2013-2014 Departmental Performance Report

PDF (1275 kb)

The original version was signed by

The Honourable Rona Ambrose, PC, MP
Minister of Health

For the period ending March 31, 2014

Foreword

Departmental Performance Reports are part of the Estimates family of documents. Estimates documents support appropriation acts, which specify the amounts and broad purposes for which funds can be spent by the government. The Estimates document family has three parts.

Part I (Government Expenditure Plan) provides an overview of federal spending.

Part II (Main Estimates) lists the financial resources required by individual departments, agencies and Crown corporations for the upcoming fiscal year.

Part III (Departmental Expenditure Plans) consists of two documents. Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) are expenditure plans for each appropriated department and agency (excluding Crown corporations). They describe departmental priorities, strategic outcomes, programs, expected results and associated resource requirements, covering a three-year period beginning with the year indicated in the title of the report. Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) are individual department and agency accounts of actual performance, for the most recently completed fiscal year, against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in their respective RPPs. DPRs inform parliamentarians and Canadians of the results achieved by government organizations for Canadians.

Additionally, Supplementary Estimates documents present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or were subsequently refined to account for developments in particular programs and services.

The financial information in DPRs is drawn directly from authorities presented in the Main Estimates and the planned spending information in RPPs. The financial information in DPRs is also consistent with information in the Public Accounts of Canada. The Public Accounts of Canada include the Government of Canada Consolidated Statement of Financial Position, the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Accumulated Deficit, the Consolidated Statement of Change in Net Debt, and the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow, as well as details of financial operations segregated by ministerial portfolio for a given fiscal year. For the DPR, two types of financial information are drawn from the Public Accounts of Canada: authorities available for use by an appropriated organization for the fiscal year, and authorities used for that same fiscal year. The latter corresponds to actual spending as presented in the DPR.

The Treasury Board Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures further strengthens the alignment of the performance information presented in DPRs, other Estimates documents and the Public Accounts of Canada. The policy establishes the Program Alignment Architecture of appropriated organizations as the structure against which financial and non-financial performance information is provided for Estimates and parliamentary reporting. The same reporting structure applies irrespective of whether the organization is reporting in the Main Estimates, the RPP, the DPR or the Public Accounts of Canada.

A number of changes have been made to DPRs for 2013−14 to better support decisions on appropriations. Where applicable, DPRs now provide financial, human resources and performance information in Section II at the lowest level of the organization's Program Alignment Architecture.

In addition, the DPR's format and terminology have been revised to provide greater clarity, consistency and a strengthened emphasis on Estimates and Public Accounts information. As well, departmental reporting on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy has been consolidated into a new supplementary information table posted on departmental websites. This new table brings together all of the components of the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy formerly presented in DPRs and on departmental websites, including reporting on the Greening of Government Operations and Strategic Environmental Assessments. Section III of the report provides a link to the new table on the organization's website. Finally, definitions of terminology are now provided in an appendix.

Minister's Message

Honourable Rona Ambrose PC, MP Minister of Health

The Honourable Rona Ambrose, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Our Government continues to put the health and safety of Canadians first. As the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) 2013-14 Departmental Performance Report clearly shows, Canadian families can continue to have confidence that our food safety system remains one of the very best in the world. It also demonstrates our Government's ongoing commitment to collaboration, clarity and modernization.

Collaboration

Mitigating risks to food safety is the CFIA's highest priority. Safeguarding the health and well-being of Canadians, our environment and economy is the driving force behind the design and development of CFIA programs.

Under the Health Portfolio and the Healthy and Safe Food for Canadians Framework, the CFIA's already strong working relationship with Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada continues to grow – providing a modern, coordinated approach to food safety. The three pillars of this framework are:

  • Promotion;
  • Prevention; and
  • Protection.

In collaboration and partnership with industry, consumers, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, the Agency continues to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases. This was successfully demonstrated at the 2014 Healthy and Safe Food Forum in June, where proposed changes to bring the Safe Food for Canadians Act into force were openly discussed with Canadian and international stakeholders.

Clarity

The CFIA, a science-based agency, is committed to transparency and using plain language to better communicate complex information.

Some key examples of this are:

  • Implementing the CFIA Online Labelling Tool in March 2014. The tool provides consumers and industry with user-friendly access to information regarding regulatory requirements for labelling food, such as consumer specific information and education on food labelling;
  • Proactively communicating with the public about food recalls, compliance and enforcement actions and other Agency information through social media (Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn); and
  • Developing advanced food recall warnings, infographics and online interactive tools that make both recalls and the recall process easier to understand.

Modernization

The CFIA continues to pursue its agenda of transformation and modernization by:

  • Continuing work and active consultations on modernizing new regulations for the Safe Food for Canadians Act since its passage in November 2012; and
  • Introducing the proposed Agricultural Growth Act in December 2013, providing for changes to strengthen the safety of agricultural products – the first link in the food chain.

The Honourable Rona Ambrose, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

1.1 Organizational Profile

Minister: The Honourable Rona Ambrose, PC, MP

Deputy Head: Bruce Archibald

Ministerial portfolio: Health

Year established: 1997

Main legislative authorities:

CFIA Wide
Food Safety
Plant
Animal Health

1.2 Organizational Context

1.2.1 Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canada's largest science-based regulatory agency. It has approximately 6,925 Footnote 1 employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal, and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy.

The CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services in order to:

  • prevent and manage food safety risks;
  • protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species;
  • prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases;
  • contribute to consumer protection; and
  • contribute to market access for Canada's food, plants, and animals.

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective risk management, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

1.2.2 Responsibilities

The CFIA's Key Federal Partners
  • Health Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Canadian Grain Commission
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada, including Canadian Forest Service
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
  • Environment Canada, including Canadian Wildlife Service

The CFIA is responsible for administrating and enforcing 13 federal statutes and 38 sets of regulations, for regulating the safety and quality of food sold in Canada, and for supporting a sustainable plant and animal resource base. In November 2012, the Safe Food for Canadians Act received Royal Assent. This new legislation, when in force, will also bring into effect new regulations that provide the necessary legal framework for a single, consistent approach to strengthening food inspection in Canada. The Safe Food for Canadians Act consolidates and replaces the Fish Inspection Act, the Canada Agricultural Products Act, the Meat Inspection Act, and the food provisions of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act.

The CFIA shares many of its core responsibilities with other federal departments and agencies, with provincial, territorial and municipal authorities, with private industry, and with other stakeholders. The CFIA works with its partners to implement food safety measures; manage food, animal, and plant risks, incidents and emergencies; and promotes the development of food safety and disease control systems to maintain the safety of Canada's high-quality agriculture, agri-food, aquaculture and fishery products . The CFIA's activities include verifying the compliance of imported products; registering and inspecting establishments; testing food, animals, plants, and their related products; and approving the use of many agricultural inputs.

Additionally, the CFIA actively participates in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies. It also engages in the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements and actively promotes the Canadian science-based regulatory system among foreign trading partners. The CFIA negotiates to resolve scientific and technical issues, contributing to market access for Canadian goods. It also provides scientific advice, develops new technologies, provides testing services, and conducts regulatory research.

At the CFIA, decisions are based on high-quality, timely, relevant science. Science informs policy development and program design and delivery through foresight, advice, risk assessment, the influence of international standards, research and development, and testing.

1.2.3 Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

To effectively fulfill its responsibilities in safeguarding Canada's food and sustaining its animal and plant resource base, the CFIA aims to achieve its strategic outcome Footnote 2 (A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base). The CFIA's Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) illustrates the Agency's plans to allocate and manage its resources to achieve the corresponding expected results. The Agency's priorities are reviewed annually to facilitate effective resource management within the context of the PAA framework. The four priority areas established in 2012–13 are detailed further in Section 1.5 and Section II.

1. Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

  • 1.1 Program: Food Safety Program
    • 1.1.1 Sub Program: Meat and Poultry
    • 1.1.2 Sub Program: Egg
    • 1.1.3 Sub Program: Dairy
    • 1.1.4 Sub Program: Fish and Seafood
    • 1.1.5 Sub Program: Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
    • 1.1.6 Sub Program: Processed Products
    • 1.1.7 Sub Program: Imported and Manufactured Food Products
  • 1.2 Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
    • 1.2.1 Sub Program: Terrestrial Animal Health
    • 1.2.2 Sub Program: Aquatic Animal Health
    • 1.2.3 Sub Program: Feed
  • 1.3 Program: Plant Resources Program
    • 1.3.1 Sub Program: Plant Protection
    • 1.3.2 Sub Program: Seed
    • 1.3.3 Sub Program: Fertilizer
    • 1.3.4 Sub Program: Intellectual Property Rights
  • 1.4 Program: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
  • Internal Services

1.2.4 Organizational Priorities

For the 2013-14 fiscal year, the CFIA focussed on four strategic business priorities. The following table summarizes the Agency's performance with respect to achieving these priorities. Additional details are provided in Section II.

Table A: Organizational Priorities
Priority Type Footnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
An increased focus on prevention which will provide an opportunity to minimize risks to human, animal and ecosystem health Previously committed to Food Safety Program, Animal Health and Zoonotics Program, Plant Resources Program, and International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Summary of Progress

The CFIA has been integrating proactive and preventive risk management approaches into its programs, including focusing on partnerships and information sharing, all of which help the CFIA to anticipate, prevent, prepare, and manage issues, including emergencies. In 2013-14, the CFIA:

  • continued modernizing its legislative and regulatory frameworks in preparation for the coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Act (SFCA) and in anticipation of the passage of Bill C-18, the Agricultural Growth Act;
  • made progress towards the development and validation of a Risk Assessment (RA) Model for food commodities. Stakeholders outreach was undertaken. Once fully implemented, the RA Model will provide a standard consistent approach to oversight activities across all commodities.
  • hosted the Food Safety Regulatory Forum on June 4, 2013, which formally launched a number of consultations on key food safety and consumer protection initiatives, including the proposed regulatory framework;
  • enhanced controls in federally registered establishments so that meat products continue to be in compliance with federal regulations, and risks associated with E.coli 0157:H7 are mitigated;
  • as part of its Feeds Regulatory Renewal initiative, conducted consultations with key stakeholders to increase the safety of animal feeds and prevent the transmission of diseases into the food chain;
  • provided educational material for domestic invasive plant surveys and early detection;
  • signed a zoning agreement with the United States (US) which provides a mechanism to mitigate the impact of a disease outbreak and could facilitate earlier resumption of trade from disease-free zones;
  • under the leadership of the Chief Veterinary Officer (CVO) of Canada, collaborated and regularly engaged with federal, provincial, and industry stakeholders to facilitate a co-ordinated approach to Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea (PED) both before and after its introduction into Canada, to mitigate the impact of this disease. As an example, the CVO facilitated a PED forum which served as a platform for the stakeholder community to engage in dialogue on the US and Canadian experience with this disease;
  • developed the Integrated Food Inspection Model to improve food inspection and implement a single risk-based inspection approach across all commodities, including the development of standardized and more efficient business processes across the Agency;
  • coordinated, in concert with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), assessments of countries regulated for a particularly destructive invasive species, the Asian Gypsy Moth and worked in partnership with the U.S. to manage the risks from this pest at the countries of origin; and
  • worked in the International Plant Protection Convention and with trading partners to enhance implementation of international standards for phytosanitary measures that will restrict the movement of plant pests, and to develop new standards that will be effective in this objective.
Table B: Organizational Priorities
Priority Type Footnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
The CFIA's role as an effective regulator will be enhanced by a focus on service excellence Previously committed to Food Safety Program, Animal Health and Zoonotics Program, Plant Resources Program, and International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Summary of Progress

Strengthening the citizen-centred service delivery culture will enhance program delivery and the confidence of domestic and international stakeholders in the CFIA as a trusted and credible regulator. The CFIA:

  • engaged stakeholders to develop recommendations for a more modern and innovative food labelling system;
  • developed the Centre of Administration (CoA) model, which was launched on April 1, 2014, to centralize and consolidate the administration of domestic and import-related permissions (licences, permits and registrations);
  • continued the development of service standards in conjunction with the User Fee Review of all authorizations with fee-based services, as part of the Agency's Regulatory Modernization initiative;
  • completed the Agency's Guidance Document initiative, which ensures that the CFIA's official regulatory Guidance documents used by inspectors and industries are available in a central website location;
  • reached a mutually acceptable agreement on facilitating pet food trade with China. As a result, Canadian pet food plants can now export their products to China, thus expanding market access opportunities;
  • continued to work with industry to develop biosecurity standards for the plant and animal sectors and upgraded Codes of Practice with respect to animal welfare;
  • using information gathered from the Complaints and Appeals Office, identified opportunities for service improvement; and
  • continued to expand the release of information on its website for consumers and stakeholders.
Table C: Organizational Priorities
Priority Type Footnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Adapt and evolve to meet new demands and expectations with a focus on internal performance excellence Previously committed to All Programs
Summary of Progress

Optimizing performance will enable the CFIA to evaluate the effectiveness of the Agency's policies and programs and to allocate resources to areas of highest risk. In 2013-14, the CFIA:

  • developed and implemented a Real Property Management Framework in an effort to define and align accountabilities for the management of real property;
  • enhanced strategic procurement planning by linking procurement planning to projects and programs on an Agency-wide basis;
  • developed internal reporting tools to enable discussion and action to highlight potential issues; and
  • provided training under modernized inspection framework.
Table D: Organizational Priorities
Priority Type Footnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Focussing on people who are supported by training and tools Previously committed to All Programs
Summary of Progress

Focussing on diverse talent, supported by training and modern tools, will result in a stable and skilled CFIA workforce and adaptable and satisfied employees. In 2013-14, the CFIA:

  • implemented the new Staffing Framework and Service Delivery Model;
  • introduced a multi-channel HR contact centre (i.e. telephone, e-mail, mail), that has streamlined service delivery for managers and employees so as to increase efficiency and effectiveness; and
  • launched the Supervisors' School to provide new supervisors with people management and HR skills to successfully lead their employees in the new Agency culture. The school was piloted in 2013-14 with 7 sessions held- 6 English and 1 French- resulting in 125 supervisors receiving the training.

1.2.5 Risk Analysis

The CFIA is responsible for identifying and managing risks to the food supply and the plant and animal resource base, on which safe food and a prosperous economy depends. As such, integrated risk management is an integral part of policy, priority setting, planning, resourcing, delivery, review and reporting activities.

The vast majority of risks that fall within the Agency's mandate are managed in concert with numerous domestic and international partners and stakeholders. Factors influencing key strategic risks faced by the Agency include (but are not limited to):

  • the emergence of new pathogens due to increases in international travel and trade, microbial adaptation, changes in production methods and distribution as well as human demographics and behaviour;
  • a greater understanding of the convergence of human, animal and ecosystem health issues;
  • the emergence of global supply chains, which have fundamentally changed the way agricultural products are produced, processed, packaged, distributed and sold;
  • an increase in the volume and variety of goods coming into Canada;
  • increased export opportunities for Canadian producers, coupled with changing international standards and more stringent requirements;
  • rapid advances in processing and manufacturing technologies, which require legislative and regulatory frameworks to adapt quickly in order to keep pace;
  • an increasingly knowledgeable, demanding and risk-averse consumer and stakeholder base; and
  • a growing international consensus around the need for common scientific standards and approaches to support industry oversight and the global agri-food trade.

A cornerstone of the CFIA's risk management is the Agency-wide Corporate Risk Profile (CRP). The 2013 CRP presents risk statements and strategies to reduce risks to levels the Agency deems tolerable. The results of the corporate risk profiling process have directly informed the priorities presented in Section 1.5 and the strategies presented throughout this DPR.

Table 1 highlights the CFIA's key strategic risks, planned responses, and notes what was done in 2013-14 to minimize risks. The risks outlined below were identified in the 2013-14 RPP. Given that the Agency's key corporate risks are currently unchanged, and that response strategies are relatively long-term in nature, the risk responses were not significantly modified from the previous report. All corporate risks link to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Table 1: Risk Summary
Risk Risk Response Strategy Footnote 4 Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Management Information and IM/IT Infrastructure:

Potential Threat:
The ability to make risk-based decisions due to the lack of timely, accurate and useful data and information.

The Agency's diverse information requirements and national presence has resulted in an IM/IT infrastructure that contains a complex mix of new and old equipment supporting multiple IM/IT systems and databases. Differences in how information is collected, analyzed and used across multiple systems and hardware may impede information sharing and timely operational and regulatory decision making.

IM/IT Campaign Plan

  • Developed a policy for documenting IM decisions and actions, IT Security Standards and Guidelines and a modernized Business Application Plan.
  • Began designing the new Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP) to support the Agency's modernized inspection regime and enhance risk-based decision making.

Business Information Management Centre (BIMC)

  • Developed and implemented a quarterly performance and monitoring dashboard that better highlights frontline operation areas requiring senior management attention.
  • Implemented an information management governance model.

Strengthen Planning, Reporting and Performance Monitoring

  • Renewed the planning process framework by incorporating lessons learned, emerging realities, and timely risk assessments.
  • Implemented a standardized semi-annual reporting framework to enable monitoring progress against Agency priorities and serves to complement quarterly operational dashboard reporting for senior management.

Knowledge Workspace Program

  • Delivered the Knowledge Workspace Program to upgrade desktop computers.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Inspection Effectiveness:

Potential Threat:
The ability to have appropriate inspection effectiveness to expeditiously prevent, detect and respond to threats to food safety, animals and plants.

The Agency delivers 14 independently evolved inspection programs, each having diverse and complex requirements for training, information collection and industry compliance based on the commodity being regulated. Currently, the Agency's resource efficiency is impacted due to the maintenance of multiple training programs and IM/IT systems used to address distinct variations in inspection processes, tools, and information collection.

Legislative Renewal

  • Began drafting new food inspection regulations with respect to licensing, trade, traceability, preventive control plans, and food safety requirements, in preparation for the coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Act.
  • Developed Food Program Framework policy suite and new guidance documents that facilitate compliance and will help implementation of the new proposed food inspection regulations
  • Proposed Agricultural Growth Act, Bill C-18, tabled in December 2013. Bill proposes to enhance suite of statutes regulating the agricultural sector.

Inspection Modernization initiative

  • Developed a Compliance Promotion Strategy to increase awareness, improve understanding and foster continuous improvement of inspection.
  • Implemented a revised inspection model.

Food Program Framework and redesign

  • Began developing a risk assessment model in support of the five-year $100 million food inspection modernisation plan under Economic Action Plan 2011.
  • Finalized an improved inspection model, the integrated Agency Inspection Model (iAIM), permitting a more consistent and risk-based approach to program delivery.
  • In support of its inspection modernization model, and in response to the recommendations of the independent review of the XL Foods recall, implemented Inspection Verification Teams to oversee the performance of Canada's food safety system.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Scientific Capability:

Potential Threat:
The ability to have the scientific capability to adapt and respond in a timely manner.

Advancements in science and technology have increased the complexity of the commodities the Agency regulates. Additionally, there is growing international consensus around the need for common scientific equipment and approaches to support industry oversight and the global agri-food trade. The Agency is expected to maintain an employee base and modern laboratory facilities that reflects these advancements in regulated products and international requirements.

Laboratory Infrastructure Strategy

  • Awarded engineering and design contacts, and procured modern food safety laboratory equipment for the St-Hyacinthe and Toronto laboratory.

Human Resources Modernization

  • Implemented the new Staffing Framework and Service Delivery Model.

Enhance Laboratory Response Capacity

  • Hired highly skilled scientists for targeted laboratories.
  • Started the development of a genomics training program and method development work plan.

Enhance Surveillance and Foresight

  • Collaborated with Health Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, and other levels of government to develop a strategy for a national food safety information network that will contribute to the anticipation, detections, and response to foodborne illnesses.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework:

Potential Threat:
The ability of the current legislative, regulatory and program framework to support the effective delivery of the Agency's mandate.

Rapid advances in processing and manufacturing technologies have resulted in significant increases in production speed, volume and diversity, requiring the subsequent need for updated legislative and regulatory frameworks. Statutes and authorities impact the design and delivery of programs that regulate new commodities and support economic competitiveness within the industry.

Legislative Renewal

  • Safe Food for Canadians Act was passed
  • Tabled the Proposed Agricultural Growth Act.

Multi-Year Regulatory Plan

  • Renewed Seed, Fertilizer and Feed regulations
  • 13 sets of food regulations being replaced with a single set of food inspection regulations and a single food program with supporting guidance documents.
  • Plant Breeders' Rights being modernized for better protection of and benefits to breeders.

Food Safety Program Frameworks and redesign:

  • Developed and piloted a more structured approach to analyzing risks and hazards to help determine the frequency, intensity and type of oversight required.
  • Began implementing a multi-year project of establishing 16 centres of expertise (CoE) across Canada. Each CoE will offer greater consistency in program interpretation and delivery to front-line inspectors of the CFIA, as well as regulated parties, while at the same time consolidating program and administrative expertise in order to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, and quality of service delivery. Much of the effort in this area for 2013-14 was spent in building the infrastructure in support of CoEs.

User Fee / Service Standard Modernization

  • Continued the review of User Fees associated with four major programs – Health of Animals, Fish and Seafood, Meat Inspection (Livestock and Poultry Grading) and Plant Protection.

E-business and e-certification

  • Continued modernizing frameworks and tools including an electronic interface which has enhanced the facilitation of trade.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Managing Change:

Potential Threat:
The ability to effectively manage change on an ongoing basis.

The global evolution of economic, social and environmental factors influences the regulatory and business environment within which the Agency operates. Consequently, fiscal restraint is growing in importance, as is the subsequent need for greater innovation to achieve efficiency while maintaining or increasing effectiveness in the way the Agency does its business and delivers its mandate.

One way we are managing this risk is the creation of the Agency Transformation Office (ATO) and governance structure with:

  • A dedicated project management capacity;
  • A streamlined governance; and
  • Common systems

Human Resources Modernization Strategy

  • Continued modernizing people management with a new staffing framework that places emphasis on talent management, which will impact training, recruitment and retention process.

Reinforce Values and Ethics Ethical Risk Profiles (ERP)

  • Developed comprehensive ERPs for each Branch which included detailed risk treatment plans.

Strengthen Planning, Reporting and Performance Monitoring

  • The CFIA continued to implement an enhanced business and operational planning, monitoring and reporting system that is based on the provision of clear science and risk-based functional direction process. This process has contributed to the effective and efficient use of inspection resources, has improved overall information sharing between branches and increased alignment of program design to operational delivery capacity across programs.
  • Renewed the planning process framework to reflect lessons learned, emerging realities and incorporate timely risk assessments.
  • Implemented a standardized semi-annual reporting framework to enable monitoring progress against Agency priorities and serves to complement quarterly operational dashboard reporting for senior management.

Enhance Project Management

  • Implemented phase 3 of the four-year Project Management Improvement Agenda Project (PMIAP), which focuses on maturing project management through the Enterprise Project Management Framework (ePMF).

Enhance Internal and Public Engagement

  • Implemented clearer communication and decision-making channels by updating the Terms of Reference (TORs) of the business line committees.
  • Continued public engagement on key Agency initiatives such as consultation on draft regulations for the new Safe Food for Canadians Act through the Agency's Food forum and partnering with other government entities to raise public awareness around food safety.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Transparency and Leveraging Relationships:

Potential Opportunity:
Opportunity for the Agency to increase its transparency and accountability to stakeholders.

Information sharing enables regulated parties to take steps to ensure compliance and helps to increase public awareness and confidence in the Canadian marketplace. Diverse methods exist to engage and collaborate with industry, other governmental stakeholders and the public to enhance the development of outputs that are mutually beneficial and agreed-upon.

Public and Industry Engagement in the coming into Force of the Safe Food for Canadians Act

  • Continued broad engagement and consultation on draft regulations for the new Safe Food for Canadians Act through the Agency's Food forum and partnering with other government entities to raise public awareness around the new Act and food safety in general.

Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP)

  • Continued to design the ESDP, a platform that will enable citizens, industry and international trading partners to more easily carry out their respective roles and conduct regular business transactions with the Agency, such as obtaining electronic export certificates, using secure information exchange protocols.

User Fee / Service Standard Modernization

  • Continued the review of User Fees associated with four major programs to update the User Fees notices and develop service standards to allow for predictability in service delivery

Red Tape Reduction Initiatives

  • Increased coordination among regulators:
    • Renewed Dairy regulations
    • Integrated network of laboratories
  • Adopted a service-oriented approach to regulated parties:
    • Continued implementing the CFIA's Transparency Agenda

Leveraging Relationships (International Engagement)

  • Developed an Agency–wide International Strategic Framework in 2013-14. Continued to engage and cooperate with regulatory counterparts and relevant international organizations to assist in the development of international standards.
  • Worked with industry stakeholders and our US counterparts to make progress on Beyond the Border (BtB) and Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) initiatives.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Emergency Management:

Potential Threat:
The ability to respond to multiple simultaneous or large-scale emergencies.

The CFIA has a well-planned emergency preparedness and response capacity. However threat environments continue to evolve, requiring regular updating of plans and responses to reflect changes and find efficiencies to ensure that the Agency maintains a minimum of essential business functions during emergencies.

Maintain and monitor current Emergency Management preparedness / response mitigation strategies and enhance them if necessary.

  • An Agency Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP) was completed and provided to Public Safety Canada in December 2013
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

1.3 Actual Expenditure

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $74.4 million reflects increased Statutory authority expenditures, incremental activities funded via the 2013-14 Supplementary Estimates, as well as expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board (such as parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service, etc.), for which the Agency receives allocations from Treasury Board Votes. A significant portion of this increase is related to statutory compensation payments made under the Health of Animals Act. New resources for the implementation of the Inspection Verification System Initiative and a resource transfer from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, as part of a multi-year Memorandum of Understanding on the Growing Forward 2 policy framework, also contributed to this increase. Furthermore, the carry forward of authorities from the previous fiscal year into 2013-14 enabled the Agency to manage operational requirements and invest in initiatives and priorities, including food safety.

The net increase takes into account recent savings initiatives undertaken by the government, the transfer of biohazard security responsibilities and resources to the Public Health Agency of Canada, and the transfer of resources to Shared Services Canada to support the implementation of the Food Safety Action Plan.

The decrease of 60 FTEs from Planned to Actual primarily relates to the reductions stemming from the implementation of recent savings; the transfer of biohazard security responsibilities and resources to the Public Health Agency of Canada; delays in certain projects and initiatives; offset by Agency investments in initiatives and priorities. The Agency has achieved these savings mainly through efficiencies and has not reduced staff or cut programs that would in any way impact food safety or place the health and safety of Canadians at risk.

A comparison of Total Authorities available for use and Actual Spending yields $49.3 million of unused 2013-14 authorities. The Agency specifically lapsed resources in 2013-14 in order to carry forward authorities into 2014-15, primarily to cover anticipated collective bargaining settlement requirements.

A variance analysis is provided for each Program; please see the applicable Program in Section II of this document. Section II also contains information at lowest level of CFIA's Treasury Board approved Program Alignment Architecture, the Sub-Program level. Sub-Program variances which are less than $5.0 million and less than a 10% change fall below CFIA's criteria for provision of a variance explanation.

Budgetary Financial Resources – (dollars)

2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Total Authorities Available for Use 2013–14 Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (actual minus planned)
687,885,404 731,351,825 855,094,470 805,751,653 74,399,828

Human Resources (Full-time equivalents - FTEs Footnote 5)

2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013–14 Difference (actual minus planned)
6,438 6,378 (60)

Budgetary Performance Summary Table for Strategic Outcome and Program(s) (dollars)

Strategic Outcome, Program(s) and Internal Services 2013-14 Main Estimates Planned Spending 2013-14 Total Authority Available for use Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2013-14 2012-13 2011-12
Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base
Food Safety Program 312,185,374 352,681,060 320,982,081 316,858,810 394,119,558 364,310,525 353,600,998 328,935,486
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 131,587,718 131,999,425 90,674,321 90,560,216 195,453,317 187,939,265 175,425,417 140,272,362
Plant Resources Program 84,260,734 84,692,441 75,532,299 75,236,980 90,803,236 86,537,966 88,983,164 83,964,960
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 31,697,693 31,697,647 25,382,494 25,382,494 37,154,661 35,004,557 33,338,750 34,859,200
Subtotal 559,731,519 601,070,573 512,571,195 508,038,500 717,530,772 673,792,313 651,348,329 588,032,008
Internal Services Subtotal 128,153,885 130,281,252 109,004,540 108,873,224 137,563,698 131,959,340 130,707,396 149,664,349
Total 687,885,404 731,351,825 621,575,735 616,911,724 855,094,470 805,751,653 782,055,725 737,696,357

1.4 Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

2013-14 Actual Spending by Whole-of-Government-Framework Spending Endnote xv Area (dollars)

Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2013-14 Actual Spending
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Food Safety Program Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 364,310,525
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 187,939,265
Plant Resources Program Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 86,537,966
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements International Affairs A prosperous Canada through global commerce 35,004,557

Total Actual Spending by Spending Area (dollars)

Spending Area Total Planned Spending Total Actual Spending
Economic Affairs 84,692,441 86,537,966
Social Affairs 484,680,485 552,249,790
International Affairs 31,697,647 35,004,557
Government Affairs 0 0

1.5 Departmental Spending Trend

Chart - Departmental Spending Trend. Description follows.
Description for Departmental Spending Trend
Total Spending
2011–12 737.7
2012–13 782.1
2013-14 805.8
2014–15 621.6
2015–16 616.9
2016–17 582.4
Sunset Programs
2014–15 74.0
2015–16 70.0
2016-17 78.0

The Agency's overall spending has increased from 2011-12 to 2013-14 by approximately 9%. This is as a result of: additional funding received for initiatives such as Food Safety Modernization and the Inspection Verification System Initiative; resources transferred from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada for the Traceability National Information Portal and Growing Forward 2 policy framework; and, a significant increase in statutory compensation expenditures. This also takes into account: the transfer of resources to Shared Services Canada (SSC) to consolidate, streamline and improve Government information technology and information management services; the transfer of biohazard security responsibilities and resources to the Public Health Agency of Canada; as well as decreases stemming from savings initiatives undertaken by the government. The Agency has achieved these savings mainly through efficiencies and has not reduced staff or cut programs that would in any way impact food safety or place the health and safety of Canadians at risk.

It should be noted that Budget 2014 announced $390 million over 5 years for the CFIA. In addition to the renewal of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) programming (included as a sunset program in the chart above), Budget 2014 announced funding for CFIA to implement new initiatives to strengthen Canada's food safety system and better protect Canadian families. Until these new resources are approved by Parliament, they cannot be included in CFIAs Planned Spending or Departmental Spending Trend.

With respect to the implementation of specific savings initiatives, ongoing savings in the amount of $55.8 million is being achieved through: administrative efficiencies, such as sharing common administrative services between the CFIA and AAFC; as well as program changes to improve services and facilitate trade, such as implementing agreed upon changes with the provinces with respect to the delivery of certain inspection activities under provincial jurisdiction; and, more effective response to animal diseases and plant pests. None of these measures affect the delivery of the CFIA's front-line food safety services.

1.6 Estimates by Vote

For information on Canadian Food Inspection Agency's organizational Votes and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2014 on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website. Endnote xvi

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

This section details the CFIA's planned activities for its strategic outcome as informed by a number of factors, including Government and Agency priorities, the Agency's Corporate Risk Profile, and the application of lessons learned. Lessons learned may be derived from a variety of sources, including: internal and external audits; internal program evaluations; stakeholder feedback and consultation; information from performance measurement (including quality management); and structured post-incident analysis following significant events such as an animal disease outbreak or a serious food safety recall. This section features key areas on which the CFIA focused its efforts during the last fiscal year.

Assessment of Performance Targets

Performance targets for compliance rates are qualitative or quantitative goals set by the CFIA that provide a basis for measuring the performance of regulated parties and the Agency toward achieving expected results. The targets in this report are for critical program areas and based either on historical averages of actual performance or on the expected results of effective programming (e.g. rate of industry compliance with regulatory standards). The CFIA has assessed the extent to which performance has met or exceeded established targets and provided analysis when performance has fallen below targets. Targets for programs that monitor activities are set differently than for programs that focus on specific areas of non-compliance. In terms of compliance rates, the CFIA deems a performance variance of +/- 1% (percent) to be "Met".

2.1 Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base

Mitigating risks to food safety is the CFIA's highest priority. Safeguarding the health and well-being of Canadians, our environment and economy is the driving force behind the design and development of CFIA programs. The CFIA, in collaboration and partnership with industry, consumers, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, continued to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases.

Recognizing that the current and future economic prosperity of the Canadian agriculture and forestry sectors relies on a healthy and sustainable animal and plant resource base, the CFIA continued to improve its program design and delivery in the animal health and plant resource areas in order to minimize and manage risks. In an effort to protect the natural environment from invasive animal and plant diseases and plant pests, the CFIA performed extensive work related to the protection of environmental biodiversity.

The CFIA also focused on several horizontal initiatives aimed at contributing to the protection of consumers. Examples of such initiatives included the elaboration of the approach for continued advancement in food labeling modernization, an increased focus on transparency, and the continued delivery of many of its day-to-day operational activities, including public food recall and allergy alert notices, and import border blitzes designed to intercept imported food items that may pose a health threat to Canadians.

The CFIA began implementing its multi-year project of establishing 16 centres of expertise (CoE) across Canada. Each CoE will offer greater consistency in program interpretation and delivery to front-line inspectors of the CFIA, as well as regulated parties, while at the same time consolidating program and administrative expertise in order to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, and quality of service delivery. Each CoE will deal with issues specific to a certain area of expertise. Much of the effort in this area for 2013-14 was spent in building the infrastructure in support of CoEs.

To successfully deliver on its strategic outcome, the CFIA has developed a robust risk management culture, and fosters the use of it throughout the Agency. As such, the CFIA continually monitors and assesses its operating environment in order to be aware of threats and opportunities concerning the achievement of its desired outcome. A cornerstone of its risk management process is the development of an Agency-wide Corporate Risk Profile (CRP).

In order to mitigate risks and achieve its strategic outcome, the Agency, through the actions of its programs (Food Safety, Animal Health and Zoonotics, Plant Resources, International Collaboration and Technical Agreements), concentrated its efforts for 2013-14 on the delivery of key initiatives that support the CFIA's four priorities:

  • Increasing focus on prevention which will provide an opportunity to minimize risks to human, animal and ecosystem health;
  • Enhancing the CFIA's role as an effective regulator by focusing on service excellence;
  • Adapting and evolving to meet new demands and expectations with a focus on internal performance excellence; and
  • Focussing on people who are supported by training and tools.

2.1.1 Food Safety Program

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Food Safety Program
2013-14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Total Authorities Available for use 2013–14 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
312,185,374 352,681,060 394,119,558 364,310,525 11,629,465
Human Resources (FTEs) – Food Safety Program
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
3,218 3,296 78

The increases from Planned to Actual Spending of $11.6 million and 78 FTEs are mainly due to: Agency investments in its transformation agenda and food safety priorities; additional resources received from the government for various food safety activities, including the establishment of an Inspection Verification System; incremental Food Safety Modernization activities; expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board (such as parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service, etc.); as well as the transfer of resources from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada as part of a multi-year Memorandum of Understanding on the Growing Forward 2 policy framework.

In addition, the Agency made a concerted effort to improve the alignment of program expenditures and FTEs. As such, a portion of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Actual Spending was aligned to the Food Safety Program; while all BSE Planned Spending was aligned to the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program, contributing to the overall increase in Actual Spending over Planned Spending in the Food Safety Program.

Table 2-1a: Summary of Performance by Program: Food Safety Program
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Number of commodity areas where federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met 5 out of 6 met Table Note 6
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 100% 100% Met
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 95% 95% Met
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where domestic food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met 6 out of 6 met
Number of commodity areas where imported food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met 5 out of 6 met Table Note 7

These are roll-up indicators from the Sub-Program level.

Table Notes

Table Note 6

The Dairy Sub-Program did not meet its target. For 2013-14, in order to harmonize the approach of calculating non-compliance across the Agri-food programs, the percentage non-compliance of dairy establishments includes all facilities that were issued a non-compliance letter. In previous years, dairy establishments that implemented corrective action plans in response to letters were not included in the calculation. For example, the percent compliance of inspected registered dairy establishments in 2012/13 was 100%.

This change in approach to the calculation for dairy establishments led to a very small decrease in the compliance rate (96%). It should be noted that all of the dairy establishments that were issued non-compliance letters submitted corrective action plans that were verified by follow-up inspection.

Return to table note 6 referrer

Table Note 7

The other Sub-Program that did not meet its target is Fish and Seafood. The non-compliance refers only to imported fish and seafood products. Of all imported fish and seafood inspections that were deemed non-compliant, the percentage of tests failing drug residues in farmed fish has decreased from 37.5% in 2012-13 to 12.5% in 2013-14. However, of all fish inspections deemed non-compliant, container integrity was the most frequent reason, increasing from 18.8% in 2012-13 to 31.3% in 2013-14. There were a total of ten rejections for imported fish and seafood. However, there was no trend relative to a particular product, processor, or country of origin. Reasons for product rejections included bacterial contamination with Listeria monocytogenes, decomposition, drug residues, environmental contaminants and misuse of additives. There is no apparent systematic problem that is causing this non-compliance.

Compliance levels are for products as imported to Canada, prior to release for domestic sale. Products are held while testing is conducted and only compliant products are allowed into the Canadian market. In addition, future shipments of similar products are held for testing until four consecutive compliant results are achieved.

Compliance of imported fish products has historically been between 85 to 90%. However, the CFIA continues to set an ambitious target of 95% and has been taking steps towards achieving it over time by working with fish importers and as part of the overall modernization of its food program. In addition, Budget 2014 announced ongoing funding to strengthen Canada's food safety system and increase oversight with respect to certain commodities including fish and seafood.

