2017-18 Departmental Plan

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Minister's Message

The Honourable Jane Philpott, PC, MP
Minister of Health

The Honourable Jane Philpott

It is my pleasure to present to my colleagues in Parliament and to all Canadians the 2017-2018 Departmental Plan for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). Every day, the Government of Canada relies on the CFIA and its more than 6,000 employees to safeguard the health and well-being of Canadians. The CFIA does this by protecting plant and animal health, preventing food safety hazards, managing food safety investigations and recalls, and defending the marketplace from unfair practices.

Our 2017-18 Departmental Plan provides parliamentarians and Canadians with information on what we do and the results we plan to achieve during the upcoming year and beyond, to fulfill our mandate and the Government's priorities. To improve reporting to Canadians, we are introducing a new, simplified report to replace the old Reports on Plans and Priorities. The name of the report has been changed to reflect its purpose: to communicate our annual performance goals and the financial and human resources forecast needed to deliver those results. The report has also been restructured to tell a clearer, more straightforward and balanced story of the actual results we are trying to achieve while continuing to provide transparency on how taxpayers' dollars will be spent. We describe our programs and services for Canadians, our priorities for 2017-18, and how our work will fulfill our departmental mandate commitments and the government's priorities.

The CFIA is one of Canada's largest science-based regulatory agencies. The Agency works closely with its federal portfolio partners, Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada, to adopt a modern, preventive approach to protecting the health of Canadians. This approach is based on managing risk, using science and technology to their best advantage, and reflecting international standards. This Departmental Plan describes the many initiatives that the CFIA will advance during the 2017-18 fiscal year to support this modern, preventive approach.

In addition, a key priority for the CFIA is to develop and enhance its client services. Through the CFIA's new approach - where being a regulator also means being a service provider - the Agency is using digital tools to provide stakeholders and clients with better service. The CFIA continues to invest in more effective tools and resources, written in plain language, to make it easier for industry to understand and comply with the rules. I am confident that the CFIA is meeting the complex challenges of its plant health, animal health, and food safety mandate. Thanks to the hard work and dedication of its staff, the Agency continues to contribute in a meaningful way to the health and prosperity of all Canadians.

The Honourable Jane Philpott, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Plans at a Glance

Every day, more than six thousand CFIA professionals work to support the government's goals to protect Canadians across the country and instill confidence in our food safety system and our plant, animal and food products and support market access for them. They help protect plant and animal health. They prevent food safety hazards and manage food safety investigations and recalls. They also promote and verify improved packaging and labelling to help consumers make better informed decisions.

The CFIA is committed to continuously improve its programs and activities in order to better meet the needs of consumers, industry and international trading partners. In 2017-18 the CFIA will continue to, modernize and consult with Canadians on new regulations or proposed amendments, update various programs and infrastructure, foster collaboration with national and international partners, and improve the services it delivers for Canadians.

To deliver on its commitments, the Agency seeks to achieve better results by placing a high priority on strengthening food safety, supporting market access, and enhancing service delivery. The Agency will track its progress towards these priorities and will report back to Canadians and Parliament through the Departmental Results.

The CFIA has an ambitious year ahead which includes the development of a new Departmental Results Framework and a number of consultations with Canadians which will help influence our agenda going forward. These initiatives will support our communication with Canadians about our core responsibilities and how we plan to measure our results starting in 2018-19. Highlighted below is a summary of our plans for 2017-18.

Strengthening Food Safety and Protecting Animal and Plant Health

The CFIA continues to enhance its rules, programs and partnerships to support the prevention of food safety and plant or animal health events and maintain confidence for Canadians in our food, plant and animal products and system.

In 2017-18 the CFIA expects to:

Supporting Market Access

Access to markets, both existing and new, is critical to Canada's economy. The CFIA will continue to safeguard Canada's animal and plant resource base and food safety system. The Agency will continue to support efforts to maintain and expand market access for Canadian plants, animals, food and their products.

In 2017-18 the CFIA will:

Enhancing Service Delivery

CFIA continues to enhance service delivery as a regulator for its clients. Canadians look to the CFIA as a regulator to ensure our rules are followed but also to provide clients with effective tools to communicate with the CFIA, apply for services and understand what is included in a service.

In 2017-18 the CFIA intends to:

For more information on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's plans, priorities and the planned results, see the "Planned results" section of this report.

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is one of Canada's largest science-based regulatory agencies. It has approximately 6,555 employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region and in four operational areas: Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western.

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food safety and animal and plant health, which enhances Canada's environment, economy, and the health and well-being of its residents.

Mandate and role

The CFIA develops program requirements and delivers inspections and other services in order to:

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective risk management, a commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

Responsibilities

The CFIA administrates and enforces 13 federal statutes and 38 sets of regulations. These statues and regulations support a sustainable plant and animal resource base and regulate the safety and quality of food sold in Canada. In November 2012, the Safe Food for Canadians Act received Royal Assent. This legislation, when fully in force, will provide the necessary legal framework for a more consistent approach to strengthening food inspection in Canada. The Safe Food for Canadians Act consolidates and will replace the following Acts: the Fish Inspection Act, the Canada Agricultural Products Act, the Meat Inspection Act, and the food provisions of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act.

The Agricultural Growth Act received Royal Assent on February 25, 2015, and most of its provisions have already come into force. The Agricultural Growth Act modernized and strengthened federal agriculture legislation, supports innovation in the Canadian agriculture industry and enhances global market opportunities for Canadians. The Agricultural Growth Act updated the following suite of Acts that the CFIA uses to regulate Canada's agriculture sector: Plant Breeders' Rights Act, Feeds Act, Fertilizers Act, Seeds Act, Health of Animals Act, Plant Protection Act, and the Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act.

New CFIA authorities include the following:

  • modern inspection authorities so that inspectors have the right tools to do their job
  • revised and strengthened offence provisions, with more up-to-date fines and penalties
  • explicit authorization for export certification
  • regulatory authority to require licensing and/or registration
  • explicit authority to incorporate documents by reference
  • regulatory authority to require preventive control plans and quality management plans from manufacturers
  • document and record-keeping requirements

New authorities

With the passage of the Safe Food for Canadians Act in 2012, which is not yet fully in force, and the Agricultural Growth Act in 2015, the CFIA has new authorities to address new challenges and issues, and respond to new pressures, trends and science.

Operating context: conditions affecting our work

The CFIA is responsible for food safety, animal health and plant health, as it relates to the health and well-being of Canadians, the environment and our economy. The Agency shares these responsibilities with various levels of government, industry and other stakeholders with whom it implements safety measures, manages risks, incidents and emergencies. We do this to maintain the safety of and confidence in Canada's high quality food, animal and plant products.

CFIA's key federal partners

  • Health Canada
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Canadian Grain Commission
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada, including Canadian Forest Service
  • Global Affairs Canada
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada, including Canadian Wildlife Service

Internal operating environment

Internal Influences

After many years of comprehensive planning, design and engagement, the CFIA will begin implementing a number of major change initiatives. 2016 was identified as a Year of Implementation where the CFIA of the future began to take shape. The CFIA will continue to streamline processes, advance science, and harness innovation to better serve Canadians. These initiatives will continue through to 2020 and beyond.

The following changes are at the heart of our business, how we inspect and regulate, how we provide service, how we design our programs and manage our resources.

  • Safe Food for Canadians Regulations
  • Electronic Service Delivery Platform
  • My CFIA client service portal
  • integrated Agency Inspection Model (iAIM)
  • Client-centric service model and culture
  • Integrated Risk Management
  • Government of Canada new Policy on Results

The CFIA actively works with international partners to develop international science-based standards and to promote the Canadian science-based regulatory system. We also negotiate with foreign trading partners to resolve scientific and technical issues related to food safety and animal and plant health. In this way, we contribute to market access for Canadian food, plants, animals and their products.

At the CFIA, decisions are based on timely, relevant science. Science informs policy development, program design and program delivery. We rely on foresight, advice, risk assessment, attention to international standards, research and development, and testing.

Internally the CFIA's operating environment is shaped by ongoing Agency transformation. To keep up with a rapidly modernizing world, the CFIA will continue to improve its processes, advance our science, and harness innovation to better serve Canadians.

Externally, the CFIA's operating environment is influenced by a number of factors: the global economy, social and environmental changes, and advances in science and technology.

External Influences

The CFIA considers the external factors in its daily operations. Each factor has a different impact as described below.

External operating environment

External Influences

  • Trade and Market Access
  • Increased Consumer Knowledge & Expectation
  • Changing Physical Environment
  • Biotechnology and Genomics
  • Policy and Technology Alignment

Trade and Market Access

There has been a significant increase in volume, variety, and diversity of sources for trade. International trade has drastically changed the way we produce and distribute Canadian food, plants, animals and their products. This increase in volume, sources, diversity and distribution of supply requires greater CFIA oversight in several areas. The CFIA negotiates international rules, advocates for practices that reflect Canada's approaches, supports product safety, and expands or maintains market access for Canadian plant, animal and food products.

Increased Consumer Knowledge & Expectation

Consumers are more aware of diverse product offerings and the accessibility of these products. They also have higher expectations for product information and availability. To respond to these needs, the CFIA has been modernizing its regulations and processes and keeping pace with science and innovation.

Changing Environment

As a result of the changing environment, the potential for different invasive species to thrive could exist. The increase and diversity in trade is also an avenue for new pests to enter Canada. Invasive species, such as insects, plants and diseases that become established in areas which are new to them can be harmful to the environment, economy and the health of plants, animals and humans. The CFIA will continue to improve its detection and control measures to mitigate the impact of these pests on our resources.

Biotechnology and Genomics

Scientific and technological advances, such as biotechnology, genomics and nanotechnology, are leading to new and innovative tools. These tools can help the CFIA build on its strong capacity to anticipate, respond to and mitigate food safety, animal and plant health risks and emergencies. Genomics technologies can significantly reduce the time and costs associated with the detection, isolation, identification and characterization of pests and pathogens. The CFIA will continue to increase its genomics capacity and capabilities for a proactive risk response.

Policy and Technology Alignment

Advances in technology result in new ways of producing and distributing agricultural products. We strive to align our food safety, animal health, and plant resource protection policies and regulations with the prevailing technology to ensure they are more effective. The CFIA will continue to modernize its policies, processes and regulations to ensure they are up-to-date, efficient and in alignment with current technology.

Key risks: things that could affect our ability to achieve our plans and results

Safe food and a prosperous economy for Canadians depend on the CFIA's ability to identify and manage risks to the food supply and to the plant and animal resource base.

The CFIA has always used risk assessment to support decision making. While the Agency plays a regulatory role in managing the many risks related to the food supply and the plant and animal resource base, there are also a number of partners and stakeholders who contribute to managing these risks. These partners include but are not limited to the following:

Creating and maintaining active partnerships to support prevention and protection activities for our food safety and plant and animal health programs will help reduce the overall threat of risks and lessen their impacts. The CFIA is currently involved in a number of partnership initiatives which will support prevention, reduce risks and advance the Agency towards its long term vision.

The Agency has explored improving its capabilities to manage risk and use resources most effectively by experimenting with new risk intelligence tools. The CFIA integrates risk information in its planning and operations in order to reduce risk in delivering its mandate, and to improve how it mobilizes resources in response to new threats.

Risk based inspection

The Agency is improving the way in which it performs inspections in order to be responsive and flexible in a constantly shifting global landscape.

The primary role of an inspector has always been to verify industry's compliance with the requirements of legislation. Risk-based approaches enable inspectors to target activities and areas of greatest risk, not just the end-product or lot by lot inspections.

The CFIA uses various measures to reduce risks to the health of Canadians, Canadian businesses, and the environment. To improve on planning and decision-making, the Agency has developed a comparative risk model that provides information on where it can most effectively reduce risk. Using the model, the CFIA can allocate resources across its different business lines, based on the gravity of the risk. The model was designed in 2015-16 and improved in 2016-17. The CFIA will publish a policy paper on this work in 2017-18.

The CFIA will conduct a baseline analysis in 2017-18 using the results of the risk model. This analysis will also be used in making recommendations for investment and the alignment of resources to risk control measures that the Agency uses. The Agency is also developing a test database that it will use for external peer review and to explore ways to use the data and model to gain new risk insights.

The CFIA also continues to implement its two-year strategy of the establishment risk assessment model. When fully implemented, this model will help us allocate resources for annual inspection plans.

