regarding forest invasive alien species and issues.

Targets and Tracking: Inform Canadians as to FIAS dangers and best practices.

ER 35: International Cooperation

Outcome: International cooperation with phytosanitary organizations and trading partners is facilitated.

Output/Activities: Continued engagement in international forest sector consultations including the North American Plant Protection Organization, International Plant Protection Convention and International Forest Quarantine Research Group. Research and analysis to respond to Canadian export trade issues and develop national and international phytosanitary standards that reduce global movement of forest pests. Support to knowledge transfer of science-based decision-making in stakeholder agencies, advisory committees and international fora to facilitate international cooperation, exchange best practices and science information, reduce threats to Canadian forests and minimize disruption of Canadian forest products by phytosanitary concerns.

Indicator: CFS participation in international forest research and forest product phytosanitary consultations.

Targets and Tracking : Provide knowledge to inform science-based decision-making in international fora.

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14
($ Millions)
Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

Science for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture

Risk Analysis 2.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.4 ongoing 0.4 ER 36
Science and Technology 5.1 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.02 ongoing 1.02 ER 37
Legislation, Regulation and Policy 1.1 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.21 ongoing 0.21 ER 38
Engaging Canadians 0.4 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.09 ongoing 0.09 ER 39
International Cooperation 11.4 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 2.28 ongoing 2.28 ER 40
Total 20.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 4.0 ongoing 4.0
ER 36: Risk Analysis

Outcome: Decision makers and legislative authorities have science information and tools to manage IAS domestically and internationally

Output/Activities: Biological Risk Assessments, Socio-economic Risk Assessment Framework

Indicator: Percentage of approved requests for science advice on aquatic invasive species that are completed within the required timelines

Targets and Tracking: 90 % Canadian Science Advice Secretariat -Access database

ER 37: Science and Technology

Output/Activities: Research, Monitoring

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)

Targets and Tracking: To be developed (TBD)

ER 38: Legislation, Regulation and Policy

Output/Activities: Regulatory policy

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)

Targets and Tracking: To be developed (TBD)

ER 39: Engaging Canadians

Output/Activities: Communications, Outreach products

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)

Targets and Tracking: To be developed (TBD)

ER 40: International Cooperation

Outcome: Sea lamprey abundance in Great Lakes falls within individual lake targets

Output/Activities: Sea Lamprey Control Program, National Aquatic Invasive Species Committee

Indicator: Number of Great Lakes with sea lamprey abundance within the lake target

Targets and Tracking: Target = 5, Annual program reporting to the Great Lakes Fishery Commission and Research and development expert panels

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14 Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
Environment Canada (EC) Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat Engaging Canadians-Invasive Alien Species Partnership Program 5.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.0 ongoing 0.0 The funding for the Invasive Alien Species Partnership Program was terminated as of March 31, 2012, as part of the Government of Canada's priority to balance the federal budget.
Total 5.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.0 ongoing 0.0
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2013–14
$95.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $19.0M ongoing$15.4M

Results achieved by non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Wendy Asbil
National Manager
Invasive Alien Species and Domestic Plant Health Programs
Biosecurity and Forestry Division
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
613-773-7236

Natural Resources Canada
Jacques Gagnon
Director
Innovation and Integration Division
613-947-9043

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Sophie Foster
Science Advisor
Aquatic Invasive Species Program
Environment and Biodiversity Science
Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Environment Canada
Ken Harris
Manager
Species Conservation Policy
Wildlife Program Policy
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environmental Stewardship Branch
819-956-4721

Table D: Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program (PPMMP)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: Plant Resources Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2015-16 (CFIA and Agriculture and Agri-food Canada); 2016-17 and ongoing (CFIA)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $17.2M (2011-12 to 2015-16) and $1.3M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Plum Pox Virus (PPV) is a viral plant disease that infects Prunus species including peach, plum, apricot and other stone fruit plants. PPV does not affect human or animal health but reduces fruit yields, mottles leaves, and causes visual symptoms on stone fruit which thus reduces their marketability. The virus is spread locally by aphids (an insect) and through the movement of infected propagative material, including live trees of all age classes, rootstock, bud wood, cuttings or other green branches and twigs, and tissue cultures.

