2013–14 Estimates Report on Plans and Priorities
Section II – Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

2.1 Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base

Mitigating risks to food safety is the CFIA's highest priority. Safeguarding the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy are the driving force behind the design and development of the CFIA's programs. The CFIA, in collaboration and partnership with industry, consumers, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, continues to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases.

The CFIA supports Canadian agriculture and the ability of agri-food businesses to enter domestic and global markets and compete successfully therein. To support this objective, the CFIA develops and enforces regulatory and program frameworks for imports and exports that meet both Canadian and international requirements. Regulatory and program frameworks are based on the most current and relevant information, and that they keep pace with a rapidly evolving, global environment; the CFIA engages in outreach and consultation activities with key stakeholders and partners (including those in industry), consumers, and international trade and standards organizations. In so doing, the CFIA is also able to maintain open and transparent communication with its stakeholder and consultative groups.

The CFIA is also focused on several horizontal initiatives aimed at contributing to consumer protection. Over the next year, the CFIA plans on implementing a new import licensing system as part of the Food Safety Action Plan, continuing to advance its food labelling modernization and transparency initiatives and continuing to deliver on many of its daily to day operational activities; these include public recall notices and import border blitzes designed to catch imported food items that may pose a health threat to Canadians.

Over the next few years, in an effort to offer greater consistency in program interpretation and delivery the CFIA will begin work towards establishing 16 centres of expertise (CoE) across Canada. Each CoE will operate as a single window and will provide consistent technical advice, interpretation, guidance and specialized knowledge to the CFIA front-line inspectors and regulated parties. Specific CoEs will deal with such subjects as processed meat and poultry, forestry, and aquatic animals among others subjects. CoEs will consolidate program and administrative expertise to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, consistency and quality of service delivery.

The performance tables listed in the preceding pages describes the performance indicators used to measure the extent to which the CFIA is achieving its single strategic outcome. (See Tables 2-1, 2-2, 2-3 and 2-4).

To be successful in delivering on its strategic outcome, the CFIA has developed a robust risk management discipline, fostering its use throughout the Agency. As such, the CFIA continually monitors and assesses its operating environment in order to be aware of the threats and opportunities concerned with the achievement of its desired outcome. A cornerstone of its risk management process is the development of an Agency-wide Corporate Risk Profile (CRP) are articulated in Table 1-5.

In order to mitigate these risks and achieve its strategic outcome, the Agency will, through the actions of its program activities (Food Safety, Animal Health and Zoonotics, Plant Resources, International Collaboration and Technical Agreements), concentrate its 2013–14 efforts on the delivery of key initiatives supporting the following four priorities:

  • An increased focus on prevention which will provide an opportunity to minimize risks to human, animal and plant health;
  • The CFIA's role as an effective regulator will be enhanced by a focus on service excellence;
  • Adapt and evolve to meet new demands and expectations with a focus on internal performance excellence; and
  • Focusing on people who are supported by training and tools

2.1.1 Program Summary

2.1.1.1 Food Safety Program

Food Safety Program - description follows

Description for Food Safety Program image
Program Activity Expected Results GoC Outcome Areas
Food Safety Program
  • Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated
  • Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
Healthy Canadians

Key Risk Areas

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships
Program Description

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Planning Highlights

In recognition of the rapidly evolving food safety environment, and in an effort to modernize and simplify federal legislation and regulations affecting food safety, the Government enacted the Safe Food for Canadians Act in November 2012. Prior to the Safe Food for Canadians Act, food safety in Canada was regulated under a suite of different statutes: the Food and Drugs Act, Fish Inspection Act, Meat Inspection Act, Canada Agricultural Products Act, and the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act. The new Safe Food for Canadians Act legislation completes the CFIA's response to the recommendations found in the Report of the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak and serves to better position the Agency to evolve along with the rapidly changing food safety landscape by, among other things, strengthening oversight of food commodities being traded inter-provincially or internationally so as to better protect consumers.

To support this new Act, the CFIA will work towards the development of a Single Food Program including new food safety regulations. By moving to an integrated food safety program that provides a consistent approach to inspections, the CFIA will be able to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of its service delivery. The CFIA will be carrying out a number of complementary initiatives to support the design and implementation of a Single Food Program: regulatory reform, stakeholder education and compliance promotion, service delivery improvements, and modernizing science capacity modernization.