Return to table note 7 referrer

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
Continuing to implement the Agency Transformation initiative by modernizing food inspection

In 2013-14, the CFIA continued to progress on its transformation agenda that includes adopting a risk-based system and modernizing the inspection system and oversight activities. Expanding beyond food and consumer protection, the CFIA developed the Integrated Agency Inspection Model (iAIM) Endnote xvii to improve the food inspection model and implement a single risk-based inspection approach across all commodities. The draft iAIM was posted for internal and external consultations with stakeholders in the fall of 2013.

In addition, to adapt to current changes in global supply chains and advances in science and technology, the CFIA worked with government partners and universities to develop a risk assessment (RA) model. The RA model will assist the CFIA with identifying and characterizing hazards, and determining the probability and/or impact of a food safety incident.

The CFIA continued to implement the pathogen reduction initiative to decrease the incidence and economic impact of foodborne illness by reducing pathogen contamination of meat and poultry. In collaboration with stakeholders, the Agency undertook the first national microbiological baseline study to estimate the prevalence and concentration of Campylobacter and Salmonella in broiler chicken and chicken meat produced across Canada. Samples were collected and analyzed in 2013, and results will be presented to stakeholders during consultation sessions in June 2014.

The CFIA also made progress towards modernizing its scientific equipment and laboratories. Since May 2013, improvements to the food laboratory structure in Toronto and St-Hyacinthe progressed well through the engineering and design phases.

Preparing for the 2015 coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Act

The Act provides the legislative basis to simplify and consolidate food regulations for a single, consistent approach to strengthening overall food inspection in Canada. As part of the Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan (SFCAP), the CFIA consulted and held discussions on renewing and modernizing food regulations. The CFIA launched the consultation process at the 2013 Food Safety Regulatory Forum. The Forum included representatives from industry, other governments, and the academic community. Proposed regulations, resulting from this consultative process, are expected to be published in the Canada Gazette Part I in the fall of 2014 and final publication is expected in mid-2015.

To support industry stakeholders, particularly small- and medium-sized enterprises, through focused efforts to promote compliance, illustrative interpretive guidance documents as well as example model systems for the new food inspection regulations have also been developed.

The CFIA launched the new Pre-Requisite Employment Program (PREP) Endnote xviii, a comprehensive orientation program designed to provide specific knowledge, skills and attitudes required by inspectors to be successful on the job. To date, PREP School has graduated a total of 170 inspectors. In parallel to this project, the CFIA also launched the Supervisor School in September 2013 to enhance food safety culture through strong and effective supervision.

Food labelling information for Canadians

Following extensive consultations with consumers, inspectors, and industry stakeholders, the CFIA successfully implemented the Online Labelling Tool (OLT) in March 2014. The tool provides consumers and industry with user-friendly access to information regarding regulatory requirements for labelling food, such as consumer specific information and education on food labelling.

Furthermore, the CFIA continued to implement the Food Labelling Modernization Initiative Endnote xix to promote an innovative food labelling system, so as to improve service delivery and align with other stakeholders' initiatives, such as Health Canada (HC's) Nutrition Labelling initiatives. In 2013-14, the first phase of engagement with stakeholders was completed. A report outlining key consultation outcomes and a discussion paper was presented at the Safe Food Regulatory Forum in June 2014. The forum launched the second consultation phase that will take place in the summer of 2014.

Collaborating with partners and stakeholders to protect Canadians' health

CFIA collaborated with HC, PHAC, and provincial and territorial partners to develop a strategy on an information network to link federal and provincial food safety authorities and private food laboratories residing across Canada. This information network will strengthen national laboratory capacity to swiftly and effectively respond to food safety incidents and emergencies, so as to better protect consumers from foodborne hazards and will be integrated through a common data sharing platform among food safety authorities. The continued development and implementation of this information network over the next five years will further strengthen and modernize Canada's food safety regime.

In an effort to draw on the strength of Agency partners and promote partnership, the CFIA entered into collaborative agreements or embarked on collaborative projects with:

  • Genome Canada and Alberta Innovates to explore biosolutions on Listeria monocytogenes genomics;
  • Genome Alberta and Alberta Innovates to look for biosolutions on E.coli genomics; and,
  • HC to analyze Campylobacter genomics. This project was completed in 2013-14.
2.1.1.1 Sub-Program: Meat and Poultry

The Meat and Poultry sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with meat and poultry and their products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that meat, poultry and their products meet health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices related to labelling compliance for pre-packaged meat products, and audits the delivery of a grading program based on objective meat quality and retail yield standards. The Meat and Poultry sub-program supports confidence in Canada's meat and poultry and their products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Meat and Poultry
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
182,678,352 190,270,609 7,592,257
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Meat and Poultry
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
1,807 1,851 44

The increases from Planned to Actual Spending of $7.6 million and 44 FTEs are mainly due to: Agency investments to support food safety priorities such as the dedication of incremental resources to maintain increased frequency of food inspections in meat processing establishments; establishment of an Inspection Verification System; incremental Food Safety Modernization activities; and expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board (such as parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service, etc.).

In addition, the Agency made a concerted effort to improve the alignment of program expenditures and FTEs. As such, a portion of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Actual Spending was aligned to the Meat and Poultry Sub-Program, while all BSE Planned Spending was aligned to the Animal Health Program, contributing to the increase in Actual Spending over Planned Spending in the Meat and Poultry Sub-Program.

Table 2-1b: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Meat and Poultry
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally registered meat and poultry establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered meat and poultry establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 98% Met
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 95% Met
Percentage of tested imported meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Revising E.coli 0157:H7 policies to continue to maintain high food safety culture

Following an in-depth review of the XL Foods Inc. incident and recall, the CFIA published, on May 17, 2013, a revised policy on the control of E.coli 0157:H7 contamination in raw beef products Endnote xx. The revised policy requires establishments to develop and implement a High Event Protocol (HEP) in the event of a contamination. In addition, the CFIA continued to deliver additional training to inspection staff in relation to E.coli controls. Sampling activities for E.coli 0157:H7 in beef trims have also significantly increased in federally-inspected meat plants.

Ensuring adherence to Listeria policies

Throughout the year, the CFIA continued to enforce HC's revised Listeria Policy. Inspections were conducted to verify the effectiveness of industry adherence to the policy and controls related to Listeria.

Provincial oversight of meat inspection

The CFIA implemented changes agreed upon with provinces by returning provincial meat inspection activities to the provinces of British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. There will be no impact on food safety, as provinces will be delivering the required inspection services.

2.1.1.2 Sub-Program: Egg

The Egg sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with egg and egg products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that eggs and egg products are graded according to relevant governing acts and regulations and that they comply with the requirements of the said acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and advertising practices meet the requirements for pre-packaged egg products. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's egg and egg products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Egg
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
10,304,909 10,549,629 244,720
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Egg
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
85 87 2
Table 2-1c: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Egg
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally registered shell egg establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered shell egg establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 97% Footnote 8 Met
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 97% Met
Percentage of tested imported shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 99% Met
2.1.1.3 Sub-Program: Dairy

The Dairy sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with dairy and dairy products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that dairy and dairy products meet health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the governing acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices by verifying that labelling for pre-packaged dairy products meets the requirements as set out in the acts and regulations. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's dairy products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Dairy
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
13,969,454 14,301,199 331,745
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Dairy
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
119 122 3
Table 2-1d: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Dairy
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally registered dairy establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered dairy establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 96% Not Met
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 99% Met
Percentage of tested imported dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Dairy Sub-Program did not meet its target. This can be attributed to the fact that, in previous years, dairy establishments were deemed non-compliant (Not Met) only after they failed to appropriately implement corrective actions following an initial inspection. For the first time this year, the number of non-compliant establishments at the time of initial inspection is included in the calculation of non-compliance. This change in approach of calculating non-compliance was implemented in 2013-14 to harmonize the method of calculation and reporting of non-compliance across the Agri-food programs. This change in approach led to a very small decrease in its compliance rate (96%).

It should be noted that all of the dairy establishments that were issued non-compliance letters submitted corrective action plans that were verified by follow-up inspection.

2.1.1.4 Sub-Program: Fish and Seafood

The Fish and Seafood sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with fish and seafood products processed in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. It achieves its objectives by developing product and process standards and ensuring that products, importers and domestic industry comply with quality, safety and identity of fish and seafood requirements through verification of compliance with the governing acts and regulations. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's fish and seafood products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Fish and Seafood
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
48,941,546 50,103,805 1,162,259
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Fish and Seafood
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
417 427 10
Table 2-1e: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Fish and Seafood
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally registered fish and seafood establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fish and seafood establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 99% Met
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met
Percentage of tested imported fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 85% Not Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Of all imported fish and seafood inspections that were deemed non-compliant, the percentage of tests failing drug residues in farmed fish has decreased from 37.5% in 2012-13 to 12.5% in 2013-14. However, of all fish inspections deemed non-compliant, container integrity was the most frequent reason, increasing from 18.8% in 2012-13 to 31.3% in 2013-14. There were a total of ten rejections for imported fish and seafood. However, there was no trend relative to a particular product, processor, or country of origin. Reasons for product rejections included bacterial contamination with Listeria monocytogenes, decomposition, drug residues, environmental contaminants and misuse of additives. There is no apparent systematic problem that is causing this non-compliance.

Compliance levels are for products as imported to Canada, prior to release for domestic sale. Products are held while testing is conducted and only compliant products are allowed into the Canadian market. In addition, future shipments of similar products are held for testing until four consecutive compliant results are achieved.

Compliance of imported fish products has historically been between 85 to 90%. However, the CFIA continues to set an ambitious target of 95% and has been taking steps towards achieving it over time by working with fish importers and as part of the overall modernization of its food program. In addition, Budget 2014 announced ongoing funding to strengthen Canada's food safety system and increase oversight with respect to certain commodities including fish and seafood.

2.1.1.5 Sub-Program: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with fresh fruits and vegetables and their products produced in Canada or imported for consumption. It achieves its objectives by verifying that products meet all stipulated health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program mitigates unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and net quantity requirements for pre-packaged Fresh Fruit and Vegetable products are adhered to. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's fresh fruit and vegetable products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
24,581,048 25,164,796 583,748
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
210 215 5
Table 2-1f: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally registered fresh fruit and vegetables establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fresh fruit and vegetable establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 97% Footnote 9 Met
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fresh fruit and vegetable samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 99% Met
Percentage of tested imported fresh fruit and vegetables samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 97% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

New inspection and oversight for fresh produce safety was initiated under the Fresh Fruit and Vegetables (FFV) program modernization project to support planned enhanced funding. This project aimed to enhance inspections of FFV establishments for food safety, to help minimize potential health risks related to the consumption of fresh fruit and vegetables. These inspections focus on industry's implementation of good manufacturing practices, good handling practices, and preventive food safety controls; label verification; and microbiological and chemical residue sampling and testing programs. Under this project, a master list of FFV establishments has been created, and the CFIA has developed inspection tools for inspectors, and communication materials. Both were made available to industry through the CFIA website.

Budget 2014 announced ongoing funding to strengthen Canada's food safety system and increase oversight with respect to certain commodities including fresh fruit and vegetables.

2.1.1.6 Sub-Program: Processed Products

The Processed Products sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with processed products, including honey and maple products, which are produced in Canada or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that processed products comply with health and food safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program minimizes unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and net quantity requirements for pre-packaged processed products are adhered to. The program supports confidence in Canada's processed products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Processed Products
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
11,132,465 11,396,838 264,373
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Processed Products
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
96 98 2
Table 2-1g: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Processed Products
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally registered processed products establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered processed products establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 98% Met
Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98% Met
Percentage of tested imported processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 95% Met
2.1.1.7 Sub-Program: Imported and Manufactured Food Products

The Imported and Manufactured Food Products sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with food commodities that are regulated by the relevant governing acts and regulations. The CFIA and provincial/territorial governments share the jurisdiction over IMFP because the sector includes a large variety of foods that are traded intra-provincially or inter-provincially. This program achieves its objectives by verifying that these products comply with the health, food safety, and consumer protection requirements. The program mitigates unfair market practices by verifying that requirements related to net quantity, composition, claims, labelling, and advertising of these foods are adhered to and by enforcing the governing acts and regulations. Through enforcement of the acts and regulations, the program supports confidence in Canada's imported and manufactured food products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Imported Manufactured Food Products
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
61,073,286 62,523,649 1,450,363
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Imported Manufactured Food Products
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
484 496 12
Table 2-1h: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program Level: Imported and Manufactured Food Products
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food (IMF) products are mitigated Percentage of major health risks in the imported and manufactured food sector that are addressed through the annual update to food safety inspection programs 95% 100% Met
Percentage of inspected IMF products with accurate net quantity, composition, labelling and advertising 70% 74% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The CFIA continued consultations on the proposed Imported Food Sector Products Regulations under Food Regulatory Modernization. The proposed regulations aim to introduce food safety and licensing requirements for importers in the Imported Food Sector, which will enable better identification of unsafe foods and ingredients and allow the CFIA to identify and engage importers. The CFIA also developed training materials associated with the revised compliance verification (CVS) inspection process.

2.1.2 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, limiting risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instils confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Financial Resources (dollars) – Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
2013-14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Total Authorities Available for use 2013–14 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
131,587,718 131,999,425 195,453,317 187,939,265 55,939,840
Human Resources (FTEs) – Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
1,128 1,074 (54)

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $55.9 million is predominantly due to a significant increase in statutory compensation payments, in accordance with the Health of Animals Act. The transfer of resources from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada as part of a multi-year Memorandum of Understanding on the Growing Forward 2 policy framework and expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board (such as parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service, etc.) also contributed to the increase.

The decrease of 54 FTEs from Planned to Actual primarily relates to the concerted effort of the Agency to improve the alignment of program expenditures and FTEs. As such, a portion of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Actual Spending was aligned to the Food Safety Program and International Collaboration and Technical Agreement Program, while all BSE Planned Spending was aligned to the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program. The application of reductions stemming from savings initiatives also contributed to the decrease. The Agency has achieved these savings mainly through efficiencies and has not reduced staff or cut programs that would in any way impact food safety or place the health and safety of Canadians at risk.

Table 2-2a: Summary of Performance by Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 Entries 0 Entries Met
Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease 100% 100% Met
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements 99% 100% Met
Canada's status on the OIE Footnote 10 disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk" Status maintained Status maintained Met
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease 100% 100% Met
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed All necessary manual updates are completed All necessary manual updates were completed Met
Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises in which CFIA participates 9 11 Met
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion 100% 100% Met
Percentage of cases where CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease 100% 100% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
Implementing Agency transformation

As part of the Agency Transformation initiative, the Animal Health Program began consolidating and modernizing its legislative and regulatory framework to:

  • improve consistency in interpretation and enforcement of regulations;
  • streamline processes;
  • integrate science more rigorously into its decision-making; and,
  • provide single-window access for services to clients.

For example, proposed changes under the proposed Agricultural Growth Act, affecting the Feeds Act and Health of Animals Act, will contribute to overall Canadian economic growth by enhancing trade opportunities and reducing red tape.

Leveraging relationships to prepare for disease outbreaks, such as Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea (PED)

The CFIA proactively engaged other federal departments, levels of government, and the private sector to reassess the appropriate response to animal diseases. The Agency also worked with the Ontario Veterinary College to develop potential public policy responses of varying levels with respect to animal diseases. To allow for a good governance system should a disease outbreak occur, the CFIA continued to participate in the National Farmed Animal Health and Welfare Council with PHAC and AAFC.

The CFIA worked closely with partners within Ontario and the U.S. to manage and seek a resolution to the PED outbreak, a pig viral disease. Despite having no impact on human health, PED potentially has serious repercussions on the swine industry. While provincial authorities led the PED investigation and response, the CFIA provided significant assistance and support. The investigation is ongoing and the CFIA continues to monitor and address issues as required.

Strengthening trade relations and market access

The Agency contributed to positive trade relationships and improved market access in 2013-14 by negotiating over 100 new and amended export certificates for live animals and a similar number of new or amended export certificates for animal products and by-products. Additionally, the CFIA continued to build on the January 2013 Canada-U.S. Zoning Agreement by creating an implementation framework which is now undergoing external consultations, under the joint leadership of the CFIA and the USDA.

2.1.2.1 Sub-Program: Terrestrial Animal Health

The Terrestrial Animal Health sub-program aims to prevent the entry of reportable, foreign animal diseases and the spread of reportable domestic animal diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program achieves its objectives by delivering initiatives that track, detect, and mitigate risks to the terrestrial animal resource base. This sub-program supports food safety, public health, and protection of the animal resource base, and instils national and international confidence in Canadian agricultural products. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports domestic and international confidence that Canada's animals are free from certain reportable diseases, particularly those potentially transmissible to humans.

Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program – Terrestrial Animal Health
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
106,024,307 105,541,039 (483,268)
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program – Terrestrial Animal Health
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
862 821 (41)
Table 2-2b: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Terrestrial Animal Health
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally registered veterinary biologics establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered veterinary biologics establishments in compliance with federal regulations 90% 100% Met
Veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations Percentage of tested veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations 100% 100% Met
Animals in Canada are transported humanely Percentage of inspected live loads in compliance with humane transport standards 100% 100% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Updating the Health of Animals Regulations

In 2013-14, Health of Animals Regulations were amended with respect to traceability. Traceability amendments with respect to swine are scheduled to come into force in July 2014.

In the fall of 2013, the CFIA held consultations with key stakeholders with respect to animal transport. Subsequent amendments have been drafted to update regulations on animal transportation. These amendments will maintain market access to major trading partners, better reflect current science, and improve the well-being of animals during transportation. These amendments are anticipated to come into force in early 2016.

Continuing the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) program

In 2013-14, the CFIA evaluated the BSE Management Program Endnote xxi and identified areas for improvement. The evaluation noted the Program's success, impact and results achieved, as well as its continued relevance. Findings supported the Agency's request for continued BSE funding.

Through Economic Action Plan 2014, the government approved an additional $205.5 million over five years to renew the BSE program. BSE has been a reportable disease in Canada since 1990 and BSE program activities are necessary to protect human and animal health and to reduce any potential negative economic and trade impacts. In 2013-14, in support of the BSE program, the CFIA:

  • conducted a costing exercise to look for efficiencies;
  • reviewed IM/IT requirements to enhance effective data capturing;
  • committed to improving BSE training; and,
  • worked with AAFC, CBSA, HC, PHAC, provinces, and industry to restart the development of a BSE Roadmap, a tool to communicate Canada's long-term BSE management approach.

The CFIA also continued to update its manuals of procedure, hazard specific plans, guidance documents for industry and other communications to enhance effective preparedness to prevent, control and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases.

Enhancing systems to manage animal health and food safety issues, and to maximise market access

In 2013-14, to enhance the traceability system and improve the ability to manage animal health issues, the CFIA enhanced its geographic information system capability and signed two additional livestock traceability data sharing agreements with provinces. As a result of data sharing agreements between the CFIA and Prairie provinces and Prince Edward Island, the CFIA has worked collaboratively with provincial partners and private sector stakeholders to launch the Traceability National Information Portal (TNIP). The Portal provides single-window access to traceability information. Successfully implemented in the fall of 2013, the CFIA continues to further enhance TNIP's information management systems and participates on a steering committee to establish the Canadian Agri-Traceability Services (CATS) so as to increase traceability at the national level. This initiative will improve the CFIA's service delivery and enable regulators at all levels to make informed decisions to effectively manage animal health issues, such as disease events and outbreaks.

To allow for more transparency and better strategic planning, the Agency developed a draft Surveillance Framework in November 2013, profiling the CFIA's animal health surveillance function. The Framework should launch broader discussions on animal health surveillance with respect to policy and program decision making and field operations and ensuring capacity is available to respond to animal health issues.

2.1.2.2 Sub-Program: Aquatic Animal Health

The Aquatic Animal Health sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with the introduction and spread of certain aquatic animal diseases of concern to Canada. This program achieves its objectives by partnering with Fisheries and Oceans Canada to deliver on initiatives that track, detect and control aquatic animal diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports domestic and international confidence that Canada's aquatic animal resources are free from aquatic animal diseases, and contributes to the sustainable productivity of aquaculture and harvest fisheries.

Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program- Aquatic Animal Health
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
5,606,323 61,533,586 55,927,263
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program – Aquatic Animal Health
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
59 43 (16)

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $55.9 million is predominantly due to the significant increase in statutory compensation payments, in accordance with the Health of Animals Act. The decrease of 16 FTEs from Planned to Actual mainly relates to the application of reductions stemming from savings initiatives.

Table 2-2c: Summary of Performance by Program: Aquatic Animal Health
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Domestic aquatic animals and their products are compliant with Canadian regulations and meet the standards of international agreements Percentage of certified aquatic animal and aquatic animal product shipments that meet the receiving country's import requirements 99% 100% Met
Risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base are mitigated Number of reportable aquatic animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 0 Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Improving service delivery and finding efficiencies

Over 2013-14, the CFIA realigned its approach to the Aquatics Animal Health Program by:

  • strengthening program compartmentalization and biosecurity measures;
  • reducing testing and inspection costs; and
  • achieving more efficient ways to implement import controls.

The CFIA also explored opportunities for alternative service delivery with approved private and provincial laboratories and continued to implement the Domestic Movement Control Program for aquatic animals.

Meeting international standards to maintain market access

To continue to improve domestic aquatic animal and product compliance with Canadian legal requirements and international agreements standards, the CFIA continued developing the National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP). This involved a phased-in implementation of import controls for aquatic animals under the Health of Animals Regulations. Additionally, export certificates for aquatic animals were negotiated with Canada's largest trade partners. In 2013-14, 20 new import permits were negotiated with several countries including those in the European Union, South America and South-East Asia.

2.1.2.3 Sub-Program: Feed

The Feed sub-program aims to minimize risks associated with livestock and poultry feeds manufactured in or imported into Canada. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that feeds are safe, effective and labelled in accordance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program contributes to the production and maintenance of a healthy and sustainable animal resource base which supports food safety and environmental sustainability. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports confidence in feed manufactured in Canada.

Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program- Feed
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
20,368,794 20,864,640 495,846
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program – Feed
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
207 210 3
Table 2-2d: Summary of Performance by Program: Feed
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Feed establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed establishments in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, not including labelling tasks 95% 97% Met
Feed labels meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed facilities in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, when assessed against inspection tasks associated with labelling 95% 95% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Renewing feed regulations

In 2013-14, the Agency led the Feed Regulatory Renewal by drafting proposals to amend the regulations for feed ingredient assessment and authorization as well as feed labeling, and releasing them for public comment in October 2013. Additionally, consultations with key stakeholders were conducted in the second half of 2013-14 for the feed hazard identification and preventative controls module. A number of policy questions have been identified and the Agency is examining their potential impact on feed regulatory modernization and broader Agency Transformation initiatives. As well, the CFIA consulted with stakeholders to update user fees under the livestock feed program.

Strengthening planning and prioritization to improve inspections and reduce risks to Canadians' health

In 2013-14, the CFIA reviewed all inspection data related to feed ban tasks available for high-risk commercial feed mills and followed up where concerns around delivery were identified, which aligned with recommendations made in the CFIA's Evaluation of the Enhanced Feed Ban Endnote xxii. To improve efficiency and effectiveness, the Agency modified feed facility inspection frequencies so as to support the enhanced Feed Ban program (an important component of the BSE program) and efficient and effective delivery of the Feed Ban program.

2.1.3 Plant Resources Program

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instils confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Plant Resources Program
2013-14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Total Authorities Available for use 2013–14 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
84,260,734 84,692,441 90,803,236 86,537,966 1,845,525
Human Resources (FTEs) – Plant Resources Program
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
856 809 (47)

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $1.8 million is due to: an increase in efforts to control the Asian Long-Horned Beetle; the transfer of resources from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, as part of a multi-year Memorandum of Understanding to continue the Growing Forward 2 policy framework; and, expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board (such as parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service, etc.). The decrease of 47 FTEs from Planned to Actual mainly relates to the application of reductions related to savings initiatives.

Table 2-3a: Summary of Performance by Program Level: Plant Resources Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves 0 0 Met
Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements 90% 92% Met
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk- mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issued 100% 100% Met
Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner 90% 100% Met
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirements 99% 99% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The performance for domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements was exceeded due to:

  • applicants and field managers were well educated about program requirements;
  • good communication between the CFIA and applicants; and
  • no extreme weather patterns during the growing season.

Close working relationship between Agency units, professionalism and good internal communication were responsible for the increased performance in the issuing of notices in a timely manner.

Continuing to modernize plant regulations and inspection activities

The CFIA continued to modernize its regulations related to seeds and plant breeder's rights, and inspection activities by making them more risk and outcome-based to provide greater flexibility, such as providing a more modern intellectual property framework for Plant Breeders that encourages increased investment, and decreasing red tape for the regulated sector.

Initiatives to control pests

The Asian Long-horned Beetle (ALHB), previously declared eradicated from the regulated area in Toronto and Vaughan, was detected in August 2013 in a separate, previously unregulated, industrial area near Pearson International Airport in Mississauga, Ontario. The CFIA established a new quarantine area and is undertaking control measures in concert with other federal, provincial, and municipal counterparts.

Through the Beyond the Border (BtB) and Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) the CFIA focused on plant-related issues to:

  • prevent the introduction into Canada of the Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM), a particularly destructive invasive species, by implementing a Canada-US AGM working group and coordinating assessments of countries regulated for AGM. Other countries, such as Mexico and New Zealand, were engaged in an expanded AGM certification program.
  • conduct a feasibility study on the Harmonization of Wood Packaging Materials, a pilot aimed at advancing a North American Perimeter Approach (NAPA) to inspecting off-continent wood packaging at the first point of arrival. Pests that might be hidden in wood packaging material would be detected before having a chance to reach the Canadian environment.
  • continue NAPA pilots to coordinate regulatory oversight approaches of Chrysanthemum White Rust (CWR) and streamlining commodity certification processes for the Greenhouse Certification Program (GCP).
  • with its U.S. counterpart, the Agency developed a draft Memorandum of Understanding to establish a framework for ongoing cooperation on plant health issues of mutual concern.
2.1.3.1 Sub-Program: Plant Protection

The Plant Protection sub-program aims to mitigate the risks associated with the introduction and spread of plant pests of quarantine significance to Canada. This sub-program achieves its objectives by delivering initiatives that track, detect and control, or eradicate regulated plant pests and diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. The program verifies that plants and plant products, and their associated risk pathways, meet phytosanitary requirements. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports environmental sustainability, and public health and instils confidence in Canada's plants and plant products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program- Plant Protection
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
67,636,012 69,187,066 1,551,054
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program – Plant Protection
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
665 626 (39)
Table 2-3b: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Plant Protection
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Pre-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of inspected shipments from off-shore system approaches or pre-clearance programs in compliance with federal regulations 85% 99% Met
At-Border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of pre-arrival documentation in compliance with Canadian import requirements 90% 99% Met
Post-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of new pest detections that have a science based management plan initiated within one year 90% N/A
No new pest detections
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Percentage of inspected shipments from off-shore system approaches or pre-clearance programs in compliance with federal regulations:

The high compliance rate indicates that the investment in communication of Canadian requirements to foreign countries and the investment of resources in developing and auditing the systems-based programs in the countries of origin are yielding a high rate of compliance with Canadian requirements.

Percentage of pre-arrival documentation in compliance with Canadian import requirements:

The higher performance indicates foreign countries and importers have a strong understanding of Canadian requirements and, in cases where minor deficiencies are identified, they are able to readily address the deficiencies in order to permit the import of their plant or plant product shipment.

Plant Protection

In 2013-14, the CFIA continued to deliver the Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program (PPMMP) through the completion of surveys and monitoring activities. The Plum Pox Virus (PPV) is a plant disease that drastically reduces yields of stone fruit. The CFIA detected PPV in the remaining quarantine area in Ontario. As a result, the western border of the quarantine area was expanded by 800 metres and survey activities will continue in 2014-15. Additionally, the CFIA continued creating a baseline of genetic data to help identify new strains of the PPV.

The CFIA continued implementing its Invasive Plants Directive, which describes the CFIA's invasive plants policy and provides a list of pest plants that are prohibited in Canada. The directive aims to control the importation and the domestic movement of pest plants in Canada. In the implementation, the Agency collaborated with domestic and international stakeholders, such as provinces and Invasive Species Councils and international partners through the WTO notification process. The Agency also collaborated with provincial partners on response options for woolly cupgrass (WCG) – an invasive plant that competes with crops, especially corn and soybeans, reducing their yield – and options for control of kudzu – an invasive plant that reduces biodiversity and causes significant productivity losses to the agriculture and forestry sectors. As well, the CFIA implemented regulatory control of other invasive plants such as jointed goatgrass in Ontario.

The Agency supported the provincial government and industry's implementation of farm level biosecurity for potato and grains and oilseeds through the development, distribution and web posting of standards, producer guides and communication tools for producers. The implementation of effective biosecurity measures across commodities supports the prevention of introduction and spread of pests, contributing to a healthy and sustainable plant resource and safe-guarding the health and well-being of Canadians, the environment and the economy.

2.1.3.2 Sub-Program: Seed

The Seed sub-program aims to ensure that seeds sold in Canada meet established standards, that seeds are properly represented in the marketplace and that most agricultural crop kinds are registered before entering the marketplace. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that seeds meet quality, biosafety, labelling and registration standards as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Regulating the environmental release of plants with novel traits contributes to environmental sustainability and the health and safety of Canadians. Furthermore, quality assured and accurately labelled seeds contribute to a prosperous agricultural production system and to domestic and international confidence in Canada's seeds.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program: Seed
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
11,895,131 12,100,495 205,364
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program: Seed
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
131 132 1
Table 2-3c: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Seed
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic pedigreed seed lots in compliance with federal regulations 95% 95% Met
Percentage of authorized confined releases of Plants with Novel Traits (PNTs) into the Canadian environment that are in compliance with the authorized conditions 90% 91% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Agency continued to prepare for the Alternative Service Delivery (ASD) transition of seed crop inspection to the private sector, beginning in the 2014 crop season. In 2013-14, the CFIA trained and evaluated over 170 private sector inspectors, resulting in more than 140 being issued licences. In addition, 24 entities were licensed as Authorized Seed Crop Inspection Services following review and evaluation of their quality management system manuals.

In anticipation of regulatory updates, the CFIA has been encouraging Seed Potato producers to voluntarily adhere to the Seed Potato Tuber Quality Management Program (SPTQMP). As a result, more than 130 growers have signed up voluntarily in 2013-14 and the CFIA will be exploring alternative approaches with stakeholders to facilitate seed potato movement both domestically and to the United States. The goal of the SPTQMP is to adjust to industry practices, facilitate timely delivery of seed potatoes during a very short timeframe domestically, and make efficient use of CFIA resources, while maintaining credibility and compliance to existing standards. The United States does not consider the SPTQMP as meeting their import requirements and the Agency will continue to explore other ASD approaches to meet U.S. import requirements and expectations.

In keeping with efforts to increase innovation and productivity in Canadian agriculture, the CFIA, along with AAFC and the Canadian Grain Commission, engaged stakeholders to review the crop variety registration system and its effects on the development and adoption of new varieties. This review is consistent with the government's focus on innovation, competitiveness, market development, and regulatory modernization to generate economic growth across the sector.

2.1.3.3 Sub-Program: Fertilizer

The Fertilizer sub-program aims to ensure that regulated fertilizer, fertilizer/pesticides and supplement products sold in Canada are properly labelled, effective and safe for humans, plants, animals, and the environment. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that all fertilizers and supplements meet the standards for safety and efficacy as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Through verification of compliance, the program contributes to public health and environmental sustainability and supports domestic and international confidence in fertilizers manufactured in Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program- Fertilizer
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
4,188,631 4,260,946 72,315
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program – Fertilizer
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
49 43 (6)
Table 2-3d: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Fertilizer
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected fertilizer and supplement products in compliance with federal regulations (Fertilizers Regulations) 90% 92% Met
Percentage of submissions reviewed within the prescribed service delivery standards 90% 90% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Changes to Fertilizers Regulations

In April 2013, requirements for fertilizer and supplement efficacy and quality were removed from the Fertilizers Regulations, and the Fertilizer Program was changed accordingly. This included discontinuing pre-market efficacy assessments, verification of performance claims, and market place monitoring for quality. Regulated products are still required to be safe and properly labelled.

These changes facilitate Canadian producers' access to innovative agricultural inputs and open the door to more complex product formulations with multiple active ingredients for which applicants have not been able to demonstrate efficacy. The CFIA is receiving more applications for this type of product. As safety assessments of complex formulations are more demanding and take longer to complete, this may impact the Fertilizer Program's ability to meet service delivery standards. The CFIA is monitoring this trend to help to allow for a timely product review.

In addition to the changes implemented in 2013, the Fertilizer Program continues to modernize its regulatory and policy frameworks as part of the CFIA's regulatory modernization strategy. This initiative takes a risk-based approach by exempting from registration additional products that are deemed safe and have a well-established history of use. It also streamlines the CFIA registration process, creates greater flexibility and lessens red tape for regulated parties. The initiative is targeted for completion in 2015. Modernization efforts support the response to the Agency's evaluation of the Fertilizer Program Endnote xxiii, with a strong emphasis on pro-active risk identification and integration in program design and delivery.

2.1.3.4 Sub-Program: Intellectual Property Rights

The Intellectual Property Rights sub-program, by which plant breeders can obtain intellectual property rights for their new plant varieties, aims to create an environment in Canada which supports innovation in plant breeding, as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program achieves its objectives by assessing applications from plant breeders to determine that new plant varieties meet the criteria for protection, and when all requirements have been met, granting rights to the variety breeder/owner for a period of up to 18 years. The owner of a new variety who receives a grant of rights has exclusive rights over use of the variety, and will be able to protect his/her new variety from exploitation by others. By enforcing the relevant governing acts and regulations, this sub-program stimulates plant breeding in Canada, facilitates better access to foreign varieties for Canadian producers and supports the protection of Canadian varieties in other countries.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Program- Intellectual Property Rights
2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Actual Spending 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
972,667 989,460 16,793
Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-Program – Intellectual Property Rights
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
10 8 (2)
Table 2-3e: Summary of Performance by Sub-Program: Intellectual Property Rights
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Plant breeders develop new varieties for the Canadian market Percentage of Plant Breeders' Rights applications that reach approval and are granted rights 100% 100% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the 2013 calendar year, the CFIA approved 322 applications for Plant Breeders' Rights (PBR), and 236 approved applications were granted PBR. More information on PBR can be found on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website Endnote xxiv.

Modernizing Plant Breeders' Rights

To strengthen breeders' rights in Canada, the CFIA continues to modernize the PBR program by updating the intellectual property framework, encouraging increased investment in and innovation of plant breeding. The CFIA completed the first phase of PBR modernization by tabling proposed amendments under Bill C-18, the Agricultural Growth Act. The CFIA has conducted 14 outreach sessions with various stakeholder organizations and will continue consultations in the summer of 2014. The CFIA will begin the second phase of PBR modernization, focusing on improving program efficiency and effectiveness.

2.1.4 International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through actively participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.

Based on market demand, the CFIA will also continue to negotiate and certify against export conditions in order to access export markets. The Agency, working with industry and interested stakeholders, will continue to develop and maintain export certification standards (which vary from country to country and commodity to commodity), conduct inspections and issue export certificates.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
2013-14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Total Authorities Available for use 2013–14 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
31,697,693 31,697,647 37,154,661 35,004,557 3,306,910
Human Resources (FTEs) – International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
338 343 5

The increase between Planned Spending and Actual Spending of $3.3 million and 5 FTEs are related to Agency investments in international engagement and standard setting primarily in relation to food, and expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board (such as parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service, etc.). In addition, the Agency made a concerted effort to improve the alignment of program expenditures and FTEs. As such, a portion of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Actual Spending was aligned to the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Program, while all BSE Planned Spending was aligned to the Animal Health Program, contributing to the increase in Actual Spending over Planned Spending for the International Collaboration and Technical Agreement Program.

Table 2-4a: Summary of Performance by Program: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance Status
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests 24 40 Met
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products Number of unjustified non- tariff barriers resolved 24 Footnote 11 50 Met
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA- led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 5 6 Met
Number of CFIA-led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments 6 Footnote 12 9 Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies (ISSB) meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests:

A category of meetings was inadvertently not forecast and ISSBs organized additional meetings that were not anticipated when the CFIA made its forecast for the RPP. Both factors contributed to the performance for this indicator far exceeding the planned target.

Number of unjustified non- tariff barriers resolved:

The CFIA exceeded the target set in 2013-14 because the Government of Canada's Global Commerce Strategy required that the Agency undertake a higher number of market access activities than had been planned.

Number of CFIA-led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments:

The delivery of a technical assistance activity by the CFIA is a demand driven response to a request from a foreign government that is assessed through an internal CFIA governance process on a case by case basis. In 2013-14, the CFIA identified and successfully delivered nine requests, surpassing the planned target of six.

International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

During 2013-14, the CFIA continued to engage international regulatory counterparts to support efforts to identify best practices in food safety, animal, and plant health regulatory approaches, advance resolution of potential issues and promote science-based approaches. For example, the CFIA:

  • continued discussions with China to advance collaboration on and resolution of food safety, animal health and plant health issues;
  • fostered further collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on modernizing food safety systems; and
  • hosted the Canada-European Union Veterinary Joint Management Committee to advance technical discussions on joint food safety and animal health objectives.
Advancing the Beyond the Border and Regulatory Cooperation Council initiatives with the U.S.