PPV was first discovered in Ontario and Nova Scotia in 2000. The Government of Canada responded in 2001 with a three-year, $49.3 million PPV program to suppress PPV, and to evaluate the feasibility of eradication. Based on the recommendations of a PPV International Expert Panel (IEP), the seven-year, Plum Pox Eradication Program (PPEP) was launched in 2004 ($85 million) and augmented in 2007 with an additional $58.6 million totaling $143.6 million in federal and Ontario government funding. The PPEP expired on March 31, 2011.

Eradication of PPV has been achieved in six of the seven quarantine areas established at the beginning of the eradication program. These six quarantine areas are Blenheim, Fonthill, Stoney Creek and Vittoria in Ontario, and the Annapolis Valley and Wolfville in Nova Scotia. All of the regions continue to be surveyed and monitored, and no new virus cases have been found outside the Niagara quarantine area. Although eradication was not achieved in Niagara, the infection rate has been reduced from 1.9% of tree samples to less than 0.02% in 2010.

By implementing a PPV monitoring and management strategy, PPV will remain in the Niagara region in perpetuity, thus the industry will need to manage the risks it poses to production and marketability of products.

The PPMMP consists of regulatory plant protection activities and, for the first five years of the program, significant research was carried out to develop PPV risk mitigation tools and educational and awareness program components to build the capacity within the industry to implement best management practices.

CFIA and Agriculture and Agri-food Canada (AAFC) funding was obtained from Budget 2011 which allocated $17.2 million over five years for the PPMMP, is to transition to a management and monitoring strategy to contain and prevent the spread of plum pox.

Shared outcome(s):

The outcome of the Government's PPMMP is to fulfill the Government of Canada's plant protection obligations and international responsibilities through implementation of measures to mitigate the spread of PPV to other regions of Canada and internationally. The PPMMP's other outcome is to facilitate industry management of PPV.

Governance structure(s):

The CFIA's PPMMP activities and deliverables are managed and governed by the Plant Health Business Line Committee as PPV is an established, regulated plant pest requiring ongoing decision making to protect Canada's plant resource base. Also, AAFC's A-Base activities are managed and governed by a committee of Science Directors from the Research Branch who report to the Director General of Science Operations. The DG has the final "sign-off" authority for AAFC Research Branch activities including PPMMP. An AAFC Science Director has been assigned as responsible for ensuring PPV research activities are implemented, managed and reported as required.

A PPV Steering Group (PPV-SG), consisting of CFIA and AAFC director-level officials, was established for the first five years to make recommendations about program delivery to the above CFIA and AAFC governance committees. The PPV-SG liaises with internal and external stakeholders as required, including international plant protection bodies, to provide updates and seek input about program and research parameters at stakeholder conferences and meetings. After a period of five years, when AAFC's role in the PPMMP has concluded, CFIA's Plant Health Business Line Committee will be responsible for managing the PPMMP on an ongoing basis.

Planning Highlights:

For 2013-14, the key horizontal plans are: 1) implement appropriate sampling and detection of Plum Pox Virus host material to update, as required, the quarantine area boundary; 2) enforce restrictions to mitigate the spread of Plum Pox Virus; and 3) undertake research activities to improve the regulatory program.

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14
($ Millions)
Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Plant Resources Program/ Internal Services 10.6 (2011-12 to 2015-16) and 1.3 ongoing 2.1 ER 41.1
ER 41.2
ER 41.3
ER 41.4
Total 10.6 (2011-12 to 2015-16) and 1.3 ongoing 2.1
ER 41.1: Monitoring, Detection

Outcome:

Mitigate the spread of PPV to other regions of Canada and internationally.

Outputs/activities:

Monitoring activities will be carried out by the CFIA to confirm and adjust the boundaries of the Niagara quarantine area as necessary. In accordance with NAPPO guidelines, the CFIA will conduct detection activities annually by taking samples along the Niagara quarantine area perimeter. Laboratory testing of the samples to determine the presence of PPV will be conducted by the CFIA. To detect whether PPV has spread beyond the quarantine area, samples will be collected annually from commercial orchards and nurseries from PPV-susceptible species in other regions of Ontario, Nova Scotia, Quebec, and British Columbia.