Modernization

In 2013–14 specifically, the CFIA expects to have a draft regulatory framework available for consultation. Underlying the development of this new set of regulations will be a set principles to improve consistency and reduce complexity in regulation, while supporting innovation and reducing unnecessary burdens on stakeholders. Building on successful stakeholder engagement, the CFIA will engage regulatory partners from both the domestic and importing sectors at different stages of the process.

Aligned with the development of a Single Food Program, in the coming year the CFIA will continue to leverage the $100 million announced in Budget 2011 over five years as well as the $40 million reallocated internally, to support the modernization of its inspection system. In recognition of the importance of hearing from all stakeholders potentially affected by changes to the food safety program, beginning in December 2011, the CFIA held a series of engagement sessions with unions, internal managers, frontline staff, and industry stakeholders. These discussions were designed to initiate dialogue and improve understanding of inspection modernization; overall, feedback has been positive.

As a result of these discussions, five common components of food inspection were identified, and related design principles were articulated and used in the development of an improved food inspection model. In 2013–14, the CFIA will begin to phase in the implementation of its new food inspection model (developed in 2012–13). This phased-in implementation will include exploring options for the development of an IM/IT solution to deliver the new inspection model and the development of a Risk-based Inspection Oversight (RBIO) framework and risk tool. During this phased-in implementation process, the CFIA will continue communicating and engaging with government and industry partners. This process will also combine effective engagement with foreign governments to enable the recognition of the new food inspection model.

To help facilitate the modernized food safety inspection model, refresher training for existing inspection staff will continue to roll out. In addition, the six-week Pre-requisite Employment Program (PREP) Core Training will be launched April 2014, training approximately 200 new inspection staff. The CFIA will also implement a Learning Content Management System (LCMS) which will be used to manage course content and support ongoing inspection learning and training through an increased blended approach (e-learning/classroom).

Budget 2011 also provided the CFIA with $19.8 million over five years to strengthen its scientific capacities in support of the new food inspection model. In 2013–14, the CFIA will complete the contracting process for making improvements to the food laboratory structure at its Toronto and St-Hyacinthe laboratories and it will continue to hire scientists in key areas to enhance CFIA's food science capacity.

Programs

The CFIA will continue to work towards modernizing its food labelling system. In 2013–14, the CFIA will begin consultations with stakeholders, which will provide the basis for modernization strategy recommendations on a modernization strategy. The Food Labelling Modernization Initiative will focus on areas of food labelling that are the responsibility of the CFIA, including roles and responsibilities, partnerships, regulations, policy and program development and service delivery. This modernization initiative will strive to balance the needs of Canadian consumers, industry and government.

Under the Food Safety Action Plan (FSAP) initiative, the Imported and Manufactured Food Program (IMFP) is developing and preparing to deliver training associated with the revised compliance verification (CVS) inspection process. The training of current staff in the CVS-IMFP process will be completed by July 31, 2013, and will be complemented by on-the-job coaching as well as other technical training deliveries. Training developed in response to the Weatherill Report (nine weeks of Meat Processing School) will continue with an ongoing focus on the training of current meat processing inspectors using the updated materials.

Federal and provincial governments remain committed to working together and with industry to enhance meat and poultry product safety. Specifically, the CFIA will build on work (completed in 2012–13) relating to the Pathogen Reduction Initiative the goal of which was to reduce the health risks and the economic impact of food-borne pathogen in Canadian meat and poultry. In 2013–14, the CFIA will focus its efforts on completing the Microbiological Baseline Study (MBS) in broiler chicken to assess current pathogens levels in Canadian meat and poultry and form the basis of to establish pathogen reduction targets and strategies. Additionally, the CFIA will implement changes agreed-upon by provinces by returning provincial meat inspection activities to the provinces of British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. There will be no impact on food safety, as provinces will be delivering the required inspection services.

The CFIA will continue ensuring industry's adherence to Health Canada's updated Listeria Policy (released in April 2011) by conducting inspections to verify the effectiveness of industry controls related to Listeria; conducting expanded environmental sampling for high-risk ready-to-eat (RTE) foods; evaluating industry studies and validating safety measures taken to limit or prevent the growth of Listeria in RTE foods. As per the additional money received in Budget 2012, the CFIA will continue its sustained effort on these critical activities.

Finally, an in-depth review will be of the incident and recall of XL Food Inc. products contaminated with E. coli 0157 that occurred in September 2012. This will allow the CFIA to assess how the incident unfolded and identify what went well and areas that must be improved to strengthen the Canadian food safety system.

