2015-2016 Departmental Performance Report
Section I: Organizational Overview

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Organizational Profile

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Dr. Jane Philpott, PC, MP

Institutional Head: B.A. (Bruce) Archibald, Ph.D.

Ministerial portfolio: Health

Enabling Instrument(s):

CFIA Wide

Food Safety

Plant and Animal Health

Plant

Animal Health

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 1997

Other: N/A

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is one of Canada's largest science-based regulatory agencies. It has approximately 6,555Footnote 47 employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food safety, animal, and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy.

The CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services in order to:

  • Prevent and manage food safety risks;
  • Protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species;
  • Prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases;
  • Contribute to consumer protection; and
  • Contribute to market access for Canada's food, plants, and animals.

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective risk management, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

Responsibilities

The CFIA's Key Federal Partners

  1. Health Canada
  2. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  3. Public Health Agency of Canada
  4. Canada Border Services Agency
  5. Canadian Grain Commission
  6. Public Safety Canada
  7. Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  8. Natural Resources Canada, including Canadian Forest Service
  9. Global Affairs Canada
  10. Environment and Climate Change Canada, including Canadian Wildlife Service

The CFIA is responsible for administrating and enforcing 13 federal statutes and 38 sets of regulations, for supporting a sustainable plant and animal resource base and regulating the safety and quality of food sold in Canada. In November 2012, the Safe Food for Canadians Act received Royal Assent. This new legislation, when fully in force, will bring into effect new regulations and provide the necessary legal framework for a more consistent approach to strengthening food inspection in Canada. The Safe Food for Canadians Act consolidates and will replace the Fish Inspection Act, the Canada Agricultural Products Act, the Meat Inspection Act, and the food provisions of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act.

The Agricultural Growth Act received Royal Assent on February 25, 2015 and most provisions have come into force. The Agricultural Growth Act modernized and strengthened federal agriculture legislation, supports innovation in the Canadian agriculture industry and enhances global market opportunities for Canadians. The Agricultural Growth Act updated the following suite of Acts that the CFIA uses to regulate Canada's agriculture sector: Plant Breeders' Rights Act, Feeds Act, Fertilizers Act, Seeds Act, Health of Animals Act, Plant Protection Act, and the Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act.

The CFIA shares many of its core responsibilities with other federal departments and agencies, with provincial, territorial and municipal authorities, with private industry, and with other stakeholders. The CFIA works with its partners to implement food safety measures; manage plant, animal, and food risks, incidents and emergencies; and promotes the development of food safety and disease control systems to maintain the safety of Canada's high-quality agriculture, agri-food, aquaculture and fishery products. The CFIA's activities include verifying the compliance of imported products; registering and inspecting establishments; testing plants, animals, and their related products, and food; and approving the use of many agricultural inputs.

Within a three-year period, with the passage of the Safe Food for Canadians Act in 2012, which is not yet fully in force, and the Agricultural Growth Act in 2015, every statute administered and enforced by the CFIA has been provided with new authorities. Having a modern legislative base is critical for the CFIA to address new challenges and issues, and respond to new pressures, trends and science.

New authorities include:

  1. Modern inspector authorities so that inspectors have the right tools to do their job;
  2. Revised and strengthened offence provisions, with more up-to-date fines and penalties;
  3. Explicit authorization for export certification;
  4. Regulatory authority to require licensing and/or registration;
  5. Explicit authority to incorporate documents by referenceFootnote 48;
  6. Regulatory authority to require preventive control plans and quality management plans for manufacturers;
  7. Document and record-keeping requirements

Additionally, the CFIA actively participates in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies. It also engages in the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements and actively promotes the Canadian science-based regulatory system among foreign trading partners. The CFIA negotiates to resolve scientific and technical issues, contributing to market access for Canadian goods. It also provides scientific advice, develops new technologies, provides testing services, and conducts regulatory research.

At the CFIA, decisions are based on high- quality, timely, relevant science. Science informs policy development and program design and delivery through foresight, advice, risk assessment, the influence of international standards, research and development, and testing.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

To effectively fulfill its responsibilities in safeguarding Canada's food supply and sustaining its animal and plant resource base, the CFIA strives to achieve its strategic outcomeFootnote 49 of maintaining "a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base". The CFIA's Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) illustrates the Agency's plans to allocate and manage its resources to achieve the corresponding expected results. The CFIA's PAA framework, through which resources are allocated for effective delivery of its mandate and performance reporting to Parliament, consists of:

1. Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

  • 1.1. Program: Food Safety Program
    • 1.1.1. Sub Program: Meat and Poultry
    • 1.1.2. Sub Program: Egg
    • 1.1.3. Sub Program: Dairy
    • 1.1.4. Sub Program: Fish and Seafood
    • 1.1.5. Sub Program: Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
    • 1.1.6. Sub Program: Processed Products
    • 1.1.7. Sub Program: Imported and Manufactured Food Products
  • 1.2. Program: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
    • 1.2.1. Sub Program: Terrestrial Animal Health
    • 1.2.2. Sub Program: Aquatic Animal Health
    • 1.2.3. Sub Program: Feed
  • 1.3. Program: Plant Resources Program
    • 1.3.1. Sub Program: Plant Protection
    • 1.3.2. Sub Program: Seed
    • 1.3.3. Sub Program: Fertilizer
    • 1.3.4. Sub Program: Intellectual Property Rights
  • 1.4. Program: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
  • Internal Services

Program Alignment Architecture

Flowchart - Strategic Outcome. Description follows.
Description for image – Strategic Outcome

The image is composed of two large boxes/shapes, one on top of the other.