Indicator:

Established quarantine areas and areas with PPV-susceptible species will determine the location where sampling will occur. Samples will be collected from these species (peach, plum, nectarine, apricot) located inside and outside of the quarantine area.

Target:

An estimated 22,850 samples will be taken and tested annually until 2015 and reduced to 17,000 samples in 2016 and ongoing.

ER 41.2: Regulatory Enforcement

Outcome:

Mitigate the spread of PPV to other regions of Canada and internationally.

Outputs/activities:

Through its inspection activities, the CFIA will monitor and assess the compliance of regulated parties with the PPMMP regulatory requirements. Monitoring activities include issuing movement certificates for regulated material (dormant root stock, seedlings, seeds and plant material for research) and conducting audits and compliance verifications of retail outlets, nurseries and other facilities that may sell, distribute or propagate susceptible Prunus species. When a non-compliance is identified, the CFIA will take the most appropriate response to obtain compliance in view of factors such as the potential or actual harm, the compliance history of the regulated party and the intent.

To help maintain a lower level of virus prevalence within the quarantine area, the prohibition and restriction to propagate regulated Prunus plants within the quarantine area will continue. The prohibition on propagation will ensure that only PPV-free or certified clean stock (planting material that is free of all viruses including PPV) is used within the Niagara quarantine area.

Indicator:

Activities of growers, residents and retailers within the quarantine area.

Target:

As part of the CFIA's inspection activities an annual inspection of a sub-set of growers, residents and retailers will be conducted to determine if the movement of material or propagation has occurred. Property scouting commenced during the 2012-13 fiscal year to determine the number of properties to be annually scouted.

ER 41.3: PPV Regulatory Research

Outcome:

Mitigate the spread of PPV to other regions of Canada and internationally.

Outputs/activities:

To support the clean stock program, a research study is being conducted by the CFIA to develop strategies for eliminating PPV from rootstock. This program supports the enforcement of the prohibition on propagation. The most effective method(s) for eliminating PPV from infected nursery stock materials will be evaluated so that desirable foreign varieties may become eligible for use by industry through clean stock services.

Regulatory research will also develop improved detection tools and more extensive knowledge about PPV to support PPV surveillance, monitoring and detection. CFIA research projects include characterizing the generic variation within individual strains of PPV found in Canada, monitoring for introduction of new strains and mapping the movement of the virus in Canada.

Indicator:

In total three indicators are identified: 1) protocol for the production of virus-free nursery stock for domestic and export clean stock programs using virus elimination techniques; 2) a genetic map to understand movement of PPV strains and isolates to allow for continuous improvement of regulatory surveillance protocols; and 3) identification of any new strains and isolates of PPV not previously reported in Canada along with protocols for their detection.

Target:

Creation of a protocol for virus elimination is expected by the end of fiscal year 2015. The genetic mapping and identification of new strains is dependant on the number of samples collected during surveillance activities that test positive.

ER 41.4: PPV Suppression Research

Outcome:

Contain PPV in the Niagara quarantine area by implementing measures to mitigate the spread of PPV to the rest of Canada and internationally. Management of PPV by industry to maintain industry viability and profitability.

Outputs/activities:

AAFC will conduct research to develop a more sensitive broad spectrum diagnostic tool for detecting PPV and determine the most efficient sampling methodology for the user of that tool. Upon completion, the diagnostic tool technology will be transferred to Canadian private laboratories and the CFIA for its regulatory program.

Beyond 2016, the CFIA will conduct similar research, such as evaluating the host range for newly discovered strains of PPV to determine the range of Prunus hosts to be regulated in Canada. Such research will ensure that the ongoing regulatory program remains effective in mitigating the spread of PPV.

Indicator:

The requirement of a comprehensive list of host plants for new strains of PPV detected in Canada to enhance surveillance protocols and industry.

Target:

Variable depending on the identification of new strains and isolates in Canada during routine surveillance activities.