Did You Know

The website Food Safety provides the most up-to-date information to consumers in Canada about recalls, for safe food handling and preparation, food allergies, information on food about poisoning, and food facts.

Table 2-1: Planning Summary – Food Safety Program
Financial Resources ($ Millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
312.2352.7330.5314.5
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTE)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
3,2182,8972,897

Planned Spending for the Food Safety Program is declining by $38.2 million from 2013–14 to 2015–16. The major items contributing to this decrease are:

  • The Budget 2012 Strategic Operating Review. Included in the Review is the return of meat inspection activities within provincially registered establishments to the provinces of British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. This measure was previously announced as a priority for the CFIA and its provincial partners. Oversight within these establishments will be provided by provincial authorities, as is the case in all other provinces. Agency front-line food safety inspection staff currently doing this work will be given guaranteed job offers to stay with the CFIA.
  • A decrease in funding for Food Safety Modernization. The decrease in funding is in line with approved investment plans related to the implementation of these projects (i.e. the level of required funding decreases as the projects near completion). The funding will sunset in 2015–16.
  • The sunsetting of resources relating to some inspection activities; the CFIA plans to seek renewal of these sunsetting resources.

Discrepancies identified in the 2011–12 Departmental Performance Report regarding the alignment of authorities and FTEs by Program as a result of the renewal of the Program Alignment Architecture in 2011–12, have now been addressed.

Program – 1.1 Food Safety Program
Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Number of commodity areas where federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 100% of Class I recalls are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 95%
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where domestic food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6
Number of commodity areas where imported food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6
Additional information:

The CFIA's Food Safety Action Plan

Listeria Policy update

Compliance Verification System Procedures

Sub-Program – 1.1.1 Meat and Poultry
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally registered meat and poultry establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered meat and poultry establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98%
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Percentage of tested imported meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Sub-Program – 1.1.2 Egg
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally registered shell egg establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered shell egg establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98%
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Percentage of tested imported shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Sub-Program – 1.1.3 Dairy
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally registered dairy establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered dairy establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98%
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Percentage of tested imported dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Sub-Program – 1.1.4 Fish & Seafood
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally registered fish and seafood establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fish and seafood establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98%
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Percentage of tested imported fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Sub-Program – 1.1.5 Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally registered fresh fruits and vegetables establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fresh fruit and vegetable establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98%
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fresh fruit and vegetable samples in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Percentage of tested imported fresh fruits and vegetables samples in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Sub-Program – 1.1.6 Processed Products
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally registered processed products establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered processed products establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98%
Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Percentage of tested imported processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Sub-Program – 1.1.7 Imported and Manufactured Food Products
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food (IMF) products are mitigated Percentage of major health risks in the imported and manufactured food sector that are addressed through the annual update to food safety inspection programs 95%
Percentage of inspected IMF products with accurate net quantity, composition, labelling and advertising 70%

2.1.1.2 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

flowchart of Animal Health and Zoonotics Program - description follows

Description for flowchart - Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Program Expected Results GoC Outcome Areas
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized
  • Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated
  • Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases
  • Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to
Strong Economic Growth

A Clean and Healthy Environment

Key Risk Areas

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships
Program Description

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, mitigating and managing risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instils confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Planning Highlights

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program will continue its core activities in support of animal disease prevention, preparedness, response and recovery. The development and delivery of these core activities will be based on effective relationships with stakeholders and partners. The CFIA will continue to follow a collaborative approach with stakeholders by sharing best practices, information, and expertise in support of a strong and healthy farmed animal industry. These core activities will support market access for the export of animals and animal products by demonstrating adequate control of, or freedom from, regulated diseases.

The CFIA will be developing a performance measurement framework to support the Animal Health Program Framework with the long-term goal of improving the delivery of the Animal Health Program. Additionally, the CFIA is committed to developing five-year strategic plans for each of the three Animal Health Divisions to improve accountability and better support decision-making within the animal health sector.

Did You Know

Approximately 50% of the overall complete feed equivalent volume required to feed all livestock and poultry in Canada is manufactured in on-farm mixing establishments.

