2015-2016 Departmental Performance Report
Programs

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Program 1.1: Food Safety Program

Flowchart - Food Safety Program. Description follows.
Description for image – Food Safety Program

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.
The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • Food Safety Program

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.
It says:

  • Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated
  • Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • Healthy Canadians

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Regulatory Modernization

  • The Food Virology National Reference Centre at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) laboratory in St. Hyacinthe, Quebec was established to further enhance Canada's ability to effectively detect viral contaminants in food, such as noroviruses and hepatitis A.
  • A partnership was established between the CFIA and Génome Québec to develop genomics-based analytical methods for pathogen detection and epidemiological support. This initiative is expected to lead to the development of more precise, molecular-based methods for identifying specific strains of foodborne viruses that could help in tracing outbreaks of viral foodborne illness back to a specific source.

In 2015–16, the CFIA continued to make progress against the Safe Food for Canadians Action Plan launched in 2013. The CFIA:

  • Revised sections of a draft proposed for the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations in response to feedback received from stakeholders during consultations conducted in summer 2015. Drafted interpretive guidance on key elements such as trade, preventive controls and traceability
  • Drafted a series of 27 model systems, which are guidance documents to provide information about new or historically accepted practices and procedures. They focus on helping small and newly regulated food businesses comply with specific elements of the preventive control and traceability requirements
  • Developed Foundational Operational Guidance for Standard Inspection Procedures and Compliance Verification of a Preventive Control Plan for all CFIA's three business lines and based on the Integrated Agency Inspection Model. The Guidance was validated and implemented in four commodity areas: Dairy – Food Safety Enhancement Program; Fish – Quality Management Program; Plant - Canadian Greenhouse Certification Program; and Feed - Oilseed. The implementation included the development of commodity-specific reference material, national training and the development of tools to document inspection results

Food Labelling Modernization Initiatives

To advance its food labelling initiative in 2015-16 the CFIA:

  • Completed engagements on options to modernize food labelling. Engaged more than 1,600 stakeholders in the process. Feedback from stakeholders will inform the development of key recommendations to modernize the food labelling framework and food compositional standards. Other Food Labelling Modernization initiatives included Beer Standard and Standard Container Sizes. CFIA is working closely with HC to align and coordinate engagement activities, proposals, and implementation of proposed regulatory changes associated with these modernization initiatives
  • Conducted a Service Lab Workshop in December 2015 with partners from Health Canada (HC), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canadian General Standards Board, and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada on food compositional standards. CFIA worked closely with HC to align and coordinate engagement activities, proposals, and the coming into force dates of proposed regulatory changes associated with these modernization initiatives

Risk Based Oversight Framework to Further Modernize Canada's Food Safety System

In 2015–16, the CFIA continued to enhance its risk-based approach to oversight activities through the continued development of an Establishment-based Risk Assessment (ERA) Model for licensed domestic food producing and storing establishments. The model provides a standard and consistent tool to inform CFIA oversight decisions for licensed establishments, the type, frequency and intensity of CFIA's oversight activities being more proportional to the risks. The CFIA conducted a cost-benefit analysis for each option of data collection of the inherent and mitigation factors.

The Information Management and Information Technology enablement project continued with the refinement of the business case, high level business requirements and five years costing of the project. Webinars aimed at presenting the results of the pilot project were presented in March 2016 to establishments and inspectors as part of the meat and dairy pilots.

Enhancing Detection and Responsiveness to Food-Borne Incidents

In 2015-16, a Treasury Board submission seeking project approval and expenditure authority for the Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN) was submitted to the Treasury Board. A bilateral data sharing arrangement with Alberta Health and Alberta Agriculture and Forestry was signed on February 3, 2016. A pilot project, aimed at better understanding the data requirements of both the CFIA and its Alberta counterparts, was started and a draft inventory of environmental scanning and intelligence data was completed. A comprehensive draft of the data dictionary was completed.