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14
($ Millions)
Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Science, Innovation and Adoption

PPV Regulatory Research 0.4 (2011-12 to 2013-14) 0.1 ER 42
Virus Resistance Research 3.0 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 0.6 ER 43
PPV Suppression Research 2.9 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 0.6 ER 44
Education and Awareness Activities 0.3 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 0.1 ER 45
Total 6.6 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 1.4
ER 42: Industry Management of PPV

Outcomes:

Immediate Outcomes

The immediate outcomes are enhanced PPV best management tools, PPV resistant varieties, and improved methods for industry to detect PPV. The research findings will contribute to the education and awareness activities of the PPMMP.

Intermediate outcomes

The intermediate outcomes are that industry will be equipped and positioned to effectively contain PPV within the Niagara region and moderate the prevalence of PPV in the Niagara region.

Implementation Plan:

Research will be conducted to provide industry with tools to support PPV management and monitoring. Research initiatives will: 1) develop virus resistance strategies and 2) enhance PPV suppression strategies.

ER 43: Virus Resistance Research - Implementation Plan

Research will develop virus resistance strategies to help protect against PPV and manage the virus over the long term. Specific research projects to support virus resistance include 1) developing a new PPV resistant peach tree line through gene silencing (switching off a gene to make susceptible hosts resistant to infection); 2) developing transferable resistance in rootstock that can be transmitted through grafting to existing fruit trees; and 3) developing a virus vector which will act like a vaccine to induce resistance by gene silencing.

ER 44: PPV Suppression Research - Implementation Plan

PPV suppression will be pursued through research to reduce PPV transmission in orchards. Research projects include assessing practices and processes to suppress PPV transmission by aphids, specifically the use of oil sprays on Prunus plant leaves; evaluating the influence of tree variety and age on the level of seasonal resistance to natural infection by aphids; determining the efficacy of newly registered insecticides on the transmission of PPV, which will result in the development of guidelines for application for use by industry; examining the impact of PPV infection in young peach tree growth, hardiness and productivity in subsequent years; and evaluating foreign material for use in Canada (in collaboration with the CFIA).

ER 45: Education and Awareness Activities

Outcomes

Immediate outcomes

The immediate outcomes are increased industry understanding and awareness of PPV best management practices.

Intermediate outcomes

The intermediate outcomes are increased industry uptake of PPV best management practices which will also help prevent the spread of PPV.

Implementation Plan

Several activities will be conducted to increase industry knowledge and awareness of PPV management practices, and facilitate the transition from eradication to long term management. These activities will be conducted in collaboration with Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA), which is responsible for providing crop advice and training to Ontario growers and nurseries on PPV management. AAFC will also liaise with the OTFPMB and the Canadian Nursery Landscape Association (CNLA) to develop and promote an effective education and awareness campaign.

Currently, the industry has very little information about the spread and risks of managing PPV. As such, education services will be pursued for the first five years of the program. AAFC will collaborate with OMAFRA to distribute information to Ontario tender fruit industry members about the PPV best management practices by publishing pamphlets and articles. An AAFC-OMAFRA fact sheet and web postings relating to the management of PPV will provide information on the disease, including symptom recognition, proper use of treatments, virus testing methods and contact information for service providers.

In addition to the publications, best management practices will be shared with producers by delivering presentations at grower meetings, conferences and information sessions. European tender fruit producers and crop advisors who have experience managing the disease will be invited to participate in the conferences, meetings and information sessions to leverage their expertise. Information and research findings will also be provided by local crop advisors and researchers.

During field tours, hands-on training and practical demonstrations will be conducted to increase the efficacy of the education and awareness campaign. Producers will be shown how to recognize PPV symptoms and properly apply treatments.