These models, used with new risk intelligence tools, support the Government's commitment to evidence-based decision making and transparency. We will use the information we gain from them to better plan inspections and surveillance decision making. This will help the Agency to deliver best value for public dollars spent.

In 2017-18 we expect to renew the Corporate Risk Profile, which was last fully renewed in 2012, with a refresh of the annex in 2014.

The CFIA will focus on three key risks in 2017-18 in line with those identified in the current Corporate Risk Profile. As outlined in the Operating Context section, external factors influence these risks, including factors such as the global economy, social and environmental changes and advances in science and technology. An internal influence, Agency transformation, will continue to modernize our processes, advance our science, and harness innovation to better serve Canadians and help us keep pace with the constantly advancing modern world.

For each risk, plans have been put in place to mitigate the likelihood and/or impact of the risk. Risks to the Agency's ability to deliver its mandate should decrease, to varying degrees, based on the proposed strategies to respond to risk.

Risks Risk response strategy Link to the department's Programs Link to government-wide and departmental priorities

Managing Change

The ability to effectively manage change on an ongoing basis.

The global evolution of economic, social and environmental factors influence the regulatory and business environment within which the Agency operates.

The Agency must continuously innovate to operate efficiently, while maintaining or increasing how well it does business and fulfills its mandate.

  • Business planning
    • Renew Long-Term Strategic Plan
    • Implement Integrated Risk Management Framework, including the policy and guide, and adopt the Program Management Framework
    • Renew Corporate Risk Profile
    • Continue to implement Business Architecture
    • Develop and implement the Departmental Results Framework to replace the Program Alignment Architecture
  • Optimizing performance
    • Optimize the workplace
    • Modernize analytics
  • Service excellence
    • Develop service model
    • Implement "Ask CFIA"
    • Implement automated guidance document management
    • Improve staffing mechanisms and employee support

P1.1 Food Safety program

P1.2 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

P1.3 Plant Resources Program

Government priority:
A Safer and Stronger Canada at Home and in the World

Government priority:
Open and Transparent Government

Emergency Management

The ability to prevent and/or respond to multiple simultaneous or large-scale emergencies.

The CFIA has a well-planned emergency preparedness and response capacity. However, threat environments continue to evolve. This requires us to regularly update plans and responses and to find efficiencies to ensure that the Agency can maintain essential business functions during emergencies.

  • Implement the Food Import Strategy
  • Deliver the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Emergency Management Framework
  • Implement the Prevention and Modernization Strategy for plant and animal health
  • Maintain and monitor current emergency management preparedness and response mitigation strategies.

P1.1 Food Safety program

P1.2 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

P1.3 Plant Resources Program

Government priority:
A Safer and Stronger Canada at Home and in the World

Scientific Capability

The ability to have the scientific capability to adapt and respond in a timely manner.

Advancements in science and technology have increased the complexity of the commodities the Agency regulates. Additionally, there is growing international consensus around the need for the following: common scientific equipment, the use of modern technologies, such as genomics, and common approaches to support industry oversight and the global agri-food trade. The Agency is expected to maintain modern laboratory facilities that reflect these advancements in regulated products and international requirements.

  • Increase focus on prevention through building scientific capacity and partnerships to support decision making, such as
    • Pathogen reduction standards in poultry establishments
    • Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN) implementation
    • Regulatory Modernization
  • Increase engagement with international partners to share scientific expertise
    • Continue to implement Regulatory Cooperation Council and Beyond the Border
  • Implement the Animal Health Modernization Initiative to achieve the following benefits:
    • Traceability
    • Export Certification Audit
    • Cross-Border Biosecurity
  • Continue to strengthen science capacity through the following:
    • Food Safety Risk Intelligence Framework
    • Laboratory Network Strategy
    • Federal Science & Technology Infrastructure Strategy and Action Plan
    • Surveillance initiatives
    • Open science
    • Genomics Strategy to enhance CFIA's genomics capacity and capabilities for proactive risk response

P1.1 Food Safety program

P1.2 Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

P1.3 Plant Resources Program

Government priority:
A Safer and Stronger Canada at Home and in the World

Government priority:
Inclusive and Sustainable Economic Growth

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

This section describes what we plan to achieve in our four main programs: the Food Safety Program the Animal Health and Zoonotic Program, the Plant Resources Program and International Collaboration and Technical Agreements.

Program 1.1: Food Safety Program

Description

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization and Program Redesign

The CFIA plans to modernize regulations and redesign some parts of the Food Safety Program. The sections that follow provide more detail on these changes.

Safe Food for Canadians Act and Regulations

The CFIA is committed to food safety oversight for Canadian families, and this is reflected in the Safe Food for Canadians Act and its regulations. Once fully in force, this legislation would achieve these goals:

  • Improve food safety oversight to better protect consumers through:
    • tougher prohibitions, penalties and fines for activities that put health and safety at risk
    • better control over imports
    • a more consistent inspection approach across all food commodities
    • strengthened traceability for food
  • Enhance international market opportunities for the Canadian food industry by providing authority to certify any food commodity for export
  • Provide for licensing of importers to ensure a consistent approach for all food commodities

Safe Food for Canadians Act

The Safe Food for Canadians Act (SFCA) will provide one suite of authorities with updated and simplified language and modernized inspection powers. The legislation provides more explicit authority for inspectors.

We have consulted and continue to consult Canadians on the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. Depending on the amount and complexity of feedback we receive from Canadians after its publication in the Canada Gazette, Part I, the final publication of the regulations and coming-into-force date for this Act could be as early as 2017-18.

The CFIA is proposing a staged implementation of the legislation over a three year period following its final publication in Canada Gazette, Part II.

In 2017-18, we will make regulatory guidance materials available to Canadian stakeholders to help them understand the proposed regulatory requirements for food. These materials will be in plain language to meet the different needs of a broad and varied audience. We anticipate that the materials will be released incrementally, beginning with Canada Gazette I.

The objectives of Canada Gazette, Part I, comment period will be to assist industry and other stakeholders to better understand the proposed regulatory requirements. This will help them to provide informed comments and feedback that will be taken into consideration for final publication in Canada Gazette, Part II. Industry and other stakeholders will also have early awareness of the impact the proposed new requirements will have on their businesses. It will also reassure that assistance and resources are available to support them in the future.

We will prepare updated operational guidance documents for the food sector as part of the Integrated Agency Inspection Modelimplementation. This is an important first step towards being ready to implement the Safe Food for Canadians Act. We are preparing a draft training module about the Safe Food for Canadians Act for delivery in 2017-18.

Food Labelling Modernization

Canadians are looking for more diverse and innovative food choices. They are increasingly aware and knowledgeable about labels on products. Consumers expect improved transparency and accountability. The food industry continues to be innovative and adaptable in response to market drivers and global trends. The objective of the Food Labelling Modernization initiative is to meet the needs of Canadians by developing a more modern food labelling system. This system includes improved labels with more useful information to Canadians, tools for building consumer awareness and promoting compliance. The system empowers consumers to play a more active role in the marketplace.

Food labelling

Food labelling provides consumers with important information that helps them make informed decisions about the food they purchase for themselves and their families. This includes:

  • what the food is and how much you are buying
  • nutrition information, ingredient lists and allergen declarations
  • other characteristics such as organic and local.

During 2015-16, CFIA completed Phase II of its engagement activities with stakeholders on options to modernize food labelling. More than 1,600 Canadians participated.

Based on the feedback provided, in 2017-18, the CFIA will prepare instructions, in collaboration with Health Canada, for drafting new labelling provisions. These labelling provisions will be included in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations and in new or revised labelling provisions in the Food and Drug Regulations.

We will integrate the Food Compositional Standards and Standard Container Sizes into the Food Labelling Modernization initiative. In 2017-18, the CFIA will work closely with Health Canada to align and coordinate engagement activities, proposals, consultations, and coming-into-force dates for these additional proposed regulatory changes.

Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program in Federal Slaughter Establishments

The CFIA continues to implement its Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program in federal slaughter establishments. The purpose of the Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program is to improve food safety through a consistent application of policy in all slaughter houses. The program is risk based, efficient, and is recognized by our trading partners. As it is recognized by our trading partners, it will benefit the Canadian economy by helping to support market access. In 2017-18, the CFIA will work closely with the United States Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) to improve the alignment of the two countries' meat inspection systems. The CFIA will also continue an international comparison of meat inspection systems to assist in improving access to international trade for Canadian meat.

Establishment-Based Risk Assessment Model

The Establishment-Based Risk Assessment Model is a proactive, science-based and risk-based tool. Its purpose is to help the CFIA detect and act upon potential emerging trends that may jeopardize food safety. The model will provide a more consistent, predictable, and transparent assessment process for industry. It will provide industry with feedback on their risks, which would assist them to improve and strengthen their food safety practices, which would in turn increase confidence in Canada's food safety system.

When fully operational, the Establishment Risk Assessment Model will evaluate food establishments based on the level of risk they represent to consumers. The model will help the CFIA use greater precision in the way it designs its programs and work plans and help the CFIA to prioritize its oversight activities and to allocate its resources.

In 2017-18, CFIA expects to implement the Establishment-Based Risk Assessment Model for most commodities in the food sector. The model will also be adapted for importers.

Surveillance

Biosurveillance is a process of gathering, integrating, interpreting, and communicating essential information that might relate to disease activity and threats to human, animal, or plant health. Biosurveillance capabilities across Canada and the world play a key role in arming the CFIA with the tools and expertise required to take decisive and pre-emptive action to respond to animal disease threats, animal health, human health and the security of the food supply. A number of collaborative networks provide early warning surveillance to strengthen our ability to anticipate, detect and respond to animal disease threats. Examples of these networks include the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network, Canadian Food Safety Information Network and the Community for Emerging and Zoonotic Disease Integrated Intelligence and Response. The CFIA is taking an integrated approach to make use of multiple data repositories to ensure that complete, robust datasets are available for trending and analysis. The CFIA is leading the development of a risk intelligence framework to facilitate the conversion of risk information into risk-based intelligence that will enhance a One Agency decision making at the CFIA.

Collaboration and Partnerships

Canadian Food Safety Information Network

The CFIA is partnering with Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, and with interested provinces and territories in the Canadian Food Safety Information Networkinitiative. This network seeks to strengthen our ability to anticipate, detect and respond to food hazards by enabling laboratories to share urgently needed surveillance information and food safety data. This sharing of information helps reduce food safety incidents in Canada and safeguards the health of Canadians. The CFIA anticipates signing data-sharing arrangements with more provinces in 2017-18, which will increase the database available.

In 2017-18, the CFIA will continue to build on the collaborative network and plan the technical infrastructure required to share food safety data with its partners. The Canadian Food Safety Information Network will use the Public Health Agency of Canada's existing web-based platform. The CFIA will integrate multiple data storage systems to ensure that complete, robust data sets are available for trending and analysis.

Foreign Food Safety Systems Recognition

Canada currently uses a range of tools and approaches to control imports. These are based on Canada's legislative and regulatory framework. The tools and approaches assign inspection resources to check for compliance with requirements, in line with international rights and obligations. As the CFIA modernizes its food safety regulatory system, it has an opportunity to make greater use of tools that could optimize its risk management activities for imports.

The CFIA will continue to work with the United States to align regulatory approaches. This will result in improved Canada-United States trade, while maintaining high standards for food safety. The objective for 2017-18 is to develop a work plan, under the Regulatory Cooperation Council, and to review how the two countries are implementing the existing Food Safety Systems recognition agreements.

Increasing Safety in Imported Foods

Through Federal Budget 2016, the CFIA received funds to increase our ability to collaborate with foreign authorities. Together we share best practices and information on food safety standards and practices, with an overall goal of improving the safety of imported food.

The objective of this initiative is to improve the safety of food imports into the Canadian market. We do this by identifying unsafe or non-compliant imported food products in the country of origin or export before the products arrive in Canada.