CFIA, in collaboration with Public Health Agency of Canada, Health Canada and the provincial health authorities, responded to an outbreak of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (a bacterium that causes acute gastroenteritis in humans) linked to consumption of British Columbia oysters. CFIA conducted an internal review of the design and delivery of CFIA's risk management activities related to Vibrio. The review focused on the Quality Management Program requirements and the CFIA's activities, with the goal of providing additional guidance to industry. CFIA staff also participated in a BC-focused multi-jurisdictional and stakeholder working group to improve actions and controls throughout the producer, processor and distribution chain.

CFIA undertook considerable work to respond to emerging issues and recalls related to Salmonella in chia and products containing chia and allergens in spices. This resulted in additional targeted oversight, both in the areas of focus during inspections as well as sampling, at Imported and Manufactured Food facilities handling these products.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16 Main Estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2015-16 Total Authorities
Available for use
2015-16 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2015-16 Difference
(actual minus planned)
362,958,350 363,836,779 408,312,924 376,113,531 12,276,752
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents - FTEs)
2015-16 Planned 2015-16 Actual 2015-16 Difference
(actual minus planned)
3,311 3,155 (156)

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $12.3 million largely relates to incremental funding received to deliver: the first year of the Federal Infrastructure Initiative, approved to accelerate the renewal and upgrade of CFIA assets; the Electronic Service Delivery Platform, which will provide technologies and tools for industry, international trading partners, and CFIA inspectors and staff to more efficiently carry out their respective roles and conduct regular business transactions electronically. Additional resources were also received from Treasury Board central votes to offset salary related disbursements made on behalf of the Treasury Board Secretariat (maternity and paternity allowances, entitlements on cessation, etc.).

This increase was partially offset by the program re-alignment of resources (dollars and FTEs) to Internal Services in order to comply with new requirements of the amended Treasury Board Guide on Internal Services Expenditures: Recording, Reporting and Attributing, which came into effect on April 1, 2015.

FTEs were also impacted by the requirement for CFIA to absorb the ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations from 2010-11 through to 2012-13. The ongoing cost of the most recent round of negotiations totalled approximately $30 million annually. Given that nearly 80% of the Agency's annual operating expenditures support personnel costs, there was limited flexibility to realign non-personnel authorities to cover these increases. As a result, the Agency FTE complement declined through attrition in all Programs, including Food Safety.

Performance Results

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Number of commodity areas where federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met 5 out of 6 met 5 out of 6 met
Meat and Poultry 98% 95.60% Not MetTable Note 36
Egg 98% 96.22% MetTable Note 37
Dairy 98% 99.00% Met
Fish and Seafood 98% 98.11% Met
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 98% 98.85% Met
Processed Products 98% 97.77% Met
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 100 % 95.03% Not MetTable Note 38
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 95% 100% Met
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where domestic food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met 6 out of 6 met 6 out of 6 met
Meat and Poultry 95% 97.32% Met
Egg 95% 99.00% Met
Dairy 95% 97.94% Met
Fish and Seafood 95% 97.61% Met
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 95% 98.95% Met
Processed Products 95% 98.12% Met
Number of commodity areas where imported food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met 4 out of 6 met 4 out of 6 met
Meat and Poultry 95% 98.62% Met
Egg 95% 99.53% Met
Dairy 95% 88.54% Not MetTable Note 39
Fish and Seafood 95% 87.89% Not MetTable Note 40
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 95% 96.83% Met
Processed Products 95% 96.98% Met

Table Notes

Table Note 36

The CFIA continues to communicate and work with industry on compliance promotion and the understanding of all requirements and related Compliance Verification System policies. The CFIA aims to increase the levels of compliance through ongoing communication and education and continue its vigilance through inspection and the enforcement of defined standards. Reporting capabilities related to non-compliances were redeveloped this fiscal year. Monthly reports have enhanced the response in addressing issues requiring corrective action. This may have contributed to the increase in non-compliances resulting in enforcement letters.

Return to table note 36 referrer

Table Note 37

here were 7 out of 185 inspected registered egg-grading stations that received at least one enforcement action letter. Out of the unsatisfactory inspected grading station, six took corrective action and met the requirements and one did not renew its license.