In 2015-16, AAFC will transfer the additional knowledge and specific recommendations to enhance best management practices that they have acquired through the research projects to OMAFRA and industry stakeholders.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2013–14
$17.2M (2011-12 to 2015-16) and $1.3M ongoing$3.5M

Results achieved by non-Federal Partners (if applicable): NA

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Karen Prange
Director – Horticulture Division
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
613-773-7181

Trent Herman
A/National Manager – Greenhouse and Nursery
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
613-773-7169

Charlene Green
A/Horticulture Specialist – Greenhouse and Nursery
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
905-938-8697

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Gary Whitfield
Science Director – Environmental Health
Science Centres Directorate
519-738-1218

Lorne Stobbs
Research Scientist – Vineland
905-562-2018

Table E: Food Safety Modernization

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Food Safety Modernization (FSM)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: Food Safety Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2015-16

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $99.8M (new funding) and $40.0M (internal reallocation) (2011-12 to 2015-16)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The CFIA was created in 1997 to enhance food safety systems through the consolidation of inspection and quarantine services that were being delivered by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Health Canada (HC), Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Industry Canada. The current inspection system comprises numerous independent inspection delivery models.

In Budget 2011, the Government of Canada committed funding amounting to $96.8 million to the CFIA to improve and modernize its food safety inspection system. A number of CFIA initiatives were identified to modernize Canada's food safety inspection system. In support of the Agencies modernization initiatives, HC received $3.0M of this funding for enhanced health risk assessment capacity.

The main objectives of this modernization initiative are to move the CFIA away from a system of independent commodity-specific inspection approaches and inspector training, and paper-based record keeping and interactions with stakeholders, to that of a single-inspection approach consistent across the food safety program, supported by standardized training, technology information solutions, enhanced proactive science capacity and improved service to stakeholders.

The plan consists of three elements:

  1. inspection system modernization, including the development of an improved inspection model which will provide standardized activities across the food program, national training for inspectors, enhanced Listeria control in high risk ready-to-eat foods, enhanced HC health risk assessment capacity in support of CFIA modernization activities, and the development of an electronic service delivery platform;
  2. supporting risk-based decision making through enhanced scientific capacity, including a proposal for a food laboratory network, enhanced capacity for scientific testing and improved facilities and equipment; and
  3. increasing efficiency through improved information management and information technology, including data storage and back-up capacity; enhanced connectivity and more support for inspector tools such as wireless devices, and laptops.

Shared outcome(s): Modernize CFIA's inspection system by providing up-to-date and relevant training and necessary technology support. This shared outcome will address the increasing complexity of inspection associated with industry advancements in food production, and international advancements to improve food safety systems.

Governance structure(s): The CFIA has imposed an internal governance framework for the delivery of activities related to Food Safety Modernization. The CFIA's Senior Management Committee, chaired by the President, will provide direction for initiatives, and is accountable for overall implementation. Three VP-level advisory committees responsible for each of the three elements (inspection system modernization, science and IM/IT) will report to the Agency's Senior Management Committee, and will be accountable for ensuring activities are on track and on budget. Each will operate individual governance structures, led by a business sponsor and a dedicated Project Manager, with representation from all implicated areas. The Project Governance and Investment Board provides the forum to ensure horizontal integration between the three elements.

Planning Highlights: For 2013-14, consultations will be held for the drafting of an improved inspection delivery model. Project approval will be sought for the IM/IT solution to support the implementation of the draft model, as well as the electronic service delivery platform. The electronic service delivery platform project team will develop the required project documentation for project approval, and work with stakeholders will be initiated to develop detailed business requirements. With respect to the implementation of Health Canada's Listeria policy for non-meat ready-to-eat food, the Agency will continue staffing actions to provide additional inspection staff for inspection activities in high-risk areas, validate new laboratory methodologies for Listeria in non-meat commodities, and analyze additional food and environmental samples. A new core training program will be piloted for new inspection staff. CFIA subject matter experts will also provide refresher training to existing staff to keep inspectors current with emerging trends and developments related to their work. Adjustments to the core training program will occur as the new inspection model is developed and refined. The Agency will strengthen its information integration capability by introducing Agency-wide data standards. Planning will commence for desktop operating system and tools upgrading and standardization, as well as increasing data storage and backup capacity.