The CFIA continued implementation of the initiatives by working with industry stakeholders and U.S. counterparts to:

  • develop procedures to share information for joint assessments on food safety, plant health and animal health risks;
  • initiate pilots to create a common approach to meat cut nomenclature systems and to reduce quality related inspections for the import of U.S. onions;
  • draft a framework to implement the previously signed arrangement for mutual recognition of zoning decisions;
  • undertake stakeholder consultations on a Framework for the Perimeter Approach to Plant Protection; and
  • commence in-country food (non-meat) safety systems recognition assessments, with the intent to determine the comparability of the Canadian and U.S. systems.
Advancing food, animal health, and plant protection agenda multilaterally

As Canada's lead for the domestic implementation of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) Measures, the CFIA led and continued to coordinate Canada's SPS input into various WTO fora such as the Negotiating Group on Trade Facilitation.

Similarly, the CFIA led Canada's participation at the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE); and in certain committees of the Codex Alimentarius Commission to promote the development of international science-based standards consistent with Canada's regulatory framework.

Furthermore, the CFIA collaborated on a new Strategic Plan at the North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO), an IPPC regional body that develops regional phytosanitary standards to enable the trade of plants and plant products between Canada, the U.S. and Mexico.

Furthermore, the CFIA continued to work with AAFC in raising awareness about and developing global solutions with respect to low level presence (LLP) of genetically modified (GM) crops in international trade. LLP refers to the unintended presence, at low levels, of minute amounts of GM material that has been approved in at least one country but not in the country that is importing the product. Over the past year, we have collaborated with AAFC to build awareness of the issue of LLP on an international level, including exchanging information on how countries manage LLP and developing a common understanding of the trade risks posed by LLP.

Fulfilling Canada's obligations under various international treaties

In 2013-14, the CFIA continued to fulfill Canada's obligations under the Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Seed Schemes, the Association of Official Seed Certifying Agencies (AOSCA), the International Seed Testing Association (ISTA), the Association of Official Seed Analysts (AOSA) and the Association of American Seed Control Officials (AASCO).

Supporting bilateral and multilateral trade negotiations

Working closely with the Department of Foreign Affairs Trade and Development Canada (DFATD), the CFIA continued to co-lead the SPS components of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations, the Canada-India Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) and the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) negotiations. The CFIA also contributed to the development of positions and strategies for free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations for all SPS chapters as well as other chapters that affect the Agency's mandate.

2.1.5 Internal Services

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Internal Service
2013-14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Total Authorities Available for use 2013–14 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
128,153,885 130,281,252 137,563,698 131,959,340 1,678,088
Human Resources (FTEs) – Internal Service
2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013-14 Difference (actual minus planned)
898 856 (42)

The increase between Planned and Actual Spending of $1.7 million is primarily related to expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board (such as parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service, etc.) and collective bargaining settlement payments negotiated in the 2013-14 fiscal year. The decrease of 42 FTEs from Planned to Actual primarily relates to the application of reductions stemming from savings initiatives. In addition, the Agency made a concerted effort to improve the alignment of program expenditures and FTEs to the applicable programs.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
Enhancing the Agency's stewardship

The Agency continued to implement an Agency-wide stewardship approach, including:

  • project management improvement through the development of a refined project management policy framework and making available project management training, coaching and mentoring.
  • strategic procurement enhancement by linking procurement planning to projects and program planning. Branch procurement plans were completed for all branches and are used to inform on strategic procurement opportunities, establish priorities, and determine resource needs.
  • developed and is communicating the CFIA's Real Property Management Framework to stakeholders to support timely and informed real property management decisions and their relationship with the strategic outcome of programs.
Leveraging government-wide initiatives to improve information management and information systems

The CFIA made progress in the area of information and record management by exploring modern information management and collaborative solutions, while continuing to maintain and enhance its existing foundation. More specifically, the Agency:

  • partnered with Library and Archives Canada , to improve its paper holdings archives;
  • implemented TBS's Standard on Email Management and Record Keeping policies;
  • initiated, as part of Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) Record Keeping compliance, a number of activities related to information assets, including:
    • revision of the file classification plan to a function based system;
    • identification and completion of an inventory of records; and
    • revisions to the file retention plan to revisit the schedules for retention.
  • explored software options for collaborative solutions, which will complement the existing information systems widely used by staff as standard repositories, so as to better manage information assets and fulfill the growing need for timely, consistent, accessible, and trusted information.
  • as part of Open Government, implemented ATIP By-Online, which allows for access to information and privacy (ATIP) requests for CFIA information to be done online.
Risk Management

An All Hazard Risk Assessment (AHRA) was completed targeting 46 identified risks covering naturally occurring hazards i.e. biological, meteorological, and geographical and human induced events. The AHRA covers unintentional and intentional events as well as risks identified in the CFIA's Security Plan. This information was a key requirement for inclusion in the Agency's Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP).

Focusing on people

The CFIA implemented its new Conflict of Interest (CoI), Post-Employment Policy and related Standard Operating Procedures and new online submission form. A comprehensive Values and Ethics in-class training course with emphasis on CoI was delivered in the National Capital Region, and the Atlantic, Quebec and Western Areas. The Agency also launched its first Ethical Climate Survey to help identify the CFIA's ethical climate and culture. An in-depth analysis of the results is underway.

The CFIA Office of the Staffing Ombudsman, dedicated to addressing staffing complaints, went operational in 2013.

The Agency streamlined human resources (HR) service delivery for managers and employees by implementing a multi-channel HR contact centre (phone, email, and mail). Efficiency and effectiveness in the delivery of HR services have increased and the HR contact centre has completed over 117,000 transactions. Furthermore, 1-888 HR already handles various processes, including the departure process and Long Term Service Awards for the NCR and Atlantic.

Maintaining citizen-focused service delivery

The CFIA's Complaints and Appeals Office, created in April 2012 to support the Agency's commitment to improve service delivery for stakeholders, published its first Annual Report on the Agency's website Endnote xxv and shared with national associations in January 2014.

The Agency continued to increase transparency and provide Canadians with useful and timely information about the work the CFIA does and how it is done. The Agency has strived to make information more widely available to Canadians and other stakeholders by:

  • actively participating in the Consumer Association Roundtable (CAR) to receive input and provide clarification on various CFIA initiatives;
  • improving the Agency's website to provide easier access to, and clearer information to Canadians, in areas such as food recalls, allergy alerts, and enforcement data;
  • enhancing the ability for Canadians to report animal and aquatic animal diseases to the CFIA;
  • launching the industry labelling tool;
  • developing the Agency's 2013-2015 Social Media Strategy for Official Communications;
  • creating the CFIA's Facebook page; and
  • providing specific enforcement data (prosecution bulletins, suspended and cancelled organic certifications, and quarterly reports of non-compliant and disposed food products, refused shipments, Administrative Monetary Penalties, and license suspensions and cancellations)

Section III: Supplementary Information

3.1 Financial Information

3.1.1Financial Highlights

The financial highlights presented within the Agency's Performance Report are intended to serve as a general overview of the CFIA's financial position and operations. Financial statements are prepared in accordance with accrual accounting principles, Treasury Board accounting policies and year-end instructions issued by the Office of the Comptroller General which are based on Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector as required under Section 31 of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act.

The main financial highlights for 2013-2014 are the reduction of the allowance for workforce adjustments and the reduction in expenses related to employee severance benefits, offset by an increase in the allowance for expired collective agreements, resulting in regular expenditures consistent with 2012-2013 at the Agency level. However, the compensation payments from the infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) outbreak in the Atlantic region led to higher expenses in the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program. Food Safety program activities were higher than last year, offset by a reduction in the Internal Services program activities. Finally, capital investments related to the modernization of information technologies were less compared to the prior year.

Condensed Statement of Operations
Condensed Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
Year ended March 31, 2014
(In thousands of dollars)
2013–14 2012–13 Actual Difference (2013-14 actual minus 2013-14 planned) Difference (2013-14 actual minus 2012-13 actual)
Planned Results Actual
Total expenses 854,708 886,508 865,151 31,800 21,357
Total revenues 52,160 58,594 57,633 6,434 961
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 802,548 827,914 807,518 25,366 20,396
Agency – Net Financial position 120,295 29,246 29,403 (91,049) (157)
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31, 2014
(In thousands of dollars)
2013–14 2012–13 Difference (2013-14 minus 2012-13)
Total net liabilities 237,834 246,592 (8,758)
Total net financial assets 66,549 70,175 (3,626)
Agency – net debt 171,285 176,417 (5,132)
Total non-financial assets 200,531 205,820 (5,289)
Agency – Net Financial Position 29,246 29,403 (157)
Pie Chart - Liabilities by Type. Description follows.
Description for Pie Chart - Liabilities by Type
Employee severance benefits Accounts payable and accrued liabities Vacation pay and compensatory leave Deferred revenue
49.20%39.25%13.81%0.74%

Total liabilities at the end of 2013-2014 were $238 million, a decrease of $9 million (4%) over the previous year's total liabilities of $247 million. The decrease is mostly the result of a reduction of $6 million in the allowance for workforce adjustments and a reduction $13 million in allowance for employee severance benefits offset by an increase of $16 million of the allowance for expired collective agreements. Employee severance benefits represented 46% of total liabilities, at $110 million, followed by the accounts payable and accrued liabilities which corresponded to 39 % of total liabilities, at $93 million. Vacation pay and compensatory leave amounted to $33 million (14%), while deferred revenue represented less than 1% of total liabilities

Pie Chart - Assets by Type. Description follows.
Description for Pie Chart - Assets by Type
Tangible capital assets Due from CRF Accounts receivable and advances Inventory Prepaid expenses
74.60%21.86%3.05%0.30%0.18%

The total net financial assets of $67 million represents a decrease of $4 million (5%), mainly the result of a diminution in the amount of Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF) caused by a decrease in payables at year-end. The non-financial assets ($201 million) were $5 million less (3%) compared to 2012-2013. Tangible capital assets represented the largest portion of total assets, at $199 million (75%), while Due from CRF corresponded to 22% at $58 million. Accounts receivable and advances only represented 3%, followed by the inventory and prepaid expenses which were both less than 1% of total assets.

Pie Chart - Expenses by Program Activities. Description follows.
Description for Pie Chart - Expenses by Program Activities
Food Safety Program Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Plant Resources Program International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Internal Services
45.98%23.62%11.15%4.64%14.61%

The total expenses were $887 million in 2014, an increase of $22 million (3%) compared to last year. Significant variances came from an increase in payments related to the Infectious Salmon Anemia compensation payments (within the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program) and higher expenditures in the Food Safety Program (Food Safety Modernization, Inspection Verification Teams) offset by recent savings initiatives undertaken by the government. The Agency has achieved these savings mainly through efficiencies and has not reduced staff or cut programs that would in any way impact food safety or place the health and safety of Canadians at risk. In summary, the majority of the expenses, $408 million (46%) were under the Food Safety Program. The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program formed 24% of total expenses, while the Plant Resources Program represented 11%. Approximately 5% of all expenses were under the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements. Finally, the Internal Services amounted to $129 million (15%), a reduction of $14 million compared to 2012-2013.

Pie Chart - Revenues by Program Activities. Description follows.
Description for Pie Chart - Revenues by Program Activities
Food Safety Program Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Plant Resources Program International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Internal Services
57.27%6.28%14.23%21.77%0.45%

The total revenues amounted to $58.6 million for 2013-2014. The increase from 2012-2013 is mostly because of administrative monetary penalties which are no longer earned on behalf of Government. The inspection fees form the biggest portion of the revenues at $42 million, representing 72% of all revenues. 57% of the revenues was derived from the Food Safety Program, while the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements represented 22% at $12.8 million. The Plant Resources Program represented 14% of all revenues while the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program represented approximately 6%.

Comparison between Future-Oriented Financial Information and Actual Results

CFIA planned results are taken from the 2013-2014 Future-Oriented Financial Statements referenced in the Agency's 2013-2014 Report on Plans and Priorities.

The main difference between the planned and the actual expenses comes from the compensation payments related to the infectious salmon anaemia outbreak leading to higher expenses in the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program than forecasted.

The most significant assumption made in the 2013-2014 Future-Oriented Financial Statements was the expected renewal of various collective agreements, which did not materialize by the end of fiscal year 2013-2014. A large number of employees were forecasted to receive a payout for employee severance benefits because of that renewal. The impact is an important variance between the planned and actual net cash provided by government. That same item also affected the net financial position forecast.

3.1.2 Financial Statements

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Statement of Management Responsibility Including Internal Control Over Financial Reporting (Unaudited)
Year ended March 31, 2014

Responsibility for the integrity and objectivity of the accompanying financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2014 and all information contained in these statements rests with the Agency's management. These financial statements have been prepared by management using the Government's accounting policies, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards.

Management is responsible for the integrity and objectivity of the information in these financial statements. Some of the information in the financial statements is based on management's best estimates and judgement, and gives due consideration to materiality. To fulfill its accounting and reporting responsibilities, management maintains a set of accounts that provides a centralized record of the Agency's financial transactions. Financial information submitted to the Public Accounts of Canada and included in the Agency's Departmental Performance Report is consistent with these financial statements.

Management is also responsible for maintaining an effective system of internal control over financial reporting (ICFR) designed to provide reasonable assurance that financial information is reliable, that assets are safeguarded and that transactions are properly authorized and recorded in accordance with the Financial Administration Act and other applicable legislation, regulations, authorities and policies.

Management seeks to ensure the objectivity and integrity of data in its financial statements through careful selection, training and development of qualified staff; through organizational arrangements that provide appropriate divisions of responsibility; through communication programs aimed at ensuring that regulations, policies, standards, and managerial authorities are understood throughout the Agency and through conducting an annual risk-based assessment of the effectiveness of the system of ICFR.

The system of ICFR is designed to mitigate risks to a reasonable level based on an on-going process to identify key risks, to assess effectiveness of associated key controls, and to make any necessary adjustments.

A risk-based assessment of the system of ICFR for the year ended March 31, 2014 was completed in accordance with the Treasury Board Policy on Internal Control and the results and action plans are summarized in the annex.

The effectiveness and adequacy of the Agency's system of internal control is reviewed by the work of internal audit staff, who conduct periodic audits of different areas of the Agency's operations, and by the Departmental Audit Committee, which is responsible for providing the President with independent and objective advice on the maintenance of adequate control systems and the quality of financial reporting. The Departmental Audit Committee provides this support through oversight of core areas of the Agency's controls and accountabilities.

The financial statements of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency have not been audited.

Original Signed by

B.A. (Bruce) Archibald, PhD
President

Daniel G. Paquette, CPA, CA
Vice-President, CMB and Chief Financial Officer

Ottawa, Canada
August 27, 2014

Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31
(In thousands of dollars)
2014 2013
Liabilities
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (Note 4)
93,357 87,939
Vacation pay and compensatory leave
32,839 34,557
Deferred revenue
1,765 1,404
Employee severance benefits (Note 5 (b))
109,873 122,692
Total liabilities 237,834 246,592
Financial Assets
Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund
58,396 62,066
Accounts receivable and advances (Note 6)
8,217 9,152
Total gross financial assets 66,613 71,218
Accounts receivable and advances held on behalf of Government (Note 6) (64) (1,043)
Total net financial assets 66,549 70,175
Agency - net debt 171,285 176,417
Non-Financial assets
Prepaid expenses
484 1,434
Inventory
796 769
Tangible capital assets (Note 7)
199,251 203,617
Total non-financial assets 200,531 205,820
Agency - net financial position 29,246 29,403

Contingent liabilities (Note 8)
Contractual obligations (Note 9)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

Approved by

Original Signed by

B.A. (Bruce) Archibald, PhD
President

Daniel G. Paquette, CPA, CA
Vice-President, CMB and Chief Financial Officer

Ottawa, Canada
August 27, 2014

Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
Year ended March 31
(In thousands of dollars)
2014 Planned Results 2014 2013
Expenses
Food Safety Program
407,900 407,591 392,142
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
155,430 209,392 190,472
Plant Resources Program
99,282 98,841 100,074
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
36,617 41,145 38,910
Internal Services
155,483 129,361 143,623
Expenses incurred on behalf of Government
(4) 178 (70)
Total expenses 854,708 886,508 865,151
Revenues
Inspection fees
39,304 42,072 42,116
Registrations, permits, certificates
8,237 8,625 8,829
Miscellaneous fees and services
2,788 4,826 4,852
Establishment license fees
623 2,067 1,783
Administrative monetary penalties
1,726 1,221 2,012
Grading
193 152 175
Interest
32 30 32
Revenues earned on behalf of Government
(743) (399) (2,166)
Total revenues 52,160 58,594 57,633
Net cost of operations 802,548 827,914 807,518
Government funding and transfers
Net Cash provided by government
825,086 749,117 709,583
Change in due from Consolidated Revenue Fund
2,046 (3,670) 15,542
Services provided without charge by other government departments (Note 10)
79,497 82,284 85,870
Assets funded by other government departments (OGD)
1,200 67 130
Transfer of assets and liabilities from/to OGD
- (41) (1,066)
Net cost of operations after government funding and transfers (105,281) 157 (2,541)
Agency - net financial position - Beginning of year 15,014 29,403 26,862
Agency - net financial position - End of year 120,295 29,246 29,403

Segmented information (Note 11)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

Statement of Change in Agency Net Debt (Unaudited)
Statement of Change in Agency Net Debt (Unaudited)
Year ended March 31
(In thousands of dollars)
2014 Planned Results 2014 2013
Net cost of operations after government funding and transfers (105,281) 157 (2,541)
Change in tangible capital assets
Acquisition of tangible capital assets
39,946 29,085 33,631
Amortization of tangible capital assets
(36,140) (32,484) (34,395)
Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets
(244) (533) (321)
Loss on disposal of tangible capital assets
(1,115) (810) (34)
Post-capitalization of tangible capital assets
400 350 48
Transfer from/to low value assets
(44) - -
Tangible capital assets funded by other government departments (OGD)
1,025 67 130
Tangible capital assets transfer to OGD
- (41) -
Total change due to tangible capital assets 3,828 (4,366) (941)
Change in inventories (31) 27 (279)
Change in prepaid expenses 156 (950) 273
Net increase in Agency net debt (101,328) (5,132) (3,488)
Agency - net debt - Beginning of year 188,528 176,417 179,905
Agency - net debt - End of year 87,200 171,285 176,417

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

Statement of Cash Flows (Unaudited)
Statement of Cash Flows (Unaudited)
Year ended March 31
(In thousands of dollars)
2014 2013
Operating activities
Cash received from:
Fees, permits and certificates
(59,761) (60,281)
Cash paid for:
Salaries and employees benefits
567,281 573,125
Operating and maintenance
152,186 119,189
Transfer payments
60,471 42,137
Revenues collected on behalf of Government
388 2,103
Cash used by operating activities 720,565 676,273
Capital investment activities
Acquisition of tangible capital assets
29,085 33,631
Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets
(533) (321)
Cash used by capital investment activities 28,552 33,310
Net cash provided by Government of Canada 749,117 709,583

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Notes to the Financial Statements (Unaudited)
Year ended March 31, 2014
1. Authority and Purposes

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (the "Agency") was established, effective April 1, 1997, under the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act. The Act consolidates all federally mandated food and fish inspection services and federal animal and plant health activities into a single agency.

The Agency is a departmental corporation named in Schedule II to the Financial Administration Act and reports to Parliament through the Minister of Health.

The mandate of the Agency is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of federal inspection and related services for food, animals and plants. The objectives of the Agency are to contribute to a safe food supply and accurate product information; to contribute to the continuing health of animals and plants; and to facilitate trade in food, animals, plants, and related products.

In delivering its mandate, the Agency operates under the following 4 program activities supported by internal services:

  1. Food Safety Program: The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.
  2. Animal Health And Zoonotics Program: The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, mitigating and managing risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instils confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.
  3. Plant Resources Program: The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability.

    The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instils confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

  4. International Collaboration And Technical Agreements: The CFIA's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through actively participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and, the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.
  5. Internal Services: Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communication Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Material Management Services; Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across the organization and not those provided specifically to a program.

The Agency is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the following acts: Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act, Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act, Feeds Act, Fertilizers Act, Health of Animals Act, Plant Breeders' Rights Act, Plant Protection Act, Seeds Act, and the Safe Food for Canadians Act, which once enacted, will replace the Canada Agricultural Products Act, Fish Inspection Act, Meat Inspection Act, and Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act (as it relates to food). In addition, the Agency is responsible for enforcement of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act and the Food and Drugs Act as they relate to food, except those provisions that relate to public health, safety, or nutrition.

Operating and capital expenditures are funded by the Government of Canada through parliamentary authorities. Compensation payments under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act and employee benefits are authorized by separate statutory authorities.

Revenues generated by its operations are deposited to the Consolidated Revenue Fund and are available for use by the Agency.

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

These financial statements have been prepared using the Government's accounting policies stated below, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards. The presentation and results using the stated accounting policies do not result in any significant differences from Canadian public sector accounting standards.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

  1. Parliamentary authorities

    The Agency is mainly financed by the Government of Canada through parliamentary authorities. Authorities provided to the Agency do not parallel financial reporting according to generally accepted accounting principles since authorities are primarily based on cash flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in the Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position and in the Statement of Financial Position are not necessarily the same as those provided through authorities from Parliament. Note 3 provides a high level reconciliation between the bases of reporting. The planned results amounts in the Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position are the amounts reported in the future-oriented financial statements approved in February 2013 and included in the 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP). The planned results are consistent with the information presented in the RPP and are based on approved budgetary figures as of December 2012.

  2. Net cash provided by Government of Canada

    The Agency operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administrated by the Receiver General for Canada. All cash received by the Agency is deposited to the CRF and all cash disbursements made by the Agency are paid from the CRF.

    The net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements including transactions between departments of the Government of Canada.

  3. Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF)

    The amount of due from CRF are the result of timing differences at year-end between when a transaction affects authorities and when it is processed through the CRF. Amounts due from the CRF represent the net amount of cash that the Agency is entitled to draw from the CRF without further authorities to discharge its liabilities.

  4. Revenues

    Revenues for fees, permits and certificates are recognized in the accounts as the services are provided.

    Funds received from external parties for specified purposes are recorded upon receipt as deferred revenue. Revenue from external parties for specified purposes is recognized in the period in which the related expenses are incurred.

    Other revenues are accounted for in the period in which the underlying transaction or event occurred that gave rise to the revenues.

    Revenues earned on behalf of Government are non-respendable and are not available to discharge the Agency's liabilities. These revenues are presented as a reduction to the Agency's revenues. While the President is expected to maintain accounting control, he or she has no authority regarding the disposition of non-respendable revenues.

    As a result, non-respendable revenues are considered to be earned on behalf of Government of Canada and are therefore presented in reduction of the Agency's revenues.

  5. Expenses

    Expenses are recorded on an accrual basis:

    Transfer payments are recognized in the year in which the recipient has met the eligibility criteria or fulfilled the terms of a contractual transfer agreement.

    Vacation pay and compensatory leave are expensed as the benefits accrue to employees under their respective terms of employment.

    Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation, the employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans and legal services are recorded as operating expenses at their estimated cost.

  6. Employee future benefits
    1. Pension benefits:

      The Agency's eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan (the "Plan"), a multi-employer plan administered by the Government of Canada. Both the employees and the Agency contribute to the cost of the Plan. The Agency's contributions are expensed during the year in which the services are rendered and represent the total pension obligation of the Agency. Under present legislation the Agency is not required to make contributions with respect to actuarial deficits of the Plan.

    2. Severance benefits:

      Eligible employees are entitled to severance benefits, as provided for under labor contracts and conditions of employment. The cost of these benefits is accrued as employees render the services necessary to earn them. The obligation relating to the benefits earned by employees is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits at the Agency level using specific rates provided by the Office of the Chief Actuary of Canada.

    3. Other future benefit plans:

      The Government of Canada sponsors a variety of other future benefit plans from which employees and former employees can benefit during or after employment or upon retirement. The Public Service Health Care Plan and the Pensioners' Dental Services Plan represent the two major future benefit plans available to the Agency's employees.

      The Agency does not pay for these programs as they fall under the Government of Canada`s financial responsibilities, but the Agency records its share of the annual benefits paid under these programs as a service provided without charge by other government departments. No amount is recorded in the Agency's financial statements with regard to either the actuarial liability of these programs at year end or the annual increase of such liabilities.

  7. Accounts receivable and advances

    Accounts receivable and advances are stated at amounts expected to be ultimately realized; a provision is made for receivables where recovery is considered uncertain.

  8. Contingent liabilities

    Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities which may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded. If the likelihood is not determinable or an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.

  9. Inventory

    Inventory consists of laboratory materials, supplies and livestock held for future program delivery and not intended for re-sale. It is valued at cost. If it no longer has service potential, it is valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value.

  10. Tangible capital assets

    All tangible capital assets and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $10,000 or more are recorded at their acquisition cost. Amortization of tangible capital assets is recorded on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:

    Tangible capital assets
    Asset class Amortization Period
    Buildings 20-30 years
    Machinery and equipment 5-20 years
    Computer equipment and software 3-10 years
    Vehicles 7-10 years
    Leasehold improvements Lesser of the remaining term of the lease or useful life of the improvement
    Assets under construction Once in service, in accordance with asset class
  11. Measurement uncertainty

    The preparation of these financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses reported in the financial statements. At the time of preparation of these statements, management believes the estimates and assumptions to be reasonable.

    The most significant items where estimates are used are contingent liabilities, the liability for employee severance benefits and the useful life of tangible capital assets. Actual results could significantly differ from those estimated. Management's estimates are reviewed periodically and, as adjustments become necessary, they are recorded in the financial statements in the year they become known.

3. Parliamentary Authorities

The Agency receives most of its funding through annual Parliamentary authorities. Items recognized in the Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position and the Statement of Financial Position in one year may be funded through Parliamentary authorities in prior, current or future years. Accordingly, the Agency has different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis. The differences are reconciled in the following tables:

  1. Reconciliation of net cost of operations to current year authorities used:
    Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers
    (In thousands of dollars) 2014 2013
    Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers $827,914 $807,518
    Adjustments for items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting authorities:
    Add (less):
    Services provided without charge by other government departments
    (82,284) (85,870)
    Amortization of tangible capital assets
    (32,484) (34,395)
    Revenues pursuant to Section 30 of the CFIA act
    57,981 56,003
    Accounts receivable and liabilities transferred to Shared Services Canada
    - (1,066)
    Bad debt expense
    (294) (106)
    Net changes in future funding requirements
    6,827 6,648
    Loss on disposal of tangible capital assets
    (810) (34)
    Post-capitalization of tangible capital assets
    350 48
    Total (50,714) (58,772)
    Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities:
    Add (less):
    Acquisition of tangible capital assets
    29,085 33,631
    Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets
    (533) (321)
    Total 28,552 33,310
    Current year authorities used $805,752 $782,056
  2. Authorities provided and used:
    Authorities provided and used
    (In thousands of dollars) 2014 2013
    Vote 11 - Operating expenditures $600,052 $624,956
    Vote 13 - Capital expenditures 26,076 39,465
    Revenues pursuant to Section 30 of the CFIA act 88,248 60,758
    Statutory contributions to employee benefits plans and compensation payments 140,719 121,553
    Less:
    Authorities available for future years
    (34,936) (30,412)
    Lapsed authority – operating
    (9,796) (26,332)
    Lapsed authority – capital
    (4,611) (7,932)
    Current year authorities used $805,752 $782,056
4. Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities

The following table presents details of the Agency's account payable and accrued liabilities:

Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities
(In thousands of dollars) 2014 2013
Accounts payable to other government department (OGD) $5,934 $8,362
Accounts payable to external parties 41,284 44,898
Total for accounts payable 47,218 53,260
Accrued liabilities 46,139 34,679
Total $93,357 $87,939

In Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012, the Government announced savings measures to be implemented by departments over the next three fiscal years starting in 2012-2013. As a result, the Agency has recorded at March 31, 2014 an obligation for termination benefits for an amount of $850,482 (2013 - $6,462,748) as part of accrued liabilities to reflect the estimated workforce adjustment costs.

5. Employee Benefits
  1. Pension benefits

    The Agency's employees participate in the public service pension plan (the "Plan"), which is sponsored and administered by the Government of Canada. Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2 percent per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings. The benefits are integrated with Canada/Québec Pension Plan benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

    Both the employees and the Agency contribute to the cost of the Plan. Due to the amendment of the Public Service Superannuation Act following the implementation of provisions related to the Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012, employee contributors have been divided into two groups – Group 1 relates to existing plan members as of December 31, 2012 and Group 2 relates to members joining the Plan as of January 1, 2013. Each group has a distinct contribution rate.

    The 2013-2014 expense amounts to $57,666,000 ($58,962,000 in 2012-2013). For Group 1 members, the expense represents approximately 1.6 times (1.7 times in 2012-2013) the employee contributions and, for Group 2 members, approximately 1.5 times (1.6 times in 2012-2013) the employee contributions.

    The Agency's responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan's sponsor.

  2. Severance benefits

    The Agency provides severance benefits to its employees based on eligibility, years of service and final salary. These severance benefits are not pre-funded and thus have no assets, resulting in a plan deficit equal to the accrued benefit obligation. Benefits will be paid from future authorities. Information about the severance benefits, measured for March 31, is as follows:

    As part of collective agreement negotiations with certain employee groups, and changes to conditions of employment for executives and certain non-represented employees, the accumulation of severance benefits under the employee severance pay program ceased for these employees commencing in 2012.

    Employees subject to these changes have been given the option to be immediately paid the full or partial value of benefits earned to date or collect the full or remaining value of benefits on termination from the public service. These changes have been reflected in the calculation of the outstanding severance benefit obligation.

    Accrued benefit obligation
    (In thousands of dollars) 2014 2013
    Accrued benefit obligation, beginning of year $122,692 $121,773
    Expense for the year (3,279) 13,027
    Benefits paid during the year (9,540) (12,108)
    Accrued benefit obligation, end of year $109,873 $122,692
6. Accounts Receivable and Advances

The following table presents details of accounts receivable and advances:

Accounts Receivable and Advances
(In thousands of dollars) 2014 2013
Receivables from other government departments (OGD) $2,903 $3,514
Receivables from external parties 5,800 6,090
Employee advances 12 55
Sub-total 8,715 9,659
Less:
Allowance for doubtful accounts on receivables from external parties
(498) (507)
Accounts receivable 8,217 9,152
Accounts receivable and advances held on behalf of Government (64) (1,043)
Net accounts receivable $8,153 $8,109
7. Tangible Capital Assets
(In thousands of dollars)
Cost Accumulated amortization
Capital asset class Opening balance Acquisi-
tions
Adjustments Table note 1 Disposals and write-offs Closing balance Opening balance Amorti-
zation Table note 2
Disposals and write-offs Closing balance 2014 Net book value 2013 Net book value
Land $3,331 $- $- $- $3,331 $- $- $- $- $3,331 $3,331
Buildings 286,484 1,407 682 161 288,412 204,374 10,403 146 214,631 73,781 82,110
Machinery and equipment 89,372 5,803 - 2,827 92,348 46,152 5,659 1,337 50,474 41,874 43,220
Computer equipment and software 76,705 8,183 3,134 1,178 86,844 43,155 10,284 1,491 51,947 34,897 33,550
Vehicles 37,719 2,345 - 5,336 34,728 26,854 2,830 5,319 24,365 10,363 10,866
Assets under construction 17,882 10,930 (4,900) 281 23,631 - - - - 23,631 17,882
Leasehold improvements 51,700 1,387 771 360 53,498 39,042 3,308 226 42,124 11,374 12,658
Total $563,193 $30,055 $(313) $10,143 $582,792 $359,576 $32,484 $8,519 $383,541 $199,251 $203,617

Table Notes

Table Note 1

Adjustments include assets under construction of $4,900,000 that were transferred to the other categories upon completion of the assets.

Return to table note 1 referrer

Table Note 2

Amortization expense for the year ended March 31, 2014 is $32,484,000 (2013 - $34,395,000).

Return to table note 2 referrer

8. Contingent Liabilities

Claims relating to both legal and employee grievances have been made against the Agency in the normal course of operations. Some of these potential liabilities may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimate of liability is accrued and an expense recorded in the financial statements.

Amounts have been accrued for contingent liabilities as at March 31, 2014 pertaining to legal claims. The amount of the contingent liabilities for legal claims recognized is based on management's best estimate. Other legal claims against the Agency and other defendants include a class action suit related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) for which the likelihood of liability is not determinable.

No amounts have been accrued pertaining to employee grievances as at March 31, 2014.

9. Contractual Obligations

The nature of the Agency's activities can result in some large multi-year contracts and agreements whereby the Agency will be obligated to make future payments when the services/goods are received. Significant contractual obligations that can be reasonably estimated are summarized as follows:

Contractual Obligations
(In thousands of dollars) 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 and thereafter Total
Capital projects $4,556 $2,984 $1,391 $- $- $8,931
Operating leases 2,223 320 320 314 4 3,181
Transfer payments 371 170 8 - - 549
Operating contracts 14,274 6,497 503 481 19 21,774
Total $21,424 $9,971 $2,222 $795 $23 $34,435
10.Related Party Transactions

The Agency is related as a result of common ownership to all Government of Canada departments, agencies, and Crown corporations. The Agency enters into transactions with these entities in the normal course of business and on normal trade terms.

  1. Services provided without charge by other government departments

    During the year, the Agency received the employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans, accommodation, and legal services, without charge from other government departments. These amounts have been recognized in the Agency's Statement of Operations and Agency Net Financial Position as follows:

    Related Party Transactions
    (In thousands of dollars) 2014 2013
    Employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans $39,832 $42,978
    Accommodation 30,372 31,101
    Legal services 660 928
    Shared Services Canada expenses 11,420 10,863
    Total $82,284 $85,870
  2. Other transactions with related parties
    Other transactions with related parties
    (In thousands of dollars) 2014 2013
    Accounts receivable from other government departments and agencies $2,903 $3,514
    Accounts payable to other government departments and agencies 5,934 8,362
    Expenses – Other Government departments and agencies 120,881 113,245
    Revenues – Other Government departments and agencies 540 371
11. Segmented information

Presentation by segment is based on the Agency's program activities architecture. The presentation by segment is based on the same accounting policies as described in the Summary of significant accounting policies in note 2. The following table presents the expenses incurred and revenues generated by program, by major object of expenses and by major type of revenues. The segment results for the period are as follows:

Segmented information
(In thousands of dollars) 2014 2013
Food Safety Program Animal Health and
Zoonotics Program
Plant Resources Program International Collaboration and
Technical Agreements
Internal Services Total Total
Transfer Payments
Compensation payments $- $57,604 $689 $- $- $58,293 $38,309
Other 310 365 25 1,426 - 2,126 1,486
Total transfer payments 310 57,969 714 1,426 - 60,419 39,795
Operating Expenses
Salaries and employee benefits 308,260 106,855 72,401 33,970 82,900 604,386 613,349
Professional and special services 32,059 11,098 7,940 509 29,637 81,243 70,363
Accommodation 20,073 8,438 5,134 1,698 4,132 39,475 40,436
Amortization 14,850 7,867 3,609 1,478 4,679 32,483 34,395
Travel and relocation 10,850 3,765 2,204 1,073 2,314 20,206 19,058
Utilities, materials and supplies 8,508 6,544 3,380 260 495 19,187 19,449
Communications 5,249 2,778 1,276 521 1,909 11,733 11,232
Furniture and equipment 3,514 1,598 635 44 786 6,577 6,624
Repairs 2,426 1,746 871 83 1,102 6,228 6,233
Equipment rentals 645 371 341 16 812 2,185 1,925
Information 260 91 204 13 368 936 1,859
Loss of disposal of assets 370 196 90 37 117 810 34
Miscellaneous 217 76 42 17 110 462 469
Expenses incurred on behalf of Government - - - - 178 178 (70)
Total operating expenses 407,281 151,423 98,127 39,719 129,539 826,089 825,356
Total expenses 407,591 209,392 98,841 41,145 129,539 886,508 865,151
Revenues
Inspection fees 28,971 905 5,392 6,804 - 42,072 42,116
Registrations, permits, certificates 2,140 818 837 4,830 - 8,625 8,829
Miscellaneous fees and services 244 1,421 1,523 1,120 518 4,826 4,852
Establishment license fees 2,054 - 13 - - 2,067 1,783
Administrative monetary penalties - 534 573 - 114 1,221 2,012
Grading 148 - - 4 - 152 175
Interest - - - - 30 30 32
Revenues earned on behalf of Government - - - - (399) (399) (2,166)
Total revenues 33,557 3,678 8,338 12,758 263 58,594 57,633
Net cost of operations $374,034 $205,714 $90,503 $28,387 $129,276 $827,914 $807,518
12. Comparative information

Comparative figures have been reclassified to conform to the current year's presentation.

Summary of the assessment of effectiveness of the systems of internal control over financial reporting and the action plan of the Agence canadienne d'inspection des aliments for fiscal year 2013–14 (unaudited)

Annex to the Statement of Management Responsibility Including Internal Control over Financial Reporting

1. Introduction

This document provides summary information on the measures taken by the Agence canadienne d'inspection des aliments (CFIA or the Agency) to maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting (ICFR), including information on internal control management and assessment results and related action plans.

Detailed information on the CFIA's authority, mandate and program activities can be found in the Agency's Departmental Performance Report and Report on Plans and Priorities.

2. Agency system of internal control over financial reporting

2.1 Internal Control Management

The CFIA has a well-established governance and accountability structure to support departmental assessment efforts and oversight of its system of internal control. An Agency internal control management framework, approved by the President, is in place and includes:

  • Organizational accountability structures as they relate to internal control management to support sound financial management, including roles and responsibilities of senior managers in their areas of responsibility for control management;
  • Values and ethics;
  • Ongoing communication and training on statutory requirements, and policies and procedures for sound financial management and control; and
  • At least semi-annual monitoring of and regular updates on internal control management, as well as the provision of related assessment results and action plans to the President and departmental senior management and, as applicable, the Agency Audit Committee.

The Agency Audit Committee provides advice to the President on the adequacy and functioning of the Agency's risk management, control and governance frameworks and processes.