The top box says:

  • Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

The bottom box has multiple smaller boxes within, arranged in five columns. The first row of each column are programs. The boxes below the first row are sub-programs.

The first box of the first column says:

  • Food Safety Program

There are seven sub-program boxes below the "Food Safety Program" box, and they say:

  • Meat & Poultry;
  • Egg;
  • Dairy;
  • Fish & Seafood;
  • Fresh Fruit & Vegetables;
  • Processed Products; and
  • Imported and Manufactured Food Products.

The first box of the second column says:

  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

There are three sub-program boxes below the "Animal Health and Zoonotics Program" box, and they say:

  • Terrestrial Animal Health;
  • Aquatic Animal Health; and
  • Feed.

The first box of the third column says:

  • Plant Resources Program

There are four sub-program boxes below the "Plant Resources Program" box, and they say:

  • Plant Protection;
  • Seed;
  • Fertilizer; and
  • Intellectual Property Rights.

The fourth column only has one box and it says:

  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

The first box of the fifth column says:

  • Internal Services

There are ten sub-program boxes below the "Internal Services" box, and they say:

  • Management and Oversight;
  • Communications;
  • Legal;
  • Human Resources Management;
  • Financial Management;
  • Information Management;
  • Information Technology;
  • Real Property Management;
  • Materiel Management; and
  • Acquisition Management.

Operating Environment and Risk Analysis

Risk Analysis

The CFIA is responsible for identifying and managing risks to the plant and animal resource base and the food supply on which safe food and a prosperous economy depends. Integrating risk management into policy, priority setting, planning, delivery, review and reporting activities supports informed decision making across and within the Agency.

The vast majority of the risks that fall within the Agency's mandate are managed in concert with numerous partners and stakeholders, both domestic and international. Factors influencing key strategic risks faced by the Agency include, but are not limited to:

  • the ongoing emergence of new pathogens due to increases in international travel and trade, microbial adaptation, changes in production methods and distribution as well as human behavior;
  • the convergence of human, animal and ecosystem health issues
  • the emergence of global supply chains, which have fundamentally changed the way agricultural products are produced, processed, packaged, distributed and sold
  • an increase in both the volume and variety of goods coming into Canada
  • increased export opportunities for Canadian producers, coupled with changing international standards and more stringent requirements
  • rapid advances in processing and manufacturing technologies, resulting in significant increases in production speed, volume and diversity and the subsequent need for legislative and regulatory frameworks to keep pace
  • an increasingly knowledgeable, demanding and risk-averse consumer and stakeholder base
  • a growing international consensus around the need for common technologies and scientific approaches to support industry oversight and the global agri-food trade

Current risk management practices at the CFIA include the development of a Corporate Risk Profile (CRP). The Agency's CRP identifies the key strategic risks to which the Agency is exposed as a result of its internal and external operating environments, and provides strategies aimed at reducing risk exposure to tolerable levels over the next several years. The Corporate Risk Profile was last fully renewed in 2012 with a refresh of the annex in 2014.

The Agency's transformation agenda has been driven by a vision for an enhanced outcome and risk-based, preventive system. To enhance the Agency's ability to more quickly align its efforts to have the greatest impact on reducing risk, the CFIA has developed a Comparative Risk Model that systematically measures and compares the diverse risks that the Agency manages on behalf of Canadians.

The comparative risk model is still being implemented but has already provided the CFIA with information regarding the relative importance of risks and cost-effectiveness of controls to mitigate them. It supports the Government's commitment to evidence-based decision making and transparency. Information gained informs decisions about how best to plan inspections, surveillance and other activities. The ultimate outcome will be the CFIA's ability to deliver the best value in terms of risk reduction for public dollars spent.

Table 1 highlights the CFIA's key strategic risks, ranked in terms of likelihood and impact, and provides associated planned response strategies. All risks link to the organization's Program Alignment Architecture (PAA).

Table 1: Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Managing Change

The ability to effectively manage change on an ongoing basis.

The global evolution of economic, social and environmental factors influences the regulatory and business environment within which the Agency operates.

Additionally, the current environment demands innovation to achieve efficiencies while maintaining or increasing effectiveness in the way the Agency does its business and delivers its mandate.