To enhance scientific capacity in 2013-14, the CFIA will assemble a small team to work in collaboration with partners and explore with experts the concepts, processes and mechanisms available to conduct a laboratory systems analysis of the Canadian food laboratory system. Partners will be engaged in exploring data and information requirements and opportunities in anticipation of future feasibility assessments, with respect to the use of existing, or in the creation of an IM/IT platform for secure data sharing. The Modernizing Equipment and Laboratories sub-projects at the GTA and St. Hyacinthe Food laboratories will move into the Project Planning stage with the award of contracts for the Engineering/Design phase of the projects. This will provide support to move to the execution stage of the projects with construction beginning in 2013-14. Additionally, highly skilled scientists will be hired in targeted laboratories.

Planned activities to increase efficiency in IM/IT will include a collaborative effort with Shared Services Canada (SSC) to create a new Data Centre Backup/Restore site to handle the increased requirements of modernized inspection systems. Improvements to end user assets will continue with the distribution of more portable end user devices and improved wireless network connectivity. The IM/IT Branch will continue consultations with their business partners in the Agency to modernize various components of the infrastructure of the organization to better meet the needs of the inspectors in the field.

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14
($ Millions)
Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Food Safety Program

Internal Services

Inspection Modernization 100.2 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 26.9 ER 46
Enhancing Scientific Capacity 19.8 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 4.7 ER 47
Improved IM/IT 16.8 (2013-14 to 2015-16) 4.8 ER 48
Total 136.8 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 36.4
ER 46: Inspection System Modernization

Improved Inspection Delivery Model:

Development of improved inspection delivery model and IM/IT solutions to support the model.

Outcome: The development of an improved inspection delivery model, with supporting IM/IT solutions that will result in the improved management of food safety risks.

Outputs/activities: A single food inspection program will be developed, supported by IM/IT solutions for food inspection. The improved inspection delivery model will include standard collection, reporting and analysis across food commodities and will provide a more consistent inspection and enforcement approach for regulated parties.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)Footnote 5
Target: To be developed (TBD)Footnote 5

Verifying Compliance with HC's Revised Listeria Policy

Outcome: Fewer illnesses caused by Listeria monocytogenes resulting from the consumption of high-risk, non-meat RTE foods.

Outputs and Activities: The Agency will enhance inspection and testing activities to verify industry control of Listeria in all high-risk, non-meat Ready to Eat (RTE) food. The Agency will increase the number of inspections and samples taken and analyzed, and provide technical support for risk assessments resulting from positive findings. Sampling data will be used to support risk-based decision making. Industry will be encouraged to implement preventative Listeria control programs. New Listeria testing methods will be validated and trend analysis will be developed.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)Footnote 5
Target: To be developed (TBD)Footnote 5

Electronic Service Delivery Platform

Outcome: The CFIA can interact with business and international trading partners in an effective, transparent and timely fashion.

Outputs and Activities: The Agency will develop an electronic service delivery platform (ESDP) to enable regulated parties to more readily access CFIA programs and information. Secure service delivery applications will be developed and integrated within an electronic portal. The first deliverable under the ESDP will be electronic export certification.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)Footnote 5
Target: To be developed (TBD)Footnote 5

Recruitment and Training of Inspectors

Outcome: Recruitment and training process for inspection staff within the CFIA will be designed to meet the requirements of the modernized inspection model.

Outputs and Activities: A comprehensive national recruitment, selection and training strategy based on a core, competency-based curriculum for inspection staff will be developed. Core training to new recruits as well as enhanced ongoing training for existing inspection staff will be provided.

Indicator: Inspection staff with required competencies will be hired, trained, and evaluations will indicate desired behaviours are demonstrated in the workplace.

Target: Numbers of inspection staff needed will be determined by Operations branch. All will receive Core training within a year. Estimated numbers are around 150 - 200.

Developing a Laboratory Network Strategy

Outcome: Improved CFIA food laboratory capacity and improved ability to detect and respond to food safety related hazards.

Outputs and Activities: Collaborative opportunities between partners will be identified. Best practices from existing laboratory networks will be reviewed and an analysis of gaps and needs within the food laboratory system will be completed. A commitment from partners to build and implement a food laboratory network will be sought. Feasibility studies describing a system to share laboratory information will be completed. A plan and steps to implement a food laboratory network will be developed and put in place.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)Footnote 5
Target: To be developed (TBD)Footnote 5

Modernizing Equipment and Laboratories

Outcome: Improved CFIA food laboratory capacity to detect and respond to food safety related hazards.

Outputs and Activities: Laboratory expansion and renovation of targeted laboratories will be completed. Laboratory equipment will be upgraded with the procurement of modern testing equipment.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)Footnote 5
Target: To be developed (TBD)Footnote 5

ER 47: Enhancing Laboratory Response Capacity

Outcome: The CFIA is able to detect and respond faster to food safety hazards.

Outputs and Activities: The number of highly skilled scientists in targeted laboratories will be enhanced through hiring additional scientists. New rapid, scientific, and sensitive food safety testing methods will be developed.

ER 48: Improved IM/IT

Outcome: Foundational IM/IT elements in place to support business needs in the delivery of the food safety management risks.

Outputs and Activities: Increase connectivity for front line staff. Acquisition and deployment of modern devices to inspection staff. Provide the Agency and Agency staff with stable and up-to-date information management and integration capabilities. Negotiate with Shared Services Canada for the provision of additional data storage and backup capacity.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)Footnote 6
Target: To be developed (TBD)Footnote 6

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Names of programs funded under the horizontal initiative Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($ Millions)
Planned Spending for 2013-14
($ Millions)
Expect Results (ER) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Health Canada (HC) Food Safety and Nutrition Enhancing Health Risk Assessment Capacity to Support CFIA Food Safety Inspection Activities 3.0 (2013-14 to 2015-16) 0.9 ER 49
Total 3.0 (2013-14 to 2015-16) 0.9
ER 49: Inspection System Modernization

Enhanced Health Risk Assessment Capacity:

Outcome 1: CFIA-led food safety investigations will be supported by timely health risk assessments that will further support swift action being taken to minimize/mitigate the potential exposure of Canadians to hazards in food and the number of associated illnesses.

Outputs/Activities: Health Canada will build additional flexibility in its health risk assessment capacity to sustain its current level of service through hiring of additional employees, ongoing training, review and analysis of health risk assessment activities, and the proactive development of new policies and guidelines, where appropriate.
Indicator: To be developed (TBD)
Target: To be developed (TBD)

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2013–14
$99.8M (new funding) and $40.0M (internal reallocation) (2011-12 to 2015-16)$37.3M

Results achieved by non-Federal Partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency:
Steven Yafalian
Portfolio Project Manager
Inspection Modernization Office
613-773-7642

Health Canada
Amanda Whitfield
Senior Policy Analyst
Director General's Office, Food Directorate
613-948-2761

Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable

Table A. Respendable Revenue
($ Millions)
Program Forecast Revenue
2012-13
Planned Revenue
2013-14
Planned Revenue
2014-15
Planned Revenue
2015-16
Food Safety Program 30.6 30.6 30.6 30.6
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 2.8 2.8 2.8 2.8
Plant Resources Program 6.4 6.4 6.4 6.4
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 13.2 13.2 13.2 13.2
Internal Services 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
Total Respendable Revenue 53.2 53.2 53.2 53.2
Table B. Non-Respendable Revenue
($ Millions)
Program Forecast Revenue
2012-13
Planned Revenue
2013-14
Planned Revenue
2014-15
Planned Revenue
2015-16
Food Safety Program
Administrative Monetary Penalties 0.8 0.9 0.9 0.9
Interest on Overdue Accounts Receivable 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Proceeds from sale of Crown Assets 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Plant Resources Program 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Internal Services 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Non-Respendable Revenue 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.2
($ Millions)
Program Forecast Revenue
2012-13
Planned Revenue
2013-14
Planned Revenue
2014-15
Planned Revenue
2015-16
Total Respendable Revenue and Non-Respendable Revenue 54.3 54.4 54.4 54.4

Summary of Capital Spending by Program

($ Millions)
Program ($ Millions) Forecast Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Food Safety Program 10.9 19.2 26.4 13.1
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 2.1 0.0 0.0 0.0
Plant Resources Program 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.1
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Internal Services 26.4 12.9 12.9 14.5
Total 39.5 32.1 39.3 27.7
A. All upcoming Internal Audits over the next three fiscal years
Name of Internal Audit Internal Audit Type Status Expected Completion Date
2012-2013Table Note 7
Safeguarding of Moveable Assets Assurance

In Progress

March, 2013
Review of Food Safety Modernization Initiative – Phase 1 Assurance In Progress March 2013
Corrective Action Requests Assurance In Progress March 2013
Quality Management System Assurance In Progress September, 2013
Occupational Safety and Health Assurance Planned December, 2013
Business Continuity Planning Assurance In Progress December 2013
2013-2014Table Note 7
IM/IT Assurance Planned TBD
Review of Food Safety Modernization Initiative – Phase 2 Assurance Planned TBD
Financial Management and Reporting Controls Assurance Planned TBD
Licensing Permitting, Registrations Assurance Planned TBD
2014-2015Table Note 7
Emergency Management Assurance Planned TBD
Staffing Assurance Planned TBD
Management of Stakeholder Complaints Assurance Planned TBD
Values, Integrity and Conflict Resolution Assurance Planned TBD

Table Notes

Table Note 7

Audits identified as 'Planned' may be subject to change due to shifting of priorities based on annual evaluation of risk elements. The new proposed audit projects for fiscal years 2013-14, 2014-15 and 2015-16 will be approved in 2013.

Return to first table note7 referrer

B. All upcoming Evaluations over the next three fiscal years
Name of Evaluation Program Activity StatusTable Note 8 Expected Completion Date
Evaluation of the Food Consumer Safety Action Plan (CFIA component) Food Safety Program

In progress

March, 2013
Fertilizer Plant resources Program In progress March 2013
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Food Safety Program In progress December 2013
Continuing a Comprehensive Strategy for Managing BSE in Canada, 5-year Funding Animal Health and Zoonotics Program In progress 2013-2014
Plant Protection Plant resources Program Planned 2013-2014
Terrestrial Animal Health Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Planned 2014-2015
Seed Plant resources Program Planned 2014-2015
Intellectual Property Rights Plant Resources Program Planned 2014-2015
Fish and Seafood Food Safety Program Planned 2015-2016
National Aquatic Animal Health Program Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Planned 2015-2016
Imported and Manufactured Food Products Food Safety Program Planned 2015-2016
Meat and Poultry Food Safety Program Planned 2015-2016
Food Safety Modernization Food Safety Program Planned 2015-2016
Name of Evaluation Program Activity StatusTable Note 8 Expected Completion Date
Continuing a Comprehensive Strategy for Managing BSE in Canada (CFIA lead) Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Planned December 2013

Table Notes

Table Note 8

Interdepartmental Evaluations identified as "Planned" may be subject to change based on annual reconsiderations. New proposed evaluation projects over the period of 2013-2016 will be approved in 2013.

Return to first table note8 referrer

2012-13 User Fees Reporting - User Fees Act

Name of User Fee (New or Amended): License for importers of non-federally registered sector products
Fee Type: Regulatory
Fee-setting Authority: Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
Reason for Planned Introduction of or Amendment to a Fee: New regulations will come into force in 2013-14 regarding the importation of non-federally registered sector products. One of the requirements will be that importers of such products will need to hold a licence. This fee is to recover the cost of issuing the licence.
Effective Date of Planned Change of existing fee or introduction of new fee: The fee will be in effect once the regulations come into force, targeted for October 30, 2013.
Consultation and Review Process Planned: The CFIA conducted an on-line consultation from April 21, 2012 to June 29, 2012. In addition, the CFIA consulted extensively with industry and associations to explain the upcoming regulations and the licence fee.

All electronic supplementary information tables found in the 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

3.3 Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV – Other Items of Interest

4.1 Organizational Contact Information

Contact the Canadian Food Inspection Agency via:

Telephone: Monday to Friday 08:00 to 20:00 Eastern Standard Time
Toll Free: 1-800-442-2342
NCR: 1-800-442-2342 / 613-773-2342
TTY: 1-800-465-7735
Internet: CFIA Contact

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