This initiative includes three different types of activities:

For 2017-18, the targeted countries and activities are:

Innovation and Experimentation

Ask CFIA

In 2016-17, the CFIA implemented a new service called 'Ask CFIA'. This service was established in response to needs identified by stakeholders, namely the need for straightforward access to consistent and easy to understand information and the desire for access to technical expertise in the Agency. Ask CFIA provides regulated parties with one point of entry to ask questions to help them understand and comply with CFIA regulatory requirements. Increased regulatory understanding and compliance will provide Canadians with a safer and stronger food system, and plant and animal resource base. Ask CFIA was initially made available to the following sectors: dairy, fish and seafood, fresh and processed fruits and vegetables, maple products, honey and egg and egg products. Additional sectors will be phased in until all CFIA regulated sectors are included. The Agency will continue to test and refine our internal processes and plans to evaluate the performance of the Ask CFIA service. The resources associated with this CFIA initiative are $1.3 million.

Proactive Offshore Preventative Activities

The CFIA is increasing its proactive offshore preventative activities to assist trading partners in complying with Canada's import food regulations. In this approach, compliance is verified at exporting countries' establishments through assessing manufacturing practices and/or inspection systems. This is a change from verifying compliance with import requirements at the Canadian port of entry.

In 2017-18, the CFIA will focus on proactive offshore activities in three areas:

The CFIA will work directly with the foreign food safety competent authority to foster understanding of, and compliance with, Canadian import requirements.

Canada will continue to implement import controls at the Canadian port of entry; however, these controls will now be supported by offshore preventative activities. This is a shift away from reacting to food safety risks to preventing them at source.

The long term performance of these offshore measures will be a reduction in the number, and scope, of imported products that are determined to be non-compliant with Canada's food import requirements. Short term progress will be measured by an increase in the number of activities conducted in the three areas of activity stated above.

Supporting information on lower-level programs is available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Planned Results

Evaluations that Affect Our Plans for Achieving Planned Results

Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Program

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Program was evaluated on its relevance and performance with respect to food safety and food quality goals during the period of 2008-13.

The finding was that the Agency needed to focus on grading (quality) and assistance to industry. The finding confirmed that a proactive and preventive approach to food safety, focussing on whole supply chain, instead of targeting specific commodities, was necessary.

As part of the CFIA's modernization agenda, each regulation applicable to Fresh Fruit and Vegetables was reviewed. As a result of the review and Fresh Fruit and Vegetable evaluation, the Agency is modernizing its Food Safety Regulations and a Fresh Fruit and Vegetables performance measurement strategy is being developed.

The following tables show our planned results for the Food Safety Program.

Expected Result - Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated
Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Number of commodity areas where inspected federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 31 March 2018 5 out of 6 5 out of 6 5 out of 6
Meat and Poultry 98% 31 March 2018 98% 97.7% 95.60%
Egg 98% 31 March 2018 97% 97% 96.22%
Dairy 98% 31 March 2018 96% 98% 99.00%
Fish and Seafood 98% 31 March 2018 99% 98.7% 98.11%
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 98% 31 March 2018 97% 90.9% 98.85%
Processed Products 98% 31 March 2018 98% 96.8% 97.77%
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision Table Note 1 100% 31 March 2018 100% 99.6% 95.03%
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision Table Note 2 95% 31 March 2018 95% 100% 100%

Table Notes

Table Note 1

Class I - represents a situation in which there is a reasonable probability that the consumption or exposure to a food will lead to adverse health consequences which are serious or life-threatening, or that the probability of a foodborne outbreak situation is considered high.

Return to table note 1  referrer

Table Note 2

Class II - represents a situation in which there is a reasonable probability that the consumption or exposure to a food will lead to temporary or non-life threatening health consequences or that the probability of serious adverse consequences is considered remote.

Return to table note 2  referrer

Expected Result - Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Number of commodity areas where tested domestic food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 31 March 2018 6 out of 6 6 out of 6 6 out of 6
Meat and Poultry 95% 31 March 2018 95% 97.7% 97.32%
Egg 95% 31 March 2018 97% 98.7% 99.00%
Dairy 95% 31 March 2018 99% 96.1% 97.94%
Fish and Seafood 95% 31 March 2018 98% 97.6% 97.61%
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 95% 31 March 2018 99% 98.8% 98.95%
Processed Products 95% 31 March 2018 98% 98.1% 98.12%
Number of commodity areas where tested imported food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 31 March 2018 5 out of 6 4 out of 6 4 out of 6
Meat and Poultry 95% 31 March 2018 98% 99.6% 98.62%
Egg 95% 31 March 2018 99% 98.9% 99.53%
Dairy 95% 31 March 2018 98% 90.6% 88.54%
Fish and Seafood 95% 31 March 2018 85% 89% 87.89%
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 95% 31 March 2018 97% 96.8% 96.83%
Processed Products 95% 31 March 2018 95% 96.2% 96.98%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Food Safety Program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

As the CFIA is developing a new Departmental Results Framework for implementation in 2018-19 the associated expected results and targets will be aligned with the new framework.

The following tables present the CFIA's Planned Spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20. This excludes funding extensions for initiatives that are scheduled to sunset.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
348,722,065 349,600,493 302,688,731 292,616,400
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
2,890 2,732 2,627

The Planned Spending for the Food Safety Program decreases by $57.0 million and 263 full-time equivalents from 2017-18 to 2019-20. This spending decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of the following initiatives and programmes in 2017-18: the Federal Infrastructure Initiative, the Budget 2016 improving food safety for Canadians initiative, the Electronic Service Delivery Platform initiative. The spending decrease is also related to the sunsetting of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy funding and the Canadian Food Safety Information Network initiative in 2018-2019.

Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding. The Agency will assess initiatives sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in the Agency's budget authorities. Agency level information, including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph.

Information on the CFIA's lower-level programs is available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Program 1.2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Description

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, limiting risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instils confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization and Program Redesign

The CFIA plans to modernize regulations and redesign some parts of the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program. The sections that follow provide more detail on these changes.

Humane Transport Regulatory Modernization

Following several years of broad consultations with Canadians, the CFIA is proposing amendments to Part XII of the Health of Animals Regulations. Modernizing the animal transport regulations will better align Canada with industry's best practices and current scientific knowledge about animal welfare during transportation. After publication in Canada Gazette, Part I, following consultations with industry and other stakeholders, we anticipate that these proposed amendments will be published in Canada Gazette, Part II, in 2017-18.

Humane Transport Regulatory Modernization

The proposed regulations would enhance requirements regarding feed, water and rest, and require improved record-keeping and training of commercial carriers. They will be closely aligned with the World Organization for Animal Health guidance, as well as the regulatory frameworks of our trading partners, contributing to continued and enhanced market access.

Traceability Regulatory Modernization

Livestock traceability is the ability to track an animal or a group of animals through all stages of its life. The objective of livestock traceability is to protect the health of animals and Canadians. It achieves this through efficient surveillance and control of diseases, microbes and toxic substances that affect animals and, in some instances, may spread to humans.

The quicker the response, the easier it is to contain a disease within its origins. Livestock traceability helps us to control and remove the disease, preventing it from spreading to other parts of the country. In some cases, the spread of disease does not take long and containing it quickly reduces the subsequent economic, health, environmental and social impacts on Canadians.

The CFIA anticipates that amendments to the Traceability section of the Health of Animals Regulations will be published in Canada Gazette, Part I, in 2017-18. The proposed amendments will strengthen existing livestock identification traceability requirements in Canada to enable effective and timely disease control investigations. The proposed amendments will improve how we manage animal health issues, further protect Canadian public health, and improve our ability to maintain market access and confidence in Canadian consumers.

The CFIA will also complete the compliance support communications products for regulated parties who may be affected by this initiative.

Traceability National Information Portal

Livestock identification, movement, location and ownership information is collected across the country in multiple information systems. These information systems are managed by different organizations and provincial governments. The CFIA's ability to efficiently and effectively conduct disease control and surveillance activities, along with compliance verification inspections, is hampered by this multiple data collection model.

The goal of the CFIA's livestock identification and traceability program is to provide rapid access to accurate and up-to-date traceability information. Traceability includes three basic elements: animal identification, premises identification and animal movement information. This information can be used to manage animal diseases, food safety issues and natural disasters, such as floods or fires that require the movement of animals.

In 2017-18, the CFIA will continue its planned enhancements to the Traceability National Information Portal (TNIP). We will sign new data-sharing arrangements with more Provinces and link additional information systems to the single-window Portal. This will allow the CFIA to respond more quickly to animal health issues and will support market access. In addition, Canadian veterinarians and epidemiologists will have access to accurate, complete and up-to-date information for a more effective support of disease control and surveillance activities.

To support the new regulations, the CFIA will continue to develop guidance, training and education materials for inspectors and industry.

Feeds Regulations Modernization

Feed is an integral component that supports food production in Canada. Safe and effective feeds contribute to the production of healthy livestock and safe foods of animal origin for human consumption. The CFIA will continue to modernize its regulatory framework for feeds. The modernized Feeds Regulations will support fair and competitive trade in the market and minimize regulatory burden on stakeholders. At the same time, the modernized regulations will continue to safeguard feeds and the food production continuum.

The CFIA consulted with Canadians, regulated parties, stakeholders, including federal partners, and other levels of government, in February and March 2016.

We anticipate that the proposed amendments will be published in Canada Gazette, Part I, in 2017-18, followed by final publication in Canada Gazette, Part II. To support the proposed regulations, the CFIA will develop and implement guidance, training and education materials for inspectors and industry.

Community for Emerging and Zoonotic Disease

The Community for Emerging and Zoonotic Disease-Integrated Intelligence and Response will continue to enhance our capability to generate intelligence and our capacity to detect and respond to emerging and zoonotic diseases. This provides Canadians with confidence in our food and animal health systems. The initiative is aimed at identifying early warning signals by gathering information from open information sources, including web-based and community-supplied information. Its purpose is to generate timely intelligence that meets the needs of decision makers and operational personnel. The Community for Emerging and Zoonotic Disease will continue to actively participate as a member network of the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System. The community's participation ensures that the information and intelligence it provides will be useful to the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System community. It also makes it possible for members of the network to explore ways for the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System community to contribute information and intelligence to the Community for Emerging and Zoonotic Disease.

Collaboration and Partnerships

Maintaining Market Access during a Foreign Animal Disease Outbreak

In October 2012, the United States Department of Agriculture and the CFIA entered into an Arrangement under the Regulatory Cooperation Council initiative to recognize each other's zoning decisions during a foreign animal disease outbreak. The CFIA and the United States Department of Agriculture used the Regulatory Cooperation Council zoning arrangement for the first time during the 2014-15 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza outbreaks in British Columbia and Ontario. In September 2015, the CFIA and the United States Department of Agriculture agreed to a streamlined approval process for Regulatory Cooperation Council zoning requests for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza outbreaks.

There is now an initiative at the Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council and the Beyond the Border Declaration to expand the Canada-United States Zoning arrangement to include Australia and New Zealand. This initiative will recognize members' disease control zones in case of a foreign animal disease outbreak, so as to reduce the impact on trade. The ultimate objective is to establish a common zoning framework for foreign animal diseases. The purpose of the proposed framework is twofold. First, it will ensure that members are protected against foreign animal diseases. Second, in the event of a disease outbreak in any of the four countries, bilateral trade can continue between zones that are free of the disease. This initiative will benefit the Canadian economy because recognizing foreign animal disease control and eradication zones will ensure trade continues with non-affected zone, while the disease is contained and managed within the affected zones.

In 2017-18, the CFIA will renew the existing arrangement with the United States Department of Agriculture, which is scheduled to expire in 2017. We will also complete Veterinary Infrastructure evaluations, and in collaboration with the North American Virtual Animal Disease Modelling Centre, we will develop tools that will help to plan zoning.

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Program Integrity

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) is a progressive, fatal disease of the nervous system of cattle. In the past 30 years, Canada has had 19 cases of BSE in cattle born in Canada. Ongoing surveillance confirms that BSE continues to remain under effective control.

The CFIA has identified eight priority areas for improvement in its BSE program for Canada, some of which address evaluation commitments. In 2017-18, the CFIA will implement these improvements in the following ways:

  • developing a system to gather data on BSE awareness activities
  • developing and implementing an action plan to fulfill current and forthcoming identified gaps in BSE expertise at CFIA
  • implementing a strategy to increase the number of samples for BSE
  • implementing a new Specified Risk Material Permit and Inspections Data System
  • delivering training to personnel involved in the inspection and audit of specified risk material controls in non-federally registered abattoirs
  • conducting audits to ensure that products and by-products exported from Canada meet foreign requirements on cross contamination by specified risk material and/or with bovine material of Canadian origin
  • analyzing how programs perform to recommend reallocation of the existing BSE resources
  • starting the implementation of improvements identified in the previous year

BSE surveillance

The CFIA is a co-lead of working groups under the national collaborative surveillance structure called CanSurveBSE. It continues to be science-based and serves the interests of all stakeholders. Its objectives are to work together nationally to ensure that:

  • Canada continues to have a credible and efficient surveillance program that clearly demonstrates BSE remains under effective control; and
  • a sufficient level of surveillance is maintained to support the marketing of Canadian cattle and beef products and by-products.