Programs

The CFIA will work with other federal departments, provinces, territories, and the private sector to determine appropriate levels of regulation for certain animal diseases. For example, the Agency has initiated a study to develop objective criteria to categorize animal diseases, which will be used to develop an updated animal health system with clearly defined roles and responsibilities among federal and provincial governments, and the private sector. This will help determine which disease prevention and response activities are appropriately led by the federal government, the provincial and territorial governments and the private sector. Animal Health is also implementing an Alternative Service Delivery (ASD) program to identify additional opportunities to achieve greater efficiency between the CFIA and the private sector. The objective of this program is to build a shared responsibility model for effectively managing risk with industry.

In 2013–14 the CFIA, in conjunction with the United States Department of Agriculture, industry, and state and provincial governments, will develop a common guidance framework for the recognition of zoning decisions in the event of a highly contagious Foreign Animal Disease (FAD) outbreak. This guidance framework will apply to both Canada and the United States to allow both countries to be collectively protected from disease while permitting the continuation of bilateral trade between zones which remain from disease-free.

With respect to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base, the CFIA will implement the new Import Program for Aquatics. Additionally, the CFIA is implementing a new Domestic Movement Control program for aquatic animals as well as Information Management projects to further support the aquatics program. These initiatives will ensure that the Canadian aquatic animal sector is compliant with regulations, that inspection staff are well positioned to deliver services, and that risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base are mitigated.

To support and maintain a modernized and efficient animal health surveillance system, the CFIA will update its animal health surveillance plan using an internationally recognized approach to prioritization. Once fully implemented, the plan will assist in maintaining accurate intelligence on the movement and emergence of animal disease threats to the Canadian herd. This work is part of an ongoing effort to build the national surveillance capacity for ongoing, rapid responses to emerging animal health issues.

In an ongoing effort to strengthen its program delivery, the Animal Health Program will continue to update its manuals of procedure manuals, hazard specific plans, guidance documents for industry, and other communications. These updates will facilitate effective preparedness to prevent, control and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases.

Modernization

The ability to trace pathogens that move among wildlife, domestic animals, and humans is critical to the CFIA's ability to anticipate, prevent, track, respond to, and recover from zoonotic outbreaks. Traceability systems allow organizations to track an animal or plant from one point in the supply chain to another. The CFIA will continue the development of a robust traceability system by building strong information management and information technology systems. This work includes the development of a traceability data integrity framework to help ensure that data used by the system is accurate and complete. Enhancements further enabling authorities with respect to traceability were included in the Health of Animals Act at the same time as the Safe Food for Canadians Act was enacted. Finally, in support of the development of a single-window traceability tool, the CFIA will continue to work with its provincial partners and industry to sign traceability data sharing agreements.

As per the findings of the 2012 internal evaluation of the Agency's Enhanced Feed Ban Program, the CFIA, in consultation with stakeholders, will develop a Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) roadmap as a communication tool to explain its approach to long-term BSE management planning. Any adjustments conveyed in the roadmap will be science- and outcome-based. As part of the CFIA's regulatory modernization initiative, in 2013–14 the Agency will consult with regulated parties, interest groups, trading partners and other stakeholders on an updated regulatory framework proposal for livestock feed. Additionally, as part of this project, the Agency will consult with stakeholders to update user fees associated with the livestock feed program. In 2013–14 the CFIA will also strengthen planning for the allocation of enhanced Feed Ban resources (both human and financial) within the current governance process by adjusting the frequency of the program inspection based on risk.

Table 2-2: Planning Summary – Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Financial Resources ($ Millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
131.6132.089.289.1
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTE)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
1,128804804

Planned Spending for the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program is declining by $42.9 million from 2013–14 to 2015–16. The major items contributing to this decrease are:

  • The Budget 2012 Strategic Operating Review, which includes a more effective response to animal diseases such as moving from eradication to management (for example, Chronic Wasting Disease) in consultation with industry and provinces.
  • The sunsetting of a portion of the resources for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE); the CFIA plans to seek renewal of these sunsetting resources.

Discrepancies identified in the 2011–12 Departmental Performance Report regarding the alignment of authorities and FTEs by Program as a result of the renewal of the Program Alignment Architecture in 2011–12, have now been addressed.

