2013-2014 Departmental Performance Report
Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

1.1 Organizational Profile

Minister: The Honourable Rona Ambrose, PC, MP

Deputy Head: Bruce Archibald

Ministerial portfolio: Health

Year established: 1997

Main legislative authorities:

CFIA Wide

Food Safety

Plant

Animal Health

1.2 Organizational Context

1.2.1 Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canada's largest science-based regulatory agency. It has approximately 6,925 Footnote 1 employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal, and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy.

The CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services in order to:

  • prevent and manage food safety risks;
  • protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species;
  • prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases;
  • contribute to consumer protection; and
  • contribute to market access for Canada's food, plants, and animals.

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective risk management, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

1.2.2 Responsibilities

The CFIA's Key Federal Partners

  • Health Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Canadian Grain Commission
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada, including Canadian Forest Service
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
  • Environment Canada, including Canadian Wildlife Service

The CFIA is responsible for administrating and enforcing 13 federal statutes and 38 sets of regulations, for regulating the safety and quality of food sold in Canada, and for supporting a sustainable plant and animal resource base. In November 2012, the Safe Food for Canadians Act received Royal Assent. This new legislation, when in force, will also bring into effect new regulations that provide the necessary legal framework for a single, consistent approach to strengthening food inspection in Canada. The Safe Food for Canadians Act consolidates and replaces the Fish Inspection Act, the Canada Agricultural Products Act, the Meat Inspection Act, and the food provisions of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act.

The CFIA shares many of its core responsibilities with other federal departments and agencies, with provincial, territorial and municipal authorities, with private industry, and with other stakeholders. The CFIA works with its partners to implement food safety measures; manage food, animal, and plant risks, incidents and emergencies; and promotes the development of food safety and disease control systems to maintain the safety of Canada's high-quality agriculture, agri-food, aquaculture and fishery products . The CFIA's activities include verifying the compliance of imported products; registering and inspecting establishments; testing food, animals, plants, and their related products; and approving the use of many agricultural inputs.

Additionally, the CFIA actively participates in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies. It also engages in the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements and actively promotes the Canadian science-based regulatory system among foreign trading partners. The CFIA negotiates to resolve scientific and technical issues, contributing to market access for Canadian goods. It also provides scientific advice, develops new technologies, provides testing services, and conducts regulatory research.

At the CFIA, decisions are based on high-quality, timely, relevant science. Science informs policy development and program design and delivery through foresight, advice, risk assessment, the influence of international standards, research and development, and testing.

1.2.3 Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

To effectively fulfill its responsibilities in safeguarding Canada's food and sustaining its animal and plant resource base, the CFIA aims to achieve its strategic outcome Footnote 2 (A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base). The CFIA's Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) illustrates the Agency's plans to allocate and manage its resources to achieve the corresponding expected results. The Agency's priorities are reviewed annually to facilitate effective resource management within the context of the PAA framework. The four priority areas established in 2012–13 are detailed further in Section 1.5 and Section II.

1. Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

  • 1.1 Program: Food Safety Program
    • 1.1.1 Sub Program: Meat and Poultry
    • 1.1.2 Sub Program: Egg
    • 1.1.3 Sub Program: Dairy
    • 1.1.4 Sub Program: Fish and Seafood
    • 1.1.5 Sub Program: Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
    • 1.1.6 Sub Program: Processed Products
    • 1.1.7 Sub Program: Imported and Manufactured Food Products
  • 1.2 Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
    • 1.2.1 Sub Program: Terrestrial Animal Health
    • 1.2.2 Sub Program: Aquatic Animal Health
    • 1.2.3 Sub Program: Feed
  • 1.3 Program: Plant Resources Program
    • 1.3.1 Sub Program: Plant Protection
    • 1.3.2 Sub Program: Seed
    • 1.3.3 Sub Program: Fertilizer
    • 1.3.4 Sub Program: Intellectual Property Rights
  • 1.4 Program: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
  • Internal Services

1.2.4 Organizational Priorities

For the 2013-14 fiscal year, the CFIA focussed on four strategic business priorities. The following table summarizes the Agency's performance with respect to achieving these priorities. Additional details are provided in Section II.

Table A: Organizational Priorities

Priority Type Footnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
An increased focus on prevention which will provide an opportunity to minimize risks to human, animal and ecosystem health Previously committed to Food Safety Program, Animal Health and Zoonotics Program, Plant Resources Program, and International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Summary of Progress

The CFIA has been integrating proactive and preventive risk management approaches into its programs, including focusing on partnerships and information sharing, all of which help the CFIA to anticipate, prevent, prepare, and manage issues, including emergencies. In 2013-14, the CFIA:

  • continued modernizing its legislative and regulatory frameworks in preparation for the coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Act (SFCA) and in anticipation of the passage of Bill C-18, the Agricultural Growth Act;
  • made progress towards the development and validation of a Risk Assessment (RA) Model for food commodities. Stakeholders outreach was undertaken. Once fully implemented, the RA Model will provide a standard consistent approach to oversight activities across all commodities.
  • hosted the Food Safety Regulatory Forum on June 4, 2013, which formally launched a number of consultations on key food safety and consumer protection initiatives, including the proposed regulatory framework;
  • enhanced controls in federally registered establishments so that meat products continue to be in compliance with federal regulations, and risks associated with E.coli 0157:H7 are mitigated;
  • as part of its Feeds Regulatory Renewal initiative, conducted consultations with key stakeholders to increase the safety of animal feeds and prevent the transmission of diseases into the food chain;
  • provided educational material for domestic invasive plant surveys and early detection;
  • signed a zoning agreement with the United States (US) which provides a mechanism to mitigate the impact of a disease outbreak and could facilitate earlier resumption of trade from disease-free zones;
  • under the leadership of the Chief Veterinary Officer (CVO) of Canada, collaborated and regularly engaged with federal, provincial, and industry stakeholders to facilitate a co-ordinated approach to Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea (PED) both before and after its introduction into Canada, to mitigate the impact of this disease. As an example, the CVO facilitated a PED forum which served as a platform for the stakeholder community to engage in dialogue on the US and Canadian experience with this disease;
  • developed the Integrated Food Inspection Model to improve food inspection and implement a single risk-based inspection approach across all commodities, including the development of standardized and more efficient business processes across the Agency;
  • coordinated, in concert with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), assessments of countries regulated for a particularly destructive invasive species, the Asian Gypsy Moth and worked in partnership with the U.S. to manage the risks from this pest at the countries of origin; and
  • worked in the International Plant Protection Convention and with trading partners to enhance implementation of international standards for phytosanitary measures that will restrict the movement of plant pests, and to develop new standards that will be effective in this objective.

Table B: Organizational Priorities

Priority Type Footnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
The CFIA's role as an effective regulator will be enhanced by a focus on service excellence Previously committed to Food Safety Program, Animal Health and Zoonotics Program, Plant Resources Program, and International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Summary of Progress

Strengthening the citizen-centred service delivery culture will enhance program delivery and the confidence of domestic and international stakeholders in the CFIA as a trusted and credible regulator. The CFIA:

  • engaged stakeholders to develop recommendations for a more modern and innovative food labelling system;
  • developed the Centre of Administration (CoA) model, which was launched on April 1, 2014, to centralize and consolidate the administration of domestic and import-related permissions (licences, permits and registrations);
  • continued the development of service standards in conjunction with the User Fee Review of all authorizations with fee-based services, as part of the Agency's Regulatory Modernization initiative;
  • completed the Agency's Guidance Document initiative, which ensures that the CFIA's official regulatory Guidance documents used by inspectors and industries are available in a central website location;
  • reached a mutually acceptable agreement on facilitating pet food trade with China. As a result, Canadian pet food plants can now export their products to China, thus expanding market access opportunities;
  • continued to work with industry to develop biosecurity standards for the plant and animal sectors and upgraded Codes of Practice with respect to animal welfare;
  • using information gathered from the Complaints and Appeals Office, identified opportunities for service improvement; and
  • continued to expand the release of information on its website for consumers and stakeholders.