Agency Transformation

Human Resource Modernization

  • Talent Management - Established the Talent Management Framework and automated tools to identify and manage talent within the Agency at the EX level
  • Succession Management - conducted executive level succession management exercise which resulted in the identification of critical positions, leadership pipeline strengths and gaps
  • Policy Suite for Executives was implemented with talent management being the foundation. New terms and conditions signed by all
  • Virtual Training was used as a way to modernize learning at the Agency to bring learning to the learners (specifically for the inspectorate)
  • Established the Peer Support Program to provide support to employees, not only to manage personal stress but also work related changes and stressors
  • A new scientific regulation standard modernized the Agency's people management model in classification. The result was a role-based, competency-driven classification platform on which over 1,000 CFIA scientists were on-boarded and reduced the number of work descriptions and different, unique positions in the Agency's work architecture by the hundreds. Service - a modernized approach to classification of positions moving away from tasks to more broadly defined roles and expectations backed by competency profiles. This unique approach is revolutionary and will prove an influential body of work across the government's science community
  • One HR for Government Science Committee - established to develop recommendations and improvements on human resource management of the science community

Reinforce Values and Ethics

  • Developed innovative awareness building mechanisms such as the Umbrella online tool, Values & Ethics awareness video and Capsules of Information for CFIA employees
  • Developed actions to address the results of the February 2014 Ethical Climate Survey
  • Organized the Agency's third annual Values & Ethics Day
  • Updated Values & Ethics Strategy to reflect the Agency's Transformation Agenda, Blueprint 2020 and the "One Agency" initiative
  • Updated Values & Ethics training for managers and supervisors
  • Updated Values & Ethics at Pre-Requisite Employment Program and People Management for Supervisors courses
  • Updated Conflict of Interest and Post-Employment Policy to provide better guidance to employees
  • Acknowledged the Values & Ethics Code for the Public Sector, the Agency Code of Conduct and the Conflict of Interest Policy during the annual performance agreement process

Enhance Project Management

  • Released a revised version of the Enterprise Project Management Framework in March 2016, which included updates to existing tools and templates and the addition of new tools to enhance delivery of projects

Enhance Service and Communication

  • Put in place a framework to help the Agency move towards an integrated, proactive and digital first communications environment
  • Through CFIA's digital communications strategy and three-year evergreen implementation plan, a number of highly visible projects were delivered through effective partnerships with client branches, portfolio partners and other Government of Canada partners. The Agency actively promoted CFIA's success stories to internal and external audiences, using existing internal tools and social media platforms such as Pinterest, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook; and, contributed content to a new Government of Canada Science of Health blog

Strengthen Planning, Performance Monitoring and Reporting

  • The CFIA planning process continues to evolve and integrate risk management into decision-making. In 2015-16, program risk owners in the Plant Resources, Animal Health and Food Safety programs identified their respective three-year business line strategic priorities to inform branch strategic planning. This systematic approach to Agency planning better aligned business priorities with branch capacity, including the enabling branches, from strategic to tactical levels. The streamlined collection of Agency planning information will be used to inform corporate level planning and reporting

Public and Stakeholder Engagement on Key Agency Initiatives

  • In support of spring 2015 consultations with small businesses, developed a number of new products designed for use by industry and regulated parties, including infographics on key themes (e.g., preventive controls, categories of hazards and key principles for importers) as well as multilingual fact sheets (12 languages) highlighting key food safety elements, preventive food safety controls and traceability
  • Feedback received during the consultations with industry and stakeholders was used to inform planning for pre-publication of regulations in Canada Gazette I, including the development of new resources (e.g., decision tools, multimedia products and videos) to support industry's understanding of proposed requirements. A compliance promotion strategy for undeclared allergens was also developed and approved. The first series of products under this strategy were developed, in particular an interactive infographic on allergen labelling (to be available in seven languages)
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Management of Information and IM/IT Infrastructure

The ability to make risk-based decisions due to the lack of timely, accurate and useful data and information.

The Agency's diverse information requirements and national presence has resulted in an IM/IT infrastructure containing a complex mix of new and old equipment that supports multiple IM/IT systems and databases. Differences in how information is collected, analyzed, and used across multiple systems and hardware may impede information sharing and timely operational and regulatory decision making.

Agency Transformation

  • Modernized applications and implemented an Application Portfolio Management Program which moved the Agency toward a balanced and sustainable technology platform, built on Government of Canada standards
  • Investment planning was further advanced, resulting in better demand management for the Agency's information management and information technology
  • Achieved greater engagement in Branch and Agency governance, which resulted in better project management of application and platform modernization efforts
  • Created an Architecture Review Committee and program to ensure alignment of the Agency's IMIT approach and Government of Canada strategies

A Flexible and Scalable Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP)

  • Began development of the business requirements for phase I of the electronic service delivery platform, with phased implementation to begin in December 2016, beginning with the Dairy sector

Collaboration with Shared Services Canada

  • Established and staffed a dedicated Client Relationship Manager position to facilitate and enhance the Agency's communication and relationship with Shared Services Canada

Business Information Management Centre (BIMC) Dashboards.