2.2 Service arrangements relevant to financial statements

The Agency relies on other organizations for the processing of certain transactions that are recorded in its financial statements:

Common arrangements

  • Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) centrally administers pay services and the procurement of goods and services, as per the Agency's Delegation of Authority, and provides accommodation services;
  • The Treasury Board Secretariat provides the Agency with information used to calculate various accruals and allowances;
  • The Department of Justice provides legal services to the CFIA; and
  • Shared Services Canada (SSC) provides IT infrastructure services to the Agency in the areas of data centre and network services. The scope and responsibilities are addressed in the interdepartmental arrangement between SSC and the Agency.

Specific arrangements

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) provides the CFIA with:
    • The SAP financial system platform to capture and report all financial transactions;
    • The Enterprise data warehouse to report financial information; and
    • The PeopleSoft human resource system platform to manage pay and leave transactions.
3. Agency assessment results during fiscal year 2013-14

The key findings and significant adjustments required from the current year's assessment activities are summarized below.

New or significantly amended key controls: In the current year, there were no significantly amended key controls in existing processes which required a reassessment. Design and operating effectiveness testing was conducted on any new key controls identified. Significant adjustments were not required for the new key controls.

Ongoing monitoring program: As part of its rotational ongoing monitoring plan, the Agency completed its reassessment of entity-level controls within People Management, Information Technology General Controls within SAP/Enterprise and the financial controls within the business processes of Pay and Financial Close & Reporting. For the most part, the key controls that were tested performed as intended, with remediation required as follows:

  • Strengthen controls over verification of pay transactions and related quality assurance activities; and
  • More frequent review of pay system user access to ensure incompatible functions are segregated.
4. Departmental Action Plan

4.1 Progress during fiscal year 2013–14

The CFIA continued to conduct its ongoing monitoring according to the previous fiscal year's rotational plan as shown in the following table:

Previous year's rotational ongoing monitoring plan for current year
Previous year's rotational ongoing monitoring plan for current year Status
Complete on-going operating effectiveness testing for People Management, SAP/Enterprise and Financial Close & Reporting.Completed as planned; no remedial actions required.
Complete on-going operating effectiveness testing for Pay.Completed as planned; remedial actions in progress.
Continue to follow up on outstanding improvement opportunities identified in previous years.Improvement opportunities are substantially completed for Capital Assets and are in progress for IT Access Control and Revenue.

Other improvement opportunities identified in previous years have been fully implemented.

4.2 Action Plan for the next fiscal year and subsequent years

The CFIA's rotational ongoing monitoring plan over the next three years, based on an annual validation of risks and controls and related adjustments as required, is shown in the following table.

Key Control Areas
Key Control Areas 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
Entity level controls
Values and Ethics No Yes No
Governance No Yes No
Risk Management Yes No Yes
Financial Management Yes No Yes
People Management No Yes No
Information technology general controls under Agency management
Access Control and Change Management Yes No Yes
SAP/Enterprise No No Yes
PeopleSoft No Yes No
Electronic Invoicing No Yes No
Business Process Controls
Pay Yes Yes Yes
Non-Pay (Operating and Maintenance) No Yes No
Revenue Yes No Yes
Capital Assets Yes No Yes
Financial Close and Reporting Yes Yes Yes
Statutory Compensation Payments No Yes No

In addition to the risk-based on-going monitoring plan, the Agency will continue to address outstanding remediation and will also conduct internal control assessment work to support the transfer of pay services to the PWGSC Public Service Pay Centre.

3.2 Supplementary Information Tables

Greening Government Operations (GGO)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Target

The federal government will take action now to reduce levels of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from its operations to match the national target of 17% below 2005 by 2020.
(Target 8.5 from 2010–13 FSDS)
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Departmental GHG reduction target: Percentage of absolute reduction in GHG emissions by FY 2020–21, relative to FY 2005–06. 13%
Departmental GHG emissions in FY 2005–06, in kilotons of CO2 equivalent. 6.43 Kt CO2e
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotons of CO2 equivalent. FY 2011-2012 5.26 Kt CO2e
FY 2012-2013 5.19 Kt CO2e
FY 2013-2014 4.92 Kt CO2e
FY 2014-2015
FY 2015-2016
FY 2016-2017
FY 2017-2018
FY 2018-2019
FY 2019-2020
FY 2020-2021
Change in departmental GHG emissions from FY 2005–06 to the end of the given fiscal year, expressed as a percentage. FY 2011-2012 -18%
FY 2012-2013 -19%
FY 2013-2014 -23.5%
FY 2014-2015
FY 2015-2016
FY 2016-2017
FY 2017-2018
FY 2018-2019
FY 2019-2020
FY 2020-2021
Existence of an implementation plan to reduce GHG emissions. Yes
Strategies and/or Comments
  1. This target only captures CFIA's GHG emissions from its fleet sources (e.g. on-road vehicles, marine vessels, agricultural equipment, recreational vehicles and lawn and garden equipment).
  2. Excluded emission sources, in certain instances, are those from operations during which the primary function is national safety or security.
  3. Indirect sources of emissions are excluded (e.g. business travel, employee commuting, movement of goods, private mileage and outsourced activities).
  4. CFIA has developed a Ground Transportation Management Strategy. Emissions reductions were considered when developing the strategy and will continue to be considered in the strategy's implementation.
  5. This target has been exceeded by purchasing fuel efficient vehicles since 2005, decreasing vehicle usage through better planning of inspections, and increasing the use of videoconferencing and teleconferencing for meetings.

Surplus Electronic and Electrical Equipment Target

By March 31, 2014, each department will reuse or recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner.
(Target 8.6 from 2010–13 FSDS)
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Existence of an implementation plan for the disposal of all departmentally generated EEE. Yes
Total number of departmental locations with an EEE implementation plan fully implemented, expressed as a percentage of all locations, by the end of the given fiscal year. FY 2011-2012 100%
FY 2012-2013 100%
FY 2013-2014 100%
Strategies and/or Comments
  1. The plan has been implemented at all CFIA offices across Canada. CFIA follows the PWGSC "Guideline for the disposal of Federal Surplus Electronic and Electrical Equipment".
  2. Location is defined as all CFIA locations where CFIA personnel maintain a physical presence.
  3. The process for proper disposal of EEE waste has been communicated to all CFIA staff.

Printing Unit Reduction Target

By March 31, 2013, each department will achieve an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units. Departments will apply the target where building occupancy levels, security considerations, and space configuration allow.
(Target 8.7 from 2010–13 FSDS)
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Opportunity for improvement
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow. FY 2011-2012 1.9 : 1
FY 2012-2013 2.1 : 1
FY 2013-2014 2.0 : 1
Strategies and/or Comments
  1. Print units have been defined as desktop printers, network printers, multifunctional devices (MFD), photocopiers, faxes and scanners.
  2. Excluded are work locations with less than 20 CFIA employees because opportunity for increasing efficiencies is minimal. Also, all laboratories will be excluded from the scope as many of their units are connected to specialized equipment and cannot be replaced by MFD.
  3. Excluded print units are plotters, label printers and thermal printers.
  4. Opportunity for improvement: The printer reduction initiative will be launched in April 2014 and the CFIA is expected to meet the 8:1 ratio target by the end of July 2014.

Paper Consumption Target

By March 31, 2014, each department will reduce internal paper consumption per office employee by 20%. Each department will establish a baseline between 2005–06 and 2011–12, and an applicable scope.
(Target 8.8 from 2010–13 FSDS)
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Number of sheets of internal office paper purchased or consumed per office employee in the 2008-2009 fiscal year. 5,825 sheets/OE
Cumulative reduction (or increase) in paper consumption per office employee in the given fiscal year, expressed as a percentage, relative to the selected baseline year. FY 2011-2012 -20% or 4,640 sheets/OE
FY 2012-2013 -32% or 3,941 sheets/OE
FY 2013-2014 -44% or 3,243 sheets/OE
Strategies and/or Comments
  1. Office employees are defined as indeterminate, term, student, seasonal and as required staff.
  2. Paper is defined as printer paper purchased in packages of 500 sheets.
  3. Determined by using CFIA Human Resources data, year end population totals are used as the number of office employees for each fiscal year.
  4. This target has been exceeded for a number of reasons:
    1. Promoting and defaulting all print jobs to double-sided printing.
    2. Encouraging electronic sharing of documents.

Green Meetings Target

By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a guide for greening meetings.
(Target 8.9 from 2010–13 FSDS)
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Presence of a green meetings guide. Yes, adopted March 31, 2012
Strategies and/or Comments
  1. Adoption of the green meetings guide is defined by its approval from senior management.
  2. The guide is applicable to all internal CFIA meetings as external meetings with other government departments, industry and stakeholders. It provides green options in the areas of hospitality, paper use, procurement, accommodation and travel.
  3. The guide defines the roles and responsibilities of CFIA managers, meeting planners and the National Environmental Office in the application and implementation of the guide.
  4. To have an 'Exceeded' target status, the CFIA would have to develop and implement a comprehensive plan to maintain the adoption of the Green Meeting Guideline. This would include tracking its use and reporting on the reduced environmental impact as a result of its implementation. This is currently not in place.

Green Procurement Targets

As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least three SMART green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts.
(Target 8.10 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Green Procurement Table-A
1. By April 1, 2013, the CFIA will utilize green consolidated procurement instruments for 95% of its photocopiers and printers procured in a given fiscal year.
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Number of photocopiers and printers procured in 2011-2012 23
Percent of photocopiers and printers procured in a given fiscal year where green consolidated procurement instruments were used. FY 2011-2012 87%
FY 2012-2013 100%
FY 2013-2014 100%
Strategies and/or Comments
  1. The target only includes photocopiers and printers procured or leased through CFIA's Contracting and Procurement Policy Division.
  2. This target excludes any procurement of specialized/technical equipment where green products are not available.
  3. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Well defined achievement level of 95%
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time
    • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result
    • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of photocopiers and printers and using green procurement instruments will reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions
    • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation
  4. Data is gathered manually from procurement records
  5. Environmental benefits are derived from these products as they are leased or purchased from PWGSC certified green suppliers who use minimum greenhouse gas emissions and non-fossil fuel products for manufacturing and machining these commodities. As well, these products are fully recyclable thus minimizing hazardous waste disposal.
Green Procurement Table-B
2. By April 1, 2013, the CFIA will utilize green consolidated procurement instruments for 95% of its computers procured in a given fiscal year.
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Number of computers procured in 2011-2012 10
Percent of computers procured in a given fiscal year where green consolidated procurement instruments were used FY 2011-2012 100%
FY 2012-2013 100%
FY 2013-2014 100%
Strategies and/or Comments
  1. The target only includes computers procured by CFIA's Contracting and Procurement Policy Division.
  2. This target excludes any procurement of specialized/technical equipment where green instruments are not available.
  3. Computers are defined as the CPUs of PCs, as these have the most green procurement opportunities.
  4. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Well defined achievement level of 95%
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time
    • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result
    • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of computers and using green procurement instruments will reduce energy use and green house gas emissions
    • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation
  5. Data is gathered manually from procurement records.
  6. Estimated environmental benefits: Personal Computers (PCs) are purchased from PWGSC certified green suppliers list and are completely recyclable through the PWGSC (OGGO) EEE waste disposal program initiative.
  7. This target has been exceeded since CFIA's Contracting and Procurement Policy Division has a mechanism in place to ensure when green procurement instruments are available for the procurement of computers, they are utilized.
Green Procurement Table-C
3. By March 31, 2014, 75% of vehicles purchased annually will be from the CFIA Preauthorised Vehicle List (PAVL), where operational requirements allow.
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Number of vehicles purchased in 2011-2012 55
Percent of vehicles procured in a given fiscal year from the CFIA Preauthorised Vehicle List (PAVL). FY 2011-2012 69%
FY 2012-2013 98%
FY 2013-2014 100%
Strategies and/or Comments
  1. The target does not include farm equipment, boats, ATVs or snowmobiles.
  2. This self-selected target is SMART:
    1. Specific: Well defined achievement level of 75%
    2. Measurable: Allows comparison over time
    3. Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result
    4. Relevant: The CFIA develops a PAVL every year based on vehicles that are the most fuel efficient in their class in the Government Motor Vehicle Ordering Guide.
    5. Time-bound: Date established for target implementation
  • The tracking for this target is done through a consolidated acquisition spreadsheet.
  • The PAVL is distributed via email to all stakeholders every year in advance of vehicle procurement.
  • The CFIA acquired 148 vehicles in 2013-2014.
  • The CFIA has in place a Ground Transportation Management Strategy which considers impacts to greenhouse gas emissions when making vehicle purchasing decisions.
  • Based on the Ground Transportation Management Strategy, the CFIA has introduced a fleet utilization benchmark which is the lower amount of either 18,000 kms or 200 days of use to better optimize fleet usage. Based on this benchmark, the CFIA is reducing its fleet by 255 units over a 3 year period commencing in fiscal 2013/14. Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) is currently recommending that the entire GoC adopt this benchmark which TBS will measure during MAF assessments.

As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision making.
(Target 8.11 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Training for select employees

Green Procurement Table-D
1. As of April 1, 2011, 100% of new materiel managers, procurement personnel and acquisition card holders will complete the online course on Green procurement provided by the Canada School of the Public Service.
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Number of new materiel managers, procurement personnel and acquisition card holders in 2011-2012. 89
Percent of new materiel managers, procurement personnel and acquisition card holders who have completed the online course on Green procurement provided by the Canada School of the Public Service. FY 2011-2012 25%
FY 2012-2013 100%
FY 2013-2014 100%
Strategies and/or Comments
  1. Materiel managers and procurement personnel are identified only as those who work in CFIA's Contracting and Procurement Policy Division.
  2. This self-selected target is SMART:
    1. Specific: Well defined achievement level of 100%
    2. Measurable: Allows comparison over time
    3. Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result
    4. Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of goods and procuring goods that are "green" minimizes CFIA's environmental footprint
    5. Time-bound: Date established for target implementation
  3. Data is collected manually from Procurement data.
  4. CFIA has a procedure in place to ensure that all new AC Cardholders take the Green Procurement Course prior to receiving their AC card.

Employee performance evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management.

GGO Performance Evaluation Table
2. By March 31, 2013, all identified procurement and materiel management functional specialists and their managers and functional heads will have environmental considerations clauses incorporated into their performance evaluations
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Number of identified positions that have environmental consideration clauses in their performance evaluations. FY 2011-2012 0
FY 2012-2013 2
FY 2013-2014 2
Percentage of identified positions that have environmental consideration clauses incorporated into their performance evaluations. FY 2011-2012 0%
FY 2012-2013 100%
FY 2013-2014 100%
Strategies and/or Comments
  1. The number of identified positions is two, both procurement managers.
  2. This self-selected target is SMART:
    • Specific: Well defined achievement level of all (100%)
    • Measurable: Allows comparison over time
    • Achievable: Tools are in place to achieve result
    • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of goods and services and procuring goods or services that are "green" minimizes CFIA's environmental footprint
    • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation
  3. This target has been exceeded because a mechanism is in place to ensure the identified positions have environmental consideration clauses incorporated into their performance evaluations.

Management processes and controls.

Ground Transportation Table
3. By March 31, 2014, the CFIA Ground Transportation Management Strategy will be developed.
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Existence of Ground Transportation Management Strategy FY 2011-2012 No
FY 2012-2013 Yes
FY 2013-2014 Yes
Strategies and/or Comments

This self-selected target is SMART:

  • Specific: The target identifies processes related to a specialized area of procurement
  • Measurable: Allows comparison over time
  • Achievable: Resources and responsibilities for target completion have been identified.
  • Relevant: CFIA procures a significant amount of vehicles and having a ground transportation management strategy that marries traditional fleet practices with green procurement principles will ensure CFIAs fleet is procured and managed in a manner that contributes to a sustainable Canada.
  • Time-bound: Date established for target implementation

The CFIA has developed a Ground Transportation Management Strategy. During the development of the strategy, mechanisms were built in to ensure its implementation considers impacts to greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. purchasing, driving practices, vehicle sharing, carpooling, etc.).

Strategic Environmental Assessment

During 2013–14 reporting cycle, the CFIA considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, as part of its decision–making processes. This is consistent with the CFIA Environmental Policy commitments to apply sound environmental principles and practices in the development and delivery of its programs and management of its facilities.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Statutory Compensation Payments

Start Date: N/A
End Date: N/A

Description of Transfer Payment Program: Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by regulations under the Plant Protection Act or the Health of Animals Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act. These payments are to compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.

Strategic outcomes: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Results Achieved: 11 Canadians were compensated for plants ordered destroyed and 88 Canadians were compensated for animals ordered destroyed.

Transfer Payment Table for Plant Resources Program
Program: Plant Resources Program ($ millions)
2011-12 Actual Spending 2012-13 Actual Spending 2013-14 Planned Spending 2013-14 Total Authorities 2013-14 Actual Spending Variance
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 0.2 0.8 0.3 1.1 1.1 0.8
Total Plant Resources Program 0.2 0.8 0.3 1.1 1.1 0.8

Comments on Variances: Actual compensation payments made to Canadians were $0.8 million higher than the $0.3 million that was earmarked under Planned Spending. This increase is largely attributed to Emerald Ash Borer and Plum Pox Virus in Ontario.

Transfer Payment Table for Animal Health and Zoonotics Program - A
Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program ($ millions)
2011-12 Actual Spending 2012-13 Actual Spending 2013-14 Planned Spending 2013-14 Total Authorities 2013-14 Actual Spending Variance
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 4.0 38.3 3.2 57.2 57.2 54.0
Total Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 4.0 38.3 3.2 57.2 57.2 54.0

Comments on Variances: Actual compensation payments made to Canadians were $54 million higher than the $3.2 million that was earmarked under Planned Spending. This increase is largely attributed to Infectious Salmon Anaemia in Newfoundland.

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Federal Assistance Program (FAP)

Start Date: N/A
End Date: N/A

Description of Transfer Payment Program: The objective of the Federal Assistance Program (FAP) is to support projects and initiatives that advance the Agency's strategic outcome—specifically a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Strategic outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Results Achieved: Contributed to building food safety capacity in developing countries and middle income economies. Enhanced agri-food value chains and improved public health outcomes. Contributed to mitigating risks to Canada's animal resource base which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. Contributed to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy.

Transfer Payment Table for Food Safety Program
Program: Food Safety Program ($ millions)
2011-12 Actual Spending 2012-13 Actual Spending 2013-14 Planned Spending 2013-14 Total Authorities 2013-14 Actual Spending Variance
Total Contributions 0 0 0 0.3 0.3 0.3
Total Food Safety Program 0 0 0 0.3 0.3 0.3
Transfer Payment Table for Animal Health and Zoonotics Program - A
Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program ($ millions)
2011-12 Actual Spending 2012-13 Actual Spending 2013-14 Planned Spending 2013-14 Total Authorities 2013-14 Actual Spending Variance
Total Contributions 0.2 0.6 0.2 0.4 0.4 0.2
Total Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 0.2 0.6 0.2 0.4 0.4 0.2
Transfer Payment Table for International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Program
Program: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements ($ millions)
2011-12 Actual Spending 2012-13 Actual Spending 2013-14 Planned Spending 2013-14 Total Authorities 2013-14 Actual Spending Variance
Total Contributions 1.0 0.9 0.6 1.4 1.4 0.8
Total International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 1.0 0.9 0.6 1.4 1.4 0.8

Comments on Variances: FAP is normally used to fund ad-hoc, short-term projects.

Audits Completed or Planned: Audit of the Federal Assistance Program (2011) and Follow-up Audit of Federal Assistance Program (2011)

Evaluations Completed or Planned: Evaluation of Federal Assistance Program (2011)

Engagement of applicants and recipients: The CFIA's FAP Program has successfully engaged recipients by providing financial support to: capacity-building activities for global food safety regulatory systems; research and training of individuals in animal epidemiology in areas most relevant to the CFIA (surveillance, risk analysis and disease modeling); and, the development of international science-based guidelines that govern safe and competitive trade.

Horizontal Initiative

Table A: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Program

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-04 (enhanced programming)

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: On-going

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $3,601.1M (2003-04 to 2013-14) and $26.6M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): To protect human and animal health, the BSE program conducts surveillance, research and risk assessments on BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) to minimize the risk of exposure to infected materials, maintain consumer confidence through assessing the effectiveness of the risk mitigation measures and having measures in place to control any potential outbreaks; and supports market access for cattle, beef and related products through promoting and explaining Canada's BSE program to domestic and international stakeholders.

HC conducts research and risk assessments on human exposure to BSE and other TSEs, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) carries out surveillance of human TSEs and targeted supporting research in this area as well. The CFIA enforces the removal of specified risk material (SRM) from the animal feed and the human food chains, monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country, monitors for the prevalence of BSE in the cattle population (through surveillance), verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place and explains Canada's BSE control measures to domestic and international stakeholders (for example, through the veterinarians abroad program) in order to maintain confidence in Canada's BSE program. AAFC supports, stabilizes and repositions Canada's beef and cattle industry, including through the provision of compensation payments to stakeholders impacted by BSE in Canada.

Table A: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)
Year Departments Funding Period Intent of Funds
2003-04CFIA, AAFC, HC2003-04 to 2007-08- develop measures to secure the future of the Canadian beef industry
2003-04CFIA2003-04 to 2007-08-remove SRM from the food chain and re-entering export markets (referred to as the enhanced BSE initiative)
2004-05CFIA , AAFC2004-05 to 2008-09-reposition the Canadian beef and cattle industry to operate on a profitable and sustainable basis
2004-05CFIA2004-05 to 2005-06-strengthen animal feed restrictions
2005-06CFIA2005-06 to 2008-09-develop additional measures to address critical pressures facing the ruminant industry
2006-07CFIA2006-07-continue the work the Agency was undertaking for the enhanced feed ban
2007-08CFIAOn-going-implement the enhanced feed ban restrictions
2008-09CFIA2008-09-extend sunsetting elements of the enhanced BSE initiative
2009-10CFIA, PHAC,HC2009-10 to 2013-14-continue work on core BSE activities

Shared outcome(s): Contributing to the protection of human and animal health, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian cattle, beef and beef products.

Governance structure(s): The CFIA is the federal lead for BSE Program delivery. A summative evaluation of the CFIA's BSE program conducted in 2008 recommended the governance of the program be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication regarding BSE-related activities, both internally and with partner organizations. Based on that recommendation and consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives, the CFIA launched a new committee structure to bring the Agency's overall governance approach more in line with evolving business needs in 2010. The new governance structure focuses on the importance of sharing information internally and ensures a more efficient and streamlined senior-level committee structure. It is expected that the renewed structure will foster a whole-of-Agency approach to decision making and will support day-to-day operations across the Agency. To ensure business line perspectives are integrated into decision making, three senior executive-level committees are supported by four committees: Animal Health, Plant, Food and Horizontal Management.

Planning Highlights: For 2013-14, the key plans and priorities from a horizontal perspective are to continue to deliver the BSE Program to current standards as well as to continue to improve communication and coordination (for example, governance), performance measurement and reporting, and financial tracking.

Table B: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)
Federal partners PAA Programs Contributing activities / programs Total allocation (from start date to end date)
($ Millions)
2013–14
($ Millions)
Planned spending Actual spending Expected results (ER) Contributing activity / program results (RA)
CFIA Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Internal Services SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain 91.5 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 9.5 9.0 ER 1 RA 1
Import Controls 2.8 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 0.3 1.0 ER 2 RA 2
BSE Surveillance 159.9 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 15.4 16.2 ER 3 RA 3
Cattle Identification 29.2 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 2.8 2.3 ER 4 RA 4
Export Certification 53.2 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 5.7 5.4 ER 5 RA 5
Technical Market Access Support 44.1 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 3.6 4.7 ER 6 RA 6
Enhanced Feed Ban 241.0 (2004-05 to 2013-14) and 26.6 ongoing 26.6 14.3 ER 7 RA 7
Establishment Review 2.3 (2004-05 to 2006-07) 0.0 Funding sunsetted in 2007-08
Oversupply of Aged Cattle 0.3 (2004-05) 0.0
Meat Inspection Reform 9.2 (2005-06 to 2007-08) 0.0
HC Health Products Risk Assessment and Targeted Research 44.0 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 2.6 2.4 ER 8 RA 8
Compliance and Enforcement 1.0 (2003-04 to 2007-08) 0.0 Funding sunsetted in 2007-08
Product Assessment 6.2 (2003-04 to 2007-08) 0.0
Tracking and Tracing 3.1 (2003-04 to 2007-08) 0.0
Food Safety and Nutrition Risk Assessment and Targeted Research 18.1 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 3.6 3.0 ER 9 RA 9
PHAC

Surveillance and Population Health Assessment

Public Health Surveillance

Prion Diseases Program 7.9 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 0.8 0.8 ER 10 RA 10
AAFC Food Safety and Biosecurity Systems (FSBRMS) Facilitating the Disposal of Specified Risk Material (SRM) 79.9 (2006-07 to 2009-10) 0.0 A summary outlining expected results for AAFC is not included in the RPP as their resources sunsetted in 2008–09
Establishment 276.0 (2003-04) 0.0
Implementation 36.0 (2003-04) 0.0
Tracking and Tracing Systems 7.8 (2003-04 to 2004-05) 0.0
Transitional Industry Support Program 934.6 (2003-04) 0.0
Accelerating Implementation of Traceability in Livestock and Meat Sources 16.1 (2004-05 to 2006-07) 0.0
Farm Income Payment Program 999.8 (2004-05 to 2005-06) 0.0
Cull Animal Program 202.4 (2003-04 to 2005-06) 0.0
Loan Loss 38.4 (2004-05 to 2008-09) 0.0
Feeder/Fed Cattle Set-Aside Program 296.3 (2004-05 to 2005-06) 0.0
Total for All Federal Partners 3,601.1 (2003-04 to 2013-14) and 26.6 ongoing 70.9 59.1
ER 1: SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain:

Outcome: Safe food

Output: Compliance with current regulations

Activities: Continuation of the enforcement and verification of SRM removal, handling and disposal by CFIA inspection staff.

Indicator Footnote 13: Industry compliance rate for removal of SRM.

Target Footnote 13: 100% compliance.

Tracking Footnote 13: Internal program files & documents.

RA1: SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain:

The CFIA conducts on-site verification of federally registered slaughter and boning establishments. The CFIA also reviews records to verify compliance with and the effectiveness of the control program. In the 2013-2014 fiscal year, 89.2% (5658/6346) of the planned programming specific to the enforcement and verification of SRM removal was delivered nationally. A compliance rate of 99.5% was achieved in tasks delivered.

CFIA continues to conduct on-site verification of provincially registered slaughter and boning establishments. Records are reviewed to ensure the removal, segregation and disposal of SRM are properly carried out and to determine the adequacy of provincial oversight for plant controls. As of January 1, 2014, inspection of provincially registered establishments in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and British Columbia transitioned from the CFIA to the provinces. This resulted in full SRM control oversight by all three provinces in abattoirs under their jurisdiction, with the CFIA continuing in its role of system inspection audit for the purposes of national and international reporting.

ER 2: Import Controls:

Outcome: Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards.

Output: Up-to-date import controls.

Activities: Review and update of current import policies and conditions for BSE as required, to reflect changes in international standards and evolving science.

Indicator 1 Footnote 13: Percentage of import policies verified and updated as required.

Target Footnote 13: 25% per year.

Tracking Footnote 13: Internal program files & documents.

Indicator 2 Footnote 13: BSE Import Policy is verified and updated as required.

Target Footnote 13: Annually, when the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) updates the BSE risk status country lists.

Tracking Footnote 13: Internal program files & documents.

RA 2: Import Controls:

Performance measurement: Target met.

ER 3: BSE Surveillance:

Outcome: Safe animals and food and Market access

Output: Measurement of BSE level and distribution in cattle population.

Activities: Analysis of options to redesign the BSE surveillance program and consultation with stakeholders to explore further targeting of surveillance.

Indicator Footnote 13: Temporal trend in exposure to the BSE agent in the cattle population.

Target Footnote 13: Testing 30,000 samples from the high-risk category of cattle is the minimum national target.

Tracking Footnote 13: Internal files / documents / databases (Laboratory Sample Tracking System, (LSTS); provincial lab data; National Livestock Identification Database; Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network).

RA 3: BSE Surveillance:

In 2013-14, the CFIA continued to deliver surveillance activities along with the national reimbursement program on at-risk animals including clinical suspects and 'over 30 months of age cattle' that are dead, down, dying or diseased. Surveillance samples were collected from cattle on-farm, at rendering facilities, at dead stock facilities and at provincial and federal abattoirs. The CFIA successfully collected and tested 29,749 samples, 20,257 of which were processed in CFIA laboratories. Monitoring the level and distribution of BSE in Canada through the weighing of surveillance samples with the OIE-recommended allocating of points has allowed Canada to maintain a controlled BSE risk status and to maintain and expand market access.

There were no cases of BSE detected in Canada during the 2013-14 fiscal year.

In 2012, a collaborative framework was placed around the CFIA's BSE surveillance (CanSurvBSE), permitting on-going consultation and consensus-based decision- making with provinces, industry, and other government departments on the BSE surveillance program. Ongoing collaboration through CanSurvBSE has led to a shared vision, common goals and objectives for BSE surveillance, and a deeper understanding of the need for surveillance along with the associated challenges.

ER 4: Cattle Identification:

Outcome:

  • Governments and other entities make informed decisions to manage animal and related human health issues
  • Risk to Canadian livestock resource base are mitigated
  • Canadian livestock sector is compliant with regulations

Output 1 Footnote 13: Compliance verification and enforcement strategy; inspection reports; data quality audits; trace-out reports; letters of non-compliance; administrative penalties; prosecutions.

Activities: Inspections, compliance verification, investigations and enforcement actions.

Output 2 Footnote 13: Regulations; program and related policies; privacy impact assessment; threat risk assessment; Administrator agreement; tools for CFIA staff (e.g. program related policy, positions, manuals, SoPs, etc.)

Indicator 1 Footnote 13: Number and development status of inspection tools in place.

Target Footnote 13: Training, tools and materials are relevant and up-to-date.

Tracking Footnote 13: Internal program files & documents.

Indicator 2 Footnote 13: Number of inspectors trained.

Target Footnote 13: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained.

Tracking Footnote 13: Internal program files & documents.

Indicator 3 Footnote 13: Ratio of non-compliances versus number of Compliance Verification System (CVS) tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage.

Target Footnote 13: 95% compliance.

Tracking Footnote 13: Internal program files & documents.

Indicator 4 Footnote 13: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards.

Target Footnote 13: 100%.

Tracking Footnote 13: Internal program files & documents.

RA 4: Cattle Identification:

Indicator 1: Number and development status of inspection tools in place
Performance measurement: Target met

Indicator 2: Number of inspectors trained
Performance measurement: Target partially met. All inspectors verifying compliance under the program are trained; training in the CVS inspection tool is ongoing.

Indicator 3: Ratio of non-compliances versus number of CVS tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage.
Performance measurement: Target partially met. Compliance rate under the program is above 95%. However, as the incorporation of CVS into the program is ongoing, the assessment of compliance remains a manual activity.

Indicator 4: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards.
Performance measurement: Target met.

ER 5: Export Certification:

Outcome: Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

Output: Export certfication.

Activities: Continue provision of export-related certification services to a wide range of affected industries.

Indicator 1: Percentage of exports meeting the standards of the importing country as required.

Target: 100%

Tracking: Internal program files and documents.

RA 5: Export Certification:

Performance measurement: Target met.

ER 6: Technical Market Access Support:

Outcome: Maintain or improve confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets.

Output: Increased market demand and confidence.

Activities: Continue the establish and maintain of strong relationships with trading partners, and the provision of global leadership and influence concerning international policies and standards development.

Indicator Footnote 13: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.

Targets Footnote 13: An ongoing record of markets that are open, and exports of Canadian beef and cattle.

Tracking Footnote 13: Internal program files & documents.

RA 6: Technical Market Access Support:

Target – has been met for 2013-14.

As part of the Federal Market Access Team, a portfolio comprised of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (DFATD)), the Agency continues to support the collaborative approach to advancing Canadian agricultural interests abroad. The Federal Market Access Team works closely with industry stakeholders to open, maintain, and expand international markets for the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector. The Federal Market Access Team focuses market access efforts, set priorities, and allocates resources for markets and cross-commodity market access issues that have the greatest potential.

In 2013-14 the CFIA continued the support and undertaking of Market Access efforts. This resulted in the opening, maintaining and expanding of cattle, genetics and beef access in markets where BSE was a concern, for at least 14 issues, including:

  • Gained access to Chile for all beef and to Taiwan for under thirty months bone-in beef and certain offal;
  • Approval of additional beef establishments eligible to export to Korea and the Russian Federation; and
  • Agreement reached on health certificates for bovine semen and embryos to Malaysia
ER 7: Enhanced Feed Ban:

Outcome: Safe feed, fertilizer, animals and food.

Output: Compliance with enhanced feed ban regulations.

Activities: Continue enforcement of enhanced feed ban restrictions.

Indicator Footnote 13: Trends in compliance with regulations associated with the enhanced feed ban, including SRM removal, handling and disposal; trends in the proportion of feed mills and renderers using prohibited materials / SRM and producing ruminant feeds.

Targets and Tracking Footnote 13: Currently being revised.

RA 7: Enhanced Feed Ban:

In 2013-14, the CFIA continued to verify compliance with the enhanced 2007 regulatory framework at facilities associated with the animal food and production chain (i.e. at rendering plants, commercial feed manufacturers, feed retail outlets, on-farm feed manufacturers and ruminant feeders, as well as at meat slaughter and processing establishments, cattle dead stock collectors, transporters and receivers of SRM, commercial composting, and fertilizer manufacturing facilities).

Feed-ban-related inspections in the 2013-14 fiscal year were as follows:

  • Commercial Feed Mills: 4589 tasks at 434 facilities;
  • On-Farm: 1022 tasks at 185 facilities;
  • Retail: 2194 tasks at 433 facilities;
  • Rendering Facilities: 803 tasks at 47 facilities.

Also in 2013-14, the CFIA, in consultation with stakeholders, undertook a full review (the Enhanced Feed Ban 2012 Review) of the enhancements to the feed ban regulations, including an assessment of the merits of continuing to exclude the full list of Specified Risk Material. This review, which was finalized in spring 2014, will inform the development of the BSE Roadmap, a communication tool to explain the Government of Canada approach to long term BSE management planning.

ER 8: Health Products Risk Assessment and Targeted Research:

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSE science, risks and product surveillance

Indicator:
Number of research publications related to BSE/TSE peer reviewed publications produced by Health Canada

Targets Footnote 14 and Tracking:
Data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, internal records, proceeds of scientific meetings

Intermediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making

Indicators:
Number and type of recommended and /or implemented changes to regulations, policies and guidelines as a result of the identification of issues/gaps
Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted
Number of Master Files containing ingredients which may be at risk of TSE/BSE contamination
Number of Natural Health Product licence applications reviewed for products which contain ingredients sourced from bovine tissue
Number of new DINs assigned for products which contain ingredients sourced from bovine tissue

Targets Footnote 14 and Tracking:
Data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, risk assessments (including recommendations), internal records.

RA 8: Health Products: Risk Assessment and Targeted Research:

There has been ongoing risk assessment, product assessment, and tracking and tracing related to BSE/TSE which has been integrated into routine Directorate activities. In FY 2013-14, the bulleted results achieved correspond to each respective noted indicator below:

Number and type of recommended and /or implemented changes to regulations, policies and guidelines as a result of the identification of issues/gaps

  • The Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate (BGTD) worked with the Canadian Standards Association to discuss and edit CSAZ294-N190 guideline regarding vCJD.
  • A study is underway on the mechanism that causes BSE/TSE, specifically the mechanism that causes the conversion of normal prion proteins into the infectious form. Publication and reporting of results are delayed due to the magnet repairs.
  • A presentation of research findings "Interactions Between the Conserved Hydrophobic Region of the Prion Protein and Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles; The first step before amyloid?" Department of Chemistry, Université de Montréal, was delivered in February 2014.

Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted

  • BGTD conducted a total of 31 Health Risk assessments (HRA's); 3 of the 31 HRA's involved cell therapy products manufactured using animal derived products. Further, at least 2 other HRA's found manufacturing issues, specifically 1 enzyme replacement and 1 fertility drug.

Number of Master Files containing ingredients which may be at risk of TSE/BSE contamination

  • 8 Drug Master Files (DMFs) containing ingredients which may be at risk of TSE/BSE contamination have been reviewed in 2013-14.

Number of Natural Health Product licence applications reviewed for products which contain ingredients sourced from bovine tissue

  • The number of Natural Health Product Licence applications reviewed for products that contain ingredients sourced from bovine tissue in FY 2013-14 was 1935.

Number of new DINs assigned for products which contain ingredients sourced from bovine tissue

  • 298 new Drug Identification Numbers (DINs) were assigned by the Therapeutic Products Directorate for products which contain ingredients sourced from bovine tissue
  • BGTD received 18 biological New Drug Submissions (NDS) for which Notices of Compliance (NOC) were issued during 2013/2014; 7 of the 18 new Drug Identification Numbers (DINs) that were issued were for products that included ingredients and/or materials of bovine origin. There were also 6 additional NDS submissions, which received negative decisions during the same reporting period, and 5 of these submissions were for products that included ingredients and/or materials of bovine origin. Further, 1 of the 5 submissions that received a negative decision was rejected, in part, because of insufficient safety information for materials and/or ingredients sourced from animal tissue.

In addition:

A summative evaluation was completed on the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy initiatives that were undertaken between 2003 and 2009. The evaluation and Management Action Plan (MAP) were completed and posted on the Health Canada Website in June 2013.

Regarding the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy initiatives undertaken between 2009 and 2013, an evaluation was initiated. The evaluation report and the MAP are expected to be completed in Q1 2014.