Table C: Organizational Priorities

Priority Type Footnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Adapt and evolve to meet new demands and expectations with a focus on internal performance excellence Previously committed to All Programs
Summary of Progress

Optimizing performance will enable the CFIA to evaluate the effectiveness of the Agency's policies and programs and to allocate resources to areas of highest risk. In 2013-14, the CFIA:

  • developed and implemented a Real Property Management Framework in an effort to define and align accountabilities for the management of real property;
  • enhanced strategic procurement planning by linking procurement planning to projects and programs on an Agency-wide basis;
  • developed internal reporting tools to enable discussion and action to highlight potential issues; and
  • provided training under modernized inspection framework.

Table D: Organizational Priorities

Priority Type Footnote 3 Strategic Outcome and/or Program
Focussing on people who are supported by training and tools Previously committed to All Programs
Summary of Progress

Focussing on diverse talent, supported by training and modern tools, will result in a stable and skilled CFIA workforce and adaptable and satisfied employees. In 2013-14, the CFIA:

  • implemented the new Staffing Framework and Service Delivery Model;
  • introduced a multi-channel HR contact centre (i.e. telephone, e-mail, mail), that has streamlined service delivery for managers and employees so as to increase efficiency and effectiveness; and
  • launched the Supervisors' School to provide new supervisors with people management and HR skills to successfully lead their employees in the new Agency culture. The school was piloted in 2013-14 with 7 sessions held- 6 English and 1 French- resulting in 125 supervisors receiving the training.

1.2.5 Risk Analysis

The CFIA is responsible for identifying and managing risks to the food supply and the plant and animal resource base, on which safe food and a prosperous economy depends. As such, integrated risk management is an integral part of policy, priority setting, planning, resourcing, delivery, review and reporting activities.

The vast majority of risks that fall within the Agency's mandate are managed in concert with numerous domestic and international partners and stakeholders. Factors influencing key strategic risks faced by the Agency include (but are not limited to):

  • the emergence of new pathogens due to increases in international travel and trade, microbial adaptation, changes in production methods and distribution as well as human demographics and behaviour;
  • a greater understanding of the convergence of human, animal and ecosystem health issues;
  • the emergence of global supply chains, which have fundamentally changed the way agricultural products are produced, processed, packaged, distributed and sold;
  • an increase in the volume and variety of goods coming into Canada;
  • increased export opportunities for Canadian producers, coupled with changing international standards and more stringent requirements;
  • rapid advances in processing and manufacturing technologies, which require legislative and regulatory frameworks to adapt quickly in order to keep pace;
  • an increasingly knowledgeable, demanding and risk-averse consumer and stakeholder base; and
  • a growing international consensus around the need for common scientific standards and approaches to support industry oversight and the global agri-food trade.

A cornerstone of the CFIA's risk management is the Agency-wide Corporate Risk Profile (CRP). The 2013 CRP presents risk statements and strategies to reduce risks to levels the Agency deems tolerable. The results of the corporate risk profiling process have directly informed the priorities presented in Section 1.5 and the strategies presented throughout this DPR.

Table 1 highlights the CFIA's key strategic risks, planned responses, and notes what was done in 2013-14 to minimize risks. The risks outlined below were identified in the 2013-14 RPP. Given that the Agency's key corporate risks are currently unchanged, and that response strategies are relatively long-term in nature, the risk responses were not significantly modified from the previous report. All corporate risks link to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Table 1: Risk Summary

Risk Risk Response Strategy Footnote 4 Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Management Information and IM/IT Infrastructure:

Potential Threat:
The ability to make risk-based decisions due to the lack of timely, accurate and useful data and information.

The Agency's diverse information requirements and national presence has resulted in an IM/IT infrastructure that contains a complex mix of new and old equipment supporting multiple IM/IT systems and databases. Differences in how information is collected, analyzed and used across multiple systems and hardware may impede information sharing and timely operational and regulatory decision making.

IM/IT Campaign Plan

  • Developed a policy for documenting IM decisions and actions, IT Security Standards and Guidelines and a modernized Business Application Plan.
  • Began designing the new Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP) to support the Agency's modernized inspection regime and enhance risk-based decision making.

Business Information Management Centre (BIMC)

  • Developed and implemented a quarterly performance and monitoring dashboard that better highlights frontline operation areas requiring senior management attention.
  • Implemented an information management governance model.

Strengthen Planning, Reporting and Performance Monitoring

  • Renewed the planning process framework by incorporating lessons learned, emerging realities, and timely risk assessments.
  • Implemented a standardized semi-annual reporting framework to enable monitoring progress against Agency priorities and serves to complement quarterly operational dashboard reporting for senior management.

Knowledge Workspace Program

  • Delivered the Knowledge Workspace Program to upgrade desktop computers.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Inspection Effectiveness:

Potential Threat:
The ability to have appropriate inspection effectiveness to expeditiously prevent, detect and respond to threats to food safety, animals and plants.

The Agency delivers 14 independently evolved inspection programs, each having diverse and complex requirements for training, information collection and industry compliance based on the commodity being regulated. Currently, the Agency's resource efficiency is impacted due to the maintenance of multiple training programs and IM/IT systems used to address distinct variations in inspection processes, tools, and information collection.

Legislative Renewal

  • Began drafting new food inspection regulations with respect to licensing, trade, traceability, preventive control plans, and food safety requirements, in preparation for the coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Act.
  • Developed Food Program Framework policy suite and new guidance documents that facilitate compliance and will help implementation of the new proposed food inspection regulations
  • Proposed Agricultural Growth Act, Bill C-18, tabled in December 2013. Bill proposes to enhance suite of statutes regulating the agricultural sector.

Inspection Modernization initiative

  • Developed a Compliance Promotion Strategy to increase awareness, improve understanding and foster continuous improvement of inspection.
  • Implemented a revised inspection model.

Food Program Framework and redesign

  • Began developing a risk assessment model in support of the five-year $100 million food inspection modernisation plan under Economic Action Plan 2011.
  • Finalized an improved inspection model, the integrated Agency Inspection Model (iAIM), permitting a more consistent and risk-based approach to program delivery.
  • In support of its inspection modernization model, and in response to the recommendations of the independent review of the XL Foods recall, implemented Inspection Verification Teams to oversee the performance of Canada's food safety system.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Scientific Capability:

Potential Threat:
The ability to have the scientific capability to adapt and respond in a timely manner.

Advancements in science and technology have increased the complexity of the commodities the Agency regulates. Additionally, there is growing international consensus around the need for common scientific equipment and approaches to support industry oversight and the global agri-food trade. The Agency is expected to maintain an employee base and modern laboratory facilities that reflects these advancements in regulated products and international requirements.

Laboratory Infrastructure Strategy

  • Awarded engineering and design contacts, and procured modern food safety laboratory equipment for the St-Hyacinthe and Toronto laboratory.

Human Resources Modernization

  • Implemented the new Staffing Framework and Service Delivery Model.

Enhance Laboratory Response Capacity

  • Hired highly skilled scientists for targeted laboratories.
  • Started the development of a genomics training program and method development work plan.

Enhance Surveillance and Foresight

  • Collaborated with Health Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, and other levels of government to develop a strategy for a national food safety information network that will contribute to the anticipation, detections, and response to foodborne illnesses.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework:

Potential Threat:
The ability of the current legislative, regulatory and program framework to support the effective delivery of the Agency's mandate.

Rapid advances in processing and manufacturing technologies have resulted in significant increases in production speed, volume and diversity, requiring the subsequent need for updated legislative and regulatory frameworks. Statutes and authorities impact the design and delivery of programs that regulate new commodities and support economic competitiveness within the industry.

Legislative Renewal

  • Safe Food for Canadians Act was passed
  • Tabled the Proposed Agricultural Growth Act.

Multi-Year Regulatory Plan

  • Renewed Seed, Fertilizer and Feed regulations
  • 13 sets of food regulations being replaced with a single set of food inspection regulations and a single food program with supporting guidance documents.
  • Plant Breeders' Rights being modernized for better protection of and benefits to breeders.

Food Safety Program Frameworks and redesign:

  • Developed and piloted a more structured approach to analyzing risks and hazards to help determine the frequency, intensity and type of oversight required.
  • Began implementing a multi-year project of establishing 16 centres of expertise (CoE) across Canada. Each CoE will offer greater consistency in program interpretation and delivery to front-line inspectors of the CFIA, as well as regulated parties, while at the same time consolidating program and administrative expertise in order to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, and quality of service delivery. Much of the effort in this area for 2013-14 was spent in building the infrastructure in support of CoEs.

User Fee / Service Standard Modernization

  • Continued the review of User Fees associated with four major programs – Health of Animals, Fish and Seafood, Meat Inspection (Livestock and Poultry Grading) and Plant Protection.

E-business and e-certification

  • Continued modernizing frameworks and tools including an electronic interface which has enhanced the facilitation of trade.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Managing Change:

Potential Threat:
The ability to effectively manage change on an ongoing basis.

The global evolution of economic, social and environmental factors influences the regulatory and business environment within which the Agency operates. Consequently, fiscal restraint is growing in importance, as is the subsequent need for greater innovation to achieve efficiency while maintaining or increasing effectiveness in the way the Agency does its business and delivers its mandate.

One way we are managing this risk is the creation of the Agency Transformation Office (ATO) and governance structure with:

  • A dedicated project management capacity;
  • A streamlined governance; and
  • Common systems

Human Resources Modernization Strategy

  • Continued modernizing people management with a new staffing framework that places emphasis on talent management, which will impact training, recruitment and retention process.

Reinforce Values and Ethics Ethical Risk Profiles (ERP)

  • Developed comprehensive ERPs for each Branch which included detailed risk treatment plans.

Strengthen Planning, Reporting and Performance Monitoring

  • The CFIA continued to implement an enhanced business and operational planning, monitoring and reporting system that is based on the provision of clear science and risk-based functional direction process. This process has contributed to the effective and efficient use of inspection resources, has improved overall information sharing between branches and increased alignment of program design to operational delivery capacity across programs.
  • Renewed the planning process framework to reflect lessons learned, emerging realities and incorporate timely risk assessments.
  • Implemented a standardized semi-annual reporting framework to enable monitoring progress against Agency priorities and serves to complement quarterly operational dashboard reporting for senior management.

Enhance Project Management

  • Implemented phase 3 of the four-year Project Management Improvement Agenda Project (PMIAP), which focuses on maturing project management through the Enterprise Project Management Framework (ePMF).

Enhance Internal and Public Engagement

  • Implemented clearer communication and decision-making channels by updating the Terms of Reference (TORs) of the business line committees.
  • Continued public engagement on key Agency initiatives such as consultation on draft regulations for the new Safe Food for Canadians Act through the Agency's Food forum and partnering with other government entities to raise public awareness around food safety.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Transparency and Leveraging Relationships:

Potential Opportunity:
Opportunity for the Agency to increase its transparency and accountability to stakeholders.

Information sharing enables regulated parties to take steps to ensure compliance and helps to increase public awareness and confidence in the Canadian marketplace. Diverse methods exist to engage and collaborate with industry, other governmental stakeholders and the public to enhance the development of outputs that are mutually beneficial and agreed-upon.

Public and Industry Engagement in the coming into Force of the Safe Food for Canadians Act

  • Continued broad engagement and consultation on draft regulations for the new Safe Food for Canadians Act through the Agency's Food forum and partnering with other government entities to raise public awareness around the new Act and food safety in general.

Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP)

  • Continued to design the ESDP, a platform that will enable citizens, industry and international trading partners to more easily carry out their respective roles and conduct regular business transactions with the Agency, such as obtaining electronic export certificates, using secure information exchange protocols.

User Fee / Service Standard Modernization

  • Continued the review of User Fees associated with four major programs to update the User Fees notices and develop service standards to allow for predictability in service delivery

Red Tape Reduction Initiatives

  • Increased coordination among regulators:
    • Renewed Dairy regulations
    • Integrated network of laboratories
  • Adopted a service-oriented approach to regulated parties:
    • Continued implementing the CFIA's Transparency Agenda

Leveraging Relationships (International Engagement)

  • Developed an Agency–wide International Strategic Framework in 2013-14. Continued to engage and cooperate with regulatory counterparts and relevant international organizations to assist in the development of international standards.
  • Worked with industry stakeholders and our US counterparts to make progress on Beyond the Border (BtB) and Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) initiatives.
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Emergency Management:

Potential Threat:
The ability to respond to multiple simultaneous or large-scale emergencies.

The CFIA has a well-planned emergency preparedness and response capacity. However threat environments continue to evolve, requiring regular updating of plans and responses to reflect changes and find efficiencies to ensure that the Agency maintains a minimum of essential business functions during emergencies.

Maintain and monitor current Emergency Management preparedness / response mitigation strategies and enhance them if necessary.

  • An Agency Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP) was completed and provided to Public Safety Canada in December 2013
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

1.3 Actual Expenditure

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $74.4 million reflects increased Statutory authority expenditures, incremental activities funded via the 2013-14 Supplementary Estimates, as well as expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board (such as parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service, etc.), for which the Agency receives allocations from Treasury Board Votes. A significant portion of this increase is related to statutory compensation payments made under the Health of Animals Act. New resources for the implementation of the Inspection Verification System Initiative and a resource transfer from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, as part of a multi-year Memorandum of Understanding on the Growing Forward 2 policy framework, also contributed to this increase. Furthermore, the carry forward of authorities from the previous fiscal year into 2013-14 enabled the Agency to manage operational requirements and invest in initiatives and priorities, including food safety.

The net increase takes into account recent savings initiatives undertaken by the government, the transfer of biohazard security responsibilities and resources to the Public Health Agency of Canada, and the transfer of resources to Shared Services Canada to support the implementation of the Food Safety Action Plan.

The decrease of 60 FTEs from Planned to Actual primarily relates to the reductions stemming from the implementation of recent savings; the transfer of biohazard security responsibilities and resources to the Public Health Agency of Canada; delays in certain projects and initiatives; offset by Agency investments in initiatives and priorities. The Agency has achieved these savings mainly through efficiencies and has not reduced staff or cut programs that would in any way impact food safety or place the health and safety of Canadians at risk.

A comparison of Total Authorities available for use and Actual Spending yields $49.3 million of unused 2013-14 authorities. The Agency specifically lapsed resources in 2013-14 in order to carry forward authorities into 2014-15, primarily to cover anticipated collective bargaining settlement requirements.

A variance analysis is provided for each Program; please see the applicable Program in Section II of this document. Section II also contains information at lowest level of CFIA's Treasury Board approved Program Alignment Architecture, the Sub-Program level. Sub-Program variances which are less than $5.0 million and less than a 10% change fall below CFIA's criteria for provision of a variance explanation.

Budgetary Financial Resources – (dollars)

2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Planned Spending 2013–14 Total Authorities Available for Use 2013–14 Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (actual minus planned)
687,885,404 731,351,825 855,094,470 805,751,653 74,399,828

Human Resources (Full-time equivalents - FTEs Footnote 5)

2013–14 Planned 2013–14 Actual 2013–14 Difference (actual minus planned)
6,438 6,378 (60)

Budgetary Performance Summary Table for Strategic Outcome and Program(s) (dollars)

Strategic Outcome, Program(s) and Internal Services 2013-14 Main Estimates Planned Spending 2013-14 Total Authority Available for use Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2013-14 2012-13 2011-12
Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base
Food Safety Program 312,185,374 352,681,060 320,982,081 316,858,810 394,119,558 364,310,525 353,600,998 328,935,486
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 131,587,718 131,999,425 90,674,321 90,560,216 195,453,317 187,939,265 175,425,417 140,272,362
Plant Resources Program 84,260,734 84,692,441 75,532,299 75,236,980 90,803,236 86,537,966 88,983,164 83,964,960
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 31,697,693 31,697,647 25,382,494 25,382,494 37,154,661 35,004,557 33,338,750 34,859,200
Subtotal 559,731,519 601,070,573 512,571,195 508,038,500 717,530,772 673,792,313 651,348,329 588,032,008
Internal Services Subtotal 128,153,885 130,281,252 109,004,540 108,873,224 137,563,698 131,959,340 130,707,396 149,664,349
Total 687,885,404 731,351,825 621,575,735 616,911,724 855,094,470 805,751,653 782,055,725 737,696,357

1.4 Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

2013-14 Actual Spending by Whole-of-Government-Framework Spending Endnote xv Area (dollars)

Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2013-14 Actual Spending
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Food Safety Program Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 364,310,525
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 187,939,265
Plant Resources Program Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 86,537,966
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements International Affairs A prosperous Canada through global commerce 35,004,557

Total Actual Spending by Spending Area (dollars)

Spending Area Total Planned Spending Total Actual Spending
Economic Affairs 84,692,441 86,537,966
Social Affairs 484,680,485 552,249,790
International Affairs 31,697,647 35,004,557
Government Affairs 0 0

1.5 Departmental Spending Trend

Chart - Departmental Spending Trend. Description follows.
Description for Departmental Spending Trend
Total Spending
2011–12 737.7
2012–13 782.1
2013-14 805.8
2014–15 621.6
2015–16 616.9
2016–17 582.4
Sunset Programs
2014–15 74.0
2015–16 70.0
2016-17 78.0

The Agency's overall spending has increased from 2011-12 to 2013-14 by approximately 9%. This is as a result of: additional funding received for initiatives such as Food Safety Modernization and the Inspection Verification System Initiative; resources transferred from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada for the Traceability National Information Portal and Growing Forward 2 policy framework; and, a significant increase in statutory compensation expenditures. This also takes into account: the transfer of resources to Shared Services Canada (SSC) to consolidate, streamline and improve Government information technology and information management services; the transfer of biohazard security responsibilities and resources to the Public Health Agency of Canada; as well as decreases stemming from savings initiatives undertaken by the government. The Agency has achieved these savings mainly through efficiencies and has not reduced staff or cut programs that would in any way impact food safety or place the health and safety of Canadians at risk.

It should be noted that Budget 2014 announced $390 million over 5 years for the CFIA. In addition to the renewal of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) programming (included as a sunset program in the chart above), Budget 2014 announced funding for CFIA to implement new initiatives to strengthen Canada's food safety system and better protect Canadian families. Until these new resources are approved by Parliament, they cannot be included in CFIAs Planned Spending or Departmental Spending Trend.

With respect to the implementation of specific savings initiatives, ongoing savings in the amount of $55.8 million is being achieved through: administrative efficiencies, such as sharing common administrative services between the CFIA and AAFC; as well as program changes to improve services and facilitate trade, such as implementing agreed upon changes with the provinces with respect to the delivery of certain inspection activities under provincial jurisdiction; and, more effective response to animal diseases and plant pests. None of these measures affect the delivery of the CFIA's front-line food safety services.

1.6 Estimates by Vote

For information on Canadian Food Inspection Agency's organizational Votes and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2014 on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website. Endnote xvi

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