Program – 1.2 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0
Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease 100%
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements 99%
Canada's status on the OIE disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk" Status maintained
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease 100%
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed All necessary manual updates are completed
Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises conducted versus planned 9
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion 100%
Percentage of cases where CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease 100%
Additional information:

BSE Enhanced Surveillance Program

Animal Diseases

Aquatic Animal Health Export Program

Livestock Traceability

Sub-Program – 1.2.1 Terrestrial Animal Health
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally registered veterinary biologics establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered veterinary biologics establishments in compliance with federal regulations 90%
Veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations Percentage of tested veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations 100%
Animals in Canada are transported humanely Percentage of inspected live loads in compliance with humane transport standards 100%
Sub-Program – 1.2.2 Aquatic Animal Health
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Domestic aquatic animals and their products are compliant with Canadian regulations and meet the standards of international agreements Percentage of certified aquatic animal and aquatic animal product shipments that meet the receiving country's import requirements 99%
Risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base are mitigated Number of reportable aquatic animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0
Sub-Program – 1.2.3 Feed
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Feed establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed establishments in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, not including labelling tasks 95%
Feed labels meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed facilities in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, when assessed against inspection tasks associated with labelling 95%

2.1.1.3 Plant Resources Program

flowchart - Food Safety Program - description follows

Description for Flowchart – Plant Resources Program
Program Expected Results GoC Outcome Areas
Plant Resources Program
  • Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated
  • Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through tine issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders)
  • Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained
Strong Economic Growth

A Clean and Healthy Environment

Key Risk Areas

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships
Program Description

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instils confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Planning Highlights

Prevention is the most effective way for the CFIA to protect the plant resource base. However, should a pest be introduced into Canada, the Agency's goal is to reduce its impact. Work under the Agency's Plant Health Resources Program includes pre-market assessments, import and safety inspections, ensuring compliance with plant program policies, processing of inspection samples, and scientific research to enhance detection across all commodities and inspection methodologies. These activities are also important for market access support.

Did You Know

In Canada, estimates of annual agricultural sector crop loss and control costs due to weeds are in excess of $2 billion. Preventing weed introduction protects agricultural and environmental sustainability and also has direct impact on maintaining market access and the successful export of Canadian products.

Modernization

The CFIA will continue to strengthen and modernize its programs by clarifying policies, updating manuals and pursing advanced risk mitigation, as well as incorporating new scientific information. As part of this work, the CFIA will be taking a risk-based approach to its prevention activities with the goal of increasing program effectiveness, efficiency and adaptability.

In keeping with its commitments under Budget 2012, the CFIA will continue to work in partnership with federal, provincial and private sector stakeholders to address plant health emergencies, to investigate alternative service delivery approaches (such as the Seed Potato Quality Management program and the Authorized Seed Crop Inspection program), to review de-regulation processes, and to work to align regulations with the United States. The CFIA will maintain regulatory responsibilities and provide strong oversight of alternative service delivery providers through recognition processes such as licensing or registration and the regular monitoring and auditing of the service delivery providers.

In addition, the CFIA will focus its efforts on product safety and on streamlining pre-market assessments to facilitate and expedite access of Canadian producers to safe and innovative agricultural inputs.

As part of the CFIA's overarching regulatory modernization strategy, the Plant Resources Program will be focusing on holding national consultations on Plant Breeder's Rights (PBR) involving farmers, horticulturalists, orchardists, seed companies, and provincial ministries of agriculture.

Programs

In 2013–14, the CFIA will continue to deliver the Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program (PPMMP). The Plum Pox Virus (PPV) is a plant disease that drastically reduces yields of stone fruit. Specifically, surveys and monitoring activities will continue with the additional goal of creating a baseline of genetic data to help identify new introductions of the PPV in contrast to the existing strains of PPV.

Under the Growing Forward initiative, the Agency will implement the Biosecurity Standards for Potato and Grains & Oilseeds. In addition, work will continue on the review and adoption of biosecurity principles, practices, and standards. This will lead to a policy on an overarching biosecurity approach for plant.

International Support

Plant and plant product imports and exports are an important part of the Canadian economy and actively support – and are dependent upon – a strong Canadian plant resource base. As such, the CFIA will actively participate in the work of the joint US-Canada Beyond the Borders (BTB) and Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) initiatives focusing on plant related issues such as:

  • risks associated with Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) in Asia and Russia;
  • wood Packaging Materials from 3rd world countries and in-transit feasibility studies;
  • harmonized North America approach to Chrysanthemum White Rust (CWR);
  • greenhouse certification systems (including MOU renewal).
Table 2-3: Planning Summary – Plant Resources Program
Financial Resources ($ Millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
84.384.774.474.1
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTE)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
856765762

Planned Spending for the Plant Health Program is declining by $10.6 million from 2013–14 to 2015–16. The major items contributing to this decrease is the Budget 2012 Strategic Operating Review, which includes shifting from eradication to management of certain plant pests such as the Emerald Ash Borer, as well as transferring non-safety activities to other fully qualified organizations to make more effective use of CFIA resources. This includes vehicle washing activities at ferry terminals in Newfoundland.

