2014-2015 Departmental Performance Report
Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

This section details the CFIA's planned activities for its strategic outcome as informed by a number of factors, including Government and Agency priorities, the Agency's Corporate Risk Profile, and the application of lessons learned. Lessons learned may be derived from a variety of sources, including: internal and external audits; internal program evaluations; stakeholder feedback and consultation; information from performance measurement (including quality management); and structured post-incident analysis following significant events such as an animal disease outbreak or a serious food safety recall. This section features key areas on which the CFIA focused its efforts during the last fiscal year.

Section II reporting at the lowest level of CFIA's Treasury Board approved Program Alignment Architecture, the Sub-Program level, was introduced in 2014-15. The CFIA worked hard to accurately align its spending plans and FTEs to meet these expanded reporting requirements. However, while preparing the 2014-15 DPR, it was noticed that some spending plans and FTEs did not properly align with the corresponding activities and amounts stated in the 2014-15 Report on Plans and Priorities. The Agency is making every effort to enable better representation in future planning exercises.

In addition, it should be noted that spending differences are not correlated to FTE differences. Many factors affected the Program and Sub-Program distribution of the substantial one-time disbursements in 2014-15 related to government-wide workforce initiatives (i.e. the cash out of accumulated severance) including employee demographics and program uptake. As a result, comparisons between program and sub-program spending and FTEs do not provide meaningful or indicative analysis of information.

Assessment of Performance Targets

Performance targets for compliance rates are qualitative or quantitative goals set by the CFIA that provide a basis for measuring the performance of regulated parties and the Agency toward achieving expected results. The targets in this report are for critical program areas and based either on historical averages of actual performance or on the expected results of effective programming (e.g. rate of industry compliance with regulatory standards). The CFIA has assessed the extent to which performance has met or exceeded established targets and provided analysis when performance has fallen below targets. Targets for programs that monitor activities are set differently than for programs that focus on specific areas of non-compliance. In terms of compliance rates, the CFIA deems a performance variance of +/- 2% (percent) to be “Met”. The methodology used in assessing the actual performance of each indicator is available on our website Endnote xix.

Strategic Outcome: A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base

Mitigating risks to food safety is the CFIA's highest priority. Safeguarding the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy is the driving force behind the design and development of the CFIA's programs. The CFIA, in collaboration and partnership with industry, consumers, universities, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, continued to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases.

To support Canadian agriculture and the ability of agri-food businesses to enter domestic and global markets and compete successfully therein, the CFIA continued to develop and enforce regulatory and program frameworks for imports and exports that meet both Canadian and international requirements. To that end, the CFIA engaged in outreach and consultation activities with key stakeholders and partners (including those in industry), consumers, and international trade and standards organizations. The CFIA thus maintained open and transparent communication with its stakeholder and consultative groups.

The CFIA also focused on several horizontal initiatives aimed at contributing to consumer protection. Over the past year, the CFIA enhanced stakeholder engagement on Agency transformation, continued to advance its food labelling modernization and transparency initiatives and to deliver on its many day to day operational activities. The day to day activities included public food recall notices and import border blitzes designed to identify and intercept imported food items that may pose a health threat to Canadians.

In April 2014, the CFIA operationalized its 16 National Centres of Operational Guidance and Expertise (NCOGEs) across Canada. Each NCOGE operates as a single window and provides consistent technical advice, interpretation, guidance and specialized knowledge to the CFIA front-line inspectors and regulated parties. NCOGEs consolidate program and administrative expertise to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, consistency and quality of service delivery.

The CFIA continued work on its 2017-18 Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) and its supporting Performance Measurement Framework (PMF). The major changes include a revised Strategic Outcome Statement, change in number of programs and a revamped Food Program that moves from a multiple commodity structure to a Single Food approach, to align with Agency transformation.

The Agricultural Growth Act received Royal Assent on February 25, 2015. The Agricultural Growth Act will modernize and strengthen federal agriculture legislation, support innovation in the Canadian agriculture industry and enhance global market opportunities for Canadians.

To successfully deliver on its Strategic Outcome, the CFIA uses a robust risk management discipline, and fosters its use throughout the Agency. As such, the CFIA continually monitors and assesses its operating environment in order to be aware of the threats and opportunities potentially impacting the achievement of its desired outcome. A cornerstone of its risk management process is the development of an Agency-wide Corporate Risk Profile (CRP).

To mitigate the risks and achieve its strategic outcome, the Agency, through the actions of its program activities (Food Safety, Animal Health and Zoonotics, Plant Resources, International Collaboration and Technical Agreements), concentrated its 2014-15 efforts on the delivery of key initiatives that support the CFIA's four priorities:

  • An increased focus on prevention which will provide an opportunity to minimize risks to human, animal and plant health;
  • An enhanced focus on service excellence that will improve CFIA effectiveness;
  • A focus on internal performance excellence to adapt and meet new demands and expectations; and
  • A focus on people who are supported by training and tools

Program 1.1: Food Safety Program

Description

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities Available for use
2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2014-15
Difference (actual minus planned)
320,103,652 320,982,081 448,414,176 421,520,442 100,538,361
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents — FTEs)
2014-15 Planned 2014-15 Actual 2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
2,940 3,250 310

The increases from Planned to Actual Spending of $100.5 million and 310 FTEs are mainly due to: incremental food safety activities funded via the 2014-15 Supplementary Estimates; as well as considerable one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and the retroactive salary settlement payments.

Additional 2014-15 resources were received from the government to: establish a Food Safety Information Network to strengthen the ability to detect and respond to food hazards; implement an enhanced food safety oversight program; and maintain a daily shift inspection presence in all federally registered meat processing establishments.

Table 2-1a: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Number of commodity areas where federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met 5 out of 6 met Table Note 5
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 100% 99.6%Table Note 6 Met
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 95% 100% Met
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where domestic food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met 6 out of 6 met
Number of commodity areas where imported food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met 4 out of 6 met Table Note 7

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

These are roll-up indicators from the Sub-Program level.

Table Notes

Table Note 5

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Sub-Program did not meet its target. Enforcement action letters were issued to 6 out of 87 Registered Produce Warehouses (RPW). All the enforcement action letters were related to non-food safety issues. All corrective actions requested for each non-compliant RPW issues were met. The existing regulatory framework for the FFV sector has undergone an intensive and extensive regulatory review during the development of the proposed Safe Food for Canadians Regulations.

Return to table note 5 referrer

Table Note 6

One recall was not posted within the 24 hour time standard due to technological issues with the Web Content Management System application that is used to publish recalls to the CFIA's website. As a result, new procedures have been established, and the Agency will continue to closely monitor the publishing of recalls to ensure the 24 hour time standard is achieved.

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Table Note 7

The Dairy Sub-Program and the Fish and Seafood Sub-Program did not meet one of their targets each.

Return to table note 7 referrer

Dairy Sub-Program: 45 out of 313 composition sampling of imported cheese samples were not compliant for % milk fat and/or % moisture declarations on the label. There is no health and safety risk associated with these non-compliances but misrepresentation of label information.