ER 9: Food Safety and Nutrition: Risk Assessment and Targeted Research:

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSE science, risks and product surveillance

Indicators:
Number of direct consultations/visits with stakeholders as a result of Canadian expertise
Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by HC staff on BSE/TSE topics
Number of research publications related to BSE/TSE peer reviewed publications produced by HC
Number and amount of funds expended for external collaborations

Targets Footnote 14 and Tracking:
Data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, incident reports, certificates, internal records

Intermediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making

Indicators:
Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted
Number and description of policies/standards on BSE/TSE contributed by HC to the international community

Targets Footnote 14 and Tracking:
Data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, risk assessments (including recommendations), incident reports, certificates, internal records

RA 9: Food Safety and Nutrition: Risk Assessment and Targeted Research:

Number of direct consultations/visits with stakeholders as a result of Canadian expertise

  • 2 - Mexican Health and Agricultural Authorities USA Center for Disease Control

Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by HC staff on BSE/TSE topics

  • None

Number of research publications related to BSE/TSE peer reviewed publications produced by HC

  • None

Number and amount of funds expended for external collaborations

  • 5 contracts with external partners. The entire amount of O&M ($1.4M) was spent towards those external collaborations/contracts.

Number and description of policies/standards on BSE/TSE contributed by HC to the international community

  • 1 - USA CDC - USFDA / USDA - USA re assessment of the US bovine specified risk material use in animal feed, regulations and policy based on HC research findings

Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted

  • None

Number and description of policies/standards on BSE/TSE contributed by HC to the international community

  • 1 - USA CDC - USFDA / USDA - USA re assessment of the US bovine specified risk material use in animal feed, regulations and policy based on HC research findings

Data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, incident reports, certificates, internal records:

  • Ongoing assessment and analysis of the HC previously established research projects in collaboration with external partners (CFIA, European research Institutions) to generate critical data related to the pathogenesis of BSE, TSEs, and specified risk material to support hazard characterization, risk assessment and standard setting.
ER 10: Prion Diseases Program

Outcome: Risks of human TSEs in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled.

Output/Activities: Continued, detailed, case-by-case, laboratory-based investigation of all human TSEs across Canada; improved methods and strategies for efficient case investigation; surveillance data; research publications; provision of policy advice for food safety, healthcare and international trade.

Indicator: Alignment of PHAC data from human TSE surveillance with international benchmarks; application of policy advice in decision-making.

Targets and Tracking: Maintenance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance intensity at a level where annual incidence of all confirmed human prion diseases in Canada is at least 1.0 per million population.

RA 10: Prion Diseases Program

The Public Health Agency of Canada's Prion Diseases Program monitors and mitigates risks of zoonotic and non-zoonotic infectious propagation of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs) to humans in Canada. This is done through prospective, case-by-case epidemiological and laboratory-based surveillance of all suspected cases of human TSEs that occur in Canada, including variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), the human form of BSE. In 2012-13, a total of 356 suspected cases of human TSEs were investigated by the Agency, with a total of 98 definite and probable cases confirmed. The average annual mortality from human TSEs in Canada remains in the range found internationally – 1.28 per million over the period 1999-2012, for which final data are currently available. Despite this intensive surveillance, no cases of vCJD were identified, providing ongoing evidence to support the low risk of Canadians acquiring this disease from possible past exposure to domestic BSE. The Agency's Prion Diseases Program remains at the forefront of improved laboratory-based diagnostic technology for human TSEs, as evidenced by peer-reviewed publications investigating TSE induced biomarkers in urine and estimating the diagnostic accuracy of protein biomarkers in human cerebrospinal fluid; and participation in an international consortium aimed at optimizing and standardizing a novel TSE diagnostic test.

Comments on Variances

CFIA:

The CFIA has been delivering the BSE program for more than 10 years. The CFIA conducted an exercise to reflect the current expenditures for the BSE program; however, the Enhanced Feed Ban (EFB) was not part of this exercise. Some of the variance between planned spending and actual spending is related to the reallocation of resources to other agency priorities such as the expansion of animal identification into non-ruminant species (e.g. pigs).

Over the years, some of the EFB activities have been integrated into the CFIA's ongoing work and are not reflected in the direct financial tracking of EFB-related activities.

Health Canada: N/A

Overall Variance

HPFB has an overall variance of $0.8M. This surplus was mainly due to staffing reduction, contracts not executed as planned and efficiency gained from centralized evaluation services within department.

Health Products has an overall O&M surplus of $0.2. This surplus was attributed to the efficiency gained from centralized evaluation services within Health Canada and the majority of the work activities were performed either in previous year or in the upcoming fiscal as the cycle was initiated at the end of the year.

Food Safety and Nutrition has an overall surplus of $0.6M. This surplus was attributed to staffing reduction within the branch and efficiency gained from centralization of evaluation services as well as redirection of funding to other higher priority areas within HPFB.

PHAC: N/A

AAFC: N/A

Contact Information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Harpreet Kochhar
Executive Director, Animal Health Directorate
613-773-7472

Public Health Agency of Canada
Steven Sternthal
Acting Director General
Centre for Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch
613-948-6883

Health Canada
Diana Dowthwaite
Director General, Resource Management & Operations Directorate,
Health Products and Food Branch,
613-957-6690

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada
John Ross,
Director
Animal Industry Division
613-773-0220

Table B: Renewal of Government Response and Action Plan to the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Renewal of Government Response and Action Plan to the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak

Name of Lead Department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); Health Canada (HC); and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC).

Lead Departments PAA Program: Food Safety Program

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2012-13

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2015-16 (CFIA); 2016-17 and ongoing (HC and PHAC).

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $112.9M (2012-17) and $10.5M ongoing (HC and PHAC).

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The objective of this horizontal initiative is to continue to enhance the Government of Canada's ability to prevent, detect and respond to outbreaks of foodborne illnesses, pursuant to recommendations stemming from reviews of the 2008 listeriosis outbreak.

The three federal organizations, the CFIA, HC, and PHAC, received a total spending authority of $112.9 million for this initiative (CFIA: $60.4 million over four years, PHAC: $33 million over five years, and HC: $19.5 million over five years). PHAC and HC also received a total spending authority of $10.5 million ongoing ($6.6 million and $3.9 million respectively). Each federal organization identified the resource requirements, strategic outcomes, objectives, and implementation plan for each program area.

Shared Outcome(s):

Address Immediate Food Safety Risks by maintaining:

  • hired ready-to-eat meat inspection staff;
  • scientific and technical training programs for inspection staff;
  • technical support to continue enhanced connectivity for inspectors;
  • enhanced food safety program risk management; and
  • capacity for the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments.

Enhanced Surveillance and Early Detection by maintaining:

  • capacity to improve and validate test detection methods for Listeria;
  • scientific capacity to continue additional Listeria testing;
  • ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards;
  • national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the FoodNet Canada (formerly C-EnterNet) Program; and
  • strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: continued implementation of whole genome sequencing; continued expansion of PulseNet Canada.

Improved Government Response to Foodborne Illness Outbreaks in Canada by maintaining:

  • support to the Food Safety Portal;
  • risk communication and social marketing strategies;
  • human illness outbreak response capacity; and
  • national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity.

Governance Structure(s): The CFIA, HC and PHAC currently work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates. Pursuant to existing trilateral memoranda of understanding, the three partners meet regularly to discuss food safety issues of mutual concern. This governance framework includes Deputy Head, Assistant Deputy Minister, and Director General level committees, which meet regularly to discuss and plan approaches for addressing joint food safety issues. The work of the committees is also informed by the F/P/T Ministers of Health and Agriculture and their associated discussions on food safety.

In October 2013, the CFIA joined Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada in reporting to the Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health. This reorganization has strengthened Canada's food safety system by bringing all three authorities responsible for food safety under one Minister. This will ensure clear focus, easy collaboration and timely communications with Canadians in relation to food safety.

Planning Highlights: The CFIA, HC and the PHAC have acted on all of the recommendations put forward by the Independent Investigator. Organizations have achieved considerable success in carrying out the Government's 2009 action plan in response to the 2008 listeriosis outbreak. Sustained effort on critical activities regarding human resources, scientific capacity and communications will maintain this strengthened food safety system.

Table A: Renewal of Government Response and Action Plan to the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak
Federal Partner PAA Program Contributing activities/ programs Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) ($ Millions) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expect Results, including Targets (ER) Contributing activity / program results (RA)
CFIA

Food Safety Program

Internal Services

Maintaining hired inspection staff in ready-to-eat meat establishments 29.2 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 7.3 6.2 ER 11 RA 11
Maintaining scientific and technical training programs 14.4 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 3.6 2.2 ER 12 RA 12
Maintaining enhanced connectivity for inspectors 2.4 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 0.6 0.0 ER 13 RA 13
Maintaining enhanced food safety program risk management 6.4 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 1.6 1.5 ER 14 RA 14
Maintaining capacity to improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards 2.0 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 0.5 0.5 ER 15 RA 15
Maintaining scientific capacity to continue Listeria testing 5.2 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 1.3 1.3 ER 16 RA 16
Maintaining support to the Government of Canada Food Safety Portal 0.8 (2012-13 to 2015-16) 0.2 0.0 ER 17 RA 17
HC Food Safety and Nutrition Maintain ability to respond within established service standards to the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments and food safety investigations 13.5 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 2.7 ongoing 2.7 2.4 ER 18 RA 18
Maintaining ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards 3.0 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.6 ongoing 0.6 0.9 ER 19 RA 19
Maintaining a Social Marketing Strategy 3.0 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.6 ongoing 0.6 0.6 ER 20 RA 20
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; Public Health Infrastructure Maintain national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the FoodNet Canada program 7.9 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 1.6 ongoing 1.6 1.5 ER 21 RA 21
Public Health Infrastructure Maintain strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued implementation of whole genome sequencing 4.5 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.9 ongoing 0.9 0.7 ER 22 RA 22
Public Health Infrastructure Maintain strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued expansion of PulseNet Canada 1.9 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.4 ongoing 0.4 0.4 ER 23 RA 23
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Maintain human illness outbreak response capacity 14.5 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 2.9 ongoing 2.9 2.9 ER 24 RA 24
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; Health Security; Public Health Infrastructure Maintain national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity 4.2 (2012-13 to 2016-17) and 0.8 ongoing 0.8 0.6 ER 25 RA 25
Total for All Federal Partners $112.9M (2012-17) and $10.5M ongoing (HC and PHAC) 25.6 21.6
Variance Explanations

CFIA: For enhanced connectivity of inspectors, the variance is due to the fact that the majority of funding was transferred from CFIA IM/IT Branch to Shared Services Canada for telephony, networks, data centres and other infrastructure costs.

PHAC: The variance is attributable to delays in staffing and in completing contracting processes.

HC: Food Safety and Nutrition

HPFB has initially forecasted a higher expenditure in RA 18 (maintaining ability to respond within established service standards) by reallocating $0.2M budget in RA 19 (maintaining ability to develop and improve test detection methods) when RPP 2013-2014 was prepared. As a result of this initial reallocation of planned spending and shifting priorities in the activities, actual expenditures in RA 18 was $0.3M higher than what was planned while actual expenditures in RA 19 was $0.3 lower than what was initially planned. An overall surplus for Food Safety is negligible.

ER 11: Maintaining Hired Inspection Staff in Ready-to-Eat Meat Establishments:

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks in federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments.

Output/Activities: Maintain additional inspection capacity in order to continue delivering enhanced verification and inspection activities resulting from the mandatory Listeria testing and reporting requirements for federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments.

Targets and Tracking: Number of inspectors maintained, percentage of delivered tasks related to Listeria controls and sampling that were found to be acceptable.

RA 11: Maintaining Hired Inspection Staff in Ready-to-Eat Meat Establishments:

In 2013-14, the CFIA was successful in maintaining the expanded workforce complement of 70 FTEs. These additional FTEs continued to deliver enhanced verification and inspection activities resulting from mandatory Listeria testing and reporting requirements in federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments. Six different tasks were delivered related to Listeria controls and sampling. These six tasks were delivered 6062 times in 2013-14 and 98.93% were found to be acceptable, demonstrating that food safety risks related to Listeria controls were and continue to be effectively managed in federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments.

ER 12: Maintaining Scientific and Technical Training Programs:

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks in federally registered ready-to-eat meat establishments.

Output/Activities: Continue to develop and deliver enhanced scientific and technical training programs to ensure that new and existing ready-to-eat meat products inspection staff are aware of the latest trends in science and technology related to meat processing and of updated policies.

Targets and Tracking: Number of training sessions delivered, number of new inspectors trained, number of existing inspectors trained, number of person days for this training.

RA 12: Maintaining Scientific and Technical Training Programs:

In 2013-14, 15 scientific and technical training sessions (Meat School) were delivered to meat processing inspectors. Several individual technical courses were also delivered including Food Safety Investigation, Meat Product Export, Microbiological Sampling and Understanding Food Allergens. A total of 2448 person days of training were delivered across the country to new and existing meat processing inspectors.

Several technical courses were updated, including Orientation to Meat Hygiene, Hygienic Practices, and Sanitation. As well, the CFIA continues to develop eLearning and Webinar compatible training products to reduce the cost of training inspection staff.

ER 13: Maintaining Enhanced Connectivity for Inspectors:

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks.

Output/Activities: Continue to provide frontline inspection staff with the ability to securely access the CFIA's network and applications through high speed internet connectivity.

Targets and Tracking: Number of inspectors with high-speed access, average amount of data used per aircard.

RA 13: Maintaining Enhanced Connectivity for Inspectors:

The number of inspectors with high speed aircard access is 549 with an average use of 14.5 megabytes per month.

The increased connectivity of inspectors is being sustained by ongoing support and maintenance of the aircards. Maintenance includes the cost of personnel to support the cards as well as some travel, training and courier costs ($30k for 2013/2014). The majority of the funding (approximately $400k) was transferred from CFIA IMIT Branch to Shared Services Canada for telephony, networks, data centers and other infrastructure costs. Remaining funds were used for other maintenance activities within CFIA IMIT Branch.

ER 14: Maintaining Enhanced Food Safety Program Risk Management:

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks through the continued review of food safety programs and activities.

Output/Activities: Continue to modernize food safety standards, programs, policies and operational procedures to make them consistent and reflect current trends (e.g. rapid technological and scientific advancements in food production).

Targets and Tracking: List of reviews/updates/projects completed (e.g. risk-based sampling plans).

RA 14: Maintaining Enhanced Food Safety Program Risk Management:

In 2013-14, CFIA's efforts focused on further program and policy alignment with the Independent Expert Panel's recommendations following the analysis of the XL Foods Inc. recalls. Notable milestones were the release of the latest update of the Meat Hygiene E.coli control policy to provide better guidance on High Event Periods (HEP), and amendments to the Listeria policy, both in spring of 2014. CFIA's official Guidance Documents provide the Agency's functional direction to its front line staff regarding their compliance verification activities. They also provide guidance to regulated parties regarding program requirements. The creation and deployment of the Guidance Document Repository (GDR) was a massive effort that supports the introduction of the Single Food Program and provides a consolidated suite of current standards/programs/policies/procedures in a number of areas within its food safety and inspection programs.

ER 15: Maintaining Capacity to Improve Test Detection Methods for Listeria and other Foodborne Hazards:

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks through improved detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards.

Output/Activities: Continue to provide greater availability and choice of testing methods for the detection of Listeria by industry and the CFIA, and faster turnaround time for reporting results.

Targets and Tracking: Completion of the validation protocol, completion of the validation project, technical review of validation project data, decisions made on new methods.

RA 15: Maintaining Capacity to Improve Test Detection Methods for Listeria and other Foodborne Hazards:

The CFIA continues to improve and validate detection methods for Listeria in meat products and in the meat processing environment, reduce the time required to test samples and enable more rapid response during food safety investigations.

As planned for 2013-14, two analysts were maintained to continue improving test detection methods.

A new method for the rapid confirmation of Listeria from meat and environmental samples (validated in 2011/12) underwent a technical review in 2012-13. The conclusion of the review was made available in 2013/14, and the method has been submitted to the joint Health Canada/CFIA Microbiology Methods Committee to be considered for publication in the Health Canada Compendium of Analytical Methods.

Furthermore, a validation study designed and implemented in 2012-13, continued in 2013-14 to compare four internationally recognized reference methods to the Canadian reference method for Listeria in meat and meat processing environment samples. If the internationally recognized methods are found to be equivalent to Canada's reference method, this validation study will allow the CFIA to accept many more rapid Listeria methods for regulatory testing. The method protocol was designed, and multiple sample sets were analyzed throughout the fiscal year. The validation studies are ongoing in 2014-15.

ER 16: Maintaining Scientific Capacity to Continue Additional Listeria Testing:

Outcome: Early detection and faster response to potential foodborne illness outbreaks through enhanced laboratory testing capacity, contributing to improved decision-making.

Output/Activities: Continue early warning of potential contamination in the food processing environment.

Targets and Tracking: Number of product and environmental samples submitted to labs for Listeria versus 2008 baseline, reports produced on data trends at a defined frequency, number of experts dedicated to trend analysis.

RA 16: Maintaining Scientific Capacity to Continue Additional Listeria Testing:

The CFIA's laboratory capacity was enhanced to enable testing of additional ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and environmental samples, which were planned as a result of the updated Listeria Directives. Since 2009, product samples for Listeria testing have increased approximately threefold. Furthermore, the funding enabled the continuation of the reinstated environmental monitoring program for Listeria in RTE meat establishments, which enabled the purchasing of the environmental test kits used by inspectors, as well as the testing of over 1000 environmental samples in 2013-14.

CFIA enhanced the reporting and communication of national level trend analysis of data collected on Listeria in RTE meats using multiple data sources. The National Listeria Trend Bulletin was completed quarterly to include: interpretation of the quarterly prevalence in relation to the expected prevalence, additional trend graphs and relevant supporting information.

In exploring additional trend analysis methodologies for interpreting Lm-prevalence at the national level, a comprehensive report was drafted that examines the Lm-prevalence in federally registered RTE meat establishment products and food contract surfaces from 2006 to 2014. CFIA will explore opportunities to collaborate and enhance knowledge transfer with stakeholders.

ER 17: Maintaining Support to the Government of Canada Food Safety Portal:

Outcome: Canadians are aware of food safety risks, and they contribute to the management thereof by sourcing their food safety information via several on-line Government of Canada resources, such as Healthy Canadians and the Food Safety portals.

Output/Activities: Continue to improve public access to integrated Government of Canada food safety information.

Targets and Tracking:

  • Number of visitors and visits to food safety information on inspection.gc.ca, healthycanadian.gc.ca and the foodsafety.gc.ca.
  • Number of followers and tweets distributed through the CFIA Food safety Twitter account.
  • Number of food safety related CFIA Facebook postings.
RA 17: Maintaining Support to the Government of Canada Food Safety Portal:

In 2013-14, the food safety information on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency inspection.gc.ca website received 5,960,320 views with 1,393,251 visits from 779,370 visitors.

In 2013-14, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency continued to maintain the Government of Canada's Food Safety Portal. Throughout this period, the portal received 2,025,517 views with 683,579 visits from 473,858 visitors.

  • In 2013-14, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency significantly increased its use of social media (Twitter and Facebook):
    • Twitter: The Canadian Food Inspection Agency published 1,325 tweets containing information for consumers related to food safety through @CFIA_Food and @ACIA_Aliments.
    • Facebook: From October 30, 2013 (launch of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Facebook page) to March 31, 2014, the Agency published 385 posts for consumers related to food safety.
ER 18: Maintaining ability to respond within established service standards to the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments and food safety investigations:

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks.

Output/Activities: Provide risk assessments, based on the best available science and methods, within established service standards and strengthen the prevention of and response to food safety incidents.

Targets and Tracking:

  • Number of staffing actions (hired/allocated) and level of funding allocated over time, specifically targeting the enhancement of our capacity for HRAs. Hire four new staff members in 2013-14.
  • Maintenance of FTEs to support HRA activities.
  • Number of HRAs completed within service standards.
  • Number of quality management practices implemented, including SOPs, templates, and inter-departmental HC-CFIA protocols.
  • National and international collaborations conducted related to risk modelling method development, refinement, testing, validation, and implementation.
RA 18: Maintaining ability to respond within established service standards to the increasing number and complexity of health risk assessments and food safety investigations:
  • 1 FTE hired, 2 FTE staffing actions were not completed due to priorities and restrictions in staffing actions, 20 FTEs allocated to direct HRA activities;
  • 391 (100%) responsive health risk assessments (HRA) were completed within the Food Directorate service standards ;
  • Piloted a prioritization tool for risk management;
  • Implemented a review of HRA opinions on a weekly basis in order to ensure ongoing consistency
  • Implemented quality management system (QMS) of HRAs to encourage document control, peer review, and approval of responsive HRAs and other supporting documents (SOPs, templates, forms, etc.) as well, training has also been enhanced including regular case studies and post-HRA analysis of responsive HRA;
  • Field learning activities to increase knowledge transfer in support of risk analysis activities - tour of food processing plant, tour of wastewater treatment plant, etc.;
  • Initiated regular meetings with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's office of food safety and recall as part of continuous improvement
  • Participated in two workshops for industry stakeholders on a "A Day in the Life of a Recall" in Mississauga and in Montreal;
  • Framework for Initiating and Conducting Risk Analysis of Microbial Hazards in Foods was developed;
  • Continued a training program and tool box for after hour HRAs
  • Ongoing improvements/revisions to templates and forms to expedite delivery of HRA;
  • FD continues to chair Food Safety Health Risk Assessment Consortium to create better partnerships between federal, provincial and territorial departments/agencies responsible for food safety. The Consortium enhances the capacity for each of its members to respond to food safety and risk assessment issues.
ER 19: Maintaining ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards:

Outcome: Improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards.

Output/Activities: Have a suite of rapid validated tools available to industry and government partners to allow action to be taken at the earliest opportunity, thereby reducing exposure of Canadians to foodborne hazards.

Targets and Tracking:

  • Risk assessment modelling methods and IT tools that are current, accepted, validated, and meet international standards.
  • Number of improved test detection methods and other laboratory diagnostic tools developed for faster detection of Listeria and other hazards in foods.
  • Establishment of the Chemical Methods Committee and Compendium of Methods for the Chemical Analysis of Foods.
  • Number of validated methods published in Compendium of Analytical Methods or the Compendium of Methods for the Chemical Analysis of Food.
  • Number of FTEs hired/allocated to developing/improving microbiological and chemical methods.
  • Establishment of service standards and protocols for publishing microbiological or chemical methods according to the MMC and RCMC.
  • Establishment and description of criteria and processes to identify priority methods for validation by HC and CFIA according to the MMC and RCMC.
  • Number of methods prioritized for fast tracking and validation by MMC and RCMC.
  • Number of completed pilots and validated methodologies/prototypes for the detection of Listeria and other hazards in foods.
RA 19: Maintaining ability to develop and improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards:
  • 4 FTEs allocated to methods development
  • Validation of new 3-day method for detection and isolation of Listeria monocytogenes in comparison to national and international methods and industry test;
  • Development of 15-minute screening method for Listeria species based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification;
  • Assessment of all Official Methods cited in the Food and Drugs Act to identify whether the methods are: still relevant; in need of revision; need replacement with other validated methods; available alternatives; if they may be removed from the regulations; and, how they compare with other jurisdictions such as Codex, the United States and the European Union; the final report is being prepared
  • Official Methods and others were posted on the website but not all were available
    • all Compendium Methods have been located and the introduction to the Compendium has been revised to better describe the intended use of each type of method posted
    • these additions have all been approved and posted and available to the public
  • The Microbiology Methods Committee (MMC) completed the assessment of 4 method submissions and has 9 active submissions (3 of the active submissions pertain to L. monocytogenes/ Listeria spp.);
  • The MMC published 4 new methods, including one for Listeria spp., revised 6 methods including 3 for L. monocytogenes/ Listeria spp., and removed 8 methods from the Compendium of Analytical Methods;
  • The MMC undertook the review of all Escherichia coli O157:H7 methods in the Compendium to ensure that there was specific validation data against a reference method using a 42°C incubation temperature to support each food commodity claimed in the application of the method.
  • Development and validation of sub-typing method based on multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeat analyses (MLVA);
  • Developed a rapid sample preparation for the isolation of Listeria from food through a new microfluidic prototype;
  • Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) Assay was developed for detection and quantification of okadaic acid and its analogues; validation has been completed for a subset of relevant food commodities
  • Polyclonal antibodies were also generated against nodularin to develop screening methods
  • Continued development of a genetic identification microfluidic unit for Listeria to be incorporated in a lab-on-a-chip system. This has been expanded to include the identification of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC)
ER 20: Maintaining a Social Marketing Strategy:

Outcome: Canadians are aware of and contribute to the management of food safety risks.

Output/Activities: Continue to increase awareness and knowledge proactively of the health risks associated with unsafe food handling practices and foodborne illness.

Targets and Tracking:

  • Number of calls to 1-800 number.
  • Number of website page views per month/year for the HC food safety section.
  • Tracking of earned media and stakeholder media coverage - Number of articles and news reports on safe food handling.
  • Number of web links from outside organizations.
  • Feedback from stakeholders and Canadians.
  • Number and reach of food safety risk communication products developed, distributed and targeted at raising awareness of food safety by type of target population (e.g. vulnerable populations).
RA 20: Maintaining a Social Marketing Strategy:
  • Number of calls to 1-800 number.

    - 2,318 calls to the 1-800 number related to food safety were received from April, 2013 through March, 2014

Website page views
Month Page views
April, 2013 6.988
May, 2013 10,052
June, 2013 11,428
July, 2013 19,881
August, 2013 24,067
September, 2013 43,681
October, 2013 45,984
November, 2013 47,979
December, 2013 62,090
January, 2014 68,563
February, 2014 69,540
March, 2014 150,174
Total 560,427 (15% increase from previous year)
Earned media and stakeholder media coverage through News Canada.
Target audience Channel Reach
(times a person saw a story)
Pregnant women 12 print/online articles 1,035,258
People with weakened immune system 14 print/online articles 187,382
Children 5 and under (parents) 40 print/online articles
48 online videos
7,806,033
24,436,325
Adults 60+ 37 print/online articles 2,945823
General audience 155 radio segments
14 print/online article
5,273,100
487,027
Total 320 stories 42,170,948
Paid media.
Channel Reach / impressions
(times a person saw the ad)
Clicks through to Healthy Canadians web content
Facebook advertisements 5,200,000 9,203
Google Adwords 413,929 9,575
TV screens in 3,444 medical clinic waiting rooms 4,751,960 N/A
Print advertisements 684,773 Footnote 15 N/A
Total 11,050,662 18,778
Web links from outside organizations.
Organization Activities Dates Results
Thyme Maternity

Banners e-newsletters sent to 248,948 recipients

Dec 2013 and Jan, Feb, March 2014

84,062 opened and 797 clicks through to Healthy Canadians web content

Email blast created specifically for campaign sent to 127,719 recipients

Feb and March 2014

38,416 opened and 4,289 clicks through to Healthy Canadians web content

SC Johnson

Right@Home e-newsletter sent to 480,000 promoting article on rightathome.ca

Sept 2014

122,000 clicks through to Healthy Canadian web content

Inserts in Ziploc-branded packages

April to Sept 2014

260,000 packages

2 BBQ safety Facebook posts

June 2014

Reach of 918,500 with 410 likes, 4 comments, 6 shares, and 900 clicks through to Healthy Canadian web content

Feedback from stakeholders and Canadians.
Healthy Canadians social media channel Results
Facebook: 49 posts on food safety topics with a reach of 1,283,455 (times a person saw the post) 51,543 comments, likes and shares, and 2,617 clicks through to Healthy Canadians web content
Twitter: 17 tweets on food safety topics 41 re-tweets and favourites
Pinterest: 8 pins on food safety topics (launched Jan 2014) 6 re-pins
YouTube: 2 videos on food safety topics (launched Jan 2014) 115,100 views
Total 172,307 engagements (interactions)
Food safety risk communication products by type of target population (e.g. vulnerable populations).
- Safe Food Guides with content tailored for vulnerable population:
Target audience Orders received & shipped by Health Canada % change from 2012-2013 Distributed via purchased lists Footnote 16 Total
Pregnant women 57,453 60% increase 1,630 Guides
(163 posters)
59,083
People with a weakened immune system 22,387 29% decrease 16,650 Guides
(5,400 posters)
39,037
Children 5 and under 46,176 162% increase - 46,176
Adults 60+ 70,768 57% increase 40,015 Guides
(8,130 posters)
110,783
Total 255,079
ER 21: Maintaining national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the FoodNet Canada program:

Outcome: Enhanced foodborne disease surveillance.

Output/Activities: Improved surveillance tools through the expansion of FoodNet Canada (formerly C-Enternet) to include at least three functional sentinel sites in Canada.

Targets and Tracking: Sentinel Site #3 human and retail products test results acquired; sampling conducted for all planned commodities at Sentinel Site #2 & #3; integrated analysis for Annual Report including all 3 sites; contracts and agreements confirmed for human cases and all planned commodities.

RA 21: Maintaining national public health surveillance tools and platforms through the expansion of the FoodNet Canada program:

All four FoodNet Canada components were active at Sentinel Site 2 and sampling was conducted for two on farm commodities (broiler chickens and turkeys). The Memorandum of Agreement was signed with Sentinel Site 3 and programs were implemented for human case and retail product testing. Initial results will be acquired later in 2014.

ER 22: Maintaining strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued implementation of whole genome sequencing:

Outcome: Canada's ability to rapidly detect and trace the origins of food hazards is enhanced.

Output/Activities: Modern genomic technologies will continue to be implemented to provide substantially more detailed information and evidence on foodborne pathogens during outbreak investigations. This will be done according to the roadmap that has been developed for the implementation of genomic epidemiology in PulseNet Canada.

Targets and Tracking: Progress in the completion of PulseNet Canada Genome roadmap implementation, including the completion of sequencing 1000 retrospective priority pathogen isolates and a pilot project for time-delayed prospective sequencing of all Listeria isolates for one year.

RA 22: Maintaining strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued implementation of whole genome sequencing:

The Public Health Agency of Canada's National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) sequenced an unprecedented number of pathogen genomes in 2013-2014: greater than 600 Listeria and 400 E.coli genomes were acquired and preliminary interpretative criteria were drafted for the application of whole genome sequencing (WGS) to real-time public health investigations.

In October 2013, the PulseNet Canada Steering Committee (federal, provincial and territorial partners) drafted PulseNet Canada's Genomics Roadmap to outline the path for implementing genomic technology to PulseNet's surveillance and outbreak response activities. The first steps of the Roadmap have been completed with the drafting of project charters for two large priority sequencing and analysis projects and an associated collaborative research agreement.

In 2013-2014, four small multi-provincial clusters of Listeria monocytogenes were investigated using WGS. While WGS provided additional valuable laboratory evidence, a common source was not identified during these public health investigations.

ER 23: Maintaining strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued expansion of PulseNet Canada:

Outcome: Canada's ability to rapidly detect and trace the origins of food hazards is enhanced.

Output/Activities: The expansion of the PulseNet Canada laboratory network will increase outbreak detection capacity and information sharing amongst F/P/T partner laboratories.

Targets and Tracking: Number of PulseNet Canada partner laboratories participating in testing proficiency programs; number of technicians within PulseNet Canada partner laboratories that successfully completed testing proficiency programs; development of new training and knowledge translation materials to support the expansion of the network to include on-line training as well as genomic epidemiology materials; publishing interpretation criteria for Multiple-Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA) (E. coli O157:H7), and accreditation of the MLVA test.

RA 23: Maintaining strengthened laboratory diagnostic and networking tools: Continued expansion of PulseNet Canada:

The Public Health Agency of Canada developed and rolled out next-generation laboratory fingerprinting for PulseNet Canada (e.g., Multi-Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] Analysis or MLVA for E. coli). An on-going assessment of new molecular characterization methods for differentiation of food-borne pathogens is being carried out to improve accuracy and turnaround time.

During 2013-2014, DataFuse was implemented. DataFuse is an electronic integration of laboratory and epidemiological data, used for earlier cluster detection and faster, more robust outbreak response.

Additionally, in 2014, an advanced, epidemiologically-specific statistical modelling algorithm for rapid and robust disease cluster detection was integrated into the Canadian Network for Public Health Intelligence (CNPHI).

There were 34 personnel from 9 PulseNet participating laboratories certified by PulseNet Canada for Listeria this fiscal year, compared to 9 personnel from 4 laboratories at the time of the 2008 listeriosis outbreak. To support this expansion, NML has developed and completed a multi-media training program.

ER 24: Maintaining human illness outbreak response capacity:

Outcome: Enhanced effectiveness and efficiency of response activities, as well as improved coordination and capacity to respond to multi-jurisdictional foodborne illness outbreaks.

Output/Activities: Completion of identified revisions to the FIERP protocol; % of relevant Health Portfolio staff participating in FIERP training exercise; % of planned FIORP exercises completed with F/P/T partners.

Targets and Tracking: Percentage of relevant Health Portfolio staff participating in Food-borne Illness Emergency Response Plan (FIERP) training and exercises.

RA 24: Maintaining human illness outbreak response capacity:

Comprehensive revisions to the Health Portfolio Emergency Operations Plan, the parent plan of the Food-borne Illness Emergency Response Protocol (FIERP) were completed in December of 2013. Revision of the FIERP will be undertaken to focus on those factors that are specifically applicable to food-borne illness response.

The Public Health Agency of Canada continued to support food-borne illness outbreak response capacity through the development of Foodborne Illness Outbreak Response Protocol exercises in parallel with other steps, such as updating standard operating procedures, to enhance outbreak response capacity. Exercises did not take place in 2013-14, since none were requested by provinces or territories.

ER 25: Maintaining national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity:

Outcome: Improved coordination and capacity to control and mitigate an outbreak which poses a public health threat to Canadians.

Output/Activities: Efficient and effective federal surge capacity to support outbreak response and mitigate the public health impact of a foodborne illness outbreak.

Targets and Tracking:

  • SOPs approved;
  • Competencies reviewed and verified;
  • Competency-based training support documentation reviewed;
  • Begin to develop plan for maintaining Agency surge capacity which includes: recruitment strategy, training strategy (including annual training for new and existing surge staff), and agreed-to competencies;
  • Protocols and processes are approved;
  • List of staff for surge reviewed and updated;
  • Number of FTEs and/or budget allocated to train and develop Agency staff; and
  • Number of Directorates participating in the surge (AERO = All Events Response Operations) database.
ER 25: Maintaining national epidemiological surge public health outbreak capacity:

A mobilization unit within the Health Portfolio Operations Centre has been established. Standard Operating Procedures are in place to support expedited deployment of national epidemiologic surge capacity for public health outbreaks, including food-borne illness outbreaks.

The Field Service Training and Response Division in the Health Security Infrastructure Branch of the Public Health Agency of Canada developed and delivered Advanced Food Safety Training (November 18-22, 2013) to Agency field staff who are part of the Agency's federal surge response capacity. The training prepared participants to better respond to food-borne illness outbreaks and to public health issues arising at the animal-human interface.

To inform the identification of competencies required to support public health surge capacity, key elements of the Agency's food-borne illness response system have been mapped, and identification of required competencies is now underway. Delays related to the ability to staff positions have occurred. As a result, the new anticipated date for completion of consultation and confirmation of competencies is December 2014.

Funding was used by the Canadian Field Epidemiology Program to staff two Field Epidemiologists, whose placement site project work was focused on food-borne issues. These Field Epidemiologists are part of the Agency's federal surge response capacity.

An information management database (All Events Response Operations (AERO)) to support a coordinated, Agency-wide, surge capacity response for food-borne illness outbreaks and other public health events is in its final stages of re-development from the .NET Framework to the Java platform. Some delays have been experienced due to the complexity of the system and unavailability of a testing environment. AERO will provide the ability to identify internal surge capacity resources, track and manage requests for assistance and support the mobilization of human resources.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Tony Ritchie
Executive Director
Strategic Policy and International Affairs Directorate
613-773-5732

Health Canada
Diana Dowthwaite
Director General, Resource Management & Operations Directorate,
Health Products and Food Branch,
613-957-6690

Public Health Agency of Canada
Steven Stemthal
Acting Director General
Centre for Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch
613-948-6883

Table C: Invasive Alien Species

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Invasive Alien Species (IAS)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: Plant Resources Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2010-11

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $95.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $19.0M ongoing

Description of Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Invasive alien species (IAS) are species introduced through human action from outside their natural distribution (past or present), that threaten the environment, economy, or society - including human health. Annually, IAS results in billions of dollars in direct losses, control costs, increased production costs and lost market access. The annual impact of IAS is estimated to be as much as $20 billion to the forest sector, $7 billion for aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes, and $2.2 billion for invasive plants alone in the agricultural sector. IAS have gained international attention as globalization, climate change, and international trade increases have elevated IAS introduction risks.

In recognition of the fact that responding to IAS is a shared responsibility, An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada was adopted in 2004 by federal, provincial and territorial resource ministers as a national coordinated approach toward prevention and management of IAS. The Strategy's objective is to initiate implementation of priority objectives (i.e. prevention, early detection and rapid response to new invaders, and management of established and spreading invaders), which will be met via work contributions in five thematic areas: Risk Analysis, Science and Technology, Legislation, Regulation and Policy, Engaging Canadians and International Cooperation. Environment Canada is the lead for invasive animal species; Fisheries and Oceans Canada leads the aquatic invasive species issues; the Canadian Food Inspection Agency leads for invasive plants and other plant pests; and Natural Resources Canada leads for forest pests.

Budget 2010 allocated $19 million per year to Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, National Resources Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to continue the Government of Canada's implementation of the IAS Strategy as well as for the maintenance and enhancement of advances made in the previous five years in terms of invasive alien species activities. Ongoing implementation of the IAS Strategy is critical for the continuation of the protection of Canada's ecosystems and resource-based economy.