  • Strengthened the tools, processes and governance of the Agency's Business Information Management Centre to capture and report on operational data, and also enhance the Centre's program performance management capabilities. Further enhanced Dashboards for Senior Management by providing strategic analysis to better highlight the areas of attention related to the delivery of the core Program and Corporate functions of the Agency

IMIT Strategy

  • Defined and received President's approval for a new Agency IMIT Strategy that provides direction for investment planning, and verifies continued alignment with Government of Canada technology strategies
  • Proactively participated in enterprise platform modernization and consolidation activities with Shared Services Canada, including email transition, data center migration, and transition to MyGCHR, the human resources management system recently adopted by the Government of Canada
  • Advanced service delivery modernization initiatives aimed at providing citizens and employees with modern digital tools

Web Renewal

  • Prepared for migration to Canada.ca, the common Government of Canada website being constructed, by completing a full review of its current web content to ensure consistency with the Canada.ca style guide, and also developed a detailed migration plan for CFIA content
  • Provided advice and guidance to the Community of Federal Regulators, Health Canada, and Treasury Board Secretariat on how to develop a Government-wide plan for posting legislative guidance on Canada.ca
  • Ensured that CFIA employees were well informed of the Web Renewal Initiative, a government-wide priority to consolidate all departmental/agency websites into fewer than six
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Transparency and Leveraging Relationships

Opportunity for the Agency to increase its transparency and accountability to stakeholders.

Information sharing enables regulated parties to take steps to ensure compliance and helps to increase public awareness and confidence in the Canadian marketplace. Diverse methods exist to engage and collaborate with industry, other governmental stakeholders and the public to enhance the development of outputs that are mutually beneficial and agreed-upon.

Creation of a Single Window Information Portal

  • Maintained ongoing collaboration with Canada Border Services Agency on the Single Window Initiative in order to address minor challenges with the system as it is implemented

User Fee/Service Standard Modernization

  • Continued user fee and service standard modernization
  • Continued exploration and development of alternative service delivery mechanisms. The objective is to transfer responsibilities from CFIA staff and CFIA laboratories to accredited service providers (including veterinarians and approved laboratories) where appropriate. A Quality Management Oversight Framework was developed, and the criteria that will guide the transfer of tests for alternative service delivery arrangements have been established. The CFIA is ready to transfer tests when export certificates are renegotiated with trading partners

Communication and Stakeholder Engagement on Agency Key initiatives

  • In support of spring 2015 consultations with small businesses, the CFIA developed a number of new products designed for use by industry and regulated parties, including infographics on key themes (e.g., preventive controls, categories of hazards and key principles for importers) as well as multilingual fact sheets (12 languages) highlighting key food safety elements, preventive food safety controls and traceability

International Engagement

  • Continued to engage with various countries through existing bilateral fora (e.g. Joint Management Committee meeting with the EU, SPS Committee meetings with Colombia and Korea, hosting plant health meeting with the United States, Australia and new Zealand, and Consultative Committee on Agriculture meetings with Mexico and Brazil), and through ad hoc bilateral meetings such as incoming foreign visits
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Emergency Management

The ability to respond to multiple simultaneous or large-scale emergencies.

The CFIA has a well- planned emergency preparedness and response capacity. However, threat environments continue to evolve, requiring regular updating of plans and responses to reflect changes and find efficiencies to ensure that the Agency maintains a minimum of essential business functions during emergencies.

Agency Emergency Management Plans

  • Developed the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Agreement on Emergency Response Coordination. The agreement sets out roles and responsibilities and establishes a working relationship between the two organizations regarding emergency response activities affecting the agriculture and agri-food sector in the context of each organization's legislated responsibilities

Maintenance and Monitoring of Current Emergency Management Preparedness/ Response Mitigation Strategies

  • Finalized After Action Reviews for the responses to the December 2014 Avian Influenza (AI) outbreak in British Columbia, the February 2015 identification of a cow in Alberta with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), also known as mad cow disease, and the April 2015 Avian Influenza outbreak in Ontario. These reviews identified areas for improvement, and recommendations and corrective actions which are being implemented to improve on future response capabilities
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Scientific Capability

The ability to have the scientific capability to adapt and respond in a timely manner.

Advancements in science and technology have increased the complexity of the commodities the Agency regulates. Additionally, there is growing international consensus around the need for common scientific equipment and approaches to support industry oversight and the global agri-food trade. The Agency is expected to maintain an employee base and modern laboratory facilities that reflects these advancements in regulated products and international requirements.

CFIA Science Branch Action Plan

The CFIA's Science Branch developed an Action Plan that will enable the Branch to:

  • Articulate measurable goals, objectives and timelines
  • Reach agreements with branch employees, clients and key stakeholders
  • Illustrate at regular intervals, the delivery of actual results against expected outcomes
  • Provide an interactive communication tool and responsive decision aid for planning and resource management
  • The Science Branch will monitor and report on this action plan mid-year and year-end for the final year of this three year plan with the goals of improved performance information for the Science Branch managers, enhanced accountability within the Agency and meaningful information for external reporting

Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN)

  • Signed a data sharing arrangement with Alberta Health and Alberta Agriculture and Forestry on February 3, 2016
  • Launched a pilot project with Alberta to identify methods of sharing food safety data
  • Completed a draft inventory of environmental scanning and intelligence data. The inventory will continue to be updated as work on environmental scanning for the CFSIN progresses
  • Completed a comprehensive draft of the data dictionary

Modernizing Equipment and Laboratories

  • Using Lean Education Academic Network (LEAN) tools, the Ottawa Laboratory Carling (OLC) streamlined its processes and increased capacity, thus improving the service standards for the animal feed service by a 20% reduction in processing time. Many lean initiatives developed in 2015-16, with implementation ongoing into 2016-17, are expected to further improve service standards
  • Completed renovations to enhance the food safety laboratory capacity at both the Greater Toronto Area and the St. Hyacinthe laboratories

Enhancing Laboratory Response Capacity

  • Identified relevant projects necessary to develop novel, more rapid and sensitive detection methods to enhance the Agency's response to food safety incidents and progress is being made as planned. Methods developed in previous projects have been operationalized
  • Genome Canada, CFIA and Alberta Innovates-BioSolutions (Al-Bio) Partnership was established to support research that applies the latest bioinformatics and genomics technologies in the detection and surveillance of priority foodborne pathogens

Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework

The ability of the current legislative, regulatory and program framework to support the effective delivery of the Agency's mandate.

Rapid advances in processing and manufacturing technologies have resulted in significant increases in production speed, volume and diversity, requiring the subsequent need for updated legislative and regulatory frameworks. Statutes and authorities impact the design and delivery of programs that regulate new commodities and support economic competitiveness within the industry.

Legislative Modernization

  • Legislative amendments to the Plant Breeders' Rights Act came into force on February 27th, 2015. Canada subsequently ratified the 1991 Act of the International Convention for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV'91) on June 19th, 2015, and became bound by the Convention on July 19th, 2015. The Plant Breeders' Rights Office now accepts applications and grants rights under the revised, UPOV'91 based, intellectual property framework

Regulatory Modernization

  • Based on stakeholder feedback, made selected revisions to the proposed Safe Food for Canadians Regulations since release of draft preliminary text for consultation in summer 2015. The proposed Regulations are targeted for pre-publication in Canada Gazette, Part I, for late fall 2016

Business Transformation/Program Frameworks

  • Implemented the compartmentalization program for domestic National Aquatic Animal Health Program successfully on 31 December 2015
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Inspection Effectiveness

The ability to have appropriate inspection effectiveness to expeditiously prevent, detect and respond to threats to food safety, animals and plants.

Until recently, the Agency delivered 14 independently evolved inspection programs, each having diverse and complex requirements for training, information collection and industry compliance that differ depending on the commodity being regulated.

Currently, the Agency's resource efficiency is impacted due to the maintenance of multiple training programs and IM/IT systems used to address distinct variations in inspection processes, tools, and information collection.

Integrated Agency Inspection Model (iAIM),

  • Developed Foundational Operational Guidance for Standard Inspection Procedures and Compliance Verification of a Preventive Control Plan for all three business lines, based on the integrated Agency Inspection Model. This Guidance was validated and implemented in four commodity areas (Dairy - Food Safety Enhancement Program, Fish - Quality Management Program, Plant - Canadian Greenhouse Certification Program and Feed - Oilseed). Implementation included development of commodity-specific reference material, national training and the development of tools to document inspection results. Operational Guidance to support the issuance of Administrative Monetary Penalties for violations of the Meat Inspection Act and Regulations was published in April 2015

Establishment Risk Assessment Model

  • Conducted a cost benefit analysis for each option of data collection of the inherent and mitigation factors of the model
  • Continued Information Management and Information Technology enablement project with refinement of the business case, high level business requirements and five year costing of the project

Ongoing Recruitment, Training and Provisions of Tools for Inspectors

  • Developed a new Scientific Regulation classification standard, complete with replacements of work descriptions in favor of descriptors of the roles of the functions. The Scientific Regulation classification standard amalgamates all science-based positions in the Biological Sciences, Agriculture and Chemistry groups and will be fully implemented in 2016-17
  • Altered the training delivery strategy supporting the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) for better alignment with the effective start date of the SFCR. Both the learning objectives and content were reviewed and validated and a revised project plan is ready for implementation in 2016-17

Strengthen Risk Management, Planning, Performance Monitoring and Reporting

  • The CFIA planning process continues to evolve and integrate risk management into planning and decision-making. In 2015-16, program risk owners in the Plant Resources, Animal Health, and Food Safety programs identified their respective three-year business line strategic priorities to inform branch strategic planning. This systematic approach to Agency planning better aligned business priorities with branch capacity, including the enabling branches, from strategic to tactical levels. The streamlined collection of this Agency planning information will be used to inform corporate level planning and reporting
Linked to the CFIA's Strategic Outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.

Organizational Priorities

The Government continued to ensure that CFIA remains a world-class regulator in the plant, animal health, and food sectors.

Transforming itself through innovating processes and systems, increasing and enhancing domestic and international partnership, and collaborating with stakeholders helped the CFIA achieve the objectives and priorities outlined in its Long-Term Strategic Plan. The Long-Term Strategic Plan helps the CFIA to mitigate risks, strengthen its foundation, and effectively deliver core program activities. Priorities focused on in 2015-16 include:

Priority: Increased focus on prevention

Description: An increased focus on prevention provides an opportunity to minimize risks to human, animal and ecosystem health. As well, integrating proactive and preventive risk management approaches into all CFIA programs and bolstering these approaches with a clear inclusive focus on partnerships and information sharing helps the CFIA to anticipate, prevent, prepare for, and manage issues, including emergencies.

Priority Type:Footnote 50 Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives - Prevention
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Summary of Progress Link to Agency's Program Alignment Architecture

Integrating proactive and preventive risk management approaches into all CFIA programs and bolstering these approaches with a clear inclusive focus on partnerships and information sharing Table Note 51, will help the CFIA to anticipate, prevent, prepare, and manage issues, including managing emergencies.

Goals for this priority are:

2013 Ongoing

The CFIA made the following progress in integrating proactive and preventive risk management approaches into all CFIA programs:

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
  • Stakeholders have a clear and common understanding of the primary role that they play in managing risk
2013 Ongoing
  • Jointly implemented the Guidance Framework on the zoning arrangement signed under the Regulatory Cooperation Council with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The arrangement outlines how Canada and the United States will recognise and accept each other's decisions regarding animal disease eradication zones in the event of an animal disease outbreak
2014 Ongoing
  • Developed an Emergency Management Framework in collaboration with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and provincial partners. The Framework sets the strategic direction for partners (federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal governments, non-governmental organizations, industry, producers, and individuals) to collaboratively prevent, mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from emergencies facing the agriculture sector
  • Continue to implement legislative and regulatory modernization within the Agency
2013 2018 for current moderni-zation process and ongoing thereafter
  • Continued to work on the amendment of Part XII (Humane Transport) of the Health of Animals Regulations to enhance animal welfare and the humane treatment of animals during transport, and to align with international standards, industry best practices and current scientific knowledge regarding animal welfare during transportation
  • Continued with work toward modernizing the Feeds Regulations to address current gaps and weaknesses, and provide more clarity to regulated parties
2013 Ongoing
  • The Agricultural Growth Act, Bill C-18, received Royal Assent on February 25, 2015 and by Order in Council, as of February 27, 2015, all amendments to the Plant Breeders' Rights Act came into force. The Canadian government ratified the 1991 Act of the International Convention for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV'91) on June 19, 2015, and became bound by this treaty on July 19, 2015
  • Proactive and preventive risk management approaches are integrated into all CFIA programs
2014 Ongoing
  • Revised sections of a draft proposed for the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations in response to stakeholder feedback. Prepared interpretive guidance based on key elements such as trade, preventive controls and traceability
  • Continued to enhance the CFIA's risk-based approach to oversight activities through the continued development of an Establishment-based Risk Assessment (ERA) Model for licensed domestic food producing establishments. The model provides a standard and consistent tool to inform CFIA oversight decisions for licensed establishments, the type, frequency and intensity of CFIA's oversight activities being more proportional to the risks. This model will also provide risk assessment results that will facilitate the allocation of resources to areas of higher risk
2015 2015
  • Conducted surveys to verify the success of the eradication measures of the Asian Long-horned Beetle implemented in 2014. The surveys found no Asian Long-horned Beetle
2015 2015
  • Finalized After Action Reviews for the responses to the December 2014 Avian Influenza outbreak in British Columbia, February 2015 identification of a cow in Alberta with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), also known as mad cow disease, and the April 2015 outbreak of Avian Influenza in Ontario. These reviews identified areas for improvement, and recommendations and corrective actions which are being implemented to improve future response capabilities
  • Continued research to develop novel, more rapid and sensitive detection methods to enhance the Agency's response to food safety incidents. Methods developed in previous projects have been operationalized
  • Evolved CFIA's approach to risk management by developing a framework for integrated risk management to support a more formalized and risk-informed approach to decision-making
  • Developed a comparative risk model to facilitate the comparison of risks across business lines, with the view to creating a stronger and more evidence based understanding of relative risk and improving the ability to inform decisions
  • Inspection systems are designed to verify industry's prevention systems
2014 2015
  • Developed Foundational Operational Guidance for Standard Inspection Procedures and Compliance Verification of a Preventive Control Plan for all three business lines, based on the integrated Agency Inspection Model. This Guidance was validated and implemented in four commodity areas (Dairy - Food Safety Enhancement Program, Fish - Quality Management Program, Plant - Canadian Greenhouse Certification Program and Feed - Oilseed). Implementation included development of commodity-specific reference material, national training and the development of tools to document inspection results
  • Operational Guidance to support the issuance of Administrative Monetary Penalties for violations of the Meat Inspection Act and Regulations was published in April 2015
  • Partnerships, networks and information sharing help the CFIA anticipate, prevent, and prepare
2012 Ongoing
  • Formed a Program Delivery Committee to identity and address priority areas for improvement in order to maintain the integrity of Canada's Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy control program delivery
  • Participated in an initiative led by the Public Health Agency of Canada to develop a framework to prevent the spread of Antimicrobial Resistance while providing input and leadership into the development of further Antimicrobial Resistance and Antimicrobial Resistance Use surveillance, stewardship and innovation activities
  • Developed a framework and program recommendations for veterinary oversight of medically important microbiological drugs in feeds in collaboration with Health Canada
  • In collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture, met with plant protection officials from China, Korea and Japan in 2015 to further assess and enhance the Asian Gypsy Moth pre-departure certification program in each country
2014 2016
  • Became a member of a joint government-industry Potato Task Force, tasked to develop a forward plan for delivering the potato seed certification program for Canadian potato seed producers that respects the necessary requirements set by United States Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Section
2013 2019