The CFIA also conducts ongoing outreach through direct contact with veterinarians and producers to promote participation in the program.

In addition, the Agency supports provincial initiatives that remind producers of the importance of continuing to submit BSE samples.

International Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Laboratories Network

The CFIA, in partnership with the Canadian Safety and Security Program, is leading the formation of the Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Laboratories Network. This is to respond to serious global concern about the risk of emerging viral agents, most often originating in animals. Outbreaks are becoming more frequent and spreading more widely, which could result in devastating damage to human health, agriculture resources and national economies. At present, a high number of containment animal health institutions exist world-wide; however, these institutions face barriers to collaborating effectively, preventing the efficient exchange of information, materials, and expertise. The CFIA will establish and sustain biosafety level 4 trusted partnerships. This will strengthen international coordination, improve knowledge sharing and make use of integrated capacity for diagnosing, researching and training for pathogens of high consequence.

Antimicrobial Resistance and Use

An antimicrobial is an agent that kills microorganisms or inhibits their growth. Antimicrobials play an important role for animals. They reduce suffering and help farmers raise healthy animals, which in turn provide safe food, including meat, milk and eggs, for Canadian consumers. Antimicrobials are routinely used in livestock feed for growth promotion and to prevent infections in food-producing animals. However, the misuse of antimicrobials contributes to the development of resistant bacteria, which poses a risk.

In 2017-18, the CFIA will continue to work with other government departments on the Federal Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance and Usage in Canada. In collaboration with the Public Health Agency of Canada, Health Canada, and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the CFIA will develop an integrated risk assessment model to help prevent the spread of antimicrobial resistance. The CFIA will focus on the three pillars outlined in the Federal Action Plan: Surveillance, Stewardship and Innovation. Applying these pillars to antimicrobial use in animals, we will ensure that a comprehensive data set is available through the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance.

Supporting information on lower-level programs is available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Planned Results

Evaluations that Affect Our Plans for Achieving Planned Results

Enhanced Feed Ban

The Enhanced Feed Ban initiative was evaluated in 2013 with the objective of assessing whether the ban remained necessary and whether it had achieved expected outcomes. The scope for the evaluation was 2004-05 to June 2011.

The evaluation found that the circumstances and factors that prompted the introduction of the enhanced feed ban had not changed significantly and warrant continuation of the ban. It also found that there were ongoing efforts led by the CFIA to identify potential modifications to the design and delivery of the enhanced feed ban that would better address the needs of CFIA partners and stakeholders, including the industries regulated by the enhanced feed ban. The evaluation made four recommendations which have been actioned by the CFIA.

In addition, the report concluded that the Enhanced Feed Ban is an important component of the Government of Canada's response to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), given the ongoing need to reduce the risk of transmission of BSE in the Canadian cattle herd to protect animal and public health and to facilitate market access for Canadian beef and other related products. Given its alignment with long-term federal government priorities and goals as well as current departmental responsibilities (including regulatory responsibilities), the enhanced feed ban continues to remain relevant to the mandate of the CFIA.

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Management Program

In 2013, the CFIA conducted an internal evaluation of its Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Management Program to ensure that it was relevant to the needs and priorities of its major stakeholders, international trading partners and organizations, as well as consistent with both government-wide priorities and its own mandate.

The evaluation resulted in several actions taken across the Agency to ensure that its Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Management Program was operating effectively and efficiently. The Agency committed to the following key deliverables as a result of the evaluation:

The following tables show our planned results for the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program.

Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada through specified regulated pathways 0 31 March 2018 0 0 0
Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease 100% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements 99% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%
Canada's status on the OIE disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk" Status maintained 31 March 2018 Status maintained Status maintained Status maintained
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease 100% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed 100% of all necessary manual updates are completed 31 March 2018 100% of all necessary manual updates are completed 33% of
necessary
manual updates
were completed
75% of
necessary
manual updates
were completed
Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises in which CFIA participates 9 31 March 2018 11 23 11
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion 100% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%
Percentage of cases where the CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease 100% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Animal Health and Zoonotics indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

As the CFIA is developing a new Departmental Results Framework for implementation in 2018-19, the associated expected results and targets will be aligned with the new framework.

The following tables present the CFIA's Planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20. This excludes funding extensions for initiatives that are scheduled to sunset.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
124,518,784 125,411,593 119,526,241 97,389,616
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
942 929 760

The Planned Spending for the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program decreases by $28.0 million and 182 full-time equivalents from 2017-18 to 2019-20. This spending decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of the following initiatives and programmes in 2017-18: the Federal Infrastructure Initiative, the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector in seizing market opportunities and securing agriculture market access initiative, and the Growing Forward 2 initiative. The spending decrease is also related to the sunsetting of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy funding.

Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding. The Agency will assess ending initiatives. We will seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in the Agency's budget authorities. Agency level information, including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph.

Information on the CFIA's lower-level programs is available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Program 1.3: Plant Resources Program

Description

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instils confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Planning Highlights

The CFIA plans to modernize regulations and redesign some parts of the Plant Resources Program. The sections that follow provide more detail on these changes.

Regulatory Modernization and Program Redesign

Fertilizer Regulatory Modernization

The CFIA is proposing to amend the Fertilizers Regulations to address gaps and inconsistencies in the current regulations. The proposed amendments are intended to reflect current science and emerging risks. They aim to be more responsive to industry needs while maintaining strong, risk-based and consistent oversight of the safety of products entering the Canadian marketplace and environment. We anticipate that the proposed amendments will be published in Canada Gazette, Part I, in 2017-18.

Grain Export Certification

In 2017-18, the CFIA will redesign its Grain Export Certification program to provide more service choices to expedite, improve the speed and efficiency of weed seed examinations. This will help with the timely export of Canadian grain. We will be consulting with Canadians and stakeholders on the approach and we will also start a pilot program.

Grain industry

Did you know…

For 2016, total grain exports reached nearly $20.6 Billion, a 31.2% increase compared to the $15.7 billion of 2011.

Top 5 markets in 2016 for grain exports (pulses, cereals and oilseeds), including associated seeds for propagation: China ($ 4.0B), U.S. ($2.4B), Japan ($2.2B), India ($1.14B) and Mexico ($1.11B)

Regulatory Cooperation Council, Beyond the Border and International initiatives

Post-Entry Quarantine Program

Certain plants from designated countries must be grown for up to two years under specific post-entry quarantine conditions to be eligible to be imported into the United States. This requirement also applies to these plants if they first enter Canada prior to re-export to the United States. Delivering upon commitments in the Regulatory Cooperation Council, in 2017-18, CFIA will establish import requirements equivalent to those of the United States through the Post-Entry Quarantine Program. This program will provide a process that allows the United States to recognize plants grown in Canada as meeting their phytosanitary import requirements. These plants will no longer require post-entry quarantine. The CFIA is developing this program with the United States Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. The program will make it easier to trade in these plants, will contribute to Canada's economy, and will provide additional plant safety assurance to the United States.

Beyond the Border Initiative

To protect biodiversity and Canada's plant resource base, the CFIA works to minimize risks to Canada's plant resource base by developing and enforcing import and export controls, performing inspections related to plant resources, and advancing and applying plant science. In 2017-18, CFIA will continue to collaborate with the United States to further enhance and expand the Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) certification program and foreign outreach activities for other plant health risk pathways and pests.

Asian Gypsy Moth

The Asian gypsy moth is an invasive insect. It poses a significant threat to Canada's forests, biodiversity and economy. These moths can feed on a wide range of economically important tree species, as well as other important plants. Ships and cargo including containers and used vehicles can carry the egg masses of these moths to Canada from China, Japan, South Korea and Russia (far east region). In the right conditions, caterpillars hatch from these egg masses and they can go great distances with the wind to find food.

Collaboration and Partnerships

The CFIA plans to grow partnerships as part of the Plant Resources Program. The sections that follow provide more detail on these plans.

Plant Health Network

As a science-based regulator, the Agency will continue to build its scientific capacity and partnerships, while focusing on outcome-based results. Similar to the approach we took to build an animal health network and a food safety network, we will develop a national network of experts in plant health. This network will resolve collective challenges, providing more rapid access to specialised knowledge and expertise in support of the Agency's regulatory and policy decisions. This initiative will help plant scientists and diagnosticians work with other federal government scientists and with national and international academic and industry partners on sharing information and managing data. This will lead to efficiencies, both internally and externally, and to improved plant protection in Canada.

Innovation and Experimentation

Emergency Management Framework for Agriculture in Canada

The emergency management framework for agriculture in Canada sets the strategic direction for partners to collaboratively prepare for and manage emergencies facing the agriculture sector. It prepares all partners to act in a predictable, cohesive, practical and forward-thinking manner. In many cases, effective emergency management systems and practices are already in place, but they may not be well integrated. The framework guides the development and eventual implementation of emergency management activities. This will allow us to better use collective capacities and expertise in order to fully prepare for and manage emergencies.

The CFIA continues to be a partner in the emergency management framework for agriculture in Canada. In 2017-18, the federal, provincial, territorial and industry partners will build upon the framework by pursuing direct actions related to the emergency management framework. These actions include scheduling regular emergency management exercises, such as tabletop and live plays, and cover all areas of agricultural risk. We will review these exercises to identify gaps and areas for improvement. In 2017-18 the federal, provincial and industry partners will build upon the framework by developing a national plant and animal health strategy.

Plant and Animal Health Strategy

This strategy is intended to ensure that Canada is best positioned to safeguard its plant and animal resources and the related wellbeing of Canadians in regard to the increasing magnitude and complexity of the risks presented. Activities in 2016 concluded in a major stakeholder forum at which key objectives and expected results for inclusion in the strategy were identified. It is intended that the strategy will be presented to federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture for endorsement in July 2017 and that its implementation will lead to more focus and activity in the area of prevention, which should provide the best return on investment for related government and industry resources.

In 2017-18, development of the strategy will continue, as well as planning for its implementation. This is expected to include the development of specific performance measures. The Agency will dedicate approximately $1.1 million worth of combined resources from the Plant Resource and Animal Health and Zoonotics Program to this innovative and collaborative approach.

Planned Results

Evaluations that Affect Our Plans for Achieving Planned Results

Fertilizer Program

The evaluation of the CFIA's Fertilizer Program was conducted during the 2012-13 fiscal year and focussed on whether the program continued to meet its objectives in terms of making sure that fertilizer products are safe and labelled correctly.

The report determined that the program remains necessary and meets the needs of stakeholders. It noted that the program was on track in focusing on fertilizer and supplement safety to Canadians, animals and plants.

Modernization of the Fertilizer Regulations is currently under way. It represents an opportunity for additional changes to program administration with a further shift towards risk-based approaches and outcome-based regulations. It also aims to lessen regulatory burden on products that are deemed safe and have a well-established history of use and to remove prescriptive provisions from the regulations thus providing for greater flexibility and less red tape on the regulated sector.

The following tables show our planned results for the Plant Resources Program.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves 0 31 March 2018 0 0 0
Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements 90% 31 March 2018 92% 98% 96.16%
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk- mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issued 100% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%
Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner 90% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirements 99% 31 March 2018 99% 99.7% 99.75%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Plant Resources Program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

As the CFIA is developing a new Departmental Results Framework for implementation in 2018-19, the associated expected results and targets will be aligned with the new framework.

The following tables present the CFIA's Planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20. This excludes funding extensions for initiatives that are scheduled to sunset.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
78,138,366 78,664,213 76,076,780 75,956,733
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
688 678 678

The Planned Spending for the Plant Resources Program decreases by $2.7 million and 10 full-time equivalents from 2017-18 to 2019-20. This spending decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of the following initiatives and programmes in 2017-18: the Federal Infrastructure Initiative, the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector in seizing market opportunities and securing agriculture market access initiative, and the Growing Forward 2 initiative. The spending decrease is also related to the sunsetting of the Genomics Research and Development Initiative funding.

Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding. The Agency will assess ending initiatives. We will seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in the Agency's budget authorities. Agency level information, including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph.

Information on the CFIA's lower-level programs is available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Program 1.4: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Description

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through actively participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.

Planning Highlights

The CFIA actively participates in developing international rules and standards for food safety and the health of animal and plant resources. The CFIA will continue to lead Canada's participation in the following organizations: the World Trade Organization Sanitary and Phytosanitary Committee, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), and the North American Plant Protection Organization. We will continue to partner with Health Canada at Codex Alimentarius. Of particular significance, the CFIA is providing in-kind contributions to international organizations, specifically the Food and Agriculture Organizations, the World Organisation for Animal Health and the International Plant Protection Convention. In 2017-18, we will provide CFIA scientific experts on assignment to these organizations to support the development of international standards.

Through these engagements, Canada influences the development of rules and standards that are consistent with Canada's needs and objectives. Through the engagements, Canada also encourages harmonization on matters related to food safety and consumer protection, plant resources, and animal health and zoonotics. Engagement approaches include formal bilateral mechanisms established under international agreements and arrangements, ad hoc mechanisms, and technical cooperation activities. In addition, Canada continues to promote its regulatory approaches, encourage the adoption of risk- and science-based regulations and their associated best practices on a global level.

For example, the CFIA will collaborate with other government departments to:

The CFIA will implement a food safety strategy through offshore verification activities and technical assistance to foreign countries. This will improve compliance of imported products before they arrive at Canadian ports of entry.

The CFIA will continue to work with its international regulatory counterparts in likeminded countries, such as the United States and member countries of the European Union, and in emerging economies. We will strengthen and expand partnerships to achieve the following objectives:

Planned initiatives include:

Innovation and Experimentation

Global Food Safety Partnership

CFIA is a part of the Global Food Safety Partnership which, under the auspices of the World Bank, enables effective and coordinated food safety capacity building through a robust public-private partnership aiming to improve public health and economic development outcomes.

In 2017-18, the CFIA will use this partnership to fund global food safety initiatives for laboratory capacity building for food safety in India and to help India and several African countries in preparing an international strategy to support their food safety systems.

The global food safety partnership will contribute to a safer supply of food imported to Canada. Canada supports capacity building for food safety in developing countries to improve the safety of imported food world-wide. The CFIA will help to strengthen the capacity of governments in the relevant science and to improve the national food safety regulatory systems in developing countries who qualify for the global food safety partnership funding and who also meet the requirements for exporting food to Canada.

We plan to verify the results we are trying to achieve through the use of performance indicators such as: the number of collaborations continued, established or broadened, CFIA stakeholders and international bodies participating in the collaborations, and the number of individuals trained and methods/procedures/ideas shared towards the strengthening of science-based regulations and regulatory frameworks. The Agency has dedicated the equivalent of $330,000 in resources to this innovative partnership.

Planned Results

The following tables show our planned results for the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Program.

Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to be Achieved Target Actual Results
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in Sanitary and Phytosanitary negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests 36 31 March 2018 40 43 38
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products Number of unjustified non - tariff barriers resolved 45 31 March 2018 50 40 57
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA-led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 4 31 March 2018 6 7 6
Number of CFIA-led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments 8 31 March 2018 9 13 11

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

As the CFIA is developing a new Departmental Results Framework for implementation in 2018-19, the associated expected results and targets will be aligned with the new framework.

The following tables present the CFIA's Planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20. This excludes funding extensions for initiatives that are scheduled to sunset.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
31,736,983 36,418,999 29,531,085 25,494,437
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
310 277 256

The Planned spending for the International Agreements and Technical Collaboration Program decreases by $10.9 million and 54 Full-time equivalents from 2017-18 to 2019-20. This spending decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of the following initiatives and programmes in 2017-18: the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector in seizing market opportunities and securing agriculture market access initiative, the Growing Forward 2 initiative and the improved market access for Canadian agricultural products initiative. The spending decrease is also related to the sunsetting of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy funding in 2018-19.

Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding. The Agency will assess ending initiatives. We will seek renewal as required to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in the Agency's budget authorities. Agency level information, including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph.

Information on the [name of department]'s lower-level programs is available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Planning highlights

Service Delivery

The CFIA is in the first year of implementing its client-centred Service Management Strategy. We are currently defining, streamlining and modernizing the way in which we deliver services. We are striving for clear and transparent standards, for accountabilities and for feedback mechanism available to clients.

In 2017-18, we will streamline the service inventory to ensure services are defined from the perspective of clients. The inventory will be used to standardize our processes and the experiences of clients. It will also be used to develop service standards that are focused on clients. We will track the standards against metrics and report on them publicly. We will begin this tracking with Permissions, or regulatory authorizations, which we have identified as priority services, due to volume and the needs of clients. The Agency is working to define an approach to better manage the ways in which it interacts with its clients and with Canadians by working towards a single, integrated window to access CFIA services.

In 2017-18, the CFIA will also implement Phase 2, of its e-Retrieval initiative. This initiative will optimize access to information services within the Agency by digitizing the information. As a result, we will operate more efficiently and reduce the costs for retrieving information in response to access to information requests.

Federal Science and Technology Infrastructure

The CFIA is working with the Government of Canada's other science-based departments and agencies to deliver an adaptable federal science and technology infrastructure enterprise for current and future science and innovation challenges. The new model for federal science and technology infrastructure will foster partnerships among industries, research institutions, federal departments and different levels of government by providing physical space, information technology, and support that is targeted to tackling multidisciplinary science challenges. These research and innovation hubs will also become magnets for Canadian and global research talent, investors and leading companies.

Web Renewal

The Government of Canada Web Renewal Initiative is a government-wide priority. Canada.ca features 15 user-centred themes based on the top information and tasks that visitors are looking for. Over a period of three years, approximately 1,500 individual websites will be brought together under Canada.ca to make it easier for Canadians to find information.

The Agency is in Stream 3 of the web renewal process. The CFIA will join this initiative in 2017, at a time to be determined by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. In 2017-18 the CFIA will continue to ensure content is ready to move over to Canada.ca.

Open Government

The CFIA's transparency agenda is part of the CFIA's ongoing transformation to be a more service-oriented, responsive and accountable organization. We are aligning with the new requirements under Open Government and the organizational changes under Agency Transformation.

In 2017-18 the CFIA will review its own experience and its key considerations to develop an approach for its next phase of the transparency agenda by doing the following:

Enhancing Project Management

The CFIA will increase project management awareness and maturity across the agency. This will help us to further develop currently recognized best practices and disciplines. The continued improvement of project management in the Agency will increase CFIA's Organizational Project Management Capacity Assessment rating. This is the rating that Treasury Board Secretariat uses to assess the ability of government departments to manage their investments. The higher rating will give the CFIA the authority to manage more complex projects or those with bigger monetary value than before.

Investment Planning and the Enterprise Project Management Office will expand project management training to include a course specific to CFIA Executives. It will also complete a full review and release of the Enterprise Project Management Framework.

People Management

The Human Resources branch has made increasing student recruitment a priority for 2017-18, with a special focus on Indigenous students and students with disabilities. In addition, the next stages of service modernization will be taken to align human resources with the current and future needs of the Agency, including in our plans and Talent Management.

One Agency

By 2020, CFIA will implement a "One Agency" Talent Management Framework with the following features: a common performance assessment tool; an elaboration of Agency job families and related competencies and career development programs and tools; a governance structure; a policy framework; and guidelines, tools and training for talent management.

The Communications and Public Affairs Branch will continue to encourage open and collaborative communication among all Agency employees in two key ways:

Information Management and Information Technology

The CFIA is currently modernizing more than it ever has since its creation. Among our many initiatives for change, the CFIA is moving to a "digital by default" approach for communicating with Canadians. We will achieve this by using web and social media strategies for communicating our messages to Canadians. We will also fulfil our commitment to deliver an Improved Food Inspection Model and a new Electronic Service Delivery Platform.

The electronic platform will standardize and automate business processes, make the use of resources more efficient and strengthen trade by using electronic signatures on export certificates and import permits. The Electronic Service Delivery Platform project will make it possible for us to provide services on-line. It will also help us to plan, track and assign activities, and will improve business reporting.

Electronic Service Delivery Platform

Winter 2016: The CFIA began rolling out the Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP), a secure digital tool supporting a suite of online services.

Spring 2017: The CFIA will expand access to ESDP to additional users of specific and targeted commodities that were not included in the first phase.

Fall 2017: The CFIA plans to expand access to the ESDP to additional users of specific and targeted commodities that were not included in previous phases.

Spring 2018: The CFIA plans to move to a complete roll-out of ESDP to proposed users in specific and targeted commodities.

In order to support the Government of Canada's direction to standardize and consolidate its activities, the Agency is moving to common administrative service platforms. The platforms are shared by all Government of Canada partners for common services, including email, document management, human resources management, financial management and the web. Moving to a common platform will eliminate redundancy, improve operations, and increase collaboration. Currently, the CFIA is involved in working on the following changes: planning and implementing an upgrade to PeopleSoft, moving from our current document management system called RDIMS to the common Government of Canada document management system called GCDOCS, moving from GroupWise to Microsoft Outlook, and moving its website to Canada.ca.

Emergency Management

The threat posed by diseases and invasive pest continues to evolve, due to increased urbanization and the global movement of people, animals, plants and goods. With consumers having access to foods from all over the world, risks from foodborne illness are also greater. A robust emergency management program is essential to meet the challenges in this ever-changing environment.

The CFIA will continue to align our emergency plans for prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery with our processes for transforming the business. For example, the Plant and Animal Prevention and Modernization strategy is aimed at improving Federal/Provincial/Territorial, industry and stakeholders approach to managing plant and animal risks by instituting more proactive and collaborative measures, leveraging partnerships, and positioning Canada to meet current and emerging pressures. For example, the Plant and Animal Prevention and Modernization strategy will improve the ways Canadian federal, provincial and territorial governments, industry and stakeholders manage plant and animal risks. The strategy will do this by instituting more proactive and collaborative measures, making use of partnerships, and positioning Canada to meet current and emerging challenges. Additionally, the CFIA will regularly update plans to reflect changes and find efficiencies. This will allow the Agency to maintain essential business functions during emergencies.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
121,533,396 121,954,294 119,943,910 117,310,435
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
861 853 835

The Planned spending for Internal Services decreases by $4.6 million and 26 full-time equivalents from 2017-18 to 2019-20. This spending decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of the following initiatives and programmes in 2017-18: the Budget 2016 improving food safety for Canadians initiative funding and the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector in seizing market opportunities and securing agriculture market access initiative. The spending decrease is also related to the sunsetting of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy funding in 2018-2019.

Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding. The Agency will assess initiatives that are sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in the Agency's budget authorities. Agency level information, including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph.

Spending and human resources

The following tables present the CFIA's total 2017-18 Planned Spending levels and full-time equivalents for the next three fiscal years (2017-18 to 2019-20). This excludes funding extensions that the Agency plans to pursue. The tables also show the 2017-18 Main Estimates amount for which CFIA will seek parliamentary approval.

Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding. The Agency will assess initiatives that are sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in the Agency's budget authorities. Agency level information, including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph.

For fiscal years 2014-15 and 2015-16, the information shown represents the actual expenditures, as reported in the Public Accounts and Departmental Performance Reports. For fiscal year 2016-17, the forecast spending and full-time equivalents represent the Agency's projected use of authorities at year-end. 2016-17 year-end authorities and actual expenditures will be reported in the 2016-17 Departmental Results.