Shared outcome(s): Continuing the implementation of the Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada is essential for the protection of Canada's aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; this includes the protection of native biological diversity, as well as domestic plants and animals, from the risks of invasive alien species. The key outcome of the Strategy is to make Canada a leader in the prevention and management of IAS in a manner that ensures environmental sustainability, economic competitiveness and societal well-being.

Governance structure(s): The government-wide IAS Strategy involves Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Departments and agencies are committed to ongoing collaboration for IAS issues. At a federal-level, coordination continues to be discussed as necessary through the Directors' General Interdepartmental Committee on Invasive Alien Species. Inter-jurisdictionally, federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) cooperation for IAS issues continues under the auspices of the annual joint meeting of Resource Ministers' Councils for Wildlife, Forests, Fisheries and Aquaculture, and Endangered Species, as well as within associated meetings with Deputy Ministers and Assistant Deputy Ministers. The Minister of Agriculture is the lead federal Minister responsible for responding to invasive alien plants and plant pests; efforts are on-going to seek the full engagement of federal, provincial, and territorial ministers of agriculture and facilitate their participation in addressing invasive alien species.

Note: The CFIA, DFO, EC, and NRCan report ongoing implementation and effectiveness of the Strategy through their respective annual Report on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports. In addition, the CFIA, DFO, EC, and NRCan updated the IAS Logic Model which assesses the IAS Strategy performance for Canada and in which indicators and targets are jointly reviewed by the four partners. The updated Logic Model was approved at the Director General IAS interdepartmental meeting in November 2013.

Planning Highlights: For 2013-14, the key horizontal plans are to: continue to develop, advance and implement concrete and practical prevention, detection, response and management activities for the IAS Strategy; continue to enhance coordination mechanisms across jurisdictions and issues.

Invasive Alien Species Table
Federal Partner PAA Program Contributing activities/ programs Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) ($ Millions) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Footnote 17 Expect Results (ER) Contributing activity / program result (RA)
CFIA

Plant Resources Program

Internal Services

Risk Analysis 15.5 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 3.1 ongoing 2.9 1.9 ER 26 RA 26
Science and Technology 33.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 6.6 ongoing 4.2 3.6 ER 27 RA 27
Legislation, Regulation and Policy 6.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.2 ongoing 1.2 0.3 ER 28 RA 28
Engaging Canadians 3.5 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.7 ongoing 0.7 0.7 ER 29 RA 29
International Cooperation 2.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.4 ongoing 0.4 0.2 ER 30 RA 30
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) Protection for Canadians and Natural Resources Risk Analysis 3.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.6 ongoing 0.6 0.6 ER 31 RA 31
Science and Technology 5.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.0 ongoing 1.0 1.0 ER 32 RA 32
Legislation, Regulation and Policy 1.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.2 ongoing 0.2 0.2 ER 33 RA 33
Engaging Canadians 0.5 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.1 ongoing 0.1 0.1 ER 34 RA 34
International Cooperation 0.5 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.1 ongoing 0.1 0.1 ER 35 RA 35
Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) Science for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture Risk Analysis 2.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.4 ongoing 0.28 0.16 ER 36 RA 36
Science and Technology 5.1 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.02 ongoing 0.89 0.77 ER 37 RA 37
Legislation, Regulation and Policy 1.1 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.21 ongoing 0.180 0.204 ER 38 RA 38
Engaging Canadians 0.4 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.09 ongoing 0.09 0.07 ER 39 RA 39
International Cooperation 11.4 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 2.28 ongoing 2.28 2.27 ER 40 RA 40
Environment Canada (EC) Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat Engaging Canadians-Invasive Alien Species Partnership Program 5.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.0 ongoing 0 0 The funding for the Invasive Alien Species Partnership Program was terminated as of March 31, 2012, as part of the Government of Canada's priority to balance the federal budget.
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) $95.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $19.0M ongoing
ER 26: Risk Analysis

The development and application of risk assessment tools and models to identify potential IAS and their associated pathways of introduction, including the evaluation and identification of appropriate mitigation measures and the design and implementation of programs to prevent, detect and manage current and potential IAS risks and pathways.

Outcome: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed in a risk-based manner.

Output/Activities: The CFIA will continue to identify highest-risk potential IAS, their pathways, and appropriate means by which to mitigate identified risks by continuing to conduct pest and weed risk analyses, developing import controls for unintentional (i.e., contaminants in field crops) and intentional (i.e., plants for planting) pathways and initial response to early detections as well as domestic response plans. For example, pathways of focus for 2013-2014 include grain and seed, ethno-botanical (food and medicinal plants), wooden handicrafts and ornamentals.

The Agency will also develop its tools and capabilities for modeling of pest risk and spread, and continue to facilitate identification-sharing among federal and provincial partners to ensure efficient information generation, communication and response to new invasive species.

Indicator:

  1. Percentage of plants and plant products entering Canada in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements governing introduced plant pests.
  2. Commodities and pests identified as potential IAS risks.

Targets and Tracking:

  1. 90%
  2. Categorizations, risk assessment and risk analysis documents that reflect those potential IAS risks.
RA 26: Risk Analysis

In 2013-14, a total of 17027 import inspections were performed in support of the Plant Program. A total of 198 official non-compliances, that resulted in Notices of Non-compliance were found as a result of these inspections. Therefore 98.8% of all imports inspected met Canadian import requirements (target met).

The CFIA continued to identify highest risk potential invasive alien species, their pathways, and appropriate means by which to mitigate identified risks through conducting pest and weed risk analyses, implementing import control measures and initial response to early detections (e.g., jointed goatgrass in British Columbia, Asian long-horned beetle in Ontario).

The Agency continued to facilitate sharing of information among federal departments to ensure information flows among departments (e.g., CFIA and AAFC are exploring collaborative opportunities on research needs for invasive plants, CFIA worked with Transport Canada to provide Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) information to Chinese and Canadian marine industry).

The CFIA completed 47 pest risk assessments (insects, fungi, nematodes, viruses) and related technical evaluations in 2013-14. Assessments were completed for forest pests, pests of grains and field crops, pests threatening the horticulture sector and newly proposed imports of commodities and new crops. The science advice provided was incorporated into delivery, renewal or development of plant health policies and programs and negotiations between Canada and its international trading partners.

Weed risk assessments were conducted for potential quarantine pest plants, to analyze their ability to establish, spread and impact the economy, environment and society. These risk assessments were conducted to ensure the ongoing protection of agriculture and ensure ongoing market access to Canadian commodities. The CFIA completed 76 preliminary assessments of plant species for their potential to be quarantine pests, as well as 12 full weed risk assessments and 2 commodity risk assessments.

Over 110 requests for information related to pest alerts from other sources, pest interceptions, detained shipments or export certification were processed, including species modelling of Apple Ermine as a potential economic and nuisance pest for Canada for apple orchards and weed contaminants in fresh pineapples.

The Agency conducted environmental scanning using literature searches, web alerts, and other resources to identify issues of potential significance. The CFIA issued 29 plant pathology, 15 entomology and 4 botany science alerts and maintained the Science Scan Index. The Agency reviewed 9 petitions for the release of biological control organisms. 291 applications to import 1950 organisms were evaluated, including 126 entomology requests and 164 plant pathology requests. The CFIA also continued the development of standardized guidelines for evaluation of living organisms other than plants.

The CFIA provides the secretariat role for the National Early Detection Rapid Response (EDRR) Forum. The purpose of the Forum is to discuss issues related to the EDRR model for invasive plants in Canada informing federal, provincial and territorial strategies. Its scope includes all vascular plants, including aquatic plants. A National EDRR Forum was recommended by Canadian stakeholders who participated in consultations of the Canadian Invasive Plant Framework (CIPF). Discussions during fiscal year 2013-2014 have focussed on the use of herbicides as EDRR tools to manage invasive plants in aquatic areas (e.g., Spartina spp. in BC), weeds in wildflower seed mixes and their sale, and developing an EDRR reporting protocols for invasive plants.

Two reports for IAS were completed by contractors for the CFIA, including the Economic Analysis of Invasive Alien Species in Canada and Invasive Species Decision Support Software, in which Asian gypsy moth was used as a case study.

ER 27: Science and Technology

Information gathering, the performance of verification activities and the development of scientific tools and expertise, and delivery of programs which support the prevention, early detection and rapid response to IAS.

Outcome: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.

Output/Activities: The Agency will support IAS prevention, detection and response through continued efforts to develop scientific tools and expertise. Projects on-going for 2013-2014 include: development of weed molecular identification methods, reference sequence databases and reference collections (i.e., herbaria); genetic barcoding of invasive plant-eating beetles for rapid pest identification; pest diagnostics; illustrated identification guides; Lucid Key; genetic barcode and trans-Pacific capacity building for emerald ash borer and its relatives; weed biology and seed identification features for Chinese weedy species that are a risk to Canadian biosecurity.

The CFIA will also minimize the impact of IAS introductions by continued foresight projects and early detection efforts, such as import monitoring and inspection for pests such as invasive plants, molluscs, Asian gypsy moth (AGM) and Asian Long-horned Beetle (ALHB), and by continuing to develop diagnostic methods and tools for the rapid and accurate identification of high risk IAS. Specific activities include the development of invasive weed seed identification fact sheets; acquisition of reference material for IAS species that are or will be regulated in the near future; monitoring of seed and grain samples to determine the presence and frequency of alien weed species; assessment of potential treatment options (e.g., treatments for AGM egg masses) inspection and auditing of facilities importing grain and other plant products.

The CFIA will continue to work with North American and international scientific partners towards the improvement of our current IAS detection tools, and the offshore evaluation of new methods for organisms not present in North America.

Domestically, the CFIA will continue to work with provincial and municipal partners on collaborative IAS plant pest surveys. Domestic regulatory response plans, including surveys, inspection and monitoring will continue to be developed and delivered for specific pests such as jointed goatgrass. The CFIA will continue to actively participate, along with federal partners, on the Operations Committee of the Invasive Species Centre to share information and coordinate research on IAS.

Indicator: Number of interceptions of invasive species in Canada, new invasive species that enter through regulated pathways and/or establish domestic spread of selected regulated invasive species that is controlled, samples tested/identified and non-compliances with Plant Protection and/or Seeds Acts.

Targets and Tracking: Same or less than historical trends based on survey and inspection data, Import Control Tracking System, updates to the Automated Import Reference System (AIRS), laboratory test results and notices of non-compliances.

RA 27: Science and Technology

In 2013-2014, a total of 198 official Notices of Non-compliances were issued and sent to foreign National Plant Protection Organizations (NPPO).

The Agency continued to support invasive alien species prevention, detection and response through continued foresight projects and efforts in early detection such as import monitoring and inspection and continuing to develop diagnostic methods and tools for rapid and accurate identification of high risk IAS.

The CFIA conducted 25 plant pest surveys in 2013-2014, in a total of 14,200 sites. These included pests in horticulture, forestry, invasive plants, and a diverse array of taxa such as viruses, insects, fungi and nematodes. In many cases, the surveys targeted specific regulated organisms but some surveys, such as the invasive forest insect survey and the invasive plants survey, focused on risk pathways in order to detect a range of pests. These surveys support regulatory decisions, import and export policies and eradication and control programs, such as Asian long-horned beetle and woolly cup grass response. In some cases, the surveys are collaborative efforts, integrated with provincial and municipal partners.

The CFIA has engaged in various international collaborations (e.g., with China and the United States) as part of the CFIA's foresight efforts. These collaborations provide programs/risk assessment with information on potential invasive species and laboratories with reference specimens to assist future diagnosis. For example, in conjunction with the USDA Forest Service and the Northeast Forestry University (Harbin, Heilongjiang), the CFIA implemented a sentinel tree monitoring program in China to determine pests of maple, poplar and oak that could be potentially introduced into Canada. This project will provide reference specimens to CFIA plant laboratories which will enhance diagnostic capabilities and reduce reliance on international diagnosticians. It will also provide a potential list of target pests to conduct detection surveys for invasive alien species.

Specific to plant research, 45 internally-funded plant research projects were conducted by the CFIA in 2013-14 to develop new detection and identification methods, tools, and high-throughput diagnostic protocols for plant pests and the differentiation of agricultural crop varieties.

Three interdepartmental plant research initiatives were conducted to enhance federal scientific capacity for the identification and management of regulated plant pests. This includes the Quarantine and Invasive Species Project under the Genomics Research & Development Initiative. The objective of this program is to protect Canadian biodiversity and trade from the impacts of global change through improved ability to monitor IAS and quarantine species. Another initiative is the Plum Pox Virus Management and Monitoring Program (PPVMMP) which supports ongoing Agency survey and monitoring activities, as well as the development of virus elimination methods, strain characterization research and enhanced detection tools. Another initiative is a collaborative research project with NRCan supporting the development of tools and strategies for the management of the Brown Spruce Long-Horned Beetle.

The CFIA completed a study on the weed biology and seed identification of Chinese weedy species that pose a risk to Canada. This study examined ecological and biological information of major weedy species found in Chinese production areas, developed weed identification tools and generated weed biology information related to seed backs, seed dispersal and winter hardiness.

A proof of concept study on seed paper as a novel pathway for invasive plants surveyed international and domestic sources of seed paper. The research project investigated the potential of novelty seed paper products as a pathway for entry of foreign plants into Canada. Seed viability and germination were evaluated followed by traditional morphological identification and DNA barcoding. Over 80 species of plants were detected and the majority germinated, validating that this pathway could lead to introductions of foreign plant species. The CFIA continues to support this work which will assist the Agency in determining the plant health risk of seed paper.

Risk assessment of invasive alien insects received support for stronger tools to evaluate overwintering potential of invasive insects. A guidance document on establishing best practices for determining thermal tolerance and potential for overwintering in novel invasive insects is intended to increase the CFIA's capacity to evaluate existing data on cold tolerance and interpret this data in a more efficient manner.

The CFIA delivered over 3000 IAS specific tasks related to import monitoring programs for risk evaluation and program verification, including sampling for weed seeds in grains, for horticultural pests and for imported traditional food and medicine. Inspection and detection activities resulted in the expansion of known Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) infested areas and the detection of Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) egg masses on vessels entering Canada. In the 2013-2014 fiscal year, a total of 873 pests were intercepted on imports, many of which are regulated. These interceptions included, 1 bacteria, 39 plants, 687 insects, 39 molluscs, 48 fungi, 42 nematodes and 17 viruses.

The CFIA posted 13 North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO) Phytosanitary Alerts on behalf of Canada, including numerous updates on Emerald Ash Borer regulated areas in Ontario and Québec, new reports of Apple Maggot in Prince George, British Columbia, detection and eradication of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in Niagara, Ontario and the eradication and then new detection of Asian long-horned beetle in Mississauga and Toronto, Ontario.

The Agency IAS detections included regulated invasive plants and/or prohibited noxious (e.g., dodder and jointed goatgrass) weed seeds as contaminants in herb seed, Chinese herbal medicines and in grain and seeds samples.

ER 28: Legislation, Regulation and Policy

Creating and updating legislation, regulations, policies and programs to support the effective implementation of CFIA commitment to the IAS Strategy.

Outcome: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed, and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.

Output/Activities: The Agency will continue legislative framework modernization by updating regulations, creating new ones and harmonizing approaches (where possible) in consultation with stakeholders.

To ensure consistency with international standards and legislated mandate, the CFIA will continue to develop new science-based programs and policies as well as to update existing ones, while focusing on higher risk pathways of introduction. These will support the implementation and delivery of associated import and domestic measures to protect Canada's resource base from potential IAS (e.g., treatment manual, domestic phytosanitary manual and on-farm biosecurity standards).

The CFIA will continue to collaborate with federal and provincial partners to coordinate implementation of An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada, to maintain strong lines of communication, engage stakeholders, and contribute to interdepartmental governance as well as strengthening internal governance across branches.

Indicator: Number of regulatory, program and policy (e.g., Directives, response plans) documents developed, revised and/or notices of confirmed quarantine pests issued.

Targets and Tracking: Completion, revision and/or posting of directives, policies, standards, response plans and Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) and/or regulatory amendments are accepted and implemented.

RA 28: Legislation, Regulation and Policy

The CFIA continued modernizing the legislative framework and harmonizing approaches in consultation with stakeholders. To ensure consistency with international standards and legislated mandate, the Agency will continue to develop new science-based program policies and update existing ones with a focus on higher risk pathways of introduction (e.g., grain import framework, Asian Gypsy Moth certification program).

The Invasive Plants Program continued to be implemented and the Invasive Plants Directive (D-12-01) was posted on the CFIA website on October 24, 2013. This Directive describes the Invasive Plants Policy and lists invasive plants species that are prohibited in Canada. Fifteen invasive plant species were added to the List of Regulated Pests in Canada and a risk management document for newly regulated invasive plants was finalized. The Automated Import Reference System (AIRS) was updated to reflect import requirements for these regulated invasive plants.

The CFIA continues to partner with provincial government representatives to develop response plans for invasive plants which are federally regulated or under consideration for federal regulation and present domestically. For example, the CFIA, the Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec (MAPAQ) and AAFC continued to work with the parties affected by woolly cup grass (WCG) infestations in Quebec to identify acceptable risk mitigation measures to reduce the spread and impact of WCG. The CFIA also developed and consulted on domestic regulatory options for WCG. The Agency continued to implement response plans and/or directives for jointed goatgrass, kudzu and Asian gypsy moth.

The CFIA engaged with AAFC to enhance collaboration on IAS issues with emphasis on policy and program development as well as research to support regulatory decisions (e.g. devitalisation, seed bank dynamics and harvesting) in the plant agriculture sector. The Agency continued to collaborate with AAFC on the review of Biological Control Agent Petitions prior to release in Canada. The CFIA has taken steps to prevent the entry of invasive pests, specifically khapra beetle and weed seeds, in the grain pathway. Risk profiling for specific crops has been initiated for invasive weeds in the grain pathway in order to develop import measures that correspond with the associated risk of introduction of these pests.

The Agency repealed the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Infested Places Order on April 25, 2013 and EAB was added to Schedule II of the Plant Protection Regulations. Asian Long-Horned Beetle (ALHB) was declared eradicated in Canada on April 5, 2013 and the Infested Place Order was repealed. However, a new Infested Place Order was enacted on December 3, 2013 after a new detection was confirmed in Mississauga, Ontario.

Additional revisions were made to the Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) Directive based on stakeholder consultation which strengthen the vessel certification program and further mitigate the risk of introduction of AGM to Canada. The CFIA continues to work on a response plan for this pest in consultation with the provinces and industry.

The CFIA continued to focus programs on preventing the entry of plant pests prior to importation and by regulating the handling and use of the material after importation when appropriate. The CFIA put in place interim import requirements to prevent the entry of the Lobesia pest into Canada and is developing an import policy directive.

The CFIA has developed and established a process for the implementation of the Living Organisms (other than plants) Program. The Agency is in the process of updating import requirements for living organisms and continues to develop the domestic living organisms program.

The Agency also worked with the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) to register two emergency pesticide options for Asian Gypsy Moth as part of the response plan.

The CFIA contributed to the finalization of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy indicators in collaboration with Environment Canada. These indicators are related to ongoing CFIA activities and performance measures under the Invasive Alien Species Strategy.

The CFIA also developed an e-commerce discussion paper for eventual consultation with trading partners. This paper discusses the increasing risk of introduction of invasive species through e-commerce (i.e., online purchases) and challenges in mitigating the risks associated with this pathway.

ER 29: Engaging Canadians:

Increase public awareness and access to IAS information, prevention, and control strategies, as well as activities that seek to maintain partnerships with governments and stakeholders.

Outcome: Increased stakeholder and partner cooperation, stakeholder and partner awareness of plants and plant pests, and compliance with policies and regulations.

Output/Activities: The Agency will continue to work collaboratively with stakeholders and government partners to raise awareness about IAS, their potential pathways and associated policies and programs, thereby promoting early reporting of IAS, best management practices and compliance with regulations to reduce risks to Canada's plant resources. The CFIA will continue to develop and participate in IAS training and outreach sessions for municipal and provincial staff as well as regional IAS organizations. The former will be supported by inspection tools and publications intended to broaden surveillance reach.

Broad stakeholder consultation will continue, and cooperation will be sought as new policies and programs - such as the invasive plants program - are implemented.

Indicator: Number of communication documents and activities completed.

Targets and Tracking: Attendance at meetings/conferences, distribution of outreach material, consultation with Canadian stakeholders, posting of fact sheets and media releases, responses to media queries and updates to the IAS webpage and stakeholder "hits".

RA 29: Engaging Canadians:
  • Over 300 field guides and over 1500 fact sheets on invasive plants and pests distributed at various events and locations across Canada
  • 3 Consultation documents prepared on woolly cupgrass and living organisms
  • 14 Announcements on forestry pests
  • 9 Responses to media queries on IAS topics such as biological control agents, invasive plants and snails
  • At least 10 Interviews conducted on invasive plants, forestry and IAS in general
  • 16 Consultative meetings and conferences attended on IAS

The Agency continued to work collaboratively with stakeholders and other government departments to raise awareness about IAS, their potential pathways and associated policies and programs, thereby promoting early reporting of IAS, best management practices and compliance with regulations for reducing the risk to Canada's plant resources. The CFIA's Invasive Plants Directive, which outlines the CFIA's position on the importation and domestic movement of potentially invasive plants and lists prohibited invasive plant species was made publicly available on the CFIA website in October 2013. Additionally, 26 documents on IAS risk management, import requirement directives and industry bulletins were contributed to the Agency's repository of guidance documents to assist online users in finding the information and making it more accessible.

The CFIA continued to promote education and awareness of invasive species by distributing material such as, Invasive Plants Field Guide, 19 invasive plant fact sheets, a general invasive plants fact sheet, forest pest brochures and Asian Gypsy Moth identification posters. This material was developed to increase the awareness of invasive plants among industry stakeholders, CFIA inspection staff, provincial representatives and the public. It was also used to educate the public of the role they can play in helping to keep invasive plants out of Canada by assisting the CFIA in determining the presence and distribution of invasive plants that are or will be regulated by the CFIA.

The CFIA participated in face-to-face meetings with producers, importers, processors and provincial weed specialists to maintain and enhance support for and develop innovations for implementation of the import program to prevent IAS introductions (e.g., presentations at the 2013 Canadian Weed Science Society meeting and the Canadian Seed Trade association on invasive plants).

Further to the WTO notifications on Canada's intention to regulate the import of grains to protect against the introduction of pests and invasive weed seeds, the CFIA continued to consult with the Canadian grain industry on proposed end-use risk-based grain import framework. Additionally, CFIA staff visited various facilities across Canada to consult with stakeholders and gain information on how grain is handled and processed to assist with implementing the framework in the least trade restrictive manner (e.g. meetings with the Association of Custom Harvesters and Agricultural Producers of Saskatchewan).

The CFIA continued to collaborate with federal and provincial partners to co-ordinate the implementation of the Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada, to maintain strong lines of interdepartmental communication and engage stakeholders, notable activities included participation in the North American Forest Commission – Insects, Diseases and Invasive Plants Working Group Annual Meeting with Canada Forest Service and made two presentations at the Ontario Plant Health Symposium in Niagara Falls.

The Agency participated on the boards of several Invasive Plant/Species Councils and a forum to engage Canadians on invasive species. Federal, Provincial and Municipal government, industry, academia, environmental groups and the general public participate in these councils. The CFIA actively participates on the Board of Directors and Operations and Advisory Committee of the Invasive Species Centre (ISC) in Sault. Ste. Marie. The ISC provides a forum for sharing information and coordinating research necessary for implementing the National IAS Strategy. The CFIA works with the Centre to identify suitable projects and student candidates for internship program that helps the CFIA advance key IAS activities (e.g., domestic transportation of firewood). The Agency also participates in working groups with the provinces (i.e., Ontario Critical Plant Pest Management Committee) and advisory committees (i.e., British Columbia Plant Protection Advisory Committee (BCPPAC).

The CFIA continues to work with stakeholders, including municipal, provincial and federal partners and industry on slowing the spread of destructive forestry pests, such as Emerald Ash Borer and Asian long-horned beetle, and the development of domestic regulatory measures to mitigate the spread of invasive plants such as woolly cupgrass and kudzu. In addressing the domestic movement and potential spread of such invasive alien species, the CFIA has initiated the development of a Domestic primer as an educational tool for communicating with stakeholders.

The Agency continued broad stakeholder consultations and engagement on the risk associated with Asian gypsy moth (AGM) through an AGM Annual Review, which provided the opportunity for the CFIA to engage stakeholders in assessing the results of the changes to the AGM program. Some of the major outcomes included clarifying the Shanghai demarcation line and the addition of new certification bodies in Japan. In order to reduce the risk of AGM introduction to Canada, educational material was distributed to the shipping industry (i.e., BC Chamber of Shipping) and other stakeholders domestically such as Transport Canada and the Shipping Federation of Canada to disseminate information to the marine industry and improve compliance with the CFIA's AGM program.

The CFIA is continually seeking a variety of ways to increase awareness of invasive alien species and provide information on what can be done on an individual basis to prevent their introduction and spread. The CFIA contributed to Environment Week at AAFC by having a staffed booth and a variety of educational materials available, participated in local events such as the Navan Fair in Ottawa, presented to the students of Lisgar Collegiate as part of their Invasive Species curriculum and was interviewed on IAS topics including for article on invasive plants in Top Crop Manager.

ER 30: International Cooperation:

Collaborate with key international phytosanitary organizations and trading partners to reduce risks of IAS introduction from imported products, and to maintain access to foreign markets for Canadian exports through the development and implementation of harmonized standards and guidelines.

Outcome: Increased international engagement, cooperation and awareness of invasive species and compliance with policies and regulations. A key objective of international cooperation is ensuring that international standards and processes reflect Canadian interests.

Output/Activities: The CFIA will continue its active participation in the establishment of international standards, negotiations and bilateral meetings with key trading partners to mitigate IAS introduction risks through trade pathways (e.g., AGM introductions via marine vessels and forest IAS in wood packaging and wooden handicrafts), and the maintenance of access to foreign markets. The CFIA anticipates enhanced sharing of risk analysis information, notification, and discussion of new policies and programs as well as approach harmonization where appropriate and feasible.

Indicator:

  1. Percentage of certified plant and plant product shipments certified by Canada that meet foreign country import requirements with respect to invasive alien species.
  2. Number of planned, proposed or needed standards or agreements initiated or revised and international consultations.

Targets and Tracking:

  1. 99%
  2. Participation at workshops, expert panels, negotiations, missions and delegations
RA 30: International Cooperation:

Percentage of certified plant and plant product shipments certified by Canada that meet foreign country import requirements with respect to invasive alien species. 99% (Target met).

Number of planned, proposed or needed standards or agreements initiated or revised and international consultations, as follows:

  • 2 bilateral negotiations with the USDA-APHIS on the regulation of weeds in grain imports.
  • 2 bilateral negotiations with the US on Lobesia and Light Brown Apple Moth
  • 6 bilateral meetings on Asian gypsy moth with the US, China, Japan, Korea.
  • 1 incoming mission from China on various issues such as forestry
  • 1 bilateral meeting with China on a multitude of plant health topics
  • 7 IPPC standard setting activities related directly or indirectly to IAS.
  • 4 NAPPO projects directly related to IAS activities including initiatives on biological control, Asian gypsy moth, plum pox virus, and plants for planting as quarantine pests.
  • 4 consensus building meetings with NAPPO and QUADs group of countries.
  • 2 World Trade Organization notifications (Revisions to the plant protection import requirements for plants and plant parts for planting – D-08-04 and Deregulation of Heterodera glycines Ichinohe – Soybean Cyst Nematode) and 4 amendments to existing notifications were issued.

A main goal of international cooperation is to ensure that international standards and processes reflect Canadian interests. The CFIA continued its active participation in international standard setting, harmonization of approaches, negotiations and bilateral meetings with key trading partners, such as the United States, Mexico and China, to mitigate the risk of invasive alien species introduction through trade pathways while maintaining access to foreign markets.

Collaboration is fostered through participation in scientific activities and knowledge transfer to international phytosanitary organizations such as the North American Plant Protection Organization and the International Forestry Quarantine Research Group that provides internationally coordinated research analyses to the International Plant Protection Convention's Technical Panel on Forest Quarantine (TPFQ) and Commission of Phytosanitary Measures (CPM). In 2013-14 the CFIA was involved in a total of nine IPPC activities, of which seven were related to IAS. These were the CPM-8 and CPM-9, Standards Committee (May and November), Working Group of the Standards Committee, TPFQ and Strategic Planning Group.

The CFIA is an active member of various QUADS working groups (i.e. international committees representing USA, New Zealand, Australia and Canada). Two of these working groups, Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) and Survey Lures and Protocols, are excellent vehicles for sharing methods in the prevention and detection of invasive alien species. There was agreement that there continues to be more focus on information sharing opportunities.

The CFIA participated in international standard-setting, harmonization of approaches, negotiations, and bilateral meetings with key trading partners. Specifically, the CFIA continued to work with the USDA and the National Plant Protection Organizations in areas regulated for AGM (China, Japan, Korea and Russia) to enhance the AGM pre-departure certification program. Communication material on AGM was shared with trading partners and industry to increase awareness of the risks associated with AGM and identification of this pest.

Ongoing discussions with the USDA are taking place regarding a collaborative approach to invasive plants from off-continent. The CFIA continues to collaborate with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) on risk assessment methodologies for invasive plants. Officers from the CFIA have been trained and developed expertise in the USDA weed risk assessment methodology with the capacity to share components of the weed risk assessment.

Both Canada and the US are working on the development of their Not Authorized Pending Pest Risk Analysis (NAPPRA) list of species that are prohibited entry until a Pest Risk Analysis (PRA) is completed and determines if they are admissible or not. Both lists contained taxa that are considered as plant pests that are not present in Canada or the United States. There was international engagement and consultation with the Canadian NAPPRA list and we engaged the United States regarding their NAPPRA round 2 list.

There is ongoing consultation with the USDA on end-use risk based import requirements to limit the introduction and spread of seeds of regulated weeds (e.g. woolly cup grass, jointed goatgrass) in grain commodities imported from the US. In 2013-14, there were two bilateral meetings with the APHIS - USDA and several conference calls, to discuss regulation of weeds for grain imports.

The Agency continued to advance the development of new system approach requirements to harmonize with U.S. requirements that will serve to update the import policy directive on tomato fruits and further reduce the risk of introducing Tuta absoluta into Canadian greenhouses. Numerous technical documents were shared with the USDA and other trading partners, as well as industry (Flowers Canada). For example, Chrysanthemum Stem Necrosis Virus factsheets.

CFIA led a number of technical bilateral meetings to improve and stabilize the phytosanitary requirements of Canadian forest products to the U.S., Europe, China, India and Mexico. A feasibility study is being used to identify gaps and make recommendations to advance the Canada-US perimeter inspection approach for wood packaging. The CFIA hosted an incoming mission from China to review log export certification program and to advance use of heat treatment certificates as on option for sawn wood exports.

The CFIA responded to a request for biological information on the review of quarantine organisms of the Russian Federation and provided a report that included presence in Canada and host ranges for both quarantine organisms absent in the territory of the Russian Federation and quarantine organisms stenotopic in the territory of the Russian Federation.

The CFIA continues to develop and refine the apple pest list, incorporating information provided by EU and reported on EPPO PQR as a resource for Canadian pest risk assessments of EU products. The Agency also participated in technical meetings with EU staff as needed and provided technical advice related to pest risk assessment, PRA and Canada's plant health program.

Natural Resources Canada:
ER 31: Risk Analysis:

Outcome: The capacity to identify and address forest invasive alien species risks and prevent their introduction is increased.

Output/Activities: Continued improvement in understanding of forest invasive alien species pathways, assessment of human-assisted introduction and impact of invasive alien forest pests. Development and facilitation of cooperative national risk models, pest models, embellishment of forest alien species historical database and national and cross-border risk maps for forest invasive alien species and high-risk commodities.

Indicator: Scientific publications and other products, including government publications and reports, on pathway and pest risk analyses, ecological risk assessments, risk maps and FIAS economic impact assessments.

Targets and Tracking: Address existing and emerging knowledge gaps relating to potential new pests and new IAS introduction pathways

RA 31: Risk Analysis:

NRCan continued to develop models and maps that contribute to a better understanding of the risks related to the movement of forest invasive alien species (FIAS) and their potential introduction and spread in Canada. Building on sound science and technology, these achievements result in an increased capacity of pest management agencies to focus prevention and response efforts where and when the risks are the highest. In 2013/14, NRCan research addressed multiple aspects of the risk associated with FIAS. The following list provides examples:

  • Spatial analysis of the spread of invasive alien species in Canada's forests using historical data
  • Assessment of patterns of invasion by invasive alien species into Canadian forest ecosystems
  • Development of national economic models for assessing economic risks posed by invasive alien species
  • Internet-accessible economic model to assess the comparative costs of protecting ash trees from emerald ash borer versus tree removal and replacement
  • Collaborative development of a risk-based forest invasive alien species strategy
  • Development of BIOSIM 10, a decision support tool forecasting insect development in order to inform pest management activities and surveillance. The tool is applicable to exotic pests such as the European gypsy moth.
  • Assessment of phytosanitary risks of Phytophthora ramorum to native and introduced larches in Canada in order to identify appropriate mitigation measures to ensure safe trade of conifer commodities.
ER 32 Science and Technology:

Outcome 1: Knowledge of forest invasive alien species taxonomy, biology, and ecology is improved.

Output/Activities: Continued scientific research addressing knowledge gaps in taxonomy, biology, ecology, distribution, and pest-host and forest-pathogen relationships, including development and testing of molecular and genetic tools to identify non-native insects and pathways and historical patterns of pest invasions.

Indicator: Scientific publications and other products, including government publications and reports, on IAS biology, taxonomy and ecology.

Targets and Tracking: Address knowledge gaps regarding forest invasive alien species taxonomy, biology and ecology.

Outcome 2: Likelihood of establishment or spread of forest alien forest species is minimized and their impacts are mitigated.

Output/Activities: Production of detection, diagnostic and surveillance tools and strategies including molecular, pheromone and chemical attractant methods for forest invasive alien species. Development of response tools and methods including communication to responsible agencies of scientific recommendations to address control and eradication of forest invasive alien species. Investigation of mechanisms of action, integration and environmental assessment of systematic insecticides.

Indicator: Science and technology tools, methodologies and strategies developed and delivered to clients and stakeholders.

Targets and Tracking: Provide tools to advance the control and eradication of forest invasive alien species.

RA 32 Science and Technology:

NRCan experts contributed to documenting of the biology, taxonomy, ecology, and interaction between pests and their hosts for critical FIAS in Canada. By filling important knowledge gaps, these achievements contribute to strengthen the assumptions behind predictive risk models and in turn, inform decision-making more accurately. The knowledge provided by NRCan is also the foundation for the development and provision of more practical tools, techniques and science advice to the pest management community in order to enhance the capacity to detect, identify and respond to FIAS threats. The following list provides examples of research undertaken in 2013/14:

  • Continued development of methods to identify and monitor exotic fungi and new or potentially harmful plant diseases present on imported live plant material intercepted by CFIA inspectors.
  • Continue to improve early detection methods for the emerald ash borer.
  • Development of a survey allowing rapid yet reasonably accurate estimates of street tree composition in Canadian communities supporting invasive species risk assessments and urban forest management activities.
  • Development of a sampling protocol for the invasive exotic hemlock woolly adelgid, recently detected in Ontario.
  • Contribution to the discovery of Trichoferus campestris (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Ontario, Canada and first host record in North America.
  • Development of molecular methods to detect and identify spores of exotic fungi introduced in urban centres, ports, industrial areas and other transportation hubs across Canada.
  • Assist the Department of National Defence efforts in detecting and monitoring emerald ash borer in southern Quebec.
  • Continue to study the behaviour, impact and ecology of brown spruce longhorn beetle in order to inform risk assessments and new control processes to ultimately slow its spread.
  • New knowledge of the occurrence and spatial distribution of symptoms from the exotic woodwasp Sirex noctilio providing key information to improve detection and predict its impact on forest stands in its new range in northeastern North America.
ER 33: Legislation, Regulation and Policy:

Outcome 1: Decision-making related to forest invasive alien species management by regulatory agencies and other organizations is informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Output/Activities: Continued provision of science and policy expertise on forest invasive alien species prevention, detection and response to regulatory agencies, other federal Departments, Provinces and Territories, Municipalities, Industry and First Nations. Expansion and implementation of a decision framework for forest invasive species decisions has been initiated and is ongoing in partnership with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and stakeholders. Availability of risk information is being enhanced.

Indicator: Stakeholder engagement in CFS FIAS strategies frameworks or facilitation activities, participation and input into relevant fora.

Targets and Tracking: Distribute CFS science expertise and strategies to all regulatory agencies and partner organizations in support of decision-making.

Outcome 2: Canadian positions in national and international discussions on phytosanitary trade issues are informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Output/Activities: Continued provision of science and policy advice that support phytosanitary trade negotiations and the development of national and international forest phytosanitary standards. Development of training material and guidance for implementation of phytosanitary standards and forest education. Continued communication to the forest sector of strategies to maximize operational flexibility and reduce barriers to the international trade of forest products.

Indicator: CFS science and policy participation in Canadian positions on phytosanitary trade negotiations and national and international phytosanitary standards, including through engagement with and guidance to industry representatives and regulators.

Targets and Tracking: Provide expert input to all relevant national and international forest phytosanitary trade groups and organizations.