The Food program will assess the non-compliance to determine whether there are any systemic issues requiring more specific follow up.

Return to table note 37 referrer

Table Note 38

Eight recalls did not meet the requirements of this indicator. Reasons for the delays included: additional lot codes and products being voluntarily added to the recall by the recalling firm; changes in product information which required further validation of the risk; late notification of additional distribution; waiting for the publication of the press release by another government department who had requested the recall; and extenuating circumstances beyond the control of the CFIA or the recalling firm.

The time frames for not achieving the 24 hour time standard ranged from 12 minutes to approximately 5 hours, with four of these eight public warnings issued within 25 hours.

Operations Branch will improve the current process to ensure that high priority files not completed by the end of a work day are addressed as a high priority at the onset of the next business day.

The Office of Food Safety and Recalls and the Web Operations Unit are developing an alternate procedure for notifying newswire services when it is identified that the 24 hour time standard may not be met using the normal procedure.

Return to table note 38 referrer

Table Note 39

Microbiological organisms: 12/245 = 95.1% compliance rate. Imported cheese found to be non-compliant for microbiological organisms are placed on directed sampling until 10 consecutive lots are found to be satisfactory. Products tested for microbiological organisms are typically held by the importer until results are received to avoid recalls due to unsatisfactory results.

Chemical residues: 50/296 = 83.1% compliance rate. Of the 50 non compliant samples, 43 are for chemical residues and 7 are for nutritional labelling. Of the 43 samples that are non-compliant, 39 are for Thiouracil. Indications are that Thiouracil is occurring in dairy products due to a natural reaction to cows having a Brassicacea rich feed. Not including the 39 Thiouracil results gives 11/296 = 96.3% compliance rate for chemical residues.

The overall compliance result is based on the combined compliance of Microbiological Organisms and Chemical Residue. Total number of imported samples tested: 296 (Chemical residues) + 245 (Microbiological organisms) = 541. Total number of imported unsatisfactory samples tested: 50 (Chemical residues) + 12 (Microbiological organisms) = 62. Percentage (%) of Tested Imported Dairy Products that are compliant is: ((541-62)/541) x 100= 88.54

The CFIA takes appropriate actions when dairy products do not meet Canadian standards. Actions may include, but are not limited to, additional inspections, further directed sampling, or product seizure and/or recall.

Return to table note 39 referrer

Table Note 40

The overall compliance rate of 88% is consistent with the 2014-15 compliance rate of 89%.

The main contributors to non-compliance in 2014-15 were sensory evaluation rejections (43% of the rejections resulting from random inspections). Sensory evaluation assesses that fish meets standards for minimum acceptable quality, verifying its level of freshness, and that the fish is not tainted, decomposed or unwholesome. In 2015-16, the sensory evaluation rejections again contributed to 43% of the random inspection rejections and implicated 50% of the packers whose fish were found to be non-compliance. Also, similar to the previous year, the products, their origin and packers were varied. As such, there is no trend identified for which measures can be taken to address the level of non-compliance.

In 2014-15, container integrity rejections accounted for 14% of the random inspection rejections and implicated only 4 lots from 3 packers. In 2015-16, container integrity rejections increased to 22% of the random inspection rejections but implicated only 5 lots, 4 of which were from the same packer in Spain.

Return to table note 40 referrer

Program 1.2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Flowchart - Animal Health and Zoonotics Program. Description follows.
Description for image – Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.
The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • Risk to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized
  • Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Risk to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated
  • Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases
  • Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • Strong Economic Growth
  • A Clean and Healthy Environment

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, limiting risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instils confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Emerging Issues Response

  • In August 2015, there was a Bluetongue disease (an infectious insect-borne viral disease impacting ruminants) outbreak in Canada, which resulted in Canada losing its status of being free from this disease. Following extensive trade negotiations, internationally and nationally, the CFIA reinstated trade with major trading partners.
  • In December 2014 and April 2015, Canada experienced outbreaks of avian influenza (bird flu) in British Columbia and Ontario respectively, resulting in the closure of export markets for Canadian poultry and poultry products. The CFIA's zoning agreement with the United States Department of Agriculture, under the Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) initiative, enabled trade to continue in areas outside the affected zones while management of the outbreak continued.