Implement Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN)

  • Signed a data sharing arrangement with Alberta Health and Alberta Agriculture and Forestry on February 3, 2016
  • Launched a pilot project with Alberta to identify methods of sharing food safety data
  • Completed a draft inventory of environmental scanning and intelligence data
  • Treasury Board granted expenditure authority in April 2016
  • Completed a comprehensive draft of the data dictionary on April 10, 2016

Table Notes

Table Note 51

The exchange of information among partners is conducted according to applicable provincial and/or federal access to information and privacy legislation and common law principles, and existing information-sharing arrangements.

Return to table note 51  referrer

Priority: Focus on service excellence

Description: The CFIA's role as an effective regulator is enhanced by a focus on service excellence. Strengthening the CFIA's citizen-centred service delivery culture will result in enhanced program delivery and increased confidence in the Agency as a trusted and credible regulator by domestic and international stakeholders.

Priority Type:Footnote 50 Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives - Service excellence
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Summary of Progress Link to Agency's Program Alignment Architecture

Strengthening the CFIA's citizen-centred service delivery culture will result in enhanced program delivery and increased confidence in the Agency as a trusted and credible regulator by domestic and international stakeholders. Goals for this priority are:

  • Service culture is embedded within the Agency. Complaints and Appeals Office provides a single-window for stakeholders to register complaints, compliments and comments related to CFIA's regulatory decisions or service delivery

The CFIA made progress in its effort to strengthen the Agency's citizen-centered service delivery culture. They include:

  • Linked the Traceability National Information Portal with the CFIA's Laboratory Sample Tracking System database to offer authorized users access to animal health, and animal movement and location information through a single window

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
2014 Ongoing
  • Developed the first series of products under the compliance promotion strategy for undeclared allergens, in particular an interactive infographic on allergen labelling which would be available in seven languages
2015 Ongoing
  • The Complaints and Appeals Office (CAO) continued to contribute to improvement in service delivery and program design. Data collected by CAO is analyzed to identify trends for opportunities and improvement that are used for business planning and programs enhancement
2014 2017
  • Continued to develop partnerships with approved private and provincial laboratories to provide alternative service delivery options for the Agency
  • The CFIA is a trusted, transparent and credible regulator with adaptable, predictable and consistent program delivery
2015 2015
  • Reviewed a Quality Management Oversight Framework and established the criteria necessary to guide the transfer of tests for alternative service delivery arrangements
  • Actively promoted CFIA's success stories to internal and external audiences using internal tools and social media platforms such as Pinterest, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook
  • Initiated the development of the business requirements for phase I of the Electronic Service Delivery Platform. Phased implementation is scheduled to begin in December 2016
  • CFIA services support efficient and effective regulation of those sectors of the marketplace that it regulates.
2014 Ongoing
  • Collaborated with the United States, Australia and New Zealand on an education and awareness approach to reduce invasive plants introduction through e-commerce
  • Developed new products designed for use by industry and regulated parties, including infographics on key themes (e.g., preventive controls, categories of hazards and key principles for importers) as well as multilingual fact sheets (12 languages) highlighting key food safety elements, preventive food safety controls and traceability
  • Provided advice and guidance to the Community of Federal Regulators, Health Canada, and Treasury Board Secretariat on how to develop a Government-wide plan for posting legislative guidance on Canada.ca
  • Launched the Single Window Initiative with Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) to deliver an integrated electronic solution for the collection, consolidation and dissemination of commercial trade data. The initiative provides a single entry point for the advanced electronic reporting of import information required to satisfy CBSA and CFIA regulatory requirements. The CFIA maintains ongoing collaboration with Canada Border Services Agency to address minor challenges with the system as it is implemented
  • Using Lean Education Academic Network (LEAN) tools, the Ottawa Laboratory Carling (OLC) streamlined its processes and increased capacity, thus improving the service standards for the animal feed service by a 20% reduction in processing time. Many lean initiatives developed in 2015-16, with implementation ongoing into 2016-17, are expected to further improve service standards

Priority: Focus on internal performance excellence

Description: Optimizing performance enables the CFIA to evaluate the effectiveness of the Agency's policies and programs in order to allocate resources to areas of highest risk. This also enables the Agency to adapt and evolve to meet new demands and expectations with a focus on internal performance excellence

Priority Type:Footnote 50 Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives - Performance excellence
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Summary of Progress Link to Agency's Program Alignment Architecture

Optimizing performance will enable the CFIA to evaluate the effectiveness of the Agency's policies and programs in order to allocate resources to areas of highest risk. Goals for this priority are:

2013 Ongoing

The CFIA made the following progress toward its drive for performance excellence:

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
  • Internal Service
  • Strong internal management systems and governance that support risk-based planning and resource allocation
2013 Ongoing
  • Developed the internal processes necessary to support the application of the Treasury Board Acquired Services Policy on Investment Planning - Assets and Acquired Services
  • The CFIA's existing Enterprise Project Management Framework describes the implementation process for projects undertaken in the Agency. In 2015-16, the CFIA:
    • Clarified the type of investments that have to be managed through the Enterprise Project Management Framework and approved a tool to guide Agency investments
    • Initiated the integration of Investment Planning and Project Management 'work intake' processes
    • Completed a full review of the Enterprise Project Management Framework toolkit and updated it to include current practices and disciplines
    • Released an updated version of the Enterprise Project Management Framework in March 2016, which included updates to existing tools and templates and the addition of new tools to aid project teams in the delivery of projects
  • Modernized applications and implemented an Application Portfolio Management Program. These efforts, along with lessons learned during implementation, moved the Agency toward a balanced and sustainable technology platform, based on Government of Canada standards
  • Developed an action plan to address the results of the February 2014 Ethical Climate Survey
  • Prepared for migration to Canada.ca by completing a full review of the Agency's current web content to ensure consistency with the Canada.ca style guide, and by developing a detailed migration plan for CFIA content
  • A performance management mindset is embedded in the Agency.
2013 Ongoing
  • Ensured green procurement was incorporated into procurement management processes and tools and procurement specialists' training and procurement heads' and managers' performance evaluations
  • Updated the Values & Ethics Strategy to reflect the Agency's Transformation Agenda, Blueprint 2020 and the "One Agency" initiative
  • Strengthened the tools, processes and governance of the Agency's Business Information Management Centre to capture and report on operational data, and also enhance the Centre's program performance management capabilities
  • Continued to enhance the CFIA's risk-based approach to oversight activities through the continued development of an Establishment-based Risk Assessment (ERA) Model for licensed domestic food producing establishments. The model provides a standard and consistent tool to inform CFIA oversight decisions for licensed establishments, the type, frequency and intensity of CFIA's oversight activities being more proportional to the risks. This model will also provide risk assessment results that will facilitate the allocation of resources to areas of higher risk

Priority: Focus on people supported by training and tools

Description: Focusing on diverse talent, supported by training and modern tools, results in a stable and skilled CFIA workforce with adaptable and motivated employees.

Priority Type: Footnote 50 Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives - People
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Summary of Progress Link to Agency's Program Alignment Architecture

Focusing on diverse talent, supported by training and modern tools will result in a stable and skilled CFIA workforce with adaptable and motivated employees. Goals for this priority are:

  • The CFIA continues to retain and attract competent, qualified, and motivated personnel

The following is the progress made against the goals identified under this priority:

  • Developed a new Scientific Regulation classification standard, and replaced work descriptions with role descriptors. The scientific regulation classification standard amalgamates all science-based positions in the Biological Sciences, Agriculture and Chemistry groups, and will be fully implemented in 2016-17

All the planned initiatives are linked to the following programs:

  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
  • Plant Resources Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
  • Internal Service
  • Individuals have the tools, training and information they need to support the Agency and progress in their careers
  • Launched a project management course specific for CFIA Executives and Executive equivalents in collaboration with the Canada School of the Public Service in January 2015. The course contents were further refined in 2015-2016
  • Altered the training delivery strategy supporting the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations to better align with the effective start date of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. Both the learning objectives and content were reviewed and validated and a revised project plan is ready for implementation in 2016-17
  • Conducted a Collective Staffing Review (CSR) and an audit of staffing to identify potential opportunities for improvement. In response, a staffing tiger team is being established to identify innovative ways to staff positions at the CFIA. Greater transparency and monitoring of staffing actions will also be implemented
  • Updated Values & Ethics training for managers and supervisors, and also updated Conflict of Interest and Post-Employment Policy to provide better guidance to employees
  • Participated in various inter-governmental meetings, coordinated information sharing throughout the Agency, and ensured that CFIA employees were well informed of the Web Renewal Initiative
  • The CFIA has the culture it needs to achieve the Long-Term Strategic Plan - a culture of engagement.
2014 2015
  • Sustained consultation and engagement with Federal-Provincial/Territorial governments and industry stakeholders culminated in the implementation in December 2015 of the Domestic Control Program, which is the last phase of the Domestic National Aquatic Animal Health Program, was successfully implemented on December 31, 2015
2014 2015
  • Developed and made publicly available standards for domestic compartments free of specific diseases within declared infected areas as part of the Domestic Movement Program
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