RA 33: Legislation, Regulation and Policy:

Outcome 1 and 2: NRCan continued to provide science-based advice to pest management and regulatory agencies on questions related to the current and future management of significant FIAS in Canada. NRCan contribution informs discussion and recommendations of various stakeholders' fora and technical working groups reporting to those agencies. NRCan also continued scientific evidence to support the development of Canadian forest sector strategies to reduce international, phytosanitary trade barriers for forest products. These activities are essential to maintain healthy forests and market access for Canadian forest products. Specific 2013/14 achievements related to the legislation, regulation and policy include:

  • Continued participation in the Canadian Forestry Phytosanitary Working Group to advance Canadian forest sector's interests
  • Chair of the emerald ash borer's, brown spruce longhorn beetle's, and Asian longhorn beetle's Science Subcommittees, advisory to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).
  • Co-Chair of the Brown Spruce Longhorn Beetle Steering Committee with CFIA; a multi-stakeholder forum seeking the best response approaches to this pest in the Maritimes region taking into consideration multiple forestry values and interests.
  • Contribution to a rapid response to a new infestation of the Asian longhorn beetle in collaboration with the CFIA.
  • Continued development of nationally consistent decision support tools promoting collaborative responses to FIAS in a multijurisdictional context.
  • Collaborate with the CFIA in Toronto to develop a sampling system for a recent find of Asian Longhorned beetle.
ER 34: Engaging Canadians:

Outcome: Scientific information on forest invasive alien species (FIAS) is made available to agencies, researchers and the public.

Output/Activities: Publications and presentations to enable stakeholder use the CanFIAS Database, continued enhancement and expansion of database capabilities and information. Literature-based analysis of CanFIAS gaps. Ongoing development of National Forest Insect Outbreak Atlas. Increased access to Canadian forest pest information for stakeholders and the public. Publication of new records of beetle species for New Brunswick.

Indicator: Information products made available to agencies, researchers and the public regarding forest invasive alien species and issues.

Targets and Tracking: Inform Canadians as to FIAS dangers and best practices.

RA 34: Engaging Canadians:

NRCan continued its ongoing effort to transfer knowledge, tools and expertise to the players of the forest sector and the public in a timely and effective way. The activities achieved in 2013/14 were essential in raising awareness about FIAS research and application among forest professionals and the public and were a step toward enhancing the collective ability to mitigate their risk and impact. Specific examples of achievement in this area include:

  • Organized the 2013 national Forest Pest Management Forum, the largest and most significant gathering of forest pest management experts, managers and practitioners in Canada.
  • Knowledge and technology transfer events were held, notably with urban forest stakeholders about emerald ash borer sampling and management. Guidance was provided on how to incorporate various methods into normal operations, and how to evaluate results.
  • Continued implementation of a knowledge transfer strategy on FIAS for the Quebec area, leading to media interviews, conferences and magazine articles in non-technical language, intended for professionals and the general public.
  • Maintenance of insect and fungal specimen collections and delivery of species identification in support of local programs and collaboration with CFIA, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and others.
ER 35: International Cooperation:

Outcome: International cooperation with phytosanitary organizations and trading partners is facilitated.

Output/Activities: Continued engagement in international forest sector consultations including the North American Plant Protection Organization, International Plant Protection Convention and International Forest Quarantine Working Group. Research and analysis to respond to Canadian export trade issues and develop national and international phytosanitary standards that reduce global movement of forest pests. Support to knowledge transfer of science-based decision-making in stakeholder agencies, advisory committees and international fora to facilitate international cooperation, exchange best practices and science information, reduce threats to Canadian forests and minimize disruption of Canadian forest products by phytosanitary concerns.

Indicator: CFS participation in international forest research and forest product phytosanitary consultations.

Targets and Tracking: Provide knowledge to inform science-based decision-making in international fora.

RA 35: International Cooperation:

NRCan has advanced cooperation with other countries, shared best management practices and built on collective capacity to address the global challenge of FIAS. Department's experts participated in various international scientific networks to promote Canadian research and facilitate synergies for collaboration initiatives. As part of its activities, NRCan also continued to provide technical advice to international and intergovernmental organizations in support of phytosanitary standard development and FIAS management with the objective of mitigating risks and facilitating trade. Examples of achievements in 2013/14 include:

  • Continued provision of scientific advice and research to the International Plant Protection Convention's Technical Panel on Forest Quarantine and Commission of Phytosanitary Measures in support of the development and revision of international phytosanitary standards.
  • Continued provision of policy advice, research results and analysis to the North American Plant Protection Organization in support of new regional phytosanitary standards.
  • Sharing of forest invasive alien species information with international community by enhancing and expanding the Canadian Forest Invasive Alien Species database and web portal
  • Forest invasive alien species research conducted by CFS in support of the Canada-China Forestry Partnership
  • Continued collaboration with the USDA Forest Service to develop new North American datasets for predicting risk of invasive pests' spread via transportation pathways
Department of Fisheries and Oceans:
ER 36: Risk Analysis:

Outcome: Decision makers and legislative authorities have science information and tools to manage AIS domestically and internationally

Output/Activities: Biological Risk Assessments, Socio-economic Risk Assessment Framework

Indicator: Percentage of approved requests for science advice on aquatic invasive species that are completed within the required timelines

Targets and Tracking: 90 % Canadian Science Advice Secretariat -Access database

RA 36: Risk Analysis:

Draft Framework for Socioeconomic Risk Assessment of Aquatic Invasive Species completed.

Result: The two approved requests for advice were completed, for a result of 100%

Four national risk assessments were completed for ballast water, freshwater fish screening, freshwater mollusk screening, and freshwater plants screening

  • 4 research documents (http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/csas-sccs/publications/resdocs-docrech/2013/2013_060-eng.html, http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/csas-sccs/publications/resdocs-docrech/2013/2013_096-eng.html, http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/csas-sccs/publications/resdocs-docrech/2013/2013_122-eng.html, http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/csas-sccs/Publications/ResDocs-DocRech/2013/2013_128-eng.html) - See below for details
    • Casas-Monroy, O., Linley, R.D., Adams, J.K., Chan, F.T., Drake, D.A.R., and Bailey, S.A. 2013. National Risk Assessment for Introduction of Aquatic Nonindigenous Species to Canada by Ballast Water. DFO Can. Sci. Advis. Sec. Res. Doc. 2013/128. vi + 73 p.
    • Gantz, C., Mandrak, N.E., and Keller, R.P. 2014. Application of an Aquatic Plant Risk Assessment to Non-Indigenous Freshwater Plants in Trade in Canada. DFO Can. Sci. Advis. Sec. Res. Doc. 2013/096 v + 31 p.
    • Mandrak, N.E., Gantz, C., Jones, L.A., Marson, D., and Cudmore, B. 2014. Evaluation of Five Freshwater Fish Screening-Level Risk Assessment Protocols and Application to Non-Indigenous Organisms in Trade in Canada. DFO Can. Sci. Advis. Sec. Res. Doc. 2013/122. v + 125 p.
    • Schroeder, B., Mandrak, N.E., and Cudmore, B.C. 2014. Application of a Freshwater Mollusc Risk Assessment to Non-indigenous Organisms in Trade in Canada. DFO Can. Sci. Advis. Sec. Res. Doc. 2013/060. v + 26 p.
  • 2 science advisory documents (http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/csas-sccs/Publications/SAR-AS/2013/2013_064-eng.html, http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/csas-sccs/publications/sar-as/2014/2014_009-eng.html) - See below for details
    • DFO. 2014. Science Advice from the National Risk Assessment for Ballast Water Introductions of Aquatic Nonindigenous Species to Canada. DFO Can. Sci. Advis. Sec. Sci. Advis. Rep. 2013/064.
    • DFO. 2014. Science advice for screening-level risk assessment protocols for nonindigenous freshwater organisms in trade in Canada. DFO Can. Sci. Advis. Sec. Sci. Advis. Rep. 2014/009.
  • and 2 proceedings ( http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/csas-sccs/publications/pro-cr/2014/2014_004-eng.html ) - See below for details
    • Proceedings from National ship meeting. Written but not yet published.
    • DFO. 2014. Proceedings of the National Peer Review of Screening-Level Risk Assessment Protocols for Freshwater Non-indigenous Species; March 19-21, 2013. DFO Can. Sci. Advis. Sec. Proceed. Ser. 2014/004.
  • Completed or underway – several primary publications and manuscript reports
    • 2 Manuscript reports
      • CABI Giant Snakehead (written but not yet published)
      • Ponto-Caspian report (in progress)
    • 1 book chapter
      • Mandrak, N.E., and Cudmore, B. 2013. Fish species at risk and nonnative fishes in the Great Lakes basin: Past, present, and future. Pages 167-202. In: Taylor, W.W., Lynch, A.J., and Leonard, N.J. (Eds.). Great Lakes Fisheries Policy and Management: A Binational Perspective 2nd Ed. Michigan State Press, East Lansing, MI.
  • Marine invertebrate screening – review of tools to evaluate risk of invasion. Manuscripts in preparation.
  • Marine recreational boating – gathering of invasive species data for the marine environment
ER 37: Science and Technology:

Output/Activities: Research, Monitoring

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)

Targets and Tracking: To be developed (TBD)

RA 37: Science and Technology:

Result: Two risk assessments on aquatic invasive species were produced, maintaining the 2009-2014 5-year average. Six scientific publications on aquatic invasive species were published through the Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat, slightly below the 2009-2014 5-year average of 8.8 publications.

Ongoing funding was dedicated for science monitoring and research activities to identify, among other things, (1) trends and status in the presence, abundance, and ranges of new and existing AIS; (2) ecological impacts; (3) high-risk species through peer-reviewed risk assessment frameworks; and (4) pathways of introduction and spread, leading to publication (including in primary literature).

More specifically, there were research in marine ecosystems on impacts of tunicates on native species and ecological processes, and impacts of green crabs on native ecosystems; evaluation of the effectiveness of management techniques for European Green Crab, tunicates, and smallmouth bass; and forecasting the effects of zebra mussel on walleye and its habitat.

ER 38: Legislation, Regulation and Policy:

Output/Activities: Regulatory policy

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)

Targets and Tracking: To be developed (TBD)

RA 38: Legislation, Regulation and Policy:

Draft Framework for Regulatory Cost-Benefit Analysis of Aquatic Invasive Species.

Completed four draft Regulatory Cost-Benefit Analyses on incremental impacts of regulating Aquatic Invasive Species.

Development of regulations for Aquatic Invasive Species is ongoing. Regulatory drafting is nearing completion.

Originally, the regulations were expected to be finalized by spring of 2014. These timelines have been delayed. The regulations are now expected to be published in Canada Gazette I in the Fall of 2014, with subsequent publication in Canada Gazette, Part II in spring of 2015.

ER 39: Engaging Canadians:

Output/Activities: Communications, Outreach products

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)

Targets and Tracking: To be developed (TBD)

RA 39: Engaging Canadians:

Communications products
Communications developed the following products:

Central & Arctic region - For the Great Lakes area and Prairies – posters re: Invasive Species and Northern snakehead display, Sea Lamprey Mobile billboard

Maritimes region - Acrylic specimens, promotional products including posters, boater cards, boater stickers, educational folder, kiosk at International Halifax Boat Show

Newfoundland region – Fact sheets for Oyster Thief and Ciona tunicate, AIS rack card

Pacific region –Brochures produced re: AIS in Pacific region for distribution at aquariums, pet shops, marine and boat launches.

Media inquiries
In addition to proactive communications products and outreach activities, the Department received approximately 74 media enquiries across the county concerning Aquatic Invasive Species.

ER 40: International Cooperation:

Outcome: Sea lamprey abundance in Great Lakes falls within individual lake targets

Output/Activities: Sea Lamprey Control Program, National Aquatic Invasive Species Committee

Indicator: Number of Great Lakes with sea lamprey abundance within the lake target

Targets and Tracking: Target = 5, Annual program reporting to the Great Lakes Fishery Commission and Research and development expert panels

RA 40: International Cooperation:
2013 Lake-wide estimates of adult sea lamprey abundance and targets:
Abundance [95% confidence intervals]: Targets
Lake Superior 53,871 [44,920-68,896]39,209 [±21,083]
Lake Michigan 57,596 [52,971-63,496]59,331 [± 13,557]
Lake Huron 126,421 [115,644-156,881]76,396 [± 20,260]
Lake Erie 16,641 [14,716-19,654]3,536 [± 1,079]
Lake Ontario 29,098 [26,352-32,357]31,427 [± 3,927]

Suppression targets were achieved in Lakes Superior, Michigan and Ontario. Although targets were not met in Lakes Huron and Erie, the estimate declined significantly in Lake Huron from 275,006 in 2012 to 126,421 in 2013. A modest decline was observed in Lake Erie, where a growing and uncontrolled larval sea lamprey population in the St. Clair River is thought to be impeding progress toward target.

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans effectively delivered the Sea Lamprey Control Program in Canadian waters of the Great Lakes and US waters of Lake Ontario, as part of Canada's commitment to a bi-national initiative administered by the Great Lakes Fishery Commission. This included: treating sea lamprey populations in 35 tributaries and 6 lentic areas, including 383 ha of the St. Marys River, with lampricide; conducting larval surveys on 319 tributaries and 12 lentic areas; operating and maintaining 27 sea lamprey barriers, and; operating spawning-phase traps at 22 sites.

Results achieved by non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Wendy Asbil
National Manager
Invasive Alien Species and Domestic Plant Health Programs
Biosecurity and Forestry Division
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
(613) 773-7236

Natural Resources Canada
Jacques Gagnon
Director
Innovation and Integration Division
(613) 947-9043

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Tracy Kerluke
Manager
Aquatic Invasive Species Program
Ecosystems Management
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
(613) 993-4922

Environment Canada
Kelly Torck
Manager
National Biodiversity Policy
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environmental Stewardship Branch
(819) 938-3997

Table D: Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Plum Pox Monitoring and Management Program (PPMMP)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: Plant Resources Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2015-16 (CFIA and Agriculture and Agri-food Canada); 2016-17 and ongoing (CFIA)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $17.2M (2011-12 to 2015-16) and $1.3M ongoing (CFIA)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Plum Pox Virus (PPV) is a viral plant disease that infects Prunus species including peach, plum, apricot and other stone fruit plants. PPV does not affect human or animal health but reduces fruit yields, mottles leaves, and causes visual symptoms on stone fruit, thus reducing their marketability. The virus is spread locally by aphids (insects) and through the movement of infected propagative material, including live trees of all age classes, rootstock, bud wood, cuttings or other green branches and twigs, and tissue cultures.

PPV was first discovered in Ontario and Nova Scotia in 2000. The Government of Canada responded in 2001 with a three-year, $49.3 million PPV program to suppress PPV, and to evaluate the feasibility of eradication. Based on the recommendations of a PPV International Expert Panel, the seven-year Plum Pox Eradication Program (PPEP) was launched in 2004 ($85 million) and augmented in 2007 with an additional $58.6 million totalling $143.6 million in federal and Ontario government funding. The PPEP expired on March 31, 2011.

Eradication of PPV has been achieved in six of the seven quarantine areas established at the beginning of the eradication program. These six quarantine areas are Blenheim, Fonthill, Stoney Creek and Vittoria in Ontario, and the Annapolis Valley and Wolfville in Nova Scotia. All of the regions continue to be surveyed and monitored, and no new virus cases have been found outside the Niagara quarantine area. Although eradication was not achieved in Niagara, the infection rate has been reduced from 1.9% of tree samples to less than 0.02% in 2010.

By implementing a PPV monitoring and management (PPMMP) strategy, PPV will remain in the Niagara region perpetually, and the industry will thus need to manage the risks it poses to the production and marketability of products.

The PPMMP consists of regulatory plant protection activities, and for the first five years of the program, significant research will be carried out to develop PPV risk mitigation tools and educational and awareness program components to build the capacity within the industry to implement best management practices.

CFIA and AAFC funding was obtained from Budget 2011, which allocated $17.2 million over five years for the PPMMP, to transition to a management and monitoring strategy to contain and mitigate the spread of plum pox.

Shared outcome(s):

The outcome of the Government's PPMMP is to fulfill the Government of Canada's plant protection obligations and international responsibilities through implementation of measures to mitigate the spread of PPV on a national and international level. The PPMMP's other outcome is to facilitate industry management of PPV.

Governance structure(s):

The CFIA's PPMMP activities and deliverables are managed and governed by the Plant Business Line Committee, as PPV is an established, regulated plant pest requiring ongoing decision-making to protect Canada's plant resource base. Also, AAFC's A-Base activities are managed and governed by the Director General (DG) of the Mixed Wood Plains directorate. The DG has the final "sign-off" authority for AAFC Science and Technology Branch activities, including the PPMMP. An AAFC RDT Director has been assigned as responsible for ensuring that PPV research activities are implemented, managed and reported as required.

A PPV Steering Group (PPV-SG), consisting of CFIA and AAFC director-level officials, was established for the first five years to make recommendations about program delivery to the above CFIA and AAFC governance committees. The PPV-SG liaises with internal and external stakeholders as required, including international plant protection bodies, to provide updates and seek input about program and research parameters at stakeholder conferences and meetings. After a period of five years, when AAFC's role in the PPMMP has concluded, the CFIA's Plant Business Line Committee will be responsible for managing the PPMMP on an ongoing basis.

Performance Highlights:

For 2014-15, the key horizontal plans are: implement appropriate sampling and detection of PPV host material to update, as required, the quarantine area boundary; enforce restrictions to mitigate the spread of PPV; and undertake research activities to improve the regulatory program.

Plum Pox Monitoring and Management Program (PPMMP) Table
Federal Partner PAA Program Contributing activities/ programs Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) ($ Millions) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expect Results, including Targets (ER) Contributing activity / program results (RA)
CFIA Plant Resources Program/ Internal Services 10.6 (2011-12 to 2015-16) and 1.3 ongoing 2.1 1.7 ER 41
ER 42
ER 43
ER 44
RA 41
RA 42
RA 43
RA 44
AAFC Science, Innovation and Adoption PPV Regulatory Research 0.4 (2011-12 to 2013-14) 0 0 ER 45 RA 45
Virus Resistance Research 3.0 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 0.603 0.603 ER 46 RA 46
PPV Suppression Research 2.9 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 0.538 0.538 ER 47 RA 47
Education and Awareness Activities 0.3 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 0.027 0.027 ER 48 RA 48
Total for All Federal Partners 17.2 (2011-12 to 2015-16) and 1.3 ongoing 3.1 2.7
ER 41: Monitoring and Detection:

Outcome: Mitigate the spread of PPV on a national and international level.

Outputs/activities: Monitoring activities will be carried out by the CFIA to confirm and adjust the boundaries of the Niagara quarantine area as necessary. In accordance with NAPPO guidelines, the CFIA will conduct detection activities annually by taking samples along the Niagara quarantine area perimeter. Laboratory testing of the samples to determine the presence of PPV will be conducted by the CFIA. To detect whether PPV has spread beyond the quarantine area, samples will be collected annually as required from commercial orchards and nurseries from PPV-susceptible species in other regions of Ontario, Nova Scotia and British Columbia.

Indicator: Established quarantine areas and areas with PPV-susceptible species will determine the location where sampling will occur. Samples will be collected from these species (peach, plum, nectarine, apricot) located inside and outside of the quarantine area.

Target: An estimated 22,850 samples will be taken and tested annually until 2015-16 and reduced to 17,000 samples in 2016-17 and onward. Total samples are determined based on sampling protocol which is reviewed annually and actual PPV-susceptible species. Adjustments to quarantine areas and grower/resident plantings influence final sample numbers.

RA 41: Monitoring and Detection:

A total of 11,726 samples were collected from the quarantine area perimeter and surrounding area. Variance in the number of collected samples was due to reduced number of orchards along the quarantine area perimeter. In addition, 1,897 samples were collected from British Columbia, as per the PPMMP sampling plan. Samples were not required to be collected from Nova Scotia or Quebec in 2013/14 as per the sampling plan. One detection of PPV along the inside perimeter of the remaining quarantine area was made through laboratory testing. As a result, the western boundary of the quarantine area was extended by 800 metres.

ER 42: Regulatory Enforcement:

Outcome: Mitigate the spread of PPV on a national and international level.

Outputs/activities: Through its inspection activities, the CFIA will monitor and assess regulated parties' compliance with the PPMMP regulatory requirements. Monitoring activities include issuing movement certificates for regulated material (dormant root stock, seedlings, seeds, and plant material for research) and conducting audits and compliance verifications of retail outlets, nurseries and other facilities that may sell or distribute susceptible Prunus species. When non-compliance is identified, the CFIA will take the most appropriate response to obtain compliance in view of factors such as potential or actual harm, the compliance history of the regulated party, and intent.

To help maintain a lower level of virus prevalence within the quarantine area, prohibition and restriction regarding propagation of regulated Prunus plants within the quarantine area will continue. The prohibition on propagation will result in only PPV-free or certified clean stock (planting material that is free of all viruses including PPV) is used within the Niagara quarantine area.

Indicator: Growers, residents and retailers within the quarantine area.

Target: Annual inspection of a sub-set of growers, residents and retailers to determine if movement of material or propagation has occurred.

RA 42: Regulatory Enforcement:

Inspectors issued movement certificates for approved material following compliance verification of regulated parties. Information regarding the continued propagation ban was distributed through local newspapers and targeted audiences. Commercial production areas and residential properties were inspected (1/3 of quarantine area sub-set) to ensure compliance with the propagation ban. Inspectors issued Restriction of Activity/Prohibition Notices to non-compliant individuals.

ER 43: PPV Regulatory Research

Outcome: Restrain the prevalence of PPV in the Niagara region, mitigate the spread on a national and international level.

Outputs/activities: To support the clean stock program, a research study is being conducted by the CFIA to develop strategies for eliminating PPV from rootstock. This program supports the enforcement of the propagation prohibition. The most effective method(s) for eliminating PPV from infected nursery stock materials will be evaluated so that desirable foreign varieties may become eligible for use by industry through clean stock services.

Regulatory research will also develop improved detection tools and more extensive knowledge about PPV to support PPV surveillance, monitoring and detection. CFIA research projects include characterizing genetic variation within individual strains of PPV found in Canada, monitoring for the introduction of new strains, and mapping the movement of the virus in Canada.

Beyond 2016, the CFIA will conduct similar research, such as evaluating the host range for newly discovered strains of PPV to determine the range of Prunus hosts to be regulated in Canada. This research will ensure that the ongoing regulatory program remains effective in mitigating the spread of PPV.

Indicator: In total, three indicators are identified: 1) protocol for the production of virus-free nursery stock for domestic and export clean stock programs using virus elimination techniques; 2) a genetic map to understand the movement of PPV strains and isolates to allow for continuous improvement of regulatory surveillance protocols; and 3) identification of and protocols for the detection of any new strains and isolates of PPV not previously reported in Canada.

The requirement of a comprehensive list of host plants for new strains of PPV detected in Canada is to enhance surveillance protocols and industry awareness.

Target: Development of a protocol for virus elimination. Genetic mapping and identification of new strains are dependent on the number of samples collected that test positive. The list of host plants is variable depending on the identification of new strains and isolates in Canada during routine surveillance activities.

RA 43: PPV Regulatory Research
Support of Clean Stock Programs

Five treatments for eliminating Plum pox virus (PPV) from infected stock were assessed for their efficiency, effectiveness and technical difficulty. These were: 1.) Traditional heat therapy followed by micrografting tips on clean rootstock; 2.) Traditional heat therapy with in vitro shoot tip culturing; 3.) In vitro meristem culturing; 4.) In vitro thermotherapy followed by meristem culturing; 5.) In vitro shoot tip grafting. Treatment five proved to be too technically difficult to be used on a routine basis and was discontinued for this project. While treatments one, two and three were successful in producing clean stock, treatment four is the only treatment that continues to have a 100% success rate in producing virus-free trees. Testing for PPV will continue on trees produced from all the treatments to monitor their health status for one more growing season.

Due to the success rate of in vitro thermotherapy followed by meristem culturing for eliminating PPV in infected stock, work is now starting on developing and optimizing a protocol to use this treatment for routine virus-elimination of different viruses from a full range of fruit tree hosts. Our challenge will be to successfully initiate a large variety of fruit tree host species in tissue culture, some of which have been known to be difficult to culture. Virus infections that can normally reduce propagation success can exacerbate the problem (e.g. Ilarvirus infections in cherries).

Genetic mapping and identification of new strains

During the course of the 2013 Canadian Plum pox virus (PPV) Survey, an isolate of PPV was detected in Prunus trees growing on a residential property in Grimsby, Ontario. The isolate was determined by the Survey Crew/Diagnostics to be an isolate of the Recombinant (Rec) strain of PPV. We were also able to definitively confirm the strain identity of this isolate as Rec by amplifying and sequencing the coat protein and the P3-6K1 regions of the virus. PPV Rec isolates were also detected in 2008 and 2010 on the same residential property as the 2013 detection. The 2008 and 2010 Rec isolates were sequenced completely and the sequences deposited in GenBank (HG964685 and HG964686, respectively). The available sequences of the 2013 Rec isolate are 98-99% identical to the corresponding regions of the 2008 and 2010 isolates, indicating that they are likely the same isolate, representing a single introduction.

In attempts to establish a baseline of PPV genetic diversity in Canada, the P3-6K1 and coat protein (CP) regions of Canadian PPV positive survey samples are being amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Almost all Canadian isolates analysed to date from the 2009/2010 Survey season are D isolates and fall within the subgroup II. No new subgroup I isolates have been identified. Attempts are being made to determine if any patterns of clustering associated with farms or regions of origin can be identified to correlate genetic diversity with geographic distribution. As yet, no clear pattern of clustering or geographic distribution of isolates has emerged. In some cases this might indicate aphid spread, or perhaps random distribution of infected budwood. An isolate CDN 10-43817 was identified that did not fit into subgroup I or subgroup II, but appeared distinct from all other isolates. The isolate was sequenced completely and confirmed to be a D isolate without any evidence of recombination. This isolate might represent a distinct and separate introduction, providing support for the potential value of this approach in identifying new introductions. Attempts are ongoing to generate more sequence data, including the analysis of isolates identified when PPV was first detected in Canada (2000 – 2004 surveys).

The PPV strain Winona (W) was first detected and described in Canada (James and Varga, 2005, Virus Res. 1110:143-150). In collaborations with American and Russian Scientists, we have determined that PPV strain W is perhaps the most diverse strain of PPV, with seven distinct phylogenetically determined clades identified within this strain. PPV W isolates have a wide host range, and there appears to be differences in the host range of some PPV W isolates with Prunus tomentosa being a natural host for some Russian isolates while P. tomentosa does not appear to be a host for the Ukrainian isolate UKR 44189. Although PPV W has been detected in Canada, Latvia, Ukraine, and Russia, Russia seems to be the source of this strain as many isolates have been detected there in a wide range of hosts showing great genetic diversity among isolates. We are collaborating with Russian scientists to better characterize the genetic diversity of PPV W isolates. It is possible that the high level of genetic diversity seen among PPV W isolates might translate into greater biological diversity.

ER 44: PPV Suppression Research

Outcome: Screening of foreign plant material for pests and diseases and conduct field pre-evaluations.

Outputs/activities: AAFC will identify foreign varieties with potential resistance to PPV. The CFIA has phytosanitary measures in place to mitigate pest movement into Canada from imported products. The CFIA will screen identified foreign plant material for resistance and hypersensitivity to PPV at the quarantine biocontainment facilities at the CFIA Sidney Laboratory.

Indicator: Plant material identified by AAFC and imported into Canada.

Target: Variable, based on the number of identified potential candidate varieties and laboratory capacity.

RA 44: PPV Suppression Research

To date, AAFC has identified four varieties as having potential for resistance or hypersensitivity to PPV. These are: Prunus domestica "Jojo", P. domestica "Jojo X Felsina 7343", P. domestica "Jojo X Haganta 7184", and P. dulcis "Garrigules". The full range of virus-testing on the "Jojo" varieties will be completed this summer. Cuttings from these varieties were provisionally released to AAFC, Vineland in August 2013 for evaluation after the first round of testing indicated that no vector transmitted viruses were present. The variety "Garrigules" was received at the Sidney Laboratory in the spring of 2014 and testing and pre-evaluation will commence this summer.

The pre-evaluation of the "Jojo" varieties indicates there may be some PPV resistance in "Jojo". Four replicates for each variety were bud grafted onto clean rootstock. Once bud take was established, the rootstock were repeatedly inoculated with PPV until they tested positive. Once the rootstock tested positive, the varieties were regularly tested for PPV throughout three accelerated growing seasons. All replicates of "Jojo" tested negative throughout the testing period with the exception of one. Only one replicate each of "Jojo X Felsina 7343" and "Jojo X Haganta 7184" tested negative throughout the testing period.

All three varieties appear to show some hypersensitivity to PPV. Four replicates for each variety was grafted onto PPV infected rootstock. Once bud take was established, the grafted trees were forced into dormancy. Once brought out of dormancy, most of the grafts did not grow and those that did wilted and died very quickly.

ER 45: PPV Regulatory Research:

Development of technologies to assist both regulatory and industry requirements for a tool to rapidly test for PPV presence. Efficient detection of PPV in infected trees is fundamental for effective management of PPV infection. Technology will include the development of a sensitive broad spectrum diagnostic tool for detecting PPV.

RA 45: PPV Regulatory Research:

Efficient detection of PPV in infected trees is fundamental for effective management of PPV infection. PPV detection is currently conducted using an "ELISA-based" detection system in which antibody raised to the viral coat protein is used to detect virus coat protein or particles which are present at a high level in infected leaves. Although PPV strain D is the predominant strain found in Canada, other PPV strains are known to exist and therefore it is important that the diagnostic procedure is capable of efficiently detecting all known strains. Laboratory Research has led to the development of highly sensitive antibodies that can be used for rapid and efficient detection of all known PPV strains. The antibodies have been licensed to Agdia, Inc and the test has been highly successful, being marketed worldwide with approximately 4.5 million tests sold since 2006. Although the antibodies produced in the laboratory have proven to be highly effective for PPV detection, it is still possible that a more sensitive, broad spectrum test could be developed. Such a test would assist in efforts to reduce the spread of the virus as it would increase the chance of detecting PPV infection at an early stage when virus is present at low levels. Also, increasing the breadth of detection would allow for more efficient detection of any new strain of PPV that may be introduced into Canada. The current test detects the PPV coat protein which is one of the more variable proteins encoded by PPV. It is proposed to produce antibodies to the PPV HC-Pro protein which is highly conserved [at least 92% amino acid (aa) identity among strains]. This protein is abundant in infected tissue and can be produced at high levels in bacterial cells making it an excellent candidate for development of a sensitive, broad spectrum antibody. The benefits to the industry would be more robust detection tool that could detect a wide range of PPV strains at earlier stages of infection and therefore reduce the reservoir of virus for further infection via aphid transmission.

PPV-D (Canadian strain) HC-Pro protein was fused to the maltose binding protein and expressed in E. coli. Following affinity purification purified protein was used to raise antibodies in rabbits utilizing the UBC Animal Care Facility and their standard immunization protocol. The biotinylated antibodies were found to be highly reactive to purified HC-Pro protein detecting as little as 6 ng in a modified DAS-ELISA test.

ELISA was conducted on PPV-D, -W, -M and -Rec strains in plum or peach or in the herbaceous host Nicotiana benthamiana obtained from the Centre for Plant Health. In initial tests, no antibody reaction was evident in repeated tests. Since it was possible that the tissue may have been only weakly infected, we utilized antisera made in our laboratory to the CP and the Agdia PPV CP test to determine if tissue was infected. These tests indicated that the leaf material was well-infected.

The leaf material had been allowed to sit at 4 C for approximately 1 week before conducting the ELISA test so we thought that it may be possible that HC-Pro may not be stable in excised leaves for this length of time. We therefore obtained fresh leaf material and conducted the ELISA test immediately upon receipt. Again, a positive reaction was not obtained.

It is known that the buffer used to extract leaf tissue can have a significant effect on the efficiency of detection so several different extraction buffers were tested. These buffers had previously been shown to be effective for detection of PPV in peach and plum and Little cherry virus in cherry leaf tissue and contained components such as DIECA, PVP-10 or 40, PEG and Tween at various pHs. A significant signal was not obtained to any of the PPV leaf extracts using the various different buffers.

We also reasoned that HC-Pro may not be stable in any of these buffers or in leaf extracts in these buffers. To test this, we conducted an ELISA test by adding HC-Pro protein to buffer or to leaf extracts in the various buffers. We found that HC-Pro protein was readily detected in leaf extracts of all tested buffers with a drop in signal intensity of only approximately 30-40%.

We then went on to test if heating the extracts prior to binding to the antibody on the plate would allow for detection and found that 65 C treatment did not produce a signal and that signal to the control HC-Pro protein diminished. We will explore other temperatures between 20 and 60 C.

It is possible that the antibodies we have produced react predominantly to maltose binding protein epitopes since our HC-Pro antibody was made to a HC-Pro/maltose binding protein fusion. To test this possibility we conducted an ELISA experiment using our antibodies and purified HC-Pro without a MBP fusion. We found that this protein reacted to only approximately 6% that of the HC-Pro/MBP control. This suggests that production of antibody against unfused HC-Pro may produce a more effective antibody.

ER 46: Virus Resistance Research

Research will develop virus resistance strategies to help protect against PPV and manage the virus over the long term. Specific research projects to support virus resistance include 1) developing a new PPV-resistant peach tree line through gene silencing (switching off a gene to make susceptible hosts resistant to infection); 2) developing transferable resistance in rootstock that can be transmitted through grafting to existing fruit trees; and 3) developing a virus vector which will act like a vaccine to induce resistance by gene silencing.

RA 46: Virus Resistance Research

Towards developing novel strategies to control PPV in Canada, we have designed three projects. The first one is to generate peach mutants and screening for mutant lines resistant to PPV. We have identified five genes that are essential for PPV infection in Arabidopsis. Four corresponding genes in peach and their promoter sequences have also been cloned and sequenced. We have also optimized a protocol for the generation of chemical-induced peach mutants from in vitro-produced embryos. About 1500 peach seedlings from in vitro mutagenesis have been generated and 875 of them were transplanted to Jordan Farm. We further extracted genomic DNA from 600 of these plants. DNA region covering the four genes and their promoters was obtained by PCR. PCR products from 50 individual plants were pooled and subjected to in-depth sequenced using a next generation sequencer. NGS data showed that a number of pools contain target gene mutants. Our second project is to evaluate if transmissible gene silencing signals can be used to induce resistance to PPV. Leaf samples form plum trees grafted in three different rootstock-scion combinations were tested to detect siRNA using Solution hybridization. The leaves from the tested transgenic segments produced a strong and clearly detectable signal in the three different combination experiments. However, the Stanley segments did not produced a detectable signal. In addition to leaf tissue, stem tissue near the graft union (5 and 10 cm) was also sampled to test for the presence of gene silencing signals, with the same results. To further enhance sensitivity for small RNA detection, NGS was used to determine the presence of rootstock-produced small RNAs in non-transgenic scions. NGS was carried out on the Stanley segments and the bioinformatics analysis of the sequences showed a number of siRNA species. The third project is to determine if virus-induced gene silencing can be utilized against PPV. We have identified Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV), Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV) and Cherry rasp leaf virus (CRLV) as potential viruses for modification. We have constructed infectious clones of PNRSV and CRLV that has the ability to infect peach trees and found PNRSV has ability to induce gene silencing in the model plants and peach. CRLV is being tested for its infectivity in peach and other stone fruits. Construction of ToRSV infectious clones is also in progress.

ER 47: PPV Suppression Research

PPV suppression will be pursued through research to reduce PPV transmission in orchards. Research projects include assessing practices and processes, specifically the use of oil sprays on Prunus plant leaves, to suppress PPV transmission by aphids; evaluating the influence of tree variety and age on the level of seasonal resistance to natural infection by aphids; determining the efficacy of newly registered insecticides on the transmission of PPV, which will result in the development of application guidelines for use by industry; and evaluating foreign material for use in Canada (in collaboration with the CFIA).

RA 47: PPV Suppression Research

Inhibition of aphid transmission by PPV. Progress toward management of aphid vectors of plum pox virus (PPV) has been achieved in the three outlined areas. Toxicities of six recently registered insecticides known to have activity against aphids were evaluated against the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, in laboratory trials and effective doses required to kill 50% (EC50) of the population determined by PROBIT analyses. This research has been largely completed except for the possible registration of new materials for the control of aphids on peaches. Aphid feeding behaviours that relate to the transmission of non-persistent plant viruses, which are typified by multiple testing probes of short duration, have been characterized using an electronic penetration graphing system. Differences in aphid feeding behaviour on plants previously sprayed with insecticides have been mostly completed and the data is being analyzed. Laboratory studies utilizing the timed feeding acquisition bioassay system were used to evaluate the effect of these new insecticides on transmission of turnip mosaic virus to rutabaga by the green peach aphid. Although not quite complete, trials involving immediate transfer of viruliferous aphids to the clean test plants showed no significant differences between infection rates for the insecticide- treated plants and those sprayed with water only as a control. Reflecting movement of aphids between peach orchards, trials will be conducted during the coming year with aphids being held for five or ten minutes between the virus acquisition feeding period and transfer to the virus-free test plants.

Factors affecting seasonal changes in susceptibility of peach trees to Plum Pox Virus (PPV). Peach trees in a commercial farm in Jordan, Ontario were extensively sampled to identify PPV uninfected trees. Three trees were selected that represented young (3-4 years), medium (5-9) and old (>10) age rankings. Leaves from the selected 9 study trees were collected every 2 weeks and tested for susceptibility to natural infection by aphids using the detached leaf method developed in 2011. To minimize the risk that study trees would become infected, surrounding trees in the rows were confirmed to also be PPV negative. Results in 2013 did not indicate any significant differences in leaf susceptibility between age groups to aphid transmission over the growing season. Trials will be repeated in 2014.