In 2015-16, the CFIA worked towards amending Part XII of the Health of Animals Regulations (humane transportation) to enhance animal welfare and the humane treatment of animals during transport, and to align with international standards, industry best practices and current scientific knowledge regarding animal welfare during transportation. The Humane Transportation of Animals Regulations is expected to be published in Canada Gazette, Part I, in the fall of 2016.

In 2015-16, the Traceability National Information Portal, also called TNIP, a data integration tool designed to share information and enhance disease control and surveillance activities, was linked with the CFIA's Laboratory Sample Tracking System (LSTS) database, a system used for tracking, sampling and analysis activities. This linkage offers authorized users access to animal health, animal movement, and location information through a single window. A Pig Trace data system, which allows for tracking of porcine imports, exports, and tag transactions, was added to the Traceability National Information Portal. Saskatchewan and Ontario joined the portal data sharing arrangements, thus increasing traceability information.

Canada experienced two limited outbreaks of the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) in December 2014 and April 2015 while the USA faced large outbreaks in several States from December 2014 to June 2015. In 2015-16, the CFIA and the United States Department of Agriculture jointly implemented the Guidance Framework on the zoning arrangement signed under the Regulatory Cooperation Council, which outlined how Canada and the USA will recognize and accept each other's decisions regarding animal disease eradication zones in the event of an animal disease outbreak. The Framework was tested, with positive results, during the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza outbreaks. The recognition of each other's zoning decisions enabled trade to continue from disease free zones during the management of the outbreak in the affected area. Work continued on a model to assist with zoning recognition decisions through the North American Virtual Animal Disease Modelling Center.

The Canadian Notifiable Avian Influenza Surveillance System (CanNAISS) continued to play a key role in designing and implementing animal diseases surveillance plans for trade limiting foreign animal diseases. During the two outbreaks of Avian Influenza (AI) in 2015-16, the CanNAISS provided timely support to detect, contain and control the outbreaks as well as designed and implemented enhanced AI surveillance plans in order to regain AI disease-free status, which supports access to international markets.

The CFIA contributed to the development of the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System (CAHSS), which is a federated network of networks, groups and individuals involved in animal health surveillance in Canada, with a shared vision to enable effective, responsive and integrated animal health surveillance in Canada. Several network groups were developed (e.g. champions, directors, communications, surveillance data, poultry and swine) and a website was initiated to enable information sharing. CAHSS will strengthen animal health surveillance, enable strategic use of technology, and enhance Canada's ability to respond to animal health emergencies.

Through collaborative partnerships with the Public Health Agency of Canada and thirteen other multi-jurisdictional partners, the Centre for Emerging and Zoonotic Disease - Integrated Intelligence and Response (CEZD-IIR) was successfully completed. This innovate project will test if Canada's early warning intelligence for emerging and zoonotic diseases can be enhanced through a real time virtual network using today's technology.

Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16 Main Estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2015-16 Total Authorities
Available for use
2015-16 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2015-16 Difference
(actual minus planned)
113,659,211 114,552,020 144,620,153 141,043,127 26,491,107
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents - FTEs)
2015-16 Planned 2015-16 Actual 2015-16 Difference
(actual minus planned)
974 959 (15)

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $26.5 million largely relates to incremental funding received to: deliver the first year of the Federal Infrastructure Initiative, approved to accelerate the renewal and upgrade of CFIA assets; cover Statutory Compensation Payments made as a result of the Avian Influenza outbreak in Ontario. Additional resources were also received from Treasury Board central votes to offset salary related disbursements made on behalf of the Treasury Board Secretariat (maternity and paternity allowances, entitlements on cessation, etc.).