Planned spending

Departmental Spending Trend. Description follows.
Departmental Spending Trend
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20
Sunset Programs - - - 35.8 43.2 80.1
Voted 667.2 595.1 630.4 582.4 520.8 485.4
Statutory 181.3 154.2 141.2 129.6 127.0 123.4
Total / Forecasted 848.5 749.4 771.6 747.9 691.0 688.8
FTEs 6,138 5,901 6,031 5,691 5,469 5,156
Sunset Programs - FTEs - - - 330 367 661
Total / Forecasted - FTEs 6,138 5,901 6,031 6,021 5,836 5,817
Budgetary planning summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2014-15 Expenditures 2015-16
Expenditures
2016-17
Forecast spending
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
Food Safety Program 421,520,442 376,113,531 394,336,688 348,722,065 349,600,493 302,688,731 292,616,400
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 162,039,970 141,043,127 132,215,740 124,518,784 125,411,593 119,526,241 97,389,616
Plant Resources Program 90,262,195 79,807,062 84,449,649 78,138,366 78,664,213 76,076,780 75,956,733
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 40,718,768 32,552,166 35,344,211 31,736,983 36,418,999 29,531,085 25,494,437
Subtotal 714,541,375 629,515,886 646,346,288 583,116,198 590,095,298 527,822,837 491,457,186
Internal Services 133,951,514 119,846,641 125,210,232 121,533,396 121,954,294 119,943,910 117,310,435
Total (excluding anticipated renewals) 848,492,889 749,362,527 771,556,520 704,649,594 712,049,592 647,766,747 608,767,621

Planned human resources

Human resources planning summary for Programs and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Programs and Internal Services 2014-15
full-time equivalents
2015-16
full-time equivalents
2016-17
Forecast full-time equivalents
2017-18 Planned full-time equivalents 2018-19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019-20 Planned full-time equivalents
Food Safety Program 3,250 3,155 3,185 2,890 2,732 2,627
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 1,012 959 953 942 929 760
Plant Resources Program 737 703 698 688 678 678
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 335 307 316 310 277 256
Subtotal 5,334 5,124 5,152 4,830 4,616 4,321
Internal Services 804 777 879 861 853 835
Total (excluding anticipated renewals) 6,138 5,901 6,031 5,691 5,469 5,156

The CFIA saw a spending increase in 2014-15, due to substantial one-time disbursements related to government-wide salary initiatives. As well, the Agency ratified all outstanding collective agreements. This resulted in significant one-time retroactive salary settlement payments and ongoing cost increases of approximately $30 million annually, which the CFIA absorbed. Given that 80% of the CFIA's annual operating expenditures support personnel costs, limited flexibility existed to realign non-personnel authorities. As a result, the Agency saw a decline in its full-time equivalent (FTE) complement in subsequent years.

The CFIA will also be required to absorb the retroactive and ongoing costs of upcoming collective agreement salary settlements related to fiscal years 2014-15 and 2015-16. Consequently, the Agency has included the estimated impacts of these upcoming costs on planned human resources for 2017-18 and future years.

The CFIA's planned spending is forecasted to peak again in 2016-17. This is mainly due to increased temporary resources for the Federal Infrastructure Initiative, Electronic Service Delivery Platform Initiative, and resources related to improved food safety for Canadians. In addition, the Agency realigned existing resources and full-time equivalents from the programs to Internal Services to comply with the April 2016 amendment to the Treasury Board requirements for classifying Internal Services activities.

In 2017-18, the Federal Infrastructure Initiative, the Electronic Service Delivery Platform Initiative, the incremental Budget 2016 resources and full-time equivalents related to improved food safety for Canadians, as well as, the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector in seizing market opportunities and securing agriculture market access initiative will wrap up.

Projected resources for 2018-19 and 2019-20 are stable, based on anticipated funding renewals for programs that are sunsetting. The Agency will assess the level of resources required for these sunsetting initiatives and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base.

In 2014-15 through to 2016-17, Agency full-time equivalents trend lower than the total and forecasted expenditures. This difference is due to significant actual and forecasted spending that would not increase full-time equivalents. One example of this spending is the significant one-time salary disbursements in 2014-15, related to the transition to salary payments in arrears and the cash out of accumulated severance. Other examples are the statutory compensation payments, made under the Health of Animals Act, as a result of the outbreak of Avian Influenza, 2015-16 and 2016-17 spending related to the implementation of the Federal Infrastructure Program and the Electronic Service Delivery Platform Initiative.

Estimates by vote

For information on the CFIA's organizational appropriations, consult the 2017-18 Main Estimates.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31
(In thousands of dollars)
Financial information 2016-17
Forecast results
2017-18
Planned results
Difference
(2017-18 Planned results minus 2016-17 Forecast results)
Total expenses 876,524 808,983 (67,541)
Total revenues 52,525 52,687 162
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 823,999 756,296 (67,703)

The forecast results for fiscal year 2016-17 and planned results for fiscal year 2017-18 slightly differ. The difference noted in the expenses is mainly explained by the differences in the statutory authority and Treasury Board Secretariat rates used for the employee benefit plan, the increase in allowance for expired collective agreements for fiscal year 2016-17, and the sunsetting of programs in the Food Safety Program. The new capital spending authorities received through capital vote for the Federal Infrastructure Initiative (FII) and the Electronic Services Delivery Platform (ESDP) will increase the Agency's Capital Assets in the future and impact expenses when amortized. Note that the majority of the Agency's revenues are considered re-spendable via statutory authority. The Main Estimates figure for statutory revenues was therefore used as a base to estimate revenues earned for both 2016-17 and 2017-18.

Supplementary Information

Corporate information

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Dr. Jane Philpott, PC, MP

Institutional Head: Paul Glover

Ministerial portfolio: Health

Enabling Instruments:

CFIA Wide

Food Safety

Plant and Animal Health

Plant

Animal Health

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 1997

Reporting framework

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) of record for 2017-18 are shown below:

Program Alignment Architecture

Program Alignment Architecture. Description follows.
Program Alignment Architecture

The image is composed of two large boxes/shapes, one on top of the other.
The top box says:

  • Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

The bottom box has multiple smaller boxes within, arranged in five columns. The first row of each column are programs. The boxes below the first row are sub-programs.
The first box of the first column says:

  • Food Safety Program

There are seven sub-program boxes below the "Food Safety Program" box, and they say:

  • Meat & Poultry;
  • Egg;
  • Dairy;
  • Fish & Seafood;
  • Fresh Fruit & Vegetables;
  • Processed Products; and
  • Imported and Manufactured Food Products.

The first box of the second column says:

  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

There are three sub-program boxes below the "Animal Health and Zoonotics Program" box, and they say:

  • Terrestrial Animal Health;
  • Aquatic Animal Health; and
  • Feed.

The first box of the third column says:

  • Plant Resources Program

There are four sub-program boxes below the "Plant Resources Program" box, and they say:

  • Plant Protection;
  • Seed;
  • Fertilizer; and
  • Intellectual Property Rights.

The fourth column only has one box and it says:

  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

The first box of the fifth column says:

  • Internal Services

There are ten sub-program boxes below the "Internal Services" box, and they say:

  • Management and Oversight;
  • Communications;
  • Legal;
  • Human Resources Management;
  • Financial Management;
  • Information Management;
  • Information Technology;
  • Real Property Management;
  • Materiel Management; and
  • Acquisition Management.

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Food Sub-Programs

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Meat and Poultry

The Meat and Poultry sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with meat and poultry and their products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that meat, poultry and their products meet health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. The sub-program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices related to labelling compliance for pre-packaged meat products, and audits the delivery of a grading sub-program based on objective meat quality and retail yield standards. The Meat and Poultry sub-program supports confidence in Canada's meat and poultry and their products.

Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Federally registered meat and poultry establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered meat and poultry establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2018 97% 97% 96.22%
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2018 97% 98.7% 99.00%
Meat and poultry products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported meat and poultry products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2018 97% 98.7% 99.00%

The following tables present the CFIA's planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20, which excludes funding extensions for sunsetting initiatives. For the anticipated renewals of sunsetting initiatives refer to Sunset Programs in the Planned Spending section.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
161,205,518 140,552,519 131,300,738
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
1,541 1,456 1,359

The Agency will assess the initiatives for which funding is scheduled to sunset, and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Egg

The Egg sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with egg and egg products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that eggs and egg products are graded according to relevant governing acts and regulations and that they comply with the requirements of the said acts and regulations. The sub-program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and advertising practices meet the requirements for pre-packaged egg products. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's egg and egg products.

Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Federally registered shell egg establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered shell egg establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2018 97% 97% 96.22%
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2018 97% 98.7% 99.00%
Shell egg and egg products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported shell egg and egg products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2018 97% 98.7% 99.00%

The following tables present the CFIA's planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20, which excludes funding extensions for sunsetting initiatives. For the anticipated renewals of sunsetting initiatives refer to Sunset Programs in the Planned Spending section.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
9,889,446 8,792,970 8,744,450
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
72 68 68

The Agency will assess the initiatives for which funding is scheduled to sunset, and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Dairy

The Dairy sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with dairy and dairy products that are produced in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. The sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that dairy and dairy products meet health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the governing acts and regulations. The sub-program also helps to mitigate unfair market practices by verifying that labelling for pre-packaged dairy products meets the requirements as set out in the acts and regulations. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's dairy products.

Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Federally registered dairy establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered dairy establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2018 96% 98% 99.00%
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2018 99% 96.1% 97.94%
Dairy products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported dairy products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2018 98% 90.6% 88.54%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Food Safety Program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

As the CFIA is developing a new Departmental Results Framework for implementation in 2018-19 the associated expected results and targets will be aligned with the new framework.

The following tables present the CFIA's planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20, which excludes funding extensions for sunsetting initiatives. For the anticipated renewals of sunsetting initiatives refer to Sunset Programs in the Planned Spending section.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
15,696,668 14,064,759 14,000,665
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
114 108 107

The Agency will assess the initiatives for which funding is scheduled to sunset, and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base.

Sub-Program 1.1.4: Fish and Seafood

The Fish and Seafood sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with fish and seafood products processed in Canada's federally registered establishments or imported for consumption. It achieves its objectives by developing product and process standards and ensuring that products, importers and domestic industry comply with quality, safety and identity of fish and seafood requirements through verification of compliance with the governing acts and regulations. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's fish and seafood products.

Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Federally registered fish and seafood establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered fish and seafood establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2018 99% 98.7% 98.11%
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2018 98% 97.6% 97.61%
Fish and seafood products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported fish and seafood products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2018 85% 89% 87.89%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Food Safety Program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

As the CFIA is developing a new Departmental Results Framework for implementation in 2018-19 the associated expected results and targets will be aligned with the new framework.

The following tables present the CFIA's planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20, which excludes funding extensions for sunsetting initiatives. For the anticipated renewals of sunsetting initiatives refer to Sunset Programs in the Planned Spending section.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
62,081,467 49,449,023 49,089,096
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
404 382 380

The Agency will assess the initiatives for which funding is scheduled to sunset, and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base.

Sub-Program 1.1.5: Fresh Fruit and Vegetables

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with fresh fruits and vegetables and their products produced in Canada or imported for consumption. It achieves its objectives by verifying that products meet all stipulated health and safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program mitigates unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and net quantity requirements for pre-packaged Fresh Fruit and Vegetable products are adhered to. This sub-program supports confidence in Canada's fresh fruit and vegetable products.

Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Federally registered fresh fruit and vegetables establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered processed fresh fruit and vegetable establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2018 97% 90.9% 98.85%
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic fresh fruit and vegetable samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2018 99% 98.8% 98.95%
Fresh fruit and vegetable products for domestic consumption meet federal regulations Percentage of tested imported fresh fruit and vegetable samples in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2018 97% 96.8% 96.83%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Food Safety Program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

As the CFIA is developing a new Departmental Results Framework for implementation in 2018-19 the associated expected results and targets will be aligned with the new framework.

The following tables present the CFIA's planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20, which excludes funding extensions for sunsetting initiatives. For the anticipated renewals of sunsetting initiatives refer to Sunset Programs in the Planned Spending section.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
35,125,631 31,127,579 30,967,676
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
229 217 216

The Agency will assess the initiatives for which funding is scheduled to sunset, and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base.

Sub-Program 1.1.6: Processed Products

The Processed Products sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with processed products, including honey and maple products, which are produced in Canada or imported for consumption. The sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that processed products comply with health and food safety requirements through verification of compliance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program minimizes unfair market practices by verifying that labelling and net quantity requirements for pre-packaged processed products are adhered to. The sub-program supports confidence in Canada's processed products.

Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Federally registered processed products establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered processed products establishments in compliance with federal regulations 98% 31 March 2018 98% 96.8% 97.77%
Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulation Percentage of tested domestic processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2018 98% 98.1% 98.12%
Processed products for domestic consumption meet federal regulation Percentage of tested imported processed products in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2018 95% 96.2% 96.98%

The following tables present the CFIA's planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20, which excludes funding extensions for sunsetting initiatives. For the anticipated renewals of sunsetting initiatives refer to Sunset Programs in the Planned Spending section.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
11,046,610 9,889,345 9,852,861
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
85 80 79

The Agency will assess the initiatives for which funding is scheduled to sunset, and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base.

Sub-Program 1.1.7: Imported and Manufactured Food Products

The Imported and Manufactured Food Products sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with food commodities that are regulated by the relevant governing acts and regulations. The CFIA and provincial/territorial governments share the jurisdiction over IMFP because the sector includes a large variety of foods that are traded intra-provincially or inter-provincially. This sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that these products comply with the health, food safety, and consumer protection requirements. The sub-program mitigates unfair market practices by verifying that requirements related to net quantity, composition, claims, labelling, and advertising of these foods are adhered to and by enforcing the governing acts and regulations. Through enforcement of the acts and regulations, the sub-program supports confidence in Canada's imported and manufactured food products.

Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food products are mitigated Percentage of major health risks in the imported and manufactured food sector that are addressed through the annual update to food safety inspection programs 95% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%
Risks to the Canadian public associated with imported and manufactured food products are mitigated Percentage of inspected imported and manufactured food products with accurate net quantity, composition, labelling and advertising 70% 31 March 2018 74% 73.1% 72.1%

The following tables present the CFIA's planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20, which excludes funding extensions for sunsetting initiatives. For the anticipated renewals of sunsetting initiatives refer to Sunset Programs in the Planned Spending section.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
54,555,153 48,812,536 48,660,914
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
445 421 418

The Agency will assess the initiatives for which funding is scheduled to sunset, and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base.

Animal Health and Zoonotics Sub-Programs

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Terrestrial Animal Health

The Terrestrial Animal Health sub-program aims to prevent the entry of reportable, foreign animal diseases and the spread of reportable domestic animal diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program achieves its objectives by delivering initiatives that track, detect, and mitigate risks to the terrestrial animal resource base. This sub-program supports food safety, public health, and protection of the animal resource base, and instils national and international confidence in Canadian agricultural products. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports domestic and international confidence that Canada's animals are free from certain reportable diseases, particularly those potentially transmissible to humans. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Federally registered veterinary biologics establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected federally registered veterinary biologics establishments in compliance with federal regulations 90% 31 March 2018 100% 93% 96%
Veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations Percentage of tested veterinary biological products in compliance with federal regulations 100% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 99.30%
Animals in Canada are transported humanely Percentage of inspected live loads in compliance with humane transport standards 100% 31 March 2018 100% 98% 98.34%

The following tables present the CFIA's planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20, which excludes funding extensions for sunsetting initiatives. For the anticipated renewals of sunsetting initiatives refer to Sunset Programs in the Planned Spending section.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
99,307,031 93,784,667 71,630,924
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
713 703 534

The Agency will assess the initiatives for which funding is scheduled to sunset, and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Aquatic Animal Health

The Aquatic Animal Health sub-program aims to mitigate risks associated with the introduction and spread of certain aquatic animal diseases of concern to Canada. This sub-program achieves its objectives by partnering with Fisheries and Oceans Canada to deliver on initiatives that track, detect and control aquatic animal diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports domestic and international confidence that Canada's aquatic animal resources are free from aquatic animal diseases, and contributes to the sustainable productivity of aquaculture and harvest fisheries. This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Domestic aquatic animals and their products are compliant with Canadian regulations and meet the standards of international agreements Percentage of certified aquatic animal and aquatic animal product shipments that meet the receiving country's import requirements 99% 31 March 2018 100% 99.7% 99.9%
Risks to the Canadian aquatic animal resource base are mitigated Number of reportable aquatic animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 31 March 2018 0 0 2

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Food Safety Program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

As the CFIA is developing a new Departmental Results Framework for implementation in 2018-19 the associated expected results and targets will be aligned with the new framework.

The following tables present the CFIA's planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20, which excludes funding extensions for sunsetting initiatives. For the anticipated renewals of sunsetting initiatives refer to Sunset Programs in the Planned Spending section.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
5,384,782 5,303,558 5,308,273
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
42 41 41
Sub-Program 1.2.3: Feed

The Feed sub-program aims to minimize risks associated with livestock and poultry feeds manufactured in or imported into Canada. The sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that feeds are safe, effective and labelled in accordance with the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program contributes to the production and maintenance of a healthy and sustainable animal resource base which supports food safety and environmental sustainability. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports confidence in feed manufactured in Canada.

Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Feed establishments meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed establishments in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, not including labelling tasks 95% 31 March 2018 97% 95.2% 95.5%
Feed labels meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected feed facilities in compliance with Feeds Regulations and Health of Animals Regulations (Feed Ban), after follow-up, when assessed against inspection tasks associated with labelling 95% 31 March 2018 95% 95.8% 96.6%

The following tables present the CFIA's planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20, which excludes funding extensions for sunsetting initiatives. For the anticipated renewals of sunsetting initiatives refer to Sunset Programs in the Planned Spending section.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
20,719,780 20,438,016 20,450,419
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
187 185 185

Plant Resources Sub-Programs

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Plant Protection

The Plant Protection sub-program aims to mitigate the risks associated with the introduction and spread of plant pests of quarantine significance to Canada. This sub-program achieves its objectives by delivering initiatives that track, detect and control, or eradicate regulated plant pests and diseases as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. The sub-program verifies that plants and plant products, and their associated risk pathways, meet phytosanitary requirements. Through verification of compliance, this sub-program supports environmental sustainability and public health and instils confidence in Canada's plants and plant products.

This sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Statutory Compensation Payments.

Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Pre-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of inspected shipments from off-shore system approaches or pre-clearance programs in compliance with federal regulations 85% 31 March 2018 99% 96% 96%
At-Border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of pre-arrival documentation in compliance with Canadian import requirements 90% 31 March 2018 99% 99.9% 97%
Post-border plant pest risks are mitigated Percentage of new pest detections that have a science based management plan initiated within one year 90% 31 March 2018 N/A No new pest detection N/A No new pest detection N/A No new pest detection

The following tables present the CFIA's planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20, which excludes funding extensions for sunsetting initiatives. For the anticipated renewals of sunsetting initiatives refer to Sunset Programs in the Planned Spending section.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
61,945,582 60,012,939 59,926,529
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
535 527 527
Sub-Program 1.3.2: Seed

The Seed sub-program aims to ensure that seeds sold in Canada meet established standards, that seeds are properly represented in the marketplace and that most agricultural crop kinds are registered before entering the marketplace. The sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that seeds meet quality, biosafety, labelling and registration standards as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Regulating the environmental release of plants with novel traits contributes to environmental sustainability and the health and safety of Canadians. Furthermore, quality assured and accurately labelled seeds contribute to a prosperous agricultural production system and to domestic and international confidence in Canada's seeds.

Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of tested domestic pedigreed seed lots in compliance with federal regulations 95% 31 March 2018 95% 98.3% 96.4%
Seed complies with federal regulations Percentage of authorized confined releases of Plants with Novel Traits (PNTs) into the Canadian environment that are in compliance with the authorized conditions 90% 31 March 2018 91% 98% 97%

The following tables present the CFIA's planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20, which excludes funding extensions for sunsetting initiatives. For the anticipated renewals of sunsetting initiatives refer to Sunset Programs in the Planned Spending section.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
11,537,907 11,024,956 10,997,753
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
107 106 106
Sub-Program 1.3.3: Fertilizer

The Fertilizer sub-program aims to ensure that regulated fertilizer, fertilizer/pesticides and supplement products sold in Canada are properly labelled, effective and safe for humans, plants, animals, and the environment. The sub-program achieves its objectives by verifying that all fertilizers and supplements meet the standards for safety and efficacy as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. Through verification of compliance, the sub-program contributes to public health and environmental sustainability and supports domestic and international confidence in fertilizers manufactured in Canada.

Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of inspected fertilizer and supplement products in compliance with federal regulations (Fertilizers Regulations) 90% 31 March 2018 92% 91.7% 96%
Fertilizer and supplement products meet federal regulations Percentage of submissions reviewed within the prescribed service delivery standards 90% 31 March 2018 90% 61% 61%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Food Safety Program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

As the CFIA is developing a new Departmental Results Framework for implementation in 2018-19 the associated expected results and targets will be aligned with the new framework.

The following tables present the CFIA's planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20, which excludes funding extensions for sunsetting initiatives. For the anticipated renewals of sunsetting initiatives refer to Sunset Programs in the Planned Spending section.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
4,024,784 3,934,262 3,926,134
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
37 36 36
Sub-Program 1.3.4: Intellectual Property Rights

The Intellectual Property Rights sub-program, by which plant breeders can obtain intellectual property rights for their new plant varieties, aims to create an environment in Canada which supports innovation in plant breeding, as set out in the relevant governing acts and regulations. This sub-program achieves its objectives by assessing applications from plant breeders to determine that new plant varieties meet the criteria for protection, and when all requirements have been met, granting rights to the variety breeder/owner for a period of up to 18 years. The owner of a new variety who receives a grant of rights has exclusive rights over use of the variety, and will be able to protect his/her new variety from exploitation by others. By enforcing the relevant governing acts and regulations, this sub-program stimulates plant breeding in Canada, facilitates better access to foreign varieties for Canadian producers and supports the protection of Canadian varieties in other countries.

Planned Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Plant breeders develop new varieties for the Canadian market Percentage of Plant Breeders' Rights applications that reach approval and are granted rights 100% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%

The following tables present the CFIA's planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20, which excludes funding extensions for sunsetting initiatives. For the anticipated renewals of sunsetting initiatives refer to Sunset Programs in the Planned Spending section.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
1,155,940 1,104,623 1,106,317
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
9 9 9

Disclosure of transfer payment programs under $5 million

General information
Name of transfer payment program Federal Assistance Program
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Voted appropriation - annually through Estimates
Link to department's Program Inventory
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
    • Terrestrial Animal Health Sub-Program
    • Aquatic Animal Health Sub-Program
  • Plant Resources Program
    • Plant Protection Sub-Program
  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
Main objective The Federal Assistance Program supports projects and initiatives that advance the CFIA's strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.
Planned spending in 2017-18 (dollars) 819,000
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation 2016-17
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation (if applicable) To be determined
General targeted recipient groups Eligible recipients include those whose goals and objectives are complementary to and supportive of the CFIA's mission and strategic outcome. This includes individuals, groups of individuals, agriculture and commodity organizations and conservation districts.
Name of transfer payment program (S) Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by Regulations under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act (S.C., 1997, c.6) - Statutory
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Compensation payment
Type of appropriation (S) Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by Regulations under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act (S.C., 1997, c.6) - Statutory
Link to department's Program Inventory
  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
    • Terrestrial Animal Health Sub-Program
    • Aquatic Animal Health Sub-Program
  • Plant Resources Program
    • Plant Protection Sub-Program
Main objective To compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Planned spending in 2017-18 (dollars) 3,500,000
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation N/A
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation (if applicable) N/A
General targeted recipient groups Canadians who have had animals and/or plants ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.

Horizontal Initiative Tables

General information
Name of horizontal initiative Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Renewal
Lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Federal partner organization(s) Health Canada; Public Health Agency of Canada
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not Applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15 Renewal Core BSE program (program regularly renewed since inception in 2003)
End date of the horizontal initiative 2018-19
Total federal funding allocated (2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 203,229,460
Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2016 (dollars) 84,643,710
Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2016 (dollars) 81,571,150
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable
Governance structures The CFIA is the federal lead for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Program delivery. A summative evaluation of the CFIA's Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy program conducted in 2008 recommended the governance of the program be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication regarding Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy - related activities, both internally and with partner organizations. Based on that recommendation and consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives, the CFIA launched a new committee structure to bring the Agency's overall governance approach more in line with evolving business needs in 2015. The new governance structure enhances whole-of-Agency information sharing and integration and ensures a more efficient and streamlined senior-level committee structure. It is expected that the renewed structure will foster a whole-of-Agency approach to decision making and will support day-to-day operations across the Agency. To ensure that business line perspectives are integrated into decision-making process, three senior executive-level committees on Animal Health, Plant and Food Safety are supported.
Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Jaspinder Komal
Executive Director
Animal Health Directorate
Policy & Programs Branch
613-773-7472

Public Health Agency of Canada
Steven Sternthal
Director General
Centre for Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch
613-948-6883

Health Canada
Diana Dowthwaite
Director General
Resource Management & Operations Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
613- 957-6690

Results information
Description of the horizontal initiative

To protect human and animal health, the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy program conducts surveillance, research and risk assessments on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies to minimize the risk of exposure to infected materials, maintain consumer confidence through assessment of the effectiveness of the risk mitigation measures and having measures in place to control any potential outbreaks. The Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy program supports market access for cattle, beef and related products by promoting and explaining Canada's Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy program to domestic and international stakeholders.