Screenhouse trials of 5 peach varieties (15 trees @) are ongoing. Within each variety 10 trees were chip bud grafted with PPV infected buds in 2012, but when extensively tested in June 2013, only 8 trees demonstrated infection. High screenhouse temperatures may have been responsible for virus titer suppression. By September 2013, only one tree tested positive. Two 50" ventilation fans were installed in the screenhouse and an anti-reflective coating applied to the roofing panels in attempts to reduce solar heat inputs. Temperature levels were monitored throughout the summer. In 2013, several young plantings of peach trees in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario and Jordan, Ontario were surveyed for the presence of PPV infection. This would provide a similar opportunity to compare the impact of PPV infection at an early stage in the trees growth. No infected trees were found in the plantings surveyed.

Surveys were done in 2013 for a variant strain of PPV at the Jordan farm site. The original infected tree was removed in 2012 by the farmer. This strain caused bumpy disfiguration of the fruit, and was atypical of symptoms associated with the Dideron strain of PPV. A strain of PPV, with some variances in nucleotide sequences from the common strain was found in neighbouring infected trees and was analyzed and characterized by Delano James, Centre for Plant Health (CPH), CFIA and the results submitted for publication in 2013. The 'bumpy peach' symptom is believed to be the result of a PPV coinfection with another peach virus.

We have demonstrated through previous studies utilizing infection of potted peaches grown outdoors and with the use of the detached leaf system we developed that the susceptibility of peaches to PPV infection changes throughout the growing season. Trees are most susceptible in early spring and become largely resistant during mid to late summer. To date, studies comparing changes in levels of resistance to PPV have been completed for early versus late varieties, and for canning versus fresh market varieties. Previous work involving different levels of nitrogen fertilizer that would influence tree vigour were suggestive of an effect on susceptibility, but the results were not conclusive. Laboratory and field studies will be conducted during the final two years of the project to assess if resistance levels can be enhanced with applications of plant growth regulators (hormones) or silica compounds that have been shown to improve resistance of pear trees to fire blight disease. Completion of these studies requires further testing of collected material and statistical analyses of accumulated data. There are no variances to report.

Molecular characterization of the mechanisms governing seasonal resistance to plum pox virus and other peach viruses in peach orchards. Molecular characterization of seasonal resistance is underway. Samples collected over two growing seasons in the Okanagan are being analyzed and the expression of RNA silencing gene is being correlated to the seasonal resistance to Tomato Ringspot virus (ToRSV). Samples collected over one growing season in the Niagara peninsula are also being analyzed. Samples have been collected over a second growing season and will soon be analyzed. In the summer of 2014, it is planned to repeat the experiment for a third growing season. Analysis of all the samples will be completed in 2015-2016.

Impact of PPV infection on tree development, vigor and productivity. Screenhouse trials of 5 peach varieties (15 trees@) are on-going. Within each variety 10 trees were chip bud grafted with PPV infected buds in 2012, but when extensively tested in June 2013, only 8 trees demonstrated infection. High screenhouse temperatures may have been responsible for virus titer suppression. By September 2013, only one tree tested positive. Two 50" ventilation fans were installed in the screenhouse, and an anti-reflective coating applied to the roofing panels in attempts to reduce solar heat inputs. Temperature levels were monitored throughout the summer.

Comparison of PPV infected and healthy trees in the field planting in Niagara-on-the-Lake failed to show any significant differences in the following areas: tree growth and development, fruit yield, firmness, texture, size, total sugar and acidity. Bud hardiness testing done in January 2014 similarly did not show differences between infected and healthy buds. Similar findings were found on infected and healthy young peach trees grown in the screenhouse. Young field plantings in both Niagara-on-the-Lake and Jordan (1659 trees in 5 plots on 2 farms) surveyed for PPV failed to identify any infected trees that could be used within the study.

ER 48: Education and Awareness Activities

Outcomes: an increased industry understanding and awareness of PPV best management practices along with increased industry uptake of PPV best management practices, which will also help prevent the spread of PPV.

Implementation Plan: Several activities will be conducted to increase industry knowledge and awareness of PPV management practices and to facilitate the transition from eradication to long-term management. These activities will be conducted in collaboration with OMAFRA, which is responsible for providing PPV management crop advice and training to Ontario growers and nurseries. AAFC will also liaise with the OTFPMB and the Canadian Nursery Landscape Association (CNLA) to develop and promote an effective educational and awareness campaign.

Indicators: AAFC will collaborate with OMAFRA to distribute information to Ontario tender fruit industry members about the PPV best management practices by publishing pamphlets and articles. An AAFC-OMAFRA fact sheet and web postings relating to the management of PPV will provide information on the disease, including symptom recognition, proper use of treatments, virus testing methods, and contact information for service providers. Information will be shared with producers through presentations at grower meetings, conferences, and information sessions. European tender fruit producers and crop advisors who have experience managing the disease will be invited to participate in the conferences, meetings, and information sessions to leverage their expertise. Information and research findings will also be provided by local crop advisors and researchers.

RA 48: Education and Awareness Activities
Marketing Board Activities
  • PPV Communications Coordinator was hired part time to manage materials published through grower monthly newsletters and website
  • Website was redesigned to facilitate a latest news section and grower section to disseminate grower awareness materials
  • Weekly grocery tours by communications coordinator to monitor fruit quality in store
OMAF and MRA Activities
  • Developed Factsheet (Pamphlet) "Best Management Practices for Reducing the Spread and Impact of Plum Pox in Prunus Producing Nurseries" and distributed to 250 landscape and nursery clients across Ontario, Canada and the US

Results achieved by non-Federal Partners (if applicable): NA

Contact information:
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

David Bailey
Director – Horticulture Division
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
613-773-7181

Patricia McAllister
A/National Manager – Greenhouse and Nursery
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
613-773-7166

Charlene Green
Horticulture Specialist – Greenhouse and Nursery
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
905-938-8697

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Gary Whitfield
Director – RDT
Mixed Wood Plains Directorate
519-738-1218

Lorne Stobbs
Research Scientist – Vineland
905-562-2018

Aiming Wang
Research Scientist – London
519-457-1470 x313

Table F: Food Safety Modernization

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Food Safety Modernization (FSM)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: Food Safety Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2015-16

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $99.8M (new funding) and $40.0M (internal reallocation) (2011-12 to 2015-16)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The CFIA was created in 1997 to enhance food safety systems through the consolidation of inspection and quarantine services that were being delivered by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Health Canada (HC), Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and Industry Canada. The current inspection system comprises numerous independent inspection delivery models.

In Budget 2011, the Government of Canada committed funding amounting to $96.8 million to the CFIA to improve and modernize its food safety inspection system. A number of CFIA initiatives were identified to modernize Canada's food safety inspection system. In support of the Agency's modernization initiatives, HC received $3.0M for enhanced health risk assessment capacity.

The main objectives of this modernization initiative are to move the CFIA away from a system of independent commodity-specific inspection approaches and inspector training, and paper-based record keeping and interactions with stakeholders, to that of a single-inspection approach consistent across the food safety program, supported by standardized training, technology information solutions, enhanced proactive science capacity and improved service to stakeholders.

The plan consists of three elements:

  1. inspection system modernization, including the development of an improved inspection model which will provide standardized activities across the food program, national training for inspectors, enhanced Listeria control in high-risk ready-to-eat foods, enhanced HC health risk assessment capacity in support of CFIA modernization activities, and the IM/IT enablement of the improved food inspection model and the export certification process;
  2. supporting risk-based decision-making through enhanced scientific capacity, including a proposal for a food laboratory network, enhanced capacity for scientific testing and improved facilities and equipment; and
  3. increasing efficiency through improved information management and information technology, including data storage and back-up capacity; enhanced connectivity, and more support for inspector tools such as wireless devices and laptops.

Shared outcome(s): Modernize the CFIA's inspection system by providing up-to-date and relevant training and necessary technology support. This shared outcome will address the increasing complexity of inspection associated with industry advancements in food production and international advancements to improve food safety systems.

Governance structure(s): The CFIA has imposed an internal governance framework for the delivery of activities related to Food Safety Modernization. The CFIA's Senior Management Committee, chaired by the President, will provide direction for initiatives and is accountable for overall implementation. Three VP-level advisory committees responsible for each of the three elements (inspection system modernization, science, and IM/IT) will report to the Agency's Senior Management Committee and will be accountable for ensuring that activities are on track and on budget. Each will operate individual governance structures, led by a business sponsor and a dedicated project manager, with representation from all implicated areas. The Project Governance and Investment Board provides the forum to ensure horizontal integration among the three elements.

Planning Highlights: For 2014-15, high level business processes will be finalized for the improved food inspection model (formerly known as the improved inspection delivery model). Project and expenditure approval was sought and was received for the IM/IT enablement of the improved food inspection model and the export certification process (the Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP) project). The ESDP project team worked with stakeholders to develop detailed business requirements and to determine the fit of those requirements to available technologies. With respect to the implementation of Health Canada's Listeria policy for non-meat ready-to-eat food, the Agency will continue staffing actions to provide additional inspection staff for inspection activities in high-risk areas, validate new laboratory methodologies for Listeria in non-meat commodities, and analyze additional food and environmental samples. CFIA subject matter experts will also provide refresher training to existing staff to keep inspectors current with emerging trends and developments related to their work. Adjustments to the core training program will occur as the new inspection model is developed and refined.

The Modernizing Equipment and Laboratories sub-projects at the GTA and St-Hyacinthe Food laboratories have moved into the Project Planning stage with the St-Hyacinthe project having awarded contracts for the engineering/design phase of the projects. This will provide support in moving to the execution stage of the projects with construction beginning in 2014-15. Additionally, the highly skilled scientists who were hired in targeted laboratories will continue research projects to develop novel, more rapid and sensitive detection methods to enhance the Agency's response to food safety incidents. They will also develop a new process for the development of tests in real-time in response to an outbreak. In the Integrated Laboratory Network initiative, the project team will continue to work in collaboration with partners and explore the concepts, processes, and mechanisms available to conduct a laboratory systems analysis of the Canadian food laboratory system. Partners will be engaged in exploring data and information requirements and opportunities in anticipation of future feasibility assessments, with respect to the use of existing feasibility assessments, or in the creation of an IM/IT platform for secure data sharing.

As part of the interrelated efforts to improve Canada's food safety system, the CFIA will work with federal, provincial, and territorial (FPT) food safety partners to establish a Food Safety Information Network (FSIN). A separate source of funds is being sought in 2014. This initiative will leverage an existing web-based electronic platform used for Canadian public health and animal health networks to allow real-time sharing of food safety information and laboratory data among FPT food safety authorities. The FSIN will enhance food safety surveillance and laboratory response capacity across Canada to allow FPT food safety partners to improve their collective ability to anticipate, detect, and response to foodborne threats and hazards.

Planned activities to increase efficiency in IM/IT will include a collaborative effort with Shared Services Canada (SSC) to create a new Data Centre Backup/Restore site to handle the increased requirements of modernized inspection systems. Improvements to end-user assets will continue with the distribution of more portable end-user devices and improved wireless network connectivity. The IM/IT Branch will continue consultations with their business partners in the Agency to modernize various components of the IM/IT infrastructure of the organization to better meet the needs of the inspectors in the field. The Agency will strengthen its information integration capability by introducing Agency-wide data standards. Planning will commence for desktop operating system and tool upgrading and standardization as well as for increased data storage and backup capacity.

Food Safety Modernization (FSM) Table
Federal Partner PAA Program Contributing activities / programs Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2013-14
($ Millions)
Planned Spending Footnote 18 Actual Spending Expect Results, including Targets (ER) Contributing activity / program results (RA)
CFIA

Food Safety Program

Internal Services

Inspection Modernization 100.2 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 16.3 13.0 ER 49 RA 49
Enhancing Scientific Capacity 19.8 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 5.1 4.1 ER 50 RA 50
Improved IM/IT 16.8 (2013-14 to 2015-16) 4.1 2.6 ER 51 RA 51
HC Food Safety and Nutrition Enhancing Health Risk Assessment Capacity to Support CFIA Food Safety Inspection Activities 3.0 (2011-12 to 2015-16) 0.9 0.8 ER 52 RA 52
Total for All Federal Partners $99.8M (new funding) and $40.0M (internal reallocation) (2011-12 to 2015-16) 26.3 20.4
ER 49: Inspection System Modernization
Improved Food Inspection Model (formally known as the Improved Inspection Delivery Model):

Outcome: The development and sequential implementation of an improved food inspection model that will result in the improved management of food safety risks.

Outputs/activities: A single food inspection program will be developed in support of the CFIA's transformation agenda. The improved food inspection model will include standard collection, reporting and analysis across all food commodities and will provide a more consistent inspection and enforcement approach for regulated parties.

Targets and Tracking: Engagement of stakeholders both internally and externally to promote the understanding of the CFIA's transformation agenda; identification of high level business processes and vision of business functions to support the effective implementation of the improved food inspection model; prioritization of key activities within the improved food inspection model to support a sequenced transformation agenda.

Verifying Compliance with HC's Revised Listeria Policy

Outcome: Fewer illnesses caused by Listeria monocytogenes resulting from the consumption of high-risk, non-meat RTE foods.

Outputs and Activities: The Agency will enhance inspection and testing activities to verify industry control of Listeria in all high-risk, non-meat ready-to-eat (RTE) food. The Agency will increase the number of inspections and samples taken and analyzed and provide technical support for risk assessments resulting from positive findings. Sampling data will be used to support risk-based decision-making. Industry will be encouraged to implement preventative Listeria control programs. New Listeria testing methods will be validated and trend analysis will be developed.

Targets and Tracking: Number of non-meat RTE samples collected and analyzed.

Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP) Project

Outcome: ESDP will provide a set of technologies and tools for citizens, Industry, and CFIA inspectors as they carry out their respective roles under the new food inspection model. It will provide an electronic platform that will allow more readily access to CFIA programs and to conduct regular business transactions.

Outputs and Activities: ESDP will enable the Improved Food Inspection Model (IFIM) and the electronic delivery of export certificates. ESDP will seek to standardize and automate processes, provide services on-line, support planning, tracking, and assignment of activities, and consistently capture, summarize, and report on activities and transactions.

Targets and Tracking: Increase internal administrative and operation efficiencies by automating inspections activities; Optimize inspection coverage by enabling management to continually reallocate the inspectorate to changing priorities throughout the year; Efficiencies in reduction of applications that support licencing, inspection and certification activities

Recruitment and Training of Inspectors

Outcome: The recruitment and training process for inspection staff within the CFIA will be designed to meet the requirements of the modernized inspection model.

Outputs and Activities: A comprehensive national recruitment, selection, and training strategy based on a core, competency-based curriculum for inspection staff will be developed. Core training to new recruits as well as enhanced ongoing training for existing inspection staff will be provided.

Targets and Tracking: New Food Regulatory Training delivered to number of inspectors; Number of employees trained; Number of new inspectors trained; Number of existing inspectors trained;

RA 49: Inspection System Modernization
Improved Food Inspection Model (formally known as the Improved Inspection Delivery Model):

Outcome: The improved food inspection model was finalized and followed by extensive planning and designing phases that are required for the sequential implementation of the model. The successful vision for food inspection articulated in the model naturally led to accommodating CFIA's animal and plant business line commodities within an overall integrated Agency Inspection Model.

Outputs/activities: Development of a single food inspection program continued in support of the CFIA's transformation agenda. The broadening of the improved food inspection model to the integrated Agency Inspection Model maintains the standardized processes for collecting, reporting and overall oversight of all CFIA regulated commodities. Common inspection processes and enforcement action, across all sectors, beginning with food first, provide a more robust approach to protecting human, animal and plant health and the environment. A draft integrated Agency Inspection Model was developed and approved through governance.

Targets and Tracking: Successful engagement activities for both internal and external stakeholders was undertaken to increase awareness of how the improved food inspection model and the integrated Agency Inspection Model fit within the larger CFIA transformation agenda. Additionally, separate employee consultation was held for the draft integrated Agency Inspection Model. High level business processes and visioning exercises of business functions supporting the integrated Agency Inspection Model were completed in order to support prioritization and the subsequent sequencing timeline for the food inspection program to be modernized first.

Verifying Compliance with HC's Revised Listeria Policy

Outcome: Fewer illnesses caused by Listeria monocytogenes resulting from the consumption of high-risk, non-meat RTE foods.

Outputs and Activities: The Agency will enhance inspection and testing activities to verify industry control of Listeria in all high-risk, non-meat ready-to-eat (RTE) food. The Agency will increase the number of inspections and samples taken and analyzed and provide technical support for risk assessments resulting from positive findings. Sampling data will be used to support risk-based decision-making. Industry will be encouraged to implement preventative Listeria control programs. New Listeria testing methods will be validated and trend analysis will be developed.

Targets and Tracking: Number of non-meat RTE samples collected and analyzed.

Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP) Project

Outcome: The Agency sought and received Project Approval and Expenditure Authority to plan out the development of the system to be automated.

Outputs and Activities: The Agency has completed detailed business requirements in order to proceed with a technology assessment, costing and design specifications. Activities to seek an Expenditure Authority have been initiated to enable the development, build and roll-out of the specific automation of business operations.

Targets and Tracking: To be enabled upon delivery of the system.

Recruitment and Training of Inspectors

Outcome: The recruitment and training process for inspection staff within the CFIA is underway with plans to design the requirements of the modernized inspection model.

Outputs and Activities: A comprehensive national recruitment, selection, and training strategy based on a core, competency-based curriculum for inspection staff is being developed. Core training to new recruits as well as enhanced ongoing training for existing inspection staff will be provided.

A collective staffing framework for recruitment of inspectors has been implemented, partially funded by the Food Safety Action Plan (FSAP). This new framework streamlines the staffing of all inspectors, including those inspectors brought in through Food Safety Modernization.

Targets and Tracking: New Food Regulatory Training delivered to number of inspectors; Number of employees trained; Number of new inspectors trained; Number of existing inspectors trained.

ER 50: Enhancing Laboratory Response Capacity

Outcome: The CFIA is able to detect and respond faster to food safety hazards.

Outputs and Activities: The number of highly skilled scientists in targeted laboratories will be enhanced through hiring additional scientists. New rapid, scientific, and sensitive food safety testing methods will be developed.

Targets and Tracking: Scientists hired; collaborative projects established with experts; Enhanced and newly developed methods.

Modernizing Equipment and Laboratories

Outcome: Improved CFIA food laboratory capacity to detect and respond to food safety related hazards.

Outputs and Activities: Laboratory expansion and renovation of targeted laboratories will be completed. Laboratory equipment will be upgraded with the procurement of modern testing equipment.

Targets and Tracking: Expansion and Renovation projects completed on schedule; Procurement of equipment

RA 50: Enhancing Laboratory Response Capacity
Enhancing Laboratory Response Capacity:

Outcome: The CFIA is able to detect and respond faster to food safety hazards.

Outputs and Activities: CFIA entered into two collaborative agreements, one with Genome Canada and Alberta Innovates - Biosolutions on Listeria monocytogenes genomics and a second with Genome Alberta and Alberta Innovates - Bio Solutions on E coli genomics. In addition, a collaborative project between CFIA Dartmouth Laboratory and Health Canada on Campylobacter genomics work was completed. Genomics projects led by the new scientists in the Ottawa Carling Laboratory were approved.

Targets and Tracking: Staffing processes were finalized for positions at the Ottawa Laboratory Carling.

Modernizing Equipment and Laboratories:

Outcome: Improved CFIA food laboratory capacity to detect and respond to food safety related hazards.

Outputs and Activities: The expansion and renovation projects for both the Greater Toronto Area and St-Hyacinthe Laboratories are progressing through the engineering and design phase, which started in May 2013. Modern food safety laboratory equipment was procured and delivered by March 2014.

Targets and Tracking: Expansion and Renovation projects completed on schedule; Procurement of equipment

Developing a Laboratory Network Strategy

Outcome: CFIA worked with federal (Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada) and provincial / territorial partners on the completion of a strategy for the Food Safety Information Network (FSIN).

Outputs and Activities: Work included the LSA study to identify existing food testing lab capacity and capability, continued FPT engagement through face-to-face meetings and teleconferences, drafting and initial consultation of information sharing agreements.

Targets and Tracking: Identification of a proposed IMIT platform to support collaboration, information, and data sharing. This platform will also allow the CFIA and the FSIN to explore opportunities to integrate with the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network (CAHSN) and the Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network (CPHLN).

ER 51: Improved IM/IT

Outcome: Improved connectivity to support inspection activities.

Outputs and Activities: Continue to deploy equipment suited to the working conditions of the inspection staff with more robust connectivity. Modernize applications.

Targets and Tracking: Testing tools installed and staff trained in their use; Number of applications converted to .NET; Software upgrades completed.

RA 51: Improved IM/IT

Outcome: Improved connectivity to support inspection activities.

Outputs and Activities: Continue to deploy equipment suited to the working conditions of the inspection staff with more robust connectivity. The application environment (Citrix) was modernized and application modernization activities were initiated.

Targets and Tracking: 90% of the testing tools have been installed and staff have been trained on their use; Software upgrades have been completed

ER 52: Enhancing Health Risk Assessment Capacity to Support CFIA Food Safety Inspection Activities
Enhanced Health Risk Assessment Capacity:

Outcome: CFIA-led food safety investigations will be supported by timely health risk assessments that will further support swift action being taken to minimize/mitigate the potential exposure of Canadians to hazards in food associated illnesses.

Outputs/Activities: Health Canada will build additional flexibility in its health risk assessment capacity to sustain its current level of service through the hiring of additional employees, ongoing training, review and analysis of health risk assessment activities, and the proactive development of new policies and guidelines, where appropriate.

Targets and Tracking: 90% of HRAs at CFIA's request responded to within time standards.

RA 52: Enhancing Health Risk Assessment Capacity to Support CFIA Food Safety Inspection Activities

Outcome: CFIA-led food safety investigations will be supported by timely health risk assessments that will further support swift action being taken to minimize/mitigate the potential exposure of Canadians to hazards in food associated illnesses.

Outputs/Activities: Continued to offer a training program and tool box for after hour HRAs; Maintained a review of after hour assessments as part of continuous improvement and expanded capability; Updated database based on data obtained from other government departments and the food research division to help inform chemical HRAs; Inputted into data reports generated by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency; Scientific evaluators outside of HRA sections are being trained for surge capacity; Implemented improved data tracking for the HRA section metrics to monitor performance; Centralized information gathering for HRAs including dedicated single point of contact; Initiated a review of Health Canada's Weight of Evidence guidance document for decision-makers during foodborne outbreak investigations

Targets and Tracking: Responded to all Canadian Food Inspection Agency generated HRAs within the service standard;

Results achieved by non-Federal Partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency:
Steven Yafalian
Senior Advisor and Governance
Portfolio Coordination Office, Agency Transformation
613-773-5153

Health Canada
Samuel Godefroy
Director General, Food Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
613-957-1821

Internal Audits and Evaluations

Internal Audits (current reporting period)
1. Name of internal audit 2. Internal audit type 3. Status 4. Completion date
2012-2013
Review of Food Safety Modernization Initiative – Phase 1 Program Completed March 2013
Corrective Action Requests Program Completed May 2013
Safeguarding of Moveable Assets Internal Services Completed July 2013
Business Continuity Planning Internal Services Completed November 2013
Quality Management System Program Completed January 2014
Occupational Safety and Health Internal Services In Progress November 2014
2013-2014
IM/IT (IT Security) Internal Services In Progress November 2014
Review of Food Safety Modernization-Phase 2 Program Deferred 2015/2016
Review of Activities conducted for the Self-Assessment of the Agency's Systems of IC Over Fin. Reporting Footnote 19 Internal Services Deferred 2015/2016
Licensing, Permitting, Registrations Program Deferred 2016/2017
Administrative Monetary Penalty Processes Program In Progress March 2015
Investment Planning Internal Services In Progress March 2015

CFIA audit reports can be found at:
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/accountability/other-activities/audits-reviews-and-evaluations/eng/1299843498252/1299843588592

Evaluations (current reporting period)
1. Name of evaluation 2. Program 3. Status 4. Completion date
Evaluation of the Enhanced Feed BanAnimal Health and Zoonotics ProgramCompletedMay 2013
Evaluation of the CFIA's Fertilizer ProgramPlant Resources ProgramCompletedJuly 2013
Evaluation of the Food Safety Action PlanFood Safety ProgramCompletedAugust 2013
Evaluation of Daily Shift Inspection PresenceFood Safety ProgramCompletedMarch 2014
Evaluation of Continuing a Comprehensive Strategy for Managing BSE in CanadaAnimal Health and Zoonotics ProgramIn ProgressSeptember 2014
Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Program EvaluationFood Safety ProgramIn ProgressSeptember 2014
Evaluation of the Plant Protection ProgramPlant Resources ProgramIn ProgressDecember 2014

CFIA evaluation reports can be found at:
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/accountability/other-activities/audits-reviews-and-evaluations/eng/1299843498252/1299843588592

Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

Response to Parliamentary Committees

The Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food

The report entitled Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) and the Effects of it on the Canadian Agriculture Sector was adopted by the Committee and then presented to the House of Commons on March 27, 2014. A Government Response was requested by the Committee. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development along with the various other departments prepared a Government Response and presented it to the House of Commons on July 16, 2014.

The response is available on the Parliament of Canada's website.

The Auditor General's Fall Report 2013, Chapter 4: Canada's Food Recall System, was tabled on November 26, 2013. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) Management Response and Action Plan was tabled with the Chair of the Public Accounts Committee on May 26, 2014. The CFIA's Management Response and Action Plan addressed all of the Auditor General's recommendations.

The response is available on the Parliament of Canada website.

Response to the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

The Fall 2013 Report of the Auditor General of Canada included a Chapter (4) on Canada's Food Recall System.

The audit focused on the CFIA and its management of the food recall process. Specifically the Office of the Auditor General examined

  • Whether the Agency followed its own policies and procedures,
  • Whether the Agency was prepared to handle large-scale food recalls and managed then effectively when it activated its emergency procedures, and
  • Whether Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada adequately supported the CFIA in fulfilling its responsibilities for food recalls.

The report produced eleven (11) recommendations. The report and Agency response can be found at:
http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_201311_04_e_38798.html

The Agency submitted its detailed action plan to the Public Accounts Committee, May 26th, 2014. The Agency reported that it has addressed all eleven (11) recommendations from the Auditor General's Report.

External Audits:

(Note: These refer to other external audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages)

No audits by either the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages were conducted at the CFIA during the 2012-2013 fiscal year.

Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue

Respendable Revenue ($ millions)
Program 2011-12 Actual 2012-13 Actual 2013-14
Main Estimates Planned Revenue Total Authorities Actual
Food Safety Program 34.9 35.2 30.6 30.6 34.3 34.3
Meat & Poultry 21.8 22.0 18.6 18.6 20.9 20.9
Egg 0.7 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.9 0.9
Dairy 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.1
Fish & Seafood 5.6 5.3 5.3 5.3 5.9 5.9
Fresh Fruit & Vegetables 3.5 3.7 2.9 2.9 3.2 3.2
Processed Products (inc. Honey & Maple products) 1.3 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3
Imported and Manufactured Food Products 0.9 1.0 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 3.5 3.4 2.8 2.8 4.0 4.0
Terrestrial Animal Health 3.3 3.2 2.7 2.7 3.8 3.8
Aquatic Animal Health Program 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Feed 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2
Plant Resources Program 7.3 7.7 6.4 6.4 8.4 8.4
Plant Protection 4.6 4.7 4.1 4.1 5.3 5.3
Seed 2.7 2.9 2.2 2.2 2.9 2.9
Fertilizer 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2
Intellectual Property Rights 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
International Collaboration & Technical Agreements 12.5 10.6 13.2 13.2 12.7 12.7
Internal Services 0.8 1.3 0.2 0.2 2.0 2.0
Total Respendable Revenue 59.0 58.2 53.2 53.2 61.4 61.4
Non-Respendable Revenue ($millions)
Program 2011-12 Actual 2012-13 Actual 2013-14
Main Estimates Planned Revenue Total Authorities Actual
Food Safety Program 0.0 0.0 N/A N/A N/A 0.0
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 0.0 0.0 N/A N/A N/A 0.0
Plant Resources Program 0.0 0.0 N/A N/A N/A 0.0
International Collaboration & Technical Agreements 0.0 0.0 N/A N/A N/A 0.0
Internal Services 1.3 2.0 N/A N/A N/A 0.1
Total Non-Respendable Revenue 1.3 2.0 N/A N/A N/A 0.1

Status Report on Projects with Specific Treasury Board Approval

Status Report on Projects with Specific Treasury Board Approval
Project Original Estimated Total Cost Revised Estimated Total Cost Actual Total Cost 2013-14 Expected Date of Close-Out
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual
Program: Food Safety Program ($ millions)
Food Safety Action Plan IM/IT Enabled Business Project Footnote 20 Footnote 21 40.0 35.5 30.0 10.5 10.5 6.9 5.3 December 2014
Food Safety Modernization - Electronic Service Delivery Platform 48.4 48.4 5.5 1.9 15.9 6.9 2.3 September 2016

2013-14 User Fees Reporting

User Fee

Program: Food Safety Program

Fee Type: R

Fee-setting Authority: CFIA Act

Year Last Modified: 1998

Table A: User Fee Food Safety Program
Food Safety Program
2013-14
($ thousands)
Planning Years
($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
34,562 33,315 473,560 2014-15 31,634 374,165
2015-16 31,634 371,647
2016-17 31,634 353,019

Program: Animal Health & Zoonotics Program

Fee Type: R

Fee-setting Authority: CFIA Act

Year Last Modified: 1998

Table B: User Fee Animal Health & Zoonotics Program
Animal Health & Zoonotics Program
2013-14
($ thousands)
Planning Years
($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
3,012 2,457 244,301 2014-15 2,333 193,025
2015-16 2,333 191,727
2016-17 2,333 182,117

Program: Plant Resources Program

Fee Type: R

Fee-setting Authority: CFIA Act

Year Last Modified: 1998

Table C: User Fee Plant Resources Program
Plant Resources Program
2013-14
($ thousands)
Planning Years
($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
7,647 7,575 112,490 2014-15 7,193 88,880
2015-16 7,193 88,282
2016-17 7,193 83,857

Program: International Collaboration & Technical Agreements

Fee Type: R

Fee-setting Authority: CFIA Act

Year Last Modified: 1998

Table D: User Fee International Collaboration & Technical Agreements
International Collaboration & Technical Agreements
2013-14
($ thousands)
Planning Years
($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
10,617 12,638 45,451 2014-15 7,193 88,880
2015-16 7,193 88,282
2016-17 7,193 83,857

Program: Internal Services

Fee Type: O

Fee-setting Authority: Access to Information Act

Year Last Modified:

Table E: User Fee Access to Information
Internal Services
2013-14
($ thousands)
Planning Years
($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
7 3 1,504 2014-15 3 1,188
2015-16 3 1,180
2016-17 3 1,121
User Fees Totals
2013-14
($ thousands)
Planning Years
($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
Subtotal Regulatory 55,838 55,985 875,803 2014-15 53,161 691,982
2015-16 53,161 687,326
2016-17 53,161 652,875
Subtotal Other Products and Services 7 3 1,504 2014-15 3 1,188
2015-16 3 1,180
2016-17 3 1,121
Total 55,845 55,988 877,307 2014-15 53,164 693,170
2015-16 53,164 688,506
2016-17 53,164 653,996

Table B: External Fee

2013-14 The CFIA's Performance Report on External Fees
External Fee Service Standard Performance Results Stakeholder Consultation
Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act (ATIA)Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension to be sent within 30 days of receipt of request.Of the 273 requests completed under the ATIA last fiscal year, 96 (35%) were completed in under 30 days; 24 (9%) were completed in 31 to 60 days; 51 (19%) were completed in 61 to 120 days; and 102 (37%) were completed in 121 days or more.The service standard is established by the ATIA and the Access to Information Regulations. Consultations with stakeholders were undertaken by the Department of Justice and the Treasury Board Secretariat for amendments made in 1986 and 1992.
Service Standards for applications for Veterinary Biologics activities
Dossier Review (new submission, change in product formulation or change in label claim)
Canadian Manufacturers
1. Review initial submission and prepare response 1) Maximum response time is four months (120 days)

2 applications completed an initial review

2 applications completed within four months

100%

To address stakeholder concerns, a phased review system is in place, allowing for initial submission review and response while information and data are pending. Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013. The next stakeholder consultations are scheduled for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
2. Review supplemental data and prepare response 2) Maximum response time is six weeks 100%
American Manufacturers
3. Review initial submission and prepare response 3) Maximum response time is four months

26 applications completed an initial review

24 applications completed initial review within four months

92%

To address stakeholder concerns about timely availability of U.S. manufactured products, a concurrent review system was introduced to allow for initial submission review and response while U.S. licensure is being finalized. Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013. The next stakeholder consultations are scheduled for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
4. Review supplemental data and prepare response 4) Maximum response time is six weeks 100%.
Manufacturers from other countries
5. Review initial submission and prepare response 5) Maximum response time is six months

One application completed review. One application completed initial review within max response time.

100%

Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013. The next stakeholder consultations are scheduled for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
6. Review supplemental data and prepare response 6) Maximum response time is six weeks 100%
Laboratory Testing
7. Each master cell line 7) Maximum response time is four months Not applicable due to closure of Biologics Evaluation laboratory.
8. Each master seed culture 8) Maximum response time is four months
9. Each pre-licensing serial tested, to a maximum of three 9) Maximum response time is four months
Facility Inspections/Audits
10. Canadian manufacturers 10) Annual

13 inspections or audits completed

100%

Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013. The next stakeholder consultations are scheduled for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
11. Canadian importers 11) Minimum every three years

16 inspections or audits completed

100%

12. American manufacturers 12) Minimum every three years

2 inspections or audits completed

100%

For facilities inspected annually and licensed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS), CCVB may inspect when the product is first licensed in Canada. Subsequent inspections will be arranged as necessary. CCVB may request copies of inspection reports from USDA-APHIS. Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013. The next stakeholder consultations are scheduled for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
13. Other non-Canadian manufacturers 13) Minimum every four years No inspections were scheduled in 2013. For facilities inspected regularly for Good Manufacturing Practices, CCVB may inspect when the product is first licensed in Canada. Subsequent inspections will be arranged as necessary. Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013.
14. Issuance of Permits, Licenses and Export Certificates 14) Maximum response time is two weeks 100% Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013. The next stakeholder consultations are scheduled for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
Serial Release
15. If not tested 15) Maximum response time is 10 working days

183 applications were received.

167 applications were completed on time.

91%

Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013. The next stakeholder consultations are scheduled for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
16. If tested 16) Maximum response time is 35 days

6 applications were received.

6 applications were completed on time.

100%

Due to test scheduling and set up requirements, the average response time has consistently approached the maximum response time of 35 days. Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013. The next stakeholder consultations are scheduled for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
17. Label Review and Approval 17) Maximum response time is four weeks

280 applications were received.

280 applications approved within four weeks

100%

Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013. The next stakeholder consultations are scheduled for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
18. Advertising Review and Approval

18) Maximum response time is four weeks

Average response time is two weeks

Not applicable. Health of Animals Regulation 135.3 was repealed in 1997 to remove the requirement for pre-approval of advertising.
19. Protocol Review for Efficacy/Safety Studies 19) Maximum response time is 45 days

13 protocols reviewed

13 protocols completed review within 45 days

100%

Protocol review for issuance of a Permit to Release Veterinary Biologic for unlicensed products. Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013. The next stakeholder consultations are schedule for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
20. Production Outline Revisions 20) Maximum response time is four weeks

379 applications received

244 applications completed within four weeks

64%

Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013. The next stakeholder consultations are scheduled for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
21. Suspected Adverse Reactions 21) Maximum response time is four weeks

1236 reports received

1047 reports responded to within four weeks

85%

Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013. The next stakeholder consultations are scheduled for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
Application for Feed Registration and Ingredient Approval
(i) Timeliness: For 90 percent or more of the applications received
(a) Feed Section screens applications within ten days of receiving them. 100% Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013. The next stakeholder consultations are scheduled for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
(b) For products requiring a review of efficacy data, a preliminary review is conducted within 10 days of the screening date, and results are communicated to the applicant. 100%
(c) Animal Feed Division conducts efficacy, livestock, human, and environmental safety reviews and responds to applicants within 90 days. 100% of applications were completed within 90 days. To address stakeholder concerns about capacity and timeliness of the regulatory approval process, the CFIA is working through the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee (CAHPRAC). Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, and 2013. The next consultations are scheduled for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
(d) The laboratory does a desk review of proposed methods of analysis within four weeks of receiving them. If laboratory testing is required, it will be done within 12 weeks of receiving a suitable method and test samples depending on availability of specialized equipment. 100%
(ii) Quality
(a) The Feeds Regulations are consistently interpreted and applied in registration/approval decisions. 100% Stakeholder consultations were held June 13, 2013 and November 28, 2013. The next consultations are scheduled for June 19, 2014 and November 19, 2014.
(b) Information is openly exchanged between clients and evaluation specialists. 100%
(c) Analytical methods are evaluated for specificity, selectivity, reliability and accuracy, using internationally standardized method validation procedures. 100%

Destination Inspection Service

(Fresh Fruits and Vegetables)

The service standard is to respond to 80% of inspection requests within eight working hours of receiving a request and 100% of inspection requests within 24 hours. National Results: 98.4% within eight hours and 99.6% within 24 hours. The CFIA consults with the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable sector on an ongoing basis, quarterly by conference call as well as an annual face to face meetings with its National Advisory Board for the DIS, which most recently occurred in February 2013 and June 05, 2014

3.3 Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Endnote xxvi publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Contact the Canadian Food Inspection Agency via:

Telephone from Monday to Friday 08:00 to 20:00 Eastern time:

Toll Free: 1-800-442-2342
NCR: 1-800-442-2342 / 613-773-2342
TTY: 1-800-465-7735

Internet: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/util/contact/commene.shtml

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures

Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report

Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

full-time equivalent

Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes

A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure

A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures

Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator

A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting

The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending

For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities

Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program

A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

results

An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

Program Alignment Architecture

A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities

Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Strategic Outcome

A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program

A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

whole-of-government framework

Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Endnotes

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