This increase was partially offset by the program re-alignment of resources (dollars and FTEs) to Internal Services in order to comply with new requirements of the amended Treasury Board Guide on Internal Services Expenditures: Recording, Reporting and Attributing, which came into effect on April 1, 2015.

FTEs were also impacted by the requirement for CFIA to absorb the ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations from 2010-11 through to 2012-13. The ongoing cost of the most recent round of negotiations totalled $30 million annually. Given that nearly 80% of the Agency's annual operating expenditures support personnel costs, there was limited flexibility to realign non-personnel authorities to cover these increases. As a result, the Agency FTE complement declined through attrition in all Programs, including Animal Health and Zoonotics Program. However, the decline was partially offset by the temporary realignment of human resources to the Program in order to address incremental response activities required to address the Avian Influenza outbreak in Ontario.

Performance Results

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 Entries 0 Entries Met
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease 100% 100% Met
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements 99% 100% Met
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Canada's status on the OIE Table Note 41 disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk" Status
maintained
Status
maintained
Met
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease 100% 100% Met
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed All necessary manual updates are completed 75% Not Met Table Note 42
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises in which CFIA participates 9 11 Met
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion 100% 100% Met
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of cases where CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease 100% 100% Met

Table Notes

Table Note 41

World Organization for Animal Health

Return to table note 41 referrer

Table Note 42

Due to several high visibility or emerging issues, resources were not available to update the existing program guidance material.

Return to table note 42 referrer

Program 1.3: Plant Resources Program

Flowchart - Plant Resources Program. Description follows.
Description for image – Plant Resources Program

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.
The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.
The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • Plant Resources Program

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated
  • Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders)
  • Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • Strong economic Growth
  • A Clean and Healthy Environment

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instils confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Regulatory Modernization

Some examples of day to day activity that support the Plant Resources Program include:

  • Conduct annual surveillance to ensure that regulated invasive plant species are not established in Canada; the 2015-16 survey did not detect any new species.
  • Advance control measures of Asian gypsy moth by collaborating with the U.S. and meeting with plant protection officials from China, Korea and Japan in 2015 to further assess and enhance the Asian gypsy moth pre-departure certification program in each country.
  • A national survey of canola was developed and delivered in 2015 to determine the presence and distribution of Verticillium longisporum in Canada. The results were used to develop, in consultation with stakeholders, a risk management document that will be finalized in fall 2016.
  • Pursue eradication of Asian long horn beetles through continuing post treatment evaluation surveys to meet international standards to support official eradication status.
  • Slow the spread of emerald ash borer from infested areas by regulating the movement of things like ash trees, ash logs or firewood from regulated areas.

The Canadian government ratified the 1991 Act of the International Convention for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV'91) on June 19, 2015, and became bound by this treaty on July 19, 2015. The Plant Breeders' Rights Office now accepts applications and grants rights under the revised, UPOV'91 based, intellectual property framework.

Emergency Management

In an effort to collaboratively manage emergencies facing the agriculture sector, Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers committed to developing an integrated, cohesive approach to manage emergencies in the sector which impacts both plant health and animal health programs. In 2015-16, the CFIA developed an Emergency Management Framework in collaboration with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and provincial partners. The Framework sets the strategic direction for partners (federal, provincial and territorial and municipal governments, non-governmental organizations, industry, producers, and individuals) to collaboratively prevent, mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from emergencies facing the agriculture sector.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16 Main Estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2015-16 Total Authorities
Available for use
2015-16 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2015-16 Difference
(actual minus planned)
76,204,256 76,730,103 82,153,712 79,807,062 3,076,959
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents - FTEs)
2015-16 Planned 2015-16 Actual 2015-16 Difference
(actual minus planned)
770 703 (67)

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $3.1 million largely relates to incremental funding received to deliver the first year of the Federal Infrastructure Initiative. Additional resources were also received from Treasury Board central votes to offset salary related disbursements made on behalf of the Treasury Board Secretariat (maternity and paternity allowances, entitlements on cessation, etc.).