Health Canada conducts research and risk assessments on human exposure to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, and the Public Health Agency of Canada carries out surveillance of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and targeted supporting research in this area. The CFIA enforces the removal of specified risk material from the animal feed and the human food chains, monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country, monitors for the prevalence of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in the cattle population (through surveillance), verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place and explains Canada's Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy control measures to domestic and international stakeholders (for example, through the veterinarians abroad program) in order to maintain confidence in Canada's Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy program.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation 2018-2019
Shared outcome of federal partners

To contribute to the protection of human and animal health, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian cattle, beef and beef products.

ER 1: Specified Risk Material Removal from the Human Food Chain:

Performance indicator(s) PI 1: Industry compliance rate for removal of specified risk material.
Target(s) T 1:100% compliance.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Internal files/ documents/databases; quarterly monitoring; annual reporting.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable.
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 2: Import Controls:

Outcome: Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards.

Performance indicator(s)

PI 2.1: Percentage of import policies verified and updated as required.

PI 2.2: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Import Policy is verified and updated as required.

Target(s)

T 2.1: 25% per year.

T 2.2: Annually, when the World Organisation for Animal Health updates the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy risk status country lists.

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Internal files/documents/ databases; annual monitoring and reporting.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable.
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 3: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Surveillance:

Outcome: Safe animals and food and Market access

Performance indicator(s) PI 3: Temporal trend in exposure to the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy agent in the cattle population.
Target(s) T 3: Testing 30,000 samples from the high-risk category of cattle is the minimum national target.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Internal files/ documents/databases; monthly monitoring and quarterly reporting.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable.
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 4: Cattle Identification:

Outcome:

  • Governments and other entities make informed decisions to manage animal and related human health issues
  • Risk to Canadian livestock resource base are mitigated
  • Canadian livestock sector is compliant with regulations
Performance indicator(s)

PI 4.1: Number and development status of inspection tools in place

PI 4.2: Number of inspectors trained

PI 4.3: Ratio of non-compliances versus number of Compliance Verification System tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage

PI 4.4: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards

Target(s)

T 4.1: Training, tools and materials are relevant and up-to-date

T 4.2: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained

T 4.3: 95% compliance

T 4.4: 100%

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

DSF 4.1: Manual (PPB), annually

DSF 4.2: Manual (Operations), annually

DSF 4.3: Manual (Operations), annually

DSF 4.4: Manual (Operations), annually

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable.
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 5: Export Certification:

Outcome: Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

Performance indicator(s) PI 5: Percentage of exports meeting the standards of the importing country as required.
Target(s) T 5: 100%
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Internal files/documents/ databases; quarterly monitoring and annual reporting.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable.
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 6: Technical Market Access Support:

Outcome: Maintain or improve confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets.

Performance indicator(s) PI 6: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.
Target(s) T 6: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Internal files/documents/ databases; annual monitoring and reporting.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable.
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 7: Health Products Risk Assessment and Targeted Research

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies science, risks and product surveillance

Performance indicator(s)

PI 7.1: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics.

PI 7.2: Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted as a result of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy suspicion by product line (i.e. biologics).

PI 7.3: Number of products / product lots assessed for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies / Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy risks).

Target(s)

T 7.1: 0 (as needed)

T 7.2: 0 (as needed)

T 7.3: 400 lots per year

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Annual monitoring and reporting of data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, risk assessments, incident reports, certificates, internal records.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable.
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 8: Food Safety and Nutrition: Risk Assessment

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies science, risks and product surveillance

Intermediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making

Performance indicator(s)

PI 8.1: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics.

PI 8.2: Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted as a result of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy suspicion by product line (i.e. food products).

PI 8.3: Number of knowledge transfer activities related to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

Target(s)

T 8.1: 1 conference

T 8.2: 0

T 8.3: 1

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Annual monitoring and reporting of data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, risk assessments, incident reports, certificates, internal records.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable.
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 9: Prion Diseases Program

Outcome: Risks of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled.

Performance indicator(s) PI 9.1: Alignment of Public Health Agency of Canada data from human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies surveillance with international benchmarks; number of research presentations and publications; use of policy advice in decision-making.
Target(s)

T 9.1: Maintenance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance sensitivity at a level where observed mortality from all human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Canada is consistent with that observed internationally i.e. 1-2 per million population.

T 9.2: Technological development to ensure Canadian diagnostic analyses remain consistent with those performed internationally.

T 9.3: At least 2 research presentations, publications or reports per year.

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

DSF 9.1: Continuous monitoring and reporting of surveillance statistics and database

DSF 9.2: Annual monitoring and reporting of scientific publication records of researchers and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance system, Electronic databases (publications; citations; impact factors)

DSF 9.3: Annual monitoring and reporting of laboratory reports and databases (internal records), National Microbiological Laboratory Quality System (internal records)

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable.
Planning information

For 2017-18, the key plans and priorities from a horizontal perspective are to continue to deliver the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Program by managing and monitoring Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy-related risks to current standards as well as to continue to improve communication and coordination (for example, governance), performance measurement and reporting, and financial tracking.

Planning summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Inventory Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 2017-18 Planned spending (dollars) 2017-18 Expected results 2017-18 Performance indicators 2017-18 Targets Link to department's Strategic Outcomes Link to govern- ment priorities
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements / Internal Services Specified Risk Material Removal from the Human Food Chain 45,946,160 9,189,232 ER 1 PI 1 T 1 A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Increasing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements / Internal Services Import Controls 3,347,815 669,563 ER 2 PI 2.1
PI 2.2
T 2.1
T 2.2
A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Increasing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements / Internal Services Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
Surveillance
80,912,125 16,182,425 ER 3 PI 3 T3 A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Increasing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements / Internal Services Cattle Identification 10,672,140 2,134,428 ER 4 PI 4.1
PI 4.2
PI 4.3
PI 4.4
T 4.1
T 4.2
T 4.3
T 4.4
A Safe and Accessible Food Supply and Plant and Animal Resource Base Increasing Safety in Imported and Domestic Products
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements / Internal Services Export Certification 29,822,860 5,964,572 ER 5 PI 5 T 5 Getting Canadian Goods to Market
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements / Internal Services Technical Market Access Support 22,794,635 4,558,927 ER 6 PI 6 T 6
Health Canada Health Products Risk Assessment 1,538,882 306,881 ER 7 PI 7.1
PI 7.2
PI 7.3
T 7.1
T 7.2
T 7.3
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Risk Assessment and standard setting 4,194,843 930,014 ER 8 PI 8.1
PI 8.2
PI 8.3
T 8.1
T 8.2
T 8.3
Public Health Agency of Canada Public Health Surveillance and Assessment Prion Diseases Program 4,000,000 800,000 ER 9 PI 9.1 T 9.1
T 9.2
T 9.3
Total for all federal organizations 203,229,460 40,736,042

ER 1: Expected Result: Specified Risk Material Removal from the Human Food Chain:

Outcome: Safe food

Output: Compliance with current regulations

Activities: Continuation of the enforcement and verification of specified risk material removal, handling and disposal by CFIA inspection staff

PI 1: Performance Indicator: Industry compliance rate for removal of SRM

T1: Target: 100% compliance

ER 2: Expected Results: Import Controls:

Outcome: Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards.

Output: Up-to-date import controls.

Activities: Review and update of current import policies and conditions for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy as required, to reflect changes in international standards and evolving science.

PI 2.1: Performance Indicator: Percentage of import policies verified and updated as required.

PI 2.2: Performance Indicator: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Import Policy is verified and updated as required.

T 2.1: Target: 25% per year.

T 2.2: Target: Annually, when the World Organisation for Animal Health updates the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy risk status country lists.

ER 3: Expected Results: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Surveillance:

Outcome: Safe animals and food and Market access

Output: Measurement of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy level and distribution in cattle population.

Activities: Analysis of options to redesign the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy surveillance program and consultation with stakeholders to explore further targeting of surveillance.

PI 3: Performance Indicator: Temporal trend in exposure to the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy agent in the cattle population.

T 3: Target: Testing 30,000 samples from the high-risk category of cattle is the minimum national target.

ER 4: Expected Results: Cattle Identification:

Outcome:

Output 1:

Activities: Inspections, compliance verification, investigations and enforcement actions.

Output 2:

PI 4.1: Performance Indicators: Number and development status of inspection tools in place

PI 4.2: Performance Indicator: Number of inspectors trained

PI 4.3: Performance Indicator: Ratio of non-compliances versus number of Compliance Verification System tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage

PI 4.4: Performance Indicators: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards

T 4.1: Target: Training, tools and materials are relevant and up-to-date

T 4.2: Target: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained

T 4.3: Target: 95% compliance

T 4.4: Target: 100%

DSF 4.1: Data Source and Frequency: Manual for Policy and Programs Branch, annually

DSF 4.2: Data Source and Frequency: Manual for Operations Branch, annually

DSF 4.3: Data Source and Frequency: Manual for Operations Branch, annually

DSF 4.4: Data Source and Frequency: Manual for Operations Branch, annually

ER 5: Performance Indicator: Export Certification:

Outcome: Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

Output: Export certification.

Activities: Continue provision of export-related certification services to a wide range of affected industries.

PI 5: Performance Indicator: Percentage of exports meeting the standards of the importing country as required.

T 5: Target: 100%

ER 6: Expected Results: Technical Market Access Support:

Outcome: Maintain or improve confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets.

Output: Increased market demand and confidence.

Activities: Continue the establishment and maintenance of strong relationships with trading partners, and the provision of global leadership and influence concerning international policies and standards development.

PI 6: Performance Indicators: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.

T 6: Target: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.

ER 7: Expected Result: Health Products Risk Assessment and Targeted Research

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies science, risks and product surveillance

PI 7.1: Performance Indicators: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics.

PI 7.2: Performance Indicator: Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted as a result of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy suspicion by product line (i.e. biologics).

PI 7.3: Performance Indicators: Number of products / product lots assessed for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies / Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy risks).

T 7.1: Target: 0 (as needed)

T 7.2: Target: 0 (as needed)

T 7.3: Target: 400 lots per year

ER 8: Expected Result: Food Safety and Nutrition: Risk Assessment

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies science, risks and product surveillance

Intermediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making

PI 8.1: Performance Indicators: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics.

PI 8.2: Performance Indicator: Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted as a result of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy suspicion by product line (i.e. food products).

PI 8.3: Performance Indicators: Number of knowledge transfer activities related to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

T 8.1: Target: 1 conference

T 8.2: Target: 0

T 8.3: Target: 1

ER 9: Expected Results: Prion Diseases Program

Outcome: Risks of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled.

Output/Activities: Continued, detailed, case-by-case, laboratory-supported investigation of all human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies across Canada; improved methods and strategies for case investigation; comprehensive human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies surveillance data; laboratory investigations of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies diagnostics and biology; research publications; provision of policy advice for food safety, healthcare and international trade.

PI 9.1: Performance Indicators: Alignment of Public Health Agency of Canada data from human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies surveillance with international benchmarks; number of research presentations and publications; use of policy advice in decision-making.

T 9.1: Target: Maintenance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance sensitivity at a level where observed mortality from all human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Canada is consistent with that observed internationally (i.e. 1-2 per million population).

T 9.2: Target: Technological development to ensure Canadian diagnostic analyses remain consistent with those performed internationally.

T 9.3: Targets: At least 2 research presentations, publications or reports per year.

DSF 9.1: Data Source and Frequency: Continuous monitoring and reporting of surveillance statistics and database

DSF 9.2: Data Source and Frequency: Annual monitoring and reporting of scientific publication records of researchers and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance system, Electronic databases (publications; citations; