2013–14 Estimates Report on Plans and Priorities
Section I – Agency Overview

1.1 Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canada's largest science-based regulatory agency. It has over 7,100Footnote 1 employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal, and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy.

The CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services in order to:

  • prevent and manage food safety risks;
  • protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species;
  • prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases;
  • contribute to consumer protection; and
  • contribute to market access for Canada's food, plants, and animals.

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective risk management, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

The CFIA's Legislative Authority

CFIA Wide

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act

Food

  • Safe Food for Canadians Act
  • Canada Agricultural Products Act
  • Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act (as it relates to food)
  • Fish Inspection Act
  • Food and Drugs Act (as it relates to food)
  • Meat Inspection Act

Plant

  • Fertilizers Act
  • Plant Breeders' Rights Act
  • Plant Protection Act
  • Seeds Act

Animal

  • Health of Animals Act
  • Feeds Act
  • Seeds Act

1.2 Responsibilities

The CFIA is responsible for administering and enforcing 13 federal statutes and 38 sets of regulations, for regulating the safety and quality of food sold in Canada, and for supporting a sustainable plant and animal resource base. As of November 2012, the Safe Food for Canadians Act received Royal Assent. Prior to the Safe Food for Canadians Act, food safety in Canada was regulated under a suite of different statutes. This new legislation completes the CFIA's response to the recommendations found in the Report of the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak and serves to better position the Agency to evolve along with the rapidly changing food safety landscape by, among other things, strengthening oversight of food commodities being traded inter-provincially or internationally in order to better protect consumers. The CFIA shares many of its core responsibilities with other federal departments and agencies, with provincial, territorial and municipal authorities, and with other stakeholders.

The CFIA's Key Federal Partners

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Health Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Canadian Grain Commission
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada, including Canadian Forest Service
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
  • Environment Canada, including Canadian Wildlife Service

The CFIA works with its partners to implement food safety measures; manage food, animal, and plant risks and emergencies; and promote the development of food safety and disease control systems to maintain the safety of Canada's high-quality agriculture, agri-food, aquaculture and fishery products. The CFIA's activities include verifying the compliance of imported products; registering and inspecting establishments; testing food, animals, plants, and their related products; and approving the use of many agricultural inputs. The CFIA also provides scientific advice, develops new technologies, provides testing services, and conducts regulatory research.

At the CFIA, decisions are based on high-quality, timely, relevant science. Science informs policy development and program design and delivery through foresight, advice, risk assessment, the influence of international standards, research and development, and testing.

1.3 Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

To effectively fulfill its responsibilities in safeguarding Canad's food and sustaining its animal and plant resource base, the CFIA aims to achieve one strategic outcomeFootnote 2: a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base. The CFIA's Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), shown in Figure 1, illustrates how the Agency's strategic outcome aligns with those of the Government of Canada and reflects how the Agency plans to allocate and manage its resources to achieve the corresponding expected results. The Agency's priorities are reviewed annually to facilitate effective resource management within the context of the PAA framework. The four priority areas established for 2013–14 are detailed further in Section 1.6 and Section II.

Click on image for larger view
Figure 2: Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) for the CFIA. Description follows.

Description for - Program Alignment Architecture for the CFIA

The CFIA's Vision
To excel as a science-based regulator, trusted and respected by Canadians and the international community

The CFIA's Mission
Dedicated to safeguarding Canada's food, animals and plants, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment and economy

GoC Outcome Areas

  • Healthy Canadians
  • Strong Economic Growth
  • A Clean and Healthy Environment
  • A Fair and Secure Marketplace
  • A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce
Strategic Outcome
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base
Program Food Safety Program Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Plant Resources Program International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Internal Services
Sub-Program Meat & Poultry Terrestrial Animal Health Plant Protection

Governance and Management Support

Resource Management Services

Asset Management Services

Egg Aquatic Animal Health Seed
Dairy Feed Fertilizer
Fish & Seafood Intellectual Property Rights
Fresh Fruits & Vegetables
Imported and Manufactured Food Products

The CFIA's Foundation

  • Sound Science
  • Effective Regulatory Base
  • Effective Inspection Programs
  • Effective Risk Management
  • Strong Partnerships
  • Transparent Timely Communications

The CFIA's Priorities

  • Prevention
  • Services Excellence
  • Performance Excellence
  • People

Key Risk Areas

  • Management Information and IM/IT Infrastructure
  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Managing Change
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships
  • Emergency Management

1.4 Contribution of Priorities to the Strategic Outcome

In 2012–13, the CFIA's activity planning was guided by four (4) overarching priorities: strong foundation, working closely with partners, enhancing services, and strengthening internal management. These priorities were rooted in the Agency's strategic change agenda. During the 2012–13 fiscal year, the change agenda, and its priorities were further refined through the Agency's ongoing Long-Term Strategic Planning (LTSP) exercise. By defining the Agency's long-term vision and carefully considering its key strategic risks, the Long-Term Strategic Plan assists the CFIA in mitigating its risks, strengthening its foundations, and effectively delivering its core program activities. The following table outlines the CFIA's priorities for 2013–14, based on the Agency's LTSP. As these priorities are refinements to the Agency's 2012–13 LTSP, they have been categorized as 'previously committed to' for the sake of clarity.

Table 1-1: Summary of Priorities

Priority TypeFootnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program(s)
An increased focus on prevention which will provide an opportunity to minimize risks to human, animal and ecosystem health Previously committed to Food Safety Program, Animal Health and Zoonotics Program, Plant Resource Program and International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Description
Integrating proactive and preventive risk management approaches into all CFIA programs, including focus on partnerships and sharing of information, will help the CFIA to anticipate, prevent, prepare, and manage issues, including emergencies. Under this priority, the CFIA has established the following goals:
  • stakeholders have a clear and common understanding of the primary role that they play in managing risk;
  • proactive and preventive risk management approaches are integrated into all CFIA programs;
  • industry's prevention systems are verified; and
  • partnerships, networks and intelligence sharing help the CFIA anticipate, prevent, and prepare.
Priority TypeFootnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program(s)
The CFIA's role as an effective regulator will be enhanced by a focus on service excellence Previously committed to Food Safety Program, Animal Health and Zoonotics Program, Plant Resource Program and International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Description
Strengthening the citizen-centred service delivery culture will result in enhanced program delivery and domestic and international stakeholders who have confidence in the CFIA as a trusted and credible regulator. Under this priority, the CFIA has established the following goals:
  • robust inspection systems provide advice and oversight;
  • service culture is embedded within the Agency;
  • the CFIA is a trusted, transparent and credible regulator with adaptable, predictable and consistent program delivery; and
  • CFIA services support efficient and effective regulation of the marketplace.
Priority TypeFootnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program(s)
Adapt and evolve to meet new demands and expectations with a focus on internal performance excellence Previously committed to All Programs
Description
Optimizing performance will enable the CFIA to evaluate the effectiveness of the Agency's policies and programs and to allocate resources to areas of highest risk. Under this priority, the CFIA has established the following goals:
  • strong internal management systems and governance that support risk-based planning and allocation of resources; and
  • a performance management mindset is embedded in the Agency.
Priority TypeFootnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program(s)
Focusing on people who are supported by training and tools Previously committed to All Programs
Description
Focusing on diverse talent, supported by training and modern tools will result in a stable and skilled CFIA workforce and adaptable and satisfied employees. Under this priority, the CFIA has established the following goals:
  • the CFIA continues to retain and attract competent, qualified, and motivated personnel;
  • individuals have the tools, training and information they need to support the Agency and progress in their careers; and
  • the CFIA has the culture it needs to achieve the Long-Term Strategic Plan – a culture of engagement.

1.5 Risk Analysis

The CFIA strives to fulfill its mandate and responsibilities by balancing both risks and opportunities when designing its policies, programs and services. The CFIA's implementation of integrated risk and opportunity management supports informed decision-making and continuous improvement.

Through the Corporate Risk Profile (CRP) exercise and other various management practices, tools, and guides, the CFIA is fostering a responsible, risk-smart and opportunity-driven culture that focuses on informed decision-making, integrated business planning, and strategic resource allocation.

The CFIA recognizes that continuous improvement and maturity of practices are required. To ensure that its risk management approach remains effective and relevant, the CFIA has held discussions with its External Advisory Committee (EAC) and others to strengthen and validate its processes. Thus, the CFIA is constantly reviewing and updating its integrated risk management process and tools to reflect leading best practices.

The following table provides an overview of the most significant, overarching corporate risks and their corresponding response strategies, as identified in the 2012–13 CRP. The implementation of key mitigation strategies for each risk will reduce residual risk to levels deemed tolerable by the Agency. Further, given the convergent nature of the Agency's corporate risks, they are directly linked to all programs.

In pursuit of its strategic objective, the CFIA continues to support a foundation for sound business practices where integrated risk management is embedded in its planning, decision-making and management.

Table 1-2: Risk Summary

Risk Area Key Mitigation Strategies and Activities Linkage to Organizational Priority
Prevention Service Excellence Performance Excellence People
Management Information and IM/IT Infrastructure
There is a threat that the Agency will be unable to make risk-based decisions due to a lack of timely, accurate and useful data and information. The fast- paced environment within which the Agency must operate means that decision-makers' information needs and expectations are increasingly complex and time-sensitive. Differences in how information is collected, analyzed and used across multiple systems may impede information sharing and timely operational and regulatory decision-making. Similarly, aging infrastructure limits capacity to take full advantage of available information.
Strengthen planning, reporting & performance monitoring checkmark
Centre for Business Information Management checkmark checkmark
Knowledge Workspace Program checkmark checkmark
IM/IT Campaign Plan checkmark
Inspection Effectiveness
There is a threat that the Agency will lack the appropriate inspection effectiveness to expeditiously prevent, detect and respond to threats to food safety, animals and plants. The Agency delivers 14 inspection programs that have evolved independently, each with diverse and complex requirements. Further, CFIA inspectors must maintain ever-increasing levels of scientific and technical expertise as a result of changing methods of production, processing and distribution. Ensuring inspectors have the appropriate knowledge, tools and direction is increasingly challenging in this complex environment.
Legislative renewal checkmark checkmark checkmark
Inspection Modernization initiative checkmark checkmark checkmark checkmark
Food Program framework and redesign checkmark checkmark checkmark checkmark
Scientific Capability
There is a threat that the Agency will not have the scientific capability to adapt and respond in a timely manner. This, along with the globalization of the marketplace and the resulting increased demand to meet the diverse science-based inspection and testing requirements of international partners, challenges the CFIA to ensure that its inspectors, scientists and program specialists are able to keep pace and that laboratory infrastructure, tools and methodologies are able to meet demands. At the same time, the Agency has an opportunity to leverage scientific capability; this includes the improvement of knowledge, information sharing and emergency response through enhanced engagement with partners.
Laboratory infrastructure strategy checkmark
Human Resources Modernization Strategy checkmark
Enhance laboratory response capacity checkmark checkmark
Enhance surveillance and foresight checkmark
Laboratory Network checkmark
Legislative, Regulatory and Program Frameworks
There is a threat that the current legislative, regulatory and program framework will be unable to support the effective delivery of the Agency's mandate. This risk is driven by the CFIA's rapidly changing operating environment coupled with an aging regulatory base. Significant advances in science and technology have impacted the production, processing and testing options available; consumers want more, better-quality and easily accessible information; industry continues to raise concerns about regulatory burden; and international partners are increasingly requiring the demonstration of comprehensive safety systems.
Legislative renewal checkmark checkmark checkmark
Multi-Year Regulatory Plan checkmark checkmark checkmark
Food Program framework and redesign checkmark checkmark checkmark checkmark
E-business and e-certification checkmark
User fee / service standard modernization checkmark
Red tape reduction initiatives checkmark
Managing Change
There is a threat that the Agency will be unable to effectively manage change on an ongoing basis. The fiscal, regulatory and scientific environment within which the Agency operates requires on-going, carefully managed change as a regular part of business. The Agency faces the challenge of ensuring that it has the capacity to take timely advantage of opportunities for innovation while continuing to maintain or increase effectiveness and efficiency.
Human Resources Modernization Strategy checkmark
Reinforce values and ethics checkmark
Strengthen planning, reporting and performance monitoring checkmark checkmark
Enhance project management checkmark
Enhance engagement – internal and public checkmark
Transparency and Leveraging Relationships
There is an opportunity for the Agency to increase its transparency and accountability to stakeholders. Canadians, industry, and our international partners are consistently demanding greater amounts of timely, understandable information. The broad use of technology is providing new opportunities to better engage and collaborate with industry, other governmental stakeholders and the public. This enables regulated parties to take steps to ensure compliance and helps to increase public awareness and confidence in the Canadian marketplace. The Agency has an opportunity to modernize its cost recovery regime to make it fairer and to reduce regulatory burden for industry, and it has the chance to adopt a more strategic approach to addressing increases in demand related to market access.
Open and Transparent communication checkmark
E-business and e-certification checkmark
User fee / service standard modernization checkmark
Red tape reduction initiatives checkmark
US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) comparability & border initiatives checkmark
Emergency Management
There is a threat that the Agency is inadequately prepared for multiple, simultaneous or large-scale emergencies. The CFIA has a well-developed emergency preparedness and response capacity for individual emergencies. That said, critical incidents and more complex emergencies could increase due to changes in human, animal and plant movement, complex processing and distribution chains, climate change, and changing production methods. The health of the population, the resource base, trade, and critical infrastructure could all be affected by a large-scale emergency such as a pandemic.
Existing risk mitigation strategies result in a tolerable level of residual risk.

1.6 Planning Summary

Taking a comprehensive and proactive approach to its annual planning and priority-setting exercises, and aligning these to Government of Canada outcomes, the Agency considers the impact of several factors. These include the global, national and economic environment; Government priorities; Agency strategic risks; its human and financial resource capacity; and past performance outcomes and related lessons learned. The plans and priorities presented in this report are based on a comprehensive assessment of the Agency's strategic risks (Section 1.7 Risk Analysis). Planning and performance assessment activities are carried out at all levels of the Agency; as such, these exercises form a part of its ongoing business.

1.6.1 Financial Resources and Human Resources

The following tables present the Agency's 2013–14 Main Estimates as well as the planned spending levels and full-time equivalents for the next three fiscal years (2013–14 to 2015–16) excluding funding extensions that the Agency will pursue. The 2013–14 Planned Spending is approximately $43.5 million higher than the Main Estimates for the same time period and includes the following resources that are not included in the Main Estimates: Renewal of resources for two years (2012–13 to 2013–14) to maintain increased frequency of food inspections in meat processing establishments; renewal of resources for four years (2012–13 to 2015–16) related to Listeriosis; new resources related to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) led initiatives such as the Single Window Initiative and Trusted Traders and Trusted Travellers programs as outlined in the Beyond the Border Action Plan; as well as resources that are earmarked in the fiscal framework related to Food Safety Modernization.

Planned Spending is declining by $111.5 million and 931 FTEs from 2013–14 to 2015–16. The major items contributing to this decrease are:

  • Budget 2012 Strategic Operating Review reductions. As part of this Review, the Agency has identified a number of opportunities across all Programs to reduce costs associated with management, administration and other internal functions; shared services with other government departments; as well as streamlining processes, simplifying regulatory requirements and providing single window access to specialized expertise. Administrative efficiencies will be found in the areas of management and administration, based largely in Ottawa. These administrative efficiency reductions are allocated proportionally across all programs. None of these efficiencies affect front-line food safety inspection staff.
  • A decrease in funding for Food Safety Modernization. The decrease in funding is in line with approved investment plans related to the implementation of these projects (i.e. the level of required funding decreases as the projects near completion) and will not decrease the number of front-line food safety inspection staff. The funding will sunset in 2015-16.
  • A transfer of resources to Public Works and Government Services Canada for the Consolidation of Pay Services Project.
  • Certain funds which are scheduled to sunset; the CFIA plans to seek renewal of these sunsetting funds.

Table 1-3: Financial Resources

Financial Resources ($ Millions)
Total Budgetary
Expenditure
(Main Estimates)
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
687.9 731.4 636.6 619.9

Table 1-4: Human Resources

Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents – FTEsFootnote 4)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
6,438 5,535 5,507

1.6.2 Planning Summary Tables

The following tables (1-5 to 1-7) highlight the Agency's strategic outcome and present a summary of the Agency's performance indicators and targets. Table 1-5 presents the Agency's forecasted spending for 2012–13 and planned spending over the next three fiscal years for each program.

Table 1-5: Planning Summary Table for Strategic Outcome and Programs ($ Millions)

Strategic Outcome Program Actual
Spending
2010–11
Actual
Spending
2011–12
Forecast
Spending
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2013–14
Planned
Spending
2014–15
Planned
Spending
2015–16
Alignment to Government
of Canada Outcomes
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Food Safety Program 313.8 328.9 360.9 352.7 330.5 314.5 Healthy Canadians
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 133.9 140.3 144.9 132.0 89.2 89.1 Healthy Canadians
Plant Resources Program 80.1 84.0 92.0 84.7 74.4 74.1 A Clean and Healthy Environment
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 33.3 34.8 35.9 31.7 25.6 25.6 A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce
Subtotal 561.1 588.0 633.7 601.1 519.7 503.3

Table 1-6 Planning Summary Table for Internal Services ($ Millions)

Program Actual
Spending
2010–11
Actual
Spending
2011–12
Forecast
Spending
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2013–14
Planned
Spending
2014–15
Planned
Spending
2015–16
Internal Services 160.7 149.7 143.9 130.3 116.9 116.6
Subtotal 160.7 149.7 143.9 130.3 116.9 116.6

Table 1-7 Planning Summary Totals ($ Millions)

Strategic Outcome(s) Program(s), and Internal Services Actual Spending
2010–11
Actual Spending
2011–12
Forecast Spending
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2013–14
Planned
Spending
2014–15
Planned
Spending
2015–16
Total 721.8 737.7 777.6 731.4 636.6 619.9

1.7 Expenditure Profile

Figure 2: Percentage of 2013–14 Planned Spending by Program Activity. Description follows.

Description for - Pie Chart – Percentage of 2013–14 Planned Spending by Program Activity
Figure 2: Percentage of 2001–12 Planned Spending by Program Activity
Food Safety Program 48%
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 18%
Plant Resources Program 12%
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 4%
Internal Services 18%

1.7.1 The CFIA's Spending Trend

Figure 3: The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's past and future spending within the context of a seven-year trend. Description follows.

Description for - Bar Graph – The CFIA's past and future spending within the context of a seven-year trend
Figure 3: The CFIA's past and future spending within the context of a seven-year trend
Actual Spending ($ Millions)
2009–10 718.1
2010–11 721.8
2011–12 737.7
Forecast Spending ($ Millions)
2012-13 4%
Planned Spending ($ Millions)
2013–14 731.4
2014–15 636.6
2015-16 619.9

1.7.2 Voted and Statutory Items

For information on our organizational appropriations, please see the 2013–14 Main Estimates publication.

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