This increase was partially offset by the program re-alignment of resources (dollars and FTEs) to Internal Services in order to comply with new requirements of the amended Treasury Board Guide on Internal Services Expenditures: Recording, Reporting and Attributing, which came into effect on April 1, 2015.

FTEs were also impacted by the requirement for CFIA to absorb the ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations from 2010-11 through to 2012-13. The ongoing cost of the most recent round of negotiations totalled approximately $30 million annually. Given that nearly 80% of the Agency's annual operating expenditures support personnel costs, there was limited flexibility to realign non-personnel authorities to cover these increases. As a result, the Agency FTE complement declined through attrition in all Programs, including the Plant Resources Program.

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results Actual Results
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves 0 0 Met
Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements 90% 96.16% Met
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk- mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issued 100% 100% Met
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk- mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner 90% 100% Met
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirements 99% 99.75% Met

Program 1.4: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Flowchart - International Collaboration and Technical Agreements. Description follows.
Description for image – International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.

The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and international Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC
  • International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants and their products
  • International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • A Fair and Secure Marketplace
  • A Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through actively participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

International Engagements:

In its international engagements for 2015-16, the CFIA:

  • Participated in and coordinated Canada's Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) input into various World Trade Organization (WTO) fora, including the three meetings of the WTO SPS Committee where the CFIA serves as the Head of Delegation for the Government of Canada
  • Led Canada's participation at the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE); and, with Health Canada, co-led Canada's participation at the Codex Alimentarius Commission, to promote the development of science-based international standards consistent with Canada's regulatory framework and Government of Canada (GoC) objectives
  • Participated in the North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO), an IPPC regional body that develops regional phytosanitary standards to enable the trade of plants and plant products between Canada, the USA, and Mexico. The review of NAPPO's Strategic Plan, including strategic elements to better position the organization on the international scene and further enhance industry participation, was initiated in 2015

Greater Alignment of Regulatory Approaches with the USA through the Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) and the Beyond the Border (BtB) Initiative

  • To enhance regulatory cooperation with the United States, the CFIA and its USA counterparts, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) developed four joint work plans in the areas of plant health, animal health, meat inspection and certification, and food safety which focussed on delivering key priorities between Canada and the USA in these areas
  • The CFIA, USDA, and FDA established a governance structure to support enhanced regulatory cooperation. These Partnership Committees act as oversight bodies to review progress made on Regulatory Cooperation Council work plan initiatives and to discuss medium and longer-term regulatory alignment opportunities
  • Key initiatives contributed to greater alignment:
    • For animal health, a zoning recognition arrangement developed through the Regulatory Cooperation Council was used in the recent highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreak resulting in faster recognition of zones and quicker re-establishment of commerce/trade
    • With respect to meat inspection, audits of the Canadian and USA meat and poultry inspection systems were completed and deemed to remain equivalent
    • In plant health, a memorandum of understanding (MoU) 'Perimeter Approach to Plant Protection' was signed that formalizes ongoing bilateral engagement between regulators to protect both countries from the introduction and spread of plant pests and invasive species, while facilitating trade
    • For food safety, the text of the Canada - USA Food Safety Systems Recognition Arrangement, which establishes that the systems in both countries achieve the same public health outcomes, was finalized
  • Under the Beyond the Border (BtB), the CFIA has successfully implemented a number of recommendations under the Integrated Cargo Security Strategy. This work supports and facilitates a perimeter inspection approach for wood packaging material at the first point of arrival to clear foreign shipments entering both countries. The CFIA and its USA counterparts have been very effective in using the Asian Gypsy Moth program under Beyond the Border to mitigate the risk of Asian Gypsy Moth at origin

Supporting Market Access

Some of the major activities the CFIA conducted in 2015-16 in support of market access include:

  • Restored multiple markets globally following the imposition of trade restrictions as a result of Canadian cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, avian influenza and bluetongue diseases in 2015
  • Hosted several foreign delegations that came to audit Canada's food systems, plant protection and animal health control systems, which allow trade to occur or to continue uninterrupted
  • Gained access for blueberries from British Colombia to China and Korea.
  • Negotiated expansion of the scope of the EU-Canada Organics Equivalency Arrangement
  • Gained access for pork and pork products to India
  • Expanded access for live aquatic animal species to Vietnam
  • Gained access for beef and ready-to-eat meat to Ukraine
  • Maintained access for exports of live aquatics, seafood and fishery products to China
  • Maintained and expanded access to China for pet food
  • Developed free sale certificates to facilitate the export of processed food to some Latin American countries
  • Continued engagement by technical specialists abroad with CFIA counterparts in Mexico, China, India, Japan, and the EU and senior level CFIA engagements with the United States, the European Union, New Zealand, Australia, and China
  • Continued engagement with various countries through existing bilateral fora (e.g. Joint Management Committee meeting with the EU, Sanitary and Phytosanitary Committee meetings with Colombia and Korea, and Consultative Committee on Agriculture meetings with Mexico and Brazil), and through ad hoc bilateral meetings such as incoming foreign visits to resolve scientific and technical issues and to support greater market access for the Canadian agriculture industry
  • Provided technical assistance to regulatory counterparts in developing countries to actively promote the Canadian science-based regulatory system
  • In collaboration with Global Affairs Canada, participated in Sanitary and Phytosanitary components of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16 Main Estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2015-16 Total Authorities
Available for use
2015-16 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2015-16 Difference
(actual minus planned)
30,000,919 34,682,935 32,938,250 32,552,166 (2,130,769)
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 Planned 2015-16 Actual 2015-16 Difference
(actual minus planned)
344 307 (37)

The decrease from Planned to Actual Spending of $2.1 million largely relates the program re-alignment of resources (dollars and FTEs). Specifically, a portion of Growing Forward II and Market Access resources were realigned to the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program and the Food Safety Program, to improve the alignment of program resources and expenditures. In addition, the re-alignment of resources to Internal Services was required in order to comply with new requirements of the amended Treasury Board Guide on Internal Services Expenditures: Recording, Reporting and Attributing, which came into effect on April 1, 2015.

FTEs were also impacted by the requirement for CFIA to absorb the ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations from 2010-11 through to 2012-13. The ongoing cost of the most recent round of negotiations totalled approximately $30 million annually. Given that nearly 80% of the Agency's annual operating expenditures support personnel costs, there was limited flexibility to realign non-personnel authorities to cover these increases. As a result, the Agency FTE complement declined through attrition in all Programs, including the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Program.

Performance Results

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Performance Status Performance Status
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests 36 38 Met
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products Number of unjustified non- tariff barriers resolved 45 57 Met
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA- led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 4 6 Met
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of CFIA-led
technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments
8 11 Met

Internal Services

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Assets and Acquired Service

In 2015-16, the CFIA addressed three of the four recommendations stemming from the Audit of Investment Planning:

  • The Agency developed the internal processes necessary to support the application of the Acquired Services concept introduced by the Treasury Board Policy on Investment Planning – Assets and Acquired Services
  • The Agency clarified the type of investments that have to be managed through the Enterprise Project Management Framework and approved a tool to appropriately guide Agency investments
  • Corporate Management Branch, in partnership with the Information Management and Information Technology Branch, undertook initiatives to integrate Investment Planning and Project Management 'work intake' processes. These initiatives all build upon the existing Enterprise Project Management Framework which describes the various project management stages and requirements to advance to the next stage for all initiatives undertaken in the Agency

The CFIA is currently addressing the fourth recommendation, which is the implementation of a performance measurement system. The system will provide the performance measures necessary to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of the investment planning process and the annual overall performance of the Agency's Investment Plan in 2016-17. This framework will be aligned with the Treasury Board Secretariat Policy Suite Reset.

As part of the CFIA's commitment to project management, a full review of the Enterprise Project Management Framework toolkit was completed and it was updated to further develop current practices and disciplines. To improve on project scope, cost and schedule management, the CFIA is enhancing its project management tools by incorporating work breakdown structure.