Discrepancies identified in the 2011–12 Departmental Performance Report regarding the alignment of authorities and FTEs by Program as a result of the renewal of the Program Alignment Architecture in 2011–12, have now been addressed.

Program – 1.3 Plant Resources Program
Program - Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves 0
Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements 90%
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issued 100%
Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner. 90%
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirements 99%
Additional information:

December 2008 OAG report on "Managing Risks to Canada's Plant Resources"

Sub-Program – 1.3.1 Plant Protection
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Pre-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of inspected shipments from off-shore system approaches or pre-clearance programs in compliance with federal regulations 85%
At-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of pre-arrival documentation in compliance with Canadian import requirements 90%
Post-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of new pest detections that have a science based management plan initiated within one year 90%
Sub-Program – 1.3.2 Seed
Sub-program
Expected Results
Performance Indicators Targets
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic pedigreed seed lots in compliance with federal regulations 95%
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of authorized confined releases of Plants with Novel Traits (PNTs) into the Canadian environment that are in compliance with the authorized conditions 90%
Sub-Program – 1.3.3 Fertilizer
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected fertilizer and supplement products in compliance with federal regulations (Fertilizers Regulations) 90%
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of submissions reviewed within the prescribed service delivery standards 90%
Sub-Program – 1.3.4 Intellectual Property Rights
Sub-program Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Plant breeders develop new varieties for the Canadian market Percentage of Plant Breeders' Rights applications that reach approval and are granted rights 100%

2.1.1.4 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

flowchart - Food Safety Program - description follows

Description for Flowchart – International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Program Expected Results GoC Outcome Areas
  • Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE and IPPC
  • International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants and their products
  • International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with theCFIA's mandate
A Fair and Secure Marketplace

A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce

Key Risk Areas

  • Scientific Capacity
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships
Program Description

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through actively participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.

Based on market demand, the CFIA will also continue to negotiate and certify against export conditions in order to access export markets. The Agency, working with industry and interested stakeholders, will continue to develop and maintain export certification standards (which vary from country to country and commodity to commodity), conduct inspections and issue export certificates.

Planning Highlights

As an active player in the international arena, Canada stays abreast of current activities and approaches taken by foreign countries and aims to enhance partnerships with foreign regulators to build global approaches. In partnership with other countries' regulatory agencies, the CFIA utilizes a variety of engagement strategies to strengthen capacity in the international regulatory framework, increase awareness of regulatory systems within the broader economic development context, and promote information sharing.

In 2013–14 the CFIA will continue to engage international partners in the development and maintenance of bilateral regulatory cooperation. This engagement will support efforts to help identify best practices in food safety, animal, and plant health regulatory approaches, including those targeted at managing the risks associated with imports into Canada, advance resolution of potential issues that may occur and promoting of science-based approaches. This includes work by the Canada-European Union (EU) Veterinary Joint Management Committee (Vet JMC) where regulatory equivalency for red meat traded between Canada and the EU is determined, and Canadian recognition of EU Member States' meat inspection systems is advanced. This engagement also includes continued work with Chinese regulators to address food safety issues of mutual interest under a joint working group. In addition, successful outreach by the CFIA with the Indian Export Inspection Council has created an opportunity to pursue a food safety arrangement in 2013.

The US has been the primary and immediate focus of Canada's international regulatory cooperation efforts. Strengthening regulatory cooperation through the establishment of permanent alignment mechanisms with the US remains a priority for Canada. As a result, the CFIA will continue to implement the initiatives introduced on February 4, 2011 by the Prime Minister of Canada and the President of the United States as part of the Beyond the Border Initiative and Regulatory Cooperation Council. They include, for example:

  • development of common approaches to food safety;
  • meat cut nomenclature;
  • zoning for foreign animal diseases;
  • perimeter approach to plant protection; and
  • creation of mutual reliance on jointly acceptable food safety laboratory recognition criteria, test results, and methodologies.

The North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO) has been instrumental in developing regional phytosanitary standards that facilitate the trade of plants and plant products within North America. The NAPPO Executive Committee (EC) is embarking on a review of NAPPO processes and objectives, with the aim of ensuring that they continue to serve the needs and priorities of the governments of the three NAPPO member countries (Canada, Mexico and the United States). Through an active role on the NAPPO EC and in the special working group that will undertake this project, the CFIA will be a key player in this review, which will start in early 2013 and which will result in the development of an updated NAPPO strategic plan.

In an increasingly competitive and integrated world economy, Canada must effectively influence the development and implementation of coherent and predictable international rules. Participation in international organizations allows Canada to influence the development of rules and standards, play a leadership role, advance our regulatory practices and systems, and encourage the overall adoption of science-based regulation and regulatory best practices on an international level. Continued leadership at the World Trade Organization Sanitary and Phytosanitary (WTO SPS) Committee, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) and, partnership with Health Canada at Codex Alimentarius permits the CFIA to shape global rules surounding products movement. Current and future growth and prosperity depend on open world markets and a stable, predictable and transparent trading environment.

Finally, as part of the Global Commerce Strategy and as announced in Budget 2012, the Government of Canada has committed to pursuing an ambitious regional and bilateral free trade agreement agenda to identify new opportunities for Canadian businesses in world markets. As part of this approach, the CFIA, along with the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT), will continue to provide technical sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) expertise to co-lead or engage in the negotiation of the SPS component of free trade agreements as well as other areas related to the CFIA's mandate (i.e. technical barriers to trade, regulatory cooperation, environment, and intellectual property). These efforts include but are not limited to the current free trade agreements being negotiated with the EU, Japan, India, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, South Korea, Morocco, and Ukraine. Additionally, Canada is exploring ways to enhance its trade ties with China.

Did You Know

Canadian exports of pork and pork products to China rose from $58.8 million in 2010 to $201.8 million in 2011.

Table 2-4: Planning Summary – International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Financial Resources ($ Millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
31.731.725.625.6
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTE)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
338299299

Planned Spending for the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements is declining by $6.1 million from 2013–14 to 2015–16. The major items contributing to this decrease are:

  • The Budget 2012 Strategic Operating Review which includes administrative efficiencies in the areas of management and administration, based largely in Ottawa;
  • The sunsetting of resources for the Pork Industry Recovery and Expansion Strategy; the CFIA plans to seek renewal of these sunsetting resources.

Discrepancies identified in the 2011–12 Departmental Performance Report regarding the alignment of authorities and FTEs by Program as a result of the renewal of the Program Alignment Architecture in 2011–12, have now been addressed.

Program – 1.4 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Program - Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests. 10/Year
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products Number of unjustified non-tariff barriers resolved 10/Year
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA-led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 5/Year
Number of CFIA led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments 10/Year
Additional information:

AAFC's Market Access Secretariat (MAS)

2.1.1.5 Internal Services

Program Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Planning Highlights
Stewardship

As a means of ensuring project success and reducing project risk, the CFIA is committed to implementing an Agency-wide approach to project management for all CFIA projects. During the 2013–14 fiscal year, the CFIA will continue to implement its four-year project management improvement agenda, with particular attention paid to the implementation of the project management policy framework and project management enhancement across the Agency. This will be achieved by continued project management training, direct coaching, and mentoring of CFIA project staff by seasoned project management officers.

The Agency has developed a medium-term strategic plan (IM/IT Campaign Plan) to guide IM/IT activities. Another key initiative within this plan is information management. The objective of this initiative is to better enable active management of the Agency's information holdings in order to fulfill the growing need for timely, consistent, accessible, and trusted information, and to ensure foundational systems are in place to support the Agency's modernization efforts

All organizations at both the federal and provincial level, in Canada as well as other countries are increasingly looking at shared service models to maximize efficiency, reduce cost and eliminate duplication. The CFIA and Agriculture and Agri-food Canada (AAFC) share national headquarter facilities and will share support services in the areas of IM/IT, facilities management, security, parliamentary affairs, ministerial correspondence, and some human resources activities. For example, collaboration with AAFC has always been a priority for the Agency's IM/IT domain as they have been a service provider for several large enterprise applications within the Agency. Recently, the Client Services Centres of both organizations have merged into one consolidated group which leverages resources and provides better service to clients of both the CFIA and AAFC. In 2013–14, collaboration the sharing of services will continue as additional IM/IT functions will be consolidated. The CFIA and AAFC will continue to implement these new shared service models and continue to explore areas where shared services could benefit both organizations.

CFIA procures goods, services, and construction services in support of the Agency's mandate. This involves among other things, purchasing vehicles for the transportation of samples to laboratories, securing protective clothing for staff involved in quarantine situations, performing infrastructure maintenance on custodial laboratories and providing test kits used by our scientific community (e.g. Listeria, BSE, scrapie, etc.). As a result in 2013–14 the CFIA will enhance our strategic procurement planning by linking procurement planning to project and program planning on an Agency-wide basis.

Additionally, in order to effectively manage the CFIA's custodial facilities and non-custodial accommodations portfolios the CFIA will develop and implement a Real Property Management Framework that supports timely, informed real property management decisions and the strategic outcome of programs. By articulating accountability and decision-making structure, roles and responsibilities, and policies and practices, this framework will provide the blueprint for how CFIA senior executives, managers and employees view, approach, and apply the management of the Agency's significant, custodial and non-custodial real property holdings.

Risk Management

Under the Emergency Management Act, all government departments and agencies are mandated to develop, test, and maintain mandate-specific emergency management plans and identify risks within or related to their area of responsibility. In 2013–14, as part of the Agency's commitment to develop the Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP), the CFIA will conduct a risk assessment in an effort to balance and prioritize investments and actions and identify interdependencies across the Agency. From these identified risk elements the CFIA will develop mitigation strategies to help strengthen the National Security Program.

People

In 2013–14 the CFIA will continue to promote values and ethics which enables continued public trust in our ability to deliver our mandate. More specifically we will review and update the CFIA's Conflict of Interest (COI) program which includes certification documents and forms, the establishment of standard operating procedures, and the updating of the Conflict of Interest and Post-Employment Code.

The implementation of a new Staffing Framework and Service Delivery Model will leverage HR staffing expertise to improve staffing time and diminish overall costs while ensuring the quality of hiring and creating a bias-free selection process. The new framework and model will innovate staffing through the use of technology, assessment tools and the automation of staffing processes. Staffing service standards will also be implemented, and regular evaluation of staffing compliance and quality will be monitored.

The Agency will be introducing a multi-channel HR contact centre (i.e. telephone, e-mail, mail), that will streamline service delivery for managers and employees to increase efficiency and effectiveness. The Centre's service mandate will be based on five pillars of service:

  • transactional processing and access to qualified candidates;
  • general HR enquiries;
  • intranet navigation guidance;
  • life events advice and counselling; and
  • advisory services from subject matter experts.
Citizen-Focused Service

Transparent and open communications are becoming an increasingly significant expectation for organizations, including modern regulators like the CFIA. The Agency is committed to providing the public with useful and timely information about the work we do and how we do it. We will continue to improve transparency by making more information widely available to our stakeholders and the public via our website, the Consumer Association Roundtable and social media. The CFIA will also produce an annual report that will highlight the important work undertaken by the CFIA and how that work affects the lives of Canadians.

Moreover, for 2013–14 the CFIA will continue to expand the release of information with a number of projects aimed at consumers and other stakeholders, such as:

  • posting targeted food safety survey results as part of the Food Safety Action Plan (FSAP);
  • expanding compliance and enforcement data posted on our website; and
  • reporting on consumer complaints.

In support of the Agency's commitment to improved service delivery for stakeholders, the Complaints and Appeals Office (created in April 2012), will conduct an analysis of data collected during 2012–13 to identify trends and systemic issues that could present opportunities for improvement.

Additionally, the CFIA will continue to work towards completing a series of Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Modernization improvements by developing and implementing a Privacy Policy Framework. Although work began in 2012–13, with respect to this initiative, the new Policy will be finalized and communicated to CFIA staff through information sessions in 2013–14.

Table 2-5: Planning Summary – Internal Services
Financial Resources ($ Millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
128.1 130.3 116.9 116.6
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTE)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
898770745

Planned Spending for Internal Services is declining by $13.7 million from 2013–14 to 2015–16. The major items contributing to this decrease are:

  • The Budget 2012 Strategic Operating Review which includes: administrative efficiencies in the areas of management and administration, based largely in Ottawa;
  • Sharing services between CFIA and AAFC including the consolidation of physical locations to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, consistency and quality of service delivery; and
  • The transfer of resources to Public Works and Government Services Canada for Consolidation of Pay Services Project.

Discrepancies identified in the 2011–12 Departmental Performance Report regarding the alignment of authorities and FTEs by Program as a result of the renewal of the Program Alignment Architecture in 2011–12, have now been addressed.

Additional information:

CFIA Renewal Plan

CFIA Management Accountability Framework assessment

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