Fish and Seafood Sub-Program: The non-compliance refers only to imported fish and seafood products. The overall compliance rate increased to 89% from 85% last year. The main contributor to non-compliance was sensory evaluation rejections. Sensory evaluations are performed to verify the level of fish quality (i.e. level of freshness), which few foreign countries inspect or monitor. Sensory evaluation rejections made up 43% of the random inspection rejections and implicated 50% of the packers whose fish were found non-compliant. The products, their origin and packers vary and the compliance rate for this analysis alone is similar to last year's compliance. To address the issue, the CFIA enhanced the basic compliance verification inspections tasks for inspectors and the verifications are expected to result in higher detections, which in turn are expected to push importers to improve their level of compliance.

Other reasons for product rejections for Fish and Seafood included bacterial contamination with Salmonella, moisture, drug residues, and misuse of additives. However, there was no trend relative to a particular product, processor, or country of origin. There is no apparent systematic problem that is causing this non-compliance.

Regulatory Modernization

In 2014-15, The CFIA continued to make progress against the Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan, launched in 2013 as a roadmap to assist the Agency in building an even stronger food safety system for Canadians. Key achievements include:

  • Completed drafting regulations in anticipation of the coming-into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Act (SFCA), including the consolidation of 13 sets of existing food inspection regulations. A third round of engagement with industry has been launched, with a focus on micro and small businesses. In addition, a base suite of interpretive guidance documents has been drafted and will continue to evolve with the proposed regulations.
  • The Healthy and Safe Food Regulatory Forum held in June 2014 to enable external stakeholders learn about and discuss elements of the Agency's ongoing modernization. Following the Forum, the CFIA received over 400 formal submissions from stakeholders on various Agency Transformation consultation documents, contributing to the advancement of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations.
  • Extensive engagement sessions on food labelling modernization occurred and a “What We Heard” report was published in collaboration with Health Canada. A food labelling modernization engagement summary report of the key issues was also produced.
  • A web-based Industry Labelling Tool was introduced, with more than 1,500 pages of labelling information and features content organized by subject. Information sessions were held to familiarize industry groups with this new resource.

Risk Based Oversight (RBO) Framework to Further Modernize Canada's Food Safety System

In 2014-15, the CFIA continued to enhance its risk-based approach to oversight activities through the continued development of a Risk Assessment (RA) Model for licensed domestic food producing establishments. The model will provide a standard and consistent tool to inform CFIA oversight decisions. The CFIA worked with scientific experts (academia), industry, and other government partners on a pilot project that tested a preliminary version of the RA Model with 49 meat and poultry and 29 dairy establishments. A plan was developed for implementation of an expanded model that includes multiple commodities.

Continuing with Single Food Safety Regulatory Regime and Inspection Model to Support Agency Modernization

In support of the Agency's modernization agenda, the CFIA continued the implementation of its Single Food Program and corresponding new organizational design. Branch re-alignment initiatives have been completed to prepare for the delivery of regulations and enforcement activities in line with the new integrated Agency Inspection Model (iAIM). Training frameworks to support the new organizational design were developed.

The iAIM was finalized in 2014-15 and implementation of some components of the model has begun. The iAIM sets out a standardized inspection process, bringing a level of consistency to the inspection process across business lines and commodities.

Enhancing Detection and Responsiveness to Food-Borne Incidents

In 2014-15, Treasury Board approved funding for the Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN), an initiative that will improve Canada's ability to anticipate, detect and respond to food-borne threats and hazards. This Network will connect food safety authorities and laboratories. Using a secure web platform, the network will share surveillance information and food safety data on a regular basis as well as during food safety investigations and emergencies.

Over the past year, a governance and organizational structure was established for CFSIN and federal and provincial partners have been engaged.

Leveraging Social Media to Communicate about Food Safety

To continue to better inform Canadians about food safety, including recalls or other incidents, the CFIA published approximately 1,000 food recalls and allergy alerts through our Facebook and Twitter accounts. The Agency used social media to communicate recalls and allergy alerts as they happen - 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days of the year.

The CFIA proactively published over 200 tweets and 180 Facebook food safety outreach postings on topics such as: safe food handling and storage, food safety around the holidays, food allergens and food safety for vulnerable populations. The Agency continued to collaborate with portfolio partners by sharing information on food safety and further increasing the reach of messaging.

E-mail alerts were also sent for each recall and alert to over 50,000 listserv subscribers on the Food Recall and Allergy Alert e-mail subscription list.

National Centres of Operational Guidance and Expertise for Enhanced Program Delivery

In 2014-15, the CFIA launched the operation of the National Centres of Operational Guidance and Expertise, aimed at improving program support and interpretation functions, increasing consistency in the advice, guidance and direction provided to the inspectorate and centralizing the subject matter expertise within a single Branch.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Meat and Poultry

Description

The Meat and Poultry sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with meat and poultry and their products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that meat, poultry and their products meet health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices related to labelling compliance for pre-packaged meat products, and audits the delivery of a grading program based on objective meat quality and retail yield standards. The Meat and Poultry sub-program supports confidence in Canada's meat and poultry and their products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Actual Spending
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
169,053,246 241,204,021 72,150,775
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
1,599 1,832 233

The increases from Planned to Actual Spending of $72.2 million and 233 FTEs are mainly due to the renewal of funding to support food safety priorities, such as the maintenance of increased frequency of food inspections in meat processing establishments and the continuation of a comprehensive strategy for managing Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy. In addition, the Agency incurred one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments.

Table 2-1b: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Federally registered meat and poultry establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered meat and poultry establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 97.7% Met
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 97.7% Met
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 99.6% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program (MSIP)

In 2014-15, as part of the Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program, the CFIA collaborated with the University of Montreal to develop a risk assessment report on the incision of mandibular lymph nodes of pork. The first phase of updates to the disposition catalogues was also completed.

Administrative Monetary Penalties to Strengthen Food Inspection

To further strengthen Canada's food inspection system, the final regulatory amendment to implement Administrative Monetary Penalties under the Meat Inspection Act and Regulations was published in the Canada Gazette II in 2014-15.

Supporting Market Access to the USA for Meat

In 2014-15, the CFIA collaborated with its American counterparts of the Beyond the Border (BtB) and Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) initiatives to re-confirm equivalence status of the Canadian and US meat inspection systems, to publish a meat cut manual to harmonize Canadian and US meat nomenclature and to develop a joint meat work plan with the US Food Safety and Inspection Service.

Enhancing the Pathogen Reduction Initiative

As part of the Pathogen Reduction Initiative, aimed at decreasing the health risk impact of foodborne pathogens in Canadian meat and poultry, a technical report on a Microbiological Baseline Study for poultry was completed. Industry stakeholders and FPT partners have been engaged throughout and were informed of the results of the baseline study. Two baselines studies were designed and pilot studies commenced for the beef component of the initiative.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Egg

Description

The Egg sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with egg and egg products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that eggs and egg products are graded according to relevant governing acts and regulations and that they comply with the requirements of the said acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and advertising practices meet the requirements for pre-packaged egg products. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's egg and egg products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Actual Spending
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
8,441,751 10,660,299 2,218,548
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
82 81 (1)

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $2.2 million is mainly due to one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments, while FTEs in the Egg program remained stable.