The CFIA released an updated version of the Enterprise Project Management Framework in March 2016. The release included updates to existing tools and templates and the addition of new tools to aid project teams in the delivery of projects.

The CFIA engaged the Canada School of the Public Service to design and develop a project management course specific for CFIA Executives and Executive equivalents. The objective of the course is to provide participants with knowledge of the key elements of project governance and their roles and responsibilities to ensure there is value for money and that the outcome and benefits for which a project is undertaken are realized. The training was successfully launched in January 2015. Further refinements to the course content were completed in fiscal 2015-2016.

The CFIA continued to contribute to the 2013-2016 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy's Theme IV (Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government) targets through the Internal Services Program.

  • The CFIA is on track to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its fleet by 13% below 2005 levels by 2020. The CFIA has reduced its fleet inventory in the last three years and procured more fuel efficient vehicles
  • The CFIA fulfilled the requirements of the Policy on Green Procurement by ensuring that green procurement was incorporated into procurement management processes and tools and procurement specialists' training and procurement heads' and managers' performance evaluations

People Management

The CFIA developed a new scientific regulation classification standard, complete with role descriptors to replace traditional work descriptions. The scientific regulation classification standard amalgamates all science-based positions in the Biological Sciences, Agriculture and Chemistry groups, and will be fully implemented in 2016-17.

The training delivery strategy supporting the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations was altered to better align with the effective start date of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. Both the learning objectives and content were reviewed and validated and a revised project plan is ready for implementation in 2016-17.

The CFIA's Office of the Staffing Ombudsman is the first of its kind in the federal public service. The Staffing Ombudsman Policy includes a provision allowing the Office to conduct systemic staffing reviews where opportunities for improvement are identified. As a result of a number of complaints concerning collective staffing, the Office of the Staffing Ombudsman carried out a review in 2015-16 of collective staffing. The results and recommendations were presented to Senior Management. These recommendations were accepted and will be addressed through a Management Review Action Plan.

Information Management / Information Technology

In support of the transformation agenda, CFIA modernized applications and implemented an Application Portfolio Management Program. These efforts, along with lessons learned during implementation, moved the Agency toward a balanced and sustainable technology platform, based on Government of Canada standards.

Investment planning was further matured, resulting in better demand management for agency information management and information technology requirements. Greater engagement in branch and agency governance was also achieved, which results in better project management of information management and information technology application and platform modernization efforts.

Emergency Management

In 2015-16, the CFIA and AAFC developed the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Agreement on Emergency Response Coordination. The agreement sets out roles and responsibilities and establishes a working relationship between AAFC and CFIA regarding emergency response activities affecting the agriculture and agri-food sector in the context of each organization's legislated responsibilities.

In 2015-16, the Agency finalized After Action Reports for the responses to Avian Influenza (AI) in British Columbia (December 2015), Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in Alberta (February 2015), and AI in Ontario (April 2015). These reviews identified areas for improvement, recommendations and corrective actions which are being implemented to improve future response capabilities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16 Main Estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2015-16 Total Authorities
Available for use
2015-16 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2015-16 Difference
(actual minus planned)
115,329,152 115,750,051 121,934,439 119,846,641 4,096,590
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents - FTEs) – Internal Service
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16 Difference
(actual minus planned)
749 777 28

The increase from Planned to Actual Spending of $4.1 million and 28 FTEs largely relates the program re-alignment of resources to Internal Services. This realignment was necessary to comply with new requirements of the amended Treasury Board Guide on Internal Services Expenditures: Recording, Reporting and Attributing, which came into effect on April 1, 2015.

The FTE increase was partially offset by the requirement for CFIA to absorb the in-year and ongoing cost increases associated with collective bargaining settlement negotiations from 2010-11 through to 2012-13. The ongoing cost of the most recent round of negotiations totalled approximately $30 million annually. Given that nearly 80% of the Agency's annual operating expenditures support personnel costs, there was limited flexibility to realign non-personnel authorities to cover these increases. As a result, the Agency FTE complement declined through attrition in all Programs, including Internal Services.

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