Table 2-1c: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Federally registered shell egg establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered shell egg establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 97.0% Met
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98.7% Met
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98.9% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Partnering to Manage Avian Influenza (AI) Outbreaks

The Egg Program and the sector were affected by Avian Influenza (AI) outbreaks that occurred in British Columbia, Canada and in five northwestern states (California, Idaho, Oregon, Utah, and Washington) of the United States between December 2014 and January 2015. CFIA's Food and Animal Health Business Lines as well as trading partners worked together to manage the outbreaks and minimize the spread of the virus and any potential effect to human health.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Dairy

Description

The Dairy sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with dairy and dairy products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that dairy and dairy products meet health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the governing acts and regulations. The program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices by verifying that labelling for pre-packaged dairy products meets the requirements as set out in the acts and regulations. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's dairy products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Actual Spending
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
10,912,842 16,996,559 6,083,717
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
111 131 20

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $6.1 million is partially due to one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and the retroactive salary settlement payments.

The CFIA worked hard to accurately align its spending plans and FTEs to meet the expanded reporting requirements introduced in 2014-15. However, while preparing the 2014-15 DPR, it was noticed that some spending plans and FTEs, including the FTEs of the Dairy sub-program, did not properly align with the corresponding activities and amounts.

Table 2-1d: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Federally registered dairy establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered dairy establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 98% Met
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 96.1% Met
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 90.6%Table Note 8 Not Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Table Notes

Table Note 8

45 out of 313 Composition sampling of imported cheese samples were not compliant for % milk fat and/or % moisture declarations on the label. There is no health and safety risk associated with these non-compliances but misrepresentation of label information.

Return to table note 8 referrer

12 out of 291 of dairy samples were unsatisfactory for microbiology. Imported cheese found to be non-compliant for microbiology are placed on directed sampling until 10 consecutive lots are found to be satisfactory. Products tested for microbiology are typically held by the importer until results are received to avoid recalls due to unsatisfactory results.

The CFIA takes appropriate actions when dairy products do not meet Canadian standards. Actions may include, but are not limited to, additional inspections, further directed sampling, or product seizure and/or recall.

Supporting Market Access for Dairy Products

In 2014-15, the CFIA continued to support market access for Canadian dairy producers. An audit of Canada's Dairy Program, conducted by China's Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ), allowed for the Chinese market to remain open to Canadian producers. In March 2015, Algeria accepted CFIA's proposal and a certification process for dairy products being exported to Algeria was established and the first certificate issued in April 2015.

Sub-Program 1.1.4: Fish and Seafood

Description

The Fish and Seafood sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with fish and seafood products processed in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. It achieves its objectives by developing product and process standards and ensuring that products, importers and domestic industry comply with quality, safety and identity of fish and seafood requirements through verification of compliance with the governing acts and regulations. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's fish and seafood products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Actual Spending
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
43,593,686 60,159,985 16,566,299
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
406 433 27

The increases from Planned to Actual Spending of $16.6 million and 27 FTEs are mainly due to incremental funding provided to the Agency for the implementation of an enhanced food safety oversight program. In addition, actual spending included one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments.

Table 2-1e: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Federally registered fish and seafood establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fish and seafood establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 98.7% Met
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 97.6% Met
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 89.0%Table Note 9 Not Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Table Notes

Table Note 9

The non-compliance refers only to imported fish and seafood products. The overall compliance rate increased to 89% from 85% last year. The main contributor to non- compliance was sensory evaluation rejections. Sensory evaluations are performed to verify the level of fish quality (i.e. level of freshness), which few foreign countries inspect or monitor. Sensory evaluation rejections made up 43% of the random inspection rejections and implicated 50% of the packers whose fish were found non-compliant. The products, their origin and packers vary and the compliance rate for this analysis alone is similar to last year's compliance. The CFIA enhanced the basic compliance verification inspection tasks for inspectors and the verifications are expected to result in higher detections, which in turn are expected to push importers to improve their level of compliance.

Return to table note 9 referrer

Other reasons for product rejections for Fish and Seafood included bacterial contamination with Salmonella, moisture, drug residues, and misuse of additives. However, there was no trend relative to a particular product, processor, or country of origin. There is no apparent systematic problem that is causing this non-compliance.

Supporting Market Access for Fish and Seafood

In 2014-15, the CFIA continued to support market access for Canadian producers through the maintenance of fish and shellfish trade agreements. Activities included the advancement of trade issues with China's Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ) Fish and Seafood Working Group, as well as with the European Union's Directorate General for Health and Consumers (SANCO).

An emergency plan was established in response to the unanticipated Russian embargo on Canadian meat and seafood exports. Through regular active engagement with the Canadian fish industry, the vast majority of the embargoed containers of products in-transit to Russia found alternative markets, thereby minimizing industry losses.

Systems-Based Fish Export Certification in Support of Inspection Modernization

To support enhancements to export certification controls for fish and seafood exports, manuals for inspectors were updated and published and a revised systems-based approach to issue fish export certificates is being developed.

Sub-Program 1.1.5: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables

Description

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with fresh fruits and vegetables and their products produced in Canada or imported for consumption. It achieves its objectives by verifying that products meet all stipulated health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program mitigates unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and net quantity requirements for pre-packaged Fresh Fruit and Vegetable products are adhered to. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's fresh fruit and vegetable products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Actual Spending
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
24,814,290 27,078,567 2,264,277
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
217 221 4

The increases from Planned to Actual Spending of $2.3 million and 4 FTEs are mainly due to incremental funding provided to the Agency for implementation of an enhanced food safety oversight program. As well, actual spending includes one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments.

Table 2-1f: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Federally registered fresh fruit and vegetables establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fresh fruit and vegetable establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 90.9%Table Note 10 Not Met
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fresh fruit and vegetable samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98.8% Met
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported fresh fruit and vegetables samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 96.8% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Table Notes

Table Note 10

This performance indicator target was not met. Enforcement action letters were issued to 6 out of 87 Registered Produce Warehouses (RPW). All the enforcement action letters were related to non-food safety issues. All corrective actions requested for each non- compliant RPW issues were met. The existing regulatory framework for the FFV sector has undergone an intensive and extensive regulatory review during the development of the proposed Safe Food for Canadians Regulations.

Return to table note 10 referrer

Inspection Modernization for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

To mitigate food safety risks associated with fresh fruits and vegetables, the CFIA pursued new inspection and oversight activities as part of the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program Modernization initiative, including the completion of Part II of a technical review of CanadaGAP, a private food safety certification program, as well as the development of a plan for conducting non-meat foreign country assessments. A Code of Practice for Minimally Processed Fresh Fruits and Vegetables was completed and the Agency engaged in outreach activities with the Canadian Produce Marketing Association and the Canadian Horticultural Council.

Sub-Program 1.1.6: Processed Products

Description

The Processed Products sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with processed products, including honey and maple products, which are produced in Canada or imported for consumption. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that processed products comply with health and food safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program minimizes unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and net quantity requirements for pre-packaged processed products are adhered to. The program supports confidence in Canada's processed products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Actual Spending
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
11,201,144 11,409,006 207,682
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
102 97 (5)

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $0.2 million is mainly one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments.

The CFIA worked hard to accurately align its spending plans and FTEs to meet the expanded reporting requirements introduced in 2014-15. However, while preparing the 2014-15 DPR, it was noticed that some spending plans and FTEs, including the FTEs of the Processed Products sub-program, may not have properly aligned with the corresponding activities and amounts.

Table 2-1g: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Federally registered processed products establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered processed products establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 96.8% Met
Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98.1% Met
Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 96.2% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Regulatory Modernization for Maple Syrup Products

In 2014-15, the CFIA amended the Maple Products Regulations in order to facilitate the trade of maple syrup with the United States and reduce consumer confusion on maple syrup grades and colour classes. The amendments standardize different grades and colour classes of maple syrup and create a harmonized definition and grading system between the United States and Canada. The changes do not impact food safety regulations or food safety monitoring for pure maple syrup. The introduction of production codes and/or lot numbers will assist the CFIA and the industry in confirming the removal of potentially unsafe maple syrup from the market. Industry has two years to transition to the new regulations.

Sub-Program 1.1.7: Imported and Manufactured Food Products

Description

The Imported and Manufactured Food Products sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with food commodities that are regulated by the relevant governing acts and regulations. The CFIA and provincial/territorial governments share the jurisdiction over IMFP because the sector includes a large variety of foods that are traded intra- provincially or inter-provincially. This program achieves its objectives by verifying that these products comply with the health, food safety, and consumer protection requirements. The program mitigates unfair market practices by verifying that requirements related to net quantity, composition, claims, labelling, and advertising of these foods are adhered to and by enforcing the governing acts and regulations. Through enforcement of the acts and regulations, the program supports confidence in Canada's imported and manufactured food products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Actual Spending
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
52,965,122 54,012,005 1,046,883
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
423 455 32

The increases from Planned to Actual Spending of $1.0 million and 32 FTEs are mainly due to incremental funding provided to the Agency for the implementation of an enhanced food safety oversight program. In addition, actual spending includes one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments.

Table 2-1h: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food (IMF) products are mitigated Percentage of major health risks in the imported and manufactured food sector that are addressed through the annual update to food safety inspection programs 95% 100% Met
Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food (IMF) products are mitigated Percentage of inspected IMF products with accurate net quantity, composition, labelling and advertising 70% 73.1% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Regulatory Modernization for Imported and Manufactured Food Products

In 2014-15, the requirements for the Imported Food Sector Products Regulations were integrated into the overarching draft Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) to ensure industry readiness and convergence. Interpretive guidance was completed for the import and export-related provisions of the SFCRs and a step-by-step guide was developed for small importers to assist in understanding and meeting the proposed preventive control plan requirements under the SFCR. A checklist was developed for small importers, to be used to assess their readiness for these regulations.

Program 1.2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Description

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, limiting risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instils confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities Available for use
2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2014-15
Difference (actual minus planned)
89,781,512 90,674,321 164,128,295 162,039,970 71,365,649
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents — FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
801 1,012 211

The increases from Planned to Actual Spending of $71.4 million and 211 FTEs are mainly due to: the renewal of funding to support BSE activities; considerable one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments; the realignment of resources to address the Avian Influenza outbreak; and, an increase in statutory compensation payments.

Table 2-2a: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 0 Met
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease 100% 100% Met
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements 99% 100% Met
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Canada's status on the OIEFootnote 12 disease risk status lists remains either “free, controlled risk, or negligible risk” Status maintained Status maintained Met
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease 100% 100% Met
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed All necessary manual updates are completed 2 out of 6 necessary manual updates were completedTable Note 11 Not Met
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises in which CFIA participates 9 23 Met
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion 100% 100% Met
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of cases where CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease 100% 100% Met

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Table Notes

Table Note 11

The manual updates were not completed because Agency human resources were diverted to respond to BSE, AI and ISA emergencies. However, updates to the BSE Manual were initiated late in the fiscal year and are still underway. Also undergoing updates are: Cervid Movement Permit Manual of Procedures, and the following Hazard Specific Plans: infectious haematopoietic necrosis, infection with Haplosporidium nelsoni, and viral haemorrhagic septicaemia.

Return to table note 11 referrer

Strengthening Animal Traceability

To improve animal traceability in Canada, the CFIA:

  • Provided training to all four Area Offices personnel;
  • Completed a livestock movement study to support further regulatory option analysis; and
  • Started consultations to amend the Health of Animals Regulations.

The CFIA improved livestock data management by enhancing the Traceability National Information Portal (TNIP) with the addition of Geographic Information System (GIS) capabilities and Prince Edward Island premises. In addition, an agreement to share livestock traceability data was signed with Ontario.

Leveraging Relationships to Control Disease Outbreaks

The CFIA expanded the Canada-U.S. Zoning Agreement by developing a guidance document to implement the 2012 arrangement recognizing highly contagious foreign animal disease control and eradication zones. This was one of the 29 initiatives included in the Joint Action Plan completed for the RCC where Canada and the U.S. will seek greater alignment in their regulatory approaches over the coming two years.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Terrestrial Animal Health

Description

The Terrestrial Animal Health sub-program aims to prevent the entry of reportable, foreign animal diseases and the spread of reportable domestic animal diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program achieves its objectives by delivering initiatives that track, detect, and mitigate risks to the terrestrial animal resource base. This sub-program supports food safety, public health, and protection of the animal resource base, and instils national and international confidence in Canadian agricultural products. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports domestic and international confidence that Canada's animals are free from certain reportable diseases, particularly those potentially transmissible to humans. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15 Planned Spending (RestatedTable Note 13) 2014-15
Actual Spending
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
67,906,145 136,545,497 68,639,352

Table Notes

Table Note 13

During the preparation of the 2014-15 RPP a computation inaccuracy was discovered in the distribution of Planned Spending and FTEs to the Sub-Programs of Animal Health and Zoonotic Program. As a result, the Planned Spending and FTEs have been restated to provide a more accurate representation of the in-year change in Terrestrial Animal Health from plans to actuals.

Return to table note 13 referrer

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents — FTEs)
2014-15
Planned (RestatedTable Note 14)
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
581 797 216

Table Notes

Table Note 14

During the preparation of the 2014-15 RPP a computation inaccuracy was discovered in the distribution of Planned Spending and FTEs to the Sub-Programs of Animal Health and Zoonotic Program. As a result, the Planned Spending and FTEs have been restated to provide a more accurate representation of the in-year change in Terrestrial Animal Health from plans to actuals.

Return to table note 14 referrer

The increases from Planned to Actual Spending of $68.6 million and 216 FTEs are mainly due to: the renewal of funding for the continuation of a comprehensive strategy for BSE. Actual spending also includes one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments.

Table 2-2b: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Federally registered veterinary biologics establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered veterinary biologics establishments in compliance with federal regulations 90% 93% Met
Veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations Percentage of tested veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations 100% 100% Met
Animals in Canada are transported humanely Percentage of inspected live loads in compliance with humane transport standards 100% 98% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Continued Improvements to the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Program

With renewed Treasury Board (TB) funding in 2014-15, the Agency continued to engage partners and stakeholders to review Canada's BSE programming and began communicating the Canadian long-term approach to BSE disease control.

Canada made significant efforts over the past decade to attain a Negligible BSE risk status. However, with the identification of a cow with BSE in February 2015 in Alberta, which had a birth year of 2009, Canada became ineligible to apply for the Negligible BSE risk status at the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) as had been planned for 2015.

Avian Influenza (AI) Containment

In 2014-15, during the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreak in the Fraser Valley in British Columbia, the CFIA further increased collaboration with the poultry industry and improved zoning level practices required to control this virus strain. Key trading partners recognized the zones and trade continued from areas outside of the control zones. The lessons learned from this outbreak were used to enhance the training of staff involved in these responses, thus improving preventive measures to ensure animal health and preparedness in Canada.

As part of an ongoing surveillance program, Canadian Notifiable Avian Influenza Surveillance System (CanNAISS), the CFIA conducted activities to provide evidence that Canadian commercial poultry flocks are free of notifiable avian influenza. The CFIA further enhanced the security of poultry flocks by supporting the Canadian Wildlife Health Centre in the detection of avian influenza in wild birds.

Partnering for Efficiencies

To improve efficiencies in dealing with animal diseases, the CFIA collaborated with the provinces and the Ontario College of Veterinarians to create a decision tool that identifies new emerging or re-emerging diseases and the authority responsible to respond to the threat. The tool was presented to the National Farmed Animal Health & Welfare Council (NFAHWC). Additionally, the CFIA began preparations to implement and validate the electronic monitoring of reported adverse reactions to veterinary vaccines and drugs, with final roll out to stakeholders targeted for the end of 2015-2016.

The CFIA contributed to the development of the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System (CAHSS), which is a new FPT and industry initiative for animal health surveillance. CAHSS will strengthen animal health surveillance, enable strategic use of technology, and enhance Canada's ability to respond to animal health emergencies.

Regulatory Modernization

In 2014-15, the CFIA proposed amendments to the Health of Animals Regulations in an effort to modernize the animal humane transportation provisions. The revisions would:

  • Improve animal welfare;
  • Maintain international standards;
  • Reflect current industry practices and animal needs indicated by recent scientific research;
  • Clarify definitions and remove vague terms;
  • Improve enforcement capabilities; and,
  • Remove obsolete or unnecessary requirements.

Amendments to the Hatchery Regulations were proposed to consolidate the requirements for operating licensed poultry hatchery establishments in Canada into one regulation under the Health of Animals Act. The amendments to the Health of Animals Act are moving towards pre-publication in Canada Gazette I.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Aquatic Animal Health

Description

The Aquatic Animal Health sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with the introduction and spread of certain aquatic animal diseases of concern to Canada. This program achieves its objectives by partnering with Fisheries and Oceans Canada to deliver on initiatives that track, detect and control aquatic animal diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports domestic and international confidence that Canada's aquatic animal resources are free from aquatic animal diseases, and contributes to the sustainable productivity of aquaculture and harvest fisheries. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15 Planned Spending (RestatedTable Note 15) 2014-15
Actual Spending
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
4,691,155 4,877,737 186,582

Table Notes

Table Note 15

During the preparation of the 2014-15 RPP a computation inaccuracy was discovered in the distribution of Planned Spending and FTEs to the Sub-Programs of Animal Health and Zoonotic Program. As a result, the Planned Spending and FTEs have been restated to provide a more accurate representation of the in-year change in Aquatic Animal Health from plans to actuals.

Return to table note 15 referrer

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents — FTEs)
2014-15
Planned (RestatedTable Note 16)
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
38 37 (1)

Table Notes

Table Note 16

During the preparation of the 2014-15 RPP a computation inaccuracy was discovered in the distribution of Planned Spending and FTEs to the Sub-Programs of Animal Health and Zoonotic Program. As a result, the Planned Spending and FTEs have been restated to provide a more accurate representation of the in-year change in Aquatic Animal Health from plans to actuals.

Return to table note 16 referrer

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $0.2 million is mainly due to one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments, while FTE remained stable.

Table 2-2c: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Domestic aquatic animals and their products are compliant with Canadian regulations and meet the standards of international agreements Percentage of certified aquatic animal and aquatic animal product shipments that meet the receiving country's import requirements 99% 99.7 Met
Risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base are mitigated Number of reportable aquatic animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 0 Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Strengthening the Aquatic Animal Program

To support the development and protection of the domestic aquatic animal resource base, the CFIA continued to phase in the implementation of the Domestic Movement Control Program (DMCP) for aquatic animals and the information management component of the Domestic Movement Import Permit System (DMIPS). In 2014-15, the CFIA completed the final phase towards the implementation of the DMCP and its associated Train-the Trainer sessions, which are now awaiting final approval. The CFIA has developed the information component of the DMIPS and it is awaiting implementation. Both DMCP and DMIPS aim to control the risks associated with the movement of aquatic animals, their genetic components, and carcasses within Canada.

Partnering to Strengthen Surveillance

In 2014-15, the CFIA completed an epidemiological analysis of existing surveillance activities in British Columbia farmed salmon and actively engaged in various stages of collaborative surveillance activities with eight provinces targeting both finfish and shellfish stocks.

In partnership with industry and government, the CFIA designed and delivered an active surveillance program that requires sampling only where gaps exist in the data. This approach decreased the overall requirements for testing and its associated costs, while still providing the information required to support strong import controls, export certification, and provide evidence for national declarations of health status.

Strengthening Trade Relations and Market Access

In 2014-15, the Agency conducted trade certificate negotiations with a number of large trading partners.

  • Exports: Aquatic Animal Health export certificates to facilitate market access for Canadian products were negotiated or renegotiated for the following countries and commodities: Ukraine (live crustaceans and frozen fishery products for food for human consumption); China (mollusc seed for culture in China); Turkey (ornamental animals for display; joint food and aquatic animal health certificate for fishery products for human consumption); South Korea, and Indonesia (molluscs for human consumption ); and the U.S.A. (live finfish for culture, stock and enhancement and uneviscerated for any use (including research, and further processing).
  • Imports: At the request of Canadian importers, initiated negotiations to access live and dead aquatic animals and products from various European Union (EU) Member States (including Denmark, France, Germany, Czech Republic and United Kingdom) for end uses of culture, further processing for human consumption, ornamental display, research and education in Canada. The CFIA worked with Chile to facilitate import market access to mollusc's seed for culture.

Additionally, a bilateral agreement with the U.S. was reached to implement the U.S. Food Service/Retail Use Certification Program for the import of live aquatic animals into Canada.

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Feed

Description

The Feed sub-program aims to minimize risks associated with livestock and poultry feeds manufactured in or imported into Canada. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that feeds are safe, effective and labelled in accordance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program contributes to the production and maintenance of a healthy and sustainable animal resource base which supports food safety and environmental sustainability. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports confidence in feed manufactured in Canada.

Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15 Planned Spending (RestatedTable Note 17) 2014-15
Actual Spending
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
18,077,022 20,616,736 2,539,714

Table Notes

Table Note 17

During the preparation of the 2014-15 RPP a computation inaccuracy was discovered in the distribution of Planned Spending and FTEs to the Sub-Programs of Animal Health and Zoonotic Program. As a result, the Planned Spending and FTEs have been restated to provide a more accurate representation of the in-year change in Feed from plans to actuals.

Return to table note 17 referrer

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents — FTEs)
2014-15 Planned (RestatedTable Note 18) 2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
181 178 (3)

Table Notes

Table Note 18

During the preparation of the 2014-15 RPP a computation inaccuracy was discovered in the distribution of Planned Spending and FTEs to the Sub-Programs of Animal Health and Zoonotic Program. As a result, the Planned Spending and FTEs have been restated to provide a more accurate representation of the in-year change in Feed from plans to actuals.

Return to table note 18 referrer

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $2.5 million is mainly due to one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments, while FTEs remained relatively stable.

Table 2-2d: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Feed establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed establishments in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, not including labelling tasks 95% 95.2% Met
Feed labels meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed facilities in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, when assessed against inspection tasks associated with labelling 95% 95.8% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Regulatory Modernization for Feed

In 2014-15, the CFIA continued to lead the Feed Regulatory Renewal aimed at aligning the Agency with industry advancements in feed technology. Feedback was received from stakeholders (the Animal Nutrition Association of Canada, various producer groups, and individual feed producers or farmers) regarding three regulatory proposals (feed ingredient assessment and authorization, feed labelling, and feed hazard identification and preventive controls). A comprehensive consolidated framework proposal for consultation was begun, as was preparation of regulatory drafting instructions.

Supporting Market Access

In response to an audit conducted by the European Union and to increase overall market access, the CFIA worked to ensure that exported meat remains protected from feed containing banned additives. To accomplish this, the Canadian Ractopamine-Free Certification Programs for the Pork and Poultry sectors were finalised. These Programs identify the requirements for feed manufacturing, as well as animal production and slaughter for participating facilities. Tools were developed to support the CFIA's inspection activities at a sample of the feed manufacturing and retail facilities enrolled in the program. Inspection activities to provide government oversight at a sample of commercial and on-farm feed facilities were developed.

Enhancing Efficiencies

On July 4, 2014, the CFIA merged the application offices of livestock feeds together with veterinary biologics and plant-related products, providing stakeholders with a single point for submitting applications for products requiring a CFIA pre-market approval. The new Pre-market Applications Submissions Office (PASO) will increase consistency and efficiency in the delivery and administration of pre-market application requests.

Efforts were made to further assist stakeholders with their feed-related submissions. Clarification of guidance pertaining to international labels was submitted for publication, a “Guidance document on classification of veterinary drugs and livestock feeds,” produced jointly with Health Canada, was published. Pre-market submission consultations were held with various industry members to provide specific guidance.

Additionally, the Feed program continued to monitor service standards for the pre-market review of feeds and report to industry via the Canadian Animal Health Products Regulatory Advisory Committee. The Pre-market Applications Submissions Office identified and implemented efficiencies in the receiving and handling of feed pre-market applications.

To improve consistency in verifying that industry is complying with Feed safety regulations and policies, the Compliance Verification System approach for both the Complaint and Residue Traceback Inspection Programs were implemented by the Animal Feed Division.

Program 1.3: Plant Resources Program

Description

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instils confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15 Total Authorities Available for use 2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2014-15
Difference (actual minus planned)
75,006,452 75,532,299 90,020,456 90,262,195 14,729,896
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents — FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
771 737 (34)

The increase from planned to actual spending of $14.7 million is mainly due to: considerable one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments; and, an increase in statutory compensation payments. The decrease of 34 FTEs is mainly due to the realignment of resources to support higher risk activities in the Agency.

Table 2-3a: Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves 0 0 Met
Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements 90% 98% Met
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk- mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issued 100% 100% Met
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk- mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner 90% 100% Met
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory phytosanitary import requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirements 99% 99.7% Met

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Regulatory Modernization

The Agricultural Growth Act, Bill C-18, received royal assent on February 25, 2015. By Order in Council, as of February 27, 2015, all of the CFIA sections, except one, are now in force. The Act modernizes and strengthens federal agriculture legislation, supports innovation in the Canadian agriculture industry and enhances global market opportunities for Canadians. In addition, the Plant Breeder Rights Office can now receive applications and grant rights under an International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV'91) based intellectual property framework.

The Agricultural Growth Act enhances intellectual property rights for plant varieties in Canada; creates a regulatory environment that benefits from the latest scientific research; reduces red tape and regulatory burden on producers; increases consistency across CFIA legislation; provides the CFIA with stronger tools to fulfil its mandate of protecting Canada's plant and animal resource base; aligns Canada with its international trading partners; and expands global market opportunities.

Inspection Modernization

Extensive consultations occurred on the approved integrated Agency Inspection Model (iAIM), which aims for a consistent inspection approach across all CFIA business lines and commodities. During 2014-15, Plant Business Line participated in working groups to ensure the Plant specific perspectives were captured in the revised inspection model.

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Plant Protection

Description

The Plant Protection sub-program aims to mitigate the risks associated with the introduction and spread of plant pests of quarantine significance to Canada. This sub- program achieves its objectives by delivering initiatives that track, detect and control, or eradicate regulated plant pests and diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. The program verifies that plants and plant products, and their associated risk pathways, meet phytosanitary requirements. Through verification of compliance, this sub- program supports environmental sustainability, and public health and instils confidence in Canada's plants and plant products. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Actual Spending
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
60,394,896 72,539,144 12,144,248
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
627 589 (38)

The increase from planned to actual spending of $12.1 million is mainly due to: one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments; and, an increase in statutory compensation payments. The decrease of 38 FTEs is mainly due to the realignment of resources to support higher risk activities in the Agency.

Table 2-3b: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Pre-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of inspected shipments from off-shore system approaches or pre- clearance programs in compliance with federal regulations 85% 96% Met
At-Border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of pre-arrival documentation in compliance with Canadian import requirements 90% 99.9% Met
Post-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of new pest detections that have a science based management plan initiated within one year 90% N/A
No new pest detections
N/A
No new pest detections
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Efforts Against Pests

Significant efforts were made to manage Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM), a non-native to North America. The problem emerges from egg masses laid on ships and dispersing to land areas surrounding ports in North America. CFIA suspects that AGM arrives in Canada on vessels from regulated ports in far eastern Asia.

Domestically, to increase the focus on the prevention of the spread of the AGM, communication with the shipping industry increased to provide additional information and educational tools to assist with AGM detection and removal prior to arriving Canada.

Through the Beyond the Border initiative, a joint CFIA-U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) report was completed, to identify the best methods to mitigate the risk of spreading the AGM at the point of origin. To minimize the incursion of the AGM to North America via ocean crossings on vessels, the CFIA continued to work with the U.S., Mexico, Chile, New Zealand and other countries to expand the Asian Gypsy Moth vessel certification program.

The CFIA implemented the directive on phytosanitary requirements to prevent the introduction of plants regulated as pests in Canada. To increase awareness and minimize risks to the ecosystem, subsequent directives to prevent introduction and spread of potentially injurious organisms were developed in 2014-15.

The CFIA continued to communicate compliance requirements to importers and sellers of ornamental, traditional medicine and food, regarding invasive plants used in their businesses. The CFIA continued to develop and publish information bulletins focusing on preventing the introduction of invasive plants. Following detection of Potato Wart in PEI in 2014, the CFIA implemented the Potato Wart long-term management plan which included quarantine controls, mandatory cleaning and disinfection requirements and prohibitions on the movement of soil and potato material. As a result of this rapid response, trade disruption was minimized and the USDA-APHIS did not implement any additional trade restrictions.

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Seed

Description

The Seed sub-program aims to ensure that seeds sold in Canada meet established standards, that seeds are properly represented in the marketplace and that most agricultural crop kinds are registered before entering the marketplace. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that seeds meet quality, biosafety, labelling and registration standards as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Regulating the environmental release of plants with novel traits contributes to environmental sustainability and the health and safety of Canadians. Furthermore, quality assured and accurately labelled seeds contribute to a prosperous agricultural production system and to domestic and international confidence in Canada's seeds.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Actual Spending
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
10,124,891 11,731,673 1,606,782
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
98 103 5

The increase from planned to actual spending of $1.6 million is mainly due to one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments. The increase of FTEs is mainly due to increased demand for CFIA seed related sample processing, analyses and inspections resulting from a larger crop in 2013 than the annual average and the coming into effect of the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act.

Table 2-3c: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic pedigreed seed lots in compliance with federal regulations 95% 98.3% Met
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of authorized confined releases of Plants with Novel Traits (PNTs) into the Canadian environment that are in compliance with the authorized conditions 90% 98.0% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Partnering with Industry for Alternative Service Delivery

The CFIA worked with authorized service providers to carry out Seed crop inspection activities. Using authorized service providers gives growers increased flexibility and choice. The CFIA continues to maintain an oversight and audit role to ensure the effectiveness of the overall program. In 2014-15, private entities inspected approximately 89 percent of the pedigreed seed crops grown in Canada while the CFIA inspectors inspected the other 11 percent. Twenty four authorized seed crop inspection services (ASCIS) were licensed and 288 individuals were licensed to conduct seed crop inspection. Out of the 288 individuals, 150 private and CFIA's own seed crop inspectors were trained by the CFIA in 2014-5 for check-inspections and audit while the other 138 were either trained the previous year or were ex-CFIA inspectors who did not require training.

At the end of the season, surveys were distributed to ASCIS, LSCI, seed growers, seed companies and CFIA inspectors to evaluate the implementation of ASD of seed crop inspection. An industry advisory group and an information management working group were established as results of the survey to identify priorities for improvement and recommend solutions.

The CFIA monitored the implementation of alternative service delivery (ASD) of seed crop inspection by check-inspecting 10 percent of all the fields inspected by licensed seed crop inspectors (LSCI) and auditing each ASCIS at the end of the inspection season.

Increasing Service to Meet Grain Surge Demands

The CFIA facilitated grain exports during the huge grain surge in 2014-15 by increasing its capacity in regional offices and laboratories to maintain and improve service delivery. The CFIA shortened sample analysis time; implemented sample tracking systems for submissions and reporting; delivered all requests for ship inspections and maintained its service standards for issuance of phytosanitory certificates to the overall satisfaction of the grain industry.

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Fertilizer

Description

The Fertilizer sub-program aims to ensure that regulated fertilizer, fertilizer/pesticides and supplement products sold in Canada are properly labelled, effective and safe for humans, plants, animals, and the environment. The program achieves its objectives by verifying that all fertilizers and supplements meet the standards for safety and efficacy as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Through verification of compliance, the program contributes to public health and environmental sustainability and supports domestic and international confidence in fertilizers manufactured in Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Actual Spending
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
4,101,579 4,213,788 112,209
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
38 36 (2)

The increase from planned to actual spending of $0.1 million is mainly due to one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments, while FTEs remained relatively stable.

Table 2-3d: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected fertilizer and supplement products in compliance with federal regulations (Fertilizers Regulations) 90% 91.7% Met
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of submissions reviewed within the prescribed service delivery standards 90% 61%Table Note 19 Not Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Table Notes

Table Note 19

During the 2014-15 fiscal year, the Fertilizer Safety Section (FSS) did not meet published service delivery standards (SDS) for file reviews. The percentage of files reviewed within service delivery standards has decreased from 82% in the 2013/14 fiscal year to 61% in 2014/15. This is because the CFIA no longer regulates product efficacy. As such, applicants who were previously unable to substantiate product performance or meet the minimum quality standards can now obtain registration as long as their product is determined to be safe. As a result, the complexity of product formulations (multiple active ingredients) has increased, rendering safety reviews more scientifically demanding and time-consuming to complete. The CFIA continued to pro-actively communicate the delays to impacted applicants and implemented an action plan in an effort to bring file reviews timelines back to the service delivery standards.

Return to table note 19 referrer

Regulatory Modernization for Fertilizer and Reorganization of the Sector

The CFIA continued the drafting of proposed amendments to the Fertilizer Regulations. The proposed changes are intended to align regulatory oversight with the risk profile of the product and facilitate access of Canadian agricultural producers to safe and innovative fertilizers and supplements.

The CFIA continued to inform stakeholders about the measures the Agency will be taking to strengthen the fertilizer file assessment capacity. The CFIA communicated to stakeholders the importance of completing submissions to a high quality in order to shorten the assessment times.

User Fees Modernization for the Fertilizer Sector

The development of the new user fee structure for fertilizers and supplements was incorporated into the overall Agency user fees modernization and strategy to align the independent fertilizers and supplements user fee modernization with the Agency's User Fee modernization and strategy timelines.

Sub-Program 1.3.4: Intellectual Property Rights

Description

The Intellectual Property Rights sub-program, by which plant breeders can obtain intellectual property rights for their new plant varieties, aims to create an environment in Canada which supports innovation in plant breeding, as set out in the relevant governing act and regulations. This sub-program achieves its objectives by assessing applications from plant breeders to determine that new plant varieties meet the criteria for protection, and when all requirements have been met, granting rights to the variety breeder/owner for a period of up to 18 years. The owner of a new variety who receives a grant of rights has exclusive rights over use of the variety, and will be able to protect his/her new variety from exploitation by others. By enforcing the relevant governing act and regulations, this sub-program stimulates plant breeding in Canada, facilitates better access to foreign varieties for Canadian producers and supports the protection of Canadian varieties in other countries.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Actual Spending
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
910,933 1,777,590 866,657
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
8 9 1

The increase from planned to actual spending of $0.9 million is mainly due to one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments, while FTEs remained fairly stable.

Table 2-3e: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Plant breeders develop new varieties for the Canadian market Percentage of Plant Breeders' Rights applications that reach approval and are granted rights 100% 100% Met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the 2014 calendar year, the CFIA received 345 applications for Plant Breeders' Rights (PBR), 285 applications were granted PBR and 1,636 PBR applications were renewed. More information on PBR can be found on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's websiteEndnote xx.

The Agricultural Growth Act, Bill C-18, and the Plant Breeders' Rights Act (PBRA).

The Agricultural Growth Act confirmed the farmer's privilege for farm-saved seed. Regulatory amendments to the Plant Breeders' Rights Regulations have been deferred to 2015/16 to allow the CFIA to adequately consult with stakeholders and the Plant Breeders' Rights Advisory Committee.

Program 1.4: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Description

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through actively participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities Available for use
2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2014-15
Difference (actual minus planned)
25,382,494 25,382,494 41,139,746 40,718,768 15,336,274
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
299 335 36

The increases from planned to actual spending of $15.3 million and 36 FTEs are mainly due to: the transfer of resources from Agriculture and Agri-Food to undertake activities to improve market access for Canadian agricultural products; the renewal of funding to support BSE activities; as well as considerable one-time disbursements related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments.

Table 2-4a: Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance Status Performance Status
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests 24 43 Met
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products Number of unjustified non-tariff barriers resolved 24Footnote 20 40 Met
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA- led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 5 7 Met
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of CFIA-led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments 6Footnote 21 13 Met

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

International Engagements

In its international engagements for 2014-15, the CFIA:

  • Led and coordinated Canada's Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) input into various World Trade Organization (WTO) fora.
  • As Canada's lead for the domestic implementation of the WTO Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) Measures, the CFIA:
    • Led Canada's participation at the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE); and in certain committees of the Codex Alimentarius Commission to promote the development of international science-based standards consistent with Canada's regulatory framework.
    • Provided technical assistance to developing countries in accordance with the WTO SPS Agreement to facilitate the development and implementation of sanitary and phytosanitary measures based on sound science.
    • Participated in 13 Codex Committees, five of which the CFIA was Canada's Head of Delegation, to influence science-based standards. Canada successfully hosted the 42nd session of the Codex Committee on Food Labelling (CCFL) for which the CFIA is a major contributor.
    • Participated in a total of 15 IPPC meetings, which were attended in person and virtually, to actively influence the IPPC strategy as well as standards-related work of the Expert Working Group on the International movement of wood products and handicraft made from wood.
    • Participated in 12 OIE meetings to provide expert input and actively influence the development of science-based international standards. Canada hosted two OIE related meetings, one on veterinary biologics and the other on the evaluation of veterinary services.

Greater Alignment of Regulatory Approaches with the USA through the Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) and the Beyond the Border (BtB) Initiative

  • To enhance regulatory cooperation with the United States, the CFIA successfully negotiated four (4) enhanced work plans with the United States in the areas of meat inspection and certification, plant health, animal health, and food safety.
  • Work continued on initial RCC and BtB initiatives.
    • Over the last year, progress was made towards finalizing a guidance document to support implementation of the Canada-U.S. Zoning arrangement for the Recognition of Foreign Animal Disease Control and Eradication Zones. An action plan was completed for the RCC.
    • In addition, the CFIA and its US counterparts reached an agreement in principle on a Memorandum of Understanding that will guide future collaboration on plant health.
  • Over the past year, the CFIA successfully negotiated enhanced partnerships with U.S. counterparts, including:
    • A new senior level governance committee with the United States Department of Agriculture, (USDA) which will set priorities and work plans for the coming years, and will include a stakeholder engagement component.
    • A senior level committee with the Unites States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) was confirmed as the forum for future discussions on regulatory cooperation activities. New to this arrangement is a commitment to conduct binational stakeholder outreach to help identify priorities going forward.

Supporting Market Access

Some of the major activities the CFIA conducted in 2014-15 in support of market access include:

  • Actively negotiated and reached agreement on new export certificate with the U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service, in collaboration with industry stakeholders.
  • Signed an Organic Equivalency with Japan in September 2014; it came into effect in January 2015.
  • Successfully conducted an evaluation process with the Chinese authorities, which now allows cherries from British Columbia to be exported to China.
  • Agreed with its Brazilian counterparts on a health certificate for the export of pork and pork products to Brazil.
  • Gained a derogation which maintains less stringent requirements for the export of ash wood to the European Union.
  • Reached a regionalization agreement with Japan in the event of a Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) outbreak in Canada.
  • Reached agreements with Ukraine and Turkey allowing trade to continue following the implementation of new import conditions for fish and fishery products.
  • Successfully negotiated with its Malaysian counterparts for continued access for soybeans.
  • Successfully renegotiated a certificate for live molluscs and their gametes or germplasm for aquaculture or research purposes to China.
  • Provided technical assistance to trade partner developing countries to actively promote the Canadian science-based regulatory system.
  • In collaboration with the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development Canada (DFATD), continued to co-lead the SPS components of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations and the Canada-India Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA). Co-led the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) negotiations.
  • Contributed to the development of positions and strategies for free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations for all SPS chapters.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided to a specific program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities Available for use
2014-15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2014-15
Difference (actual minus planned)
109,053,625 109,004,540 137,511,974 133,951,514 24,946,974
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents — FTEs) - Internal Service
2014-15
Planned
2014-15
Actual
2014-15 Difference (actual minus planned)
774 804 30

The increases from planned to actual spending of $24.9 million and 30 FTEs reflects the incremental Internal Services support for the various initiative resources received via the Supplementary Estimates, as well as considerable expenditures made on behalf of the Treasury Board related to government-wide workforce initiatives and retroactive salary settlement payments.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Regulatory Modernization

The CFIA organized a Healthy and Safe Food Regulatory Forum in June 2014 which brought 250 external stakeholders to Ottawa to learn about and discuss elements of the Agency's ongoing modernization efforts. Following the Forum, the CFIA received over 400 formal submissions from stakeholders on various Agency Transformation consultation documents. This provided the Agency with a good insight and understanding of the policy and regulatory aspects and business concerns in these areas, and contributed to the advancement of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations.

Progress on Government Record Keeping Directive

Made progress on compliance with the Treasury Board Directive on Record Keeping, including:

  • Implemented a progressive email storage quota during 2014/15, moving from 5GB to 3GB as the Agency moves towards the 2GB standard in 2015/16;
  • Integrated information management governance with Agency governance, providing senior management with visibility and providing a mechanism to embed good information management practices in day-to-day business.

Improving Transparency and Service Delivery through Engagements

In 2014-15, the CFIA engaged the public and stakeholders through social media, the CFIA website, and meetings. The Agency participated in 210 external stakeholder events (meetings, webinars, teleconferences, videoconferences), reaching more than 7,300 people. In addition to legislative and regulatory modernization, engagement topics included other Agency Transformation initiatives and supporting policies such as integrated Agency Inspection Model (iAIM), labelling modernization and the risk assessment model.

Contributing to the Government's Sustainable Development Goals

The CFIA continued to contribute to the Federal Sustainable Directive's (FSD) Theme IV (Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government) targets through the Internal Services Program.

The CFIA is on track to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its fleet by 13% below 2005 levels by 2020. The CFIA has reduced its fleet inventory in the last two years and procured more fuel efficient vehicles.

The CFIA took action to demonstrate that it fulfilled the requirements of the Policy on Green Procurement in relation to training, employee performance evaluations, procurement management processes and controls and using common use procurement instruments.

Progress on Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Requests

In 2014-15, the Access to Information and Privacy Office released information for 358 requests, thereby eliminating most of the backlog, including approximately 107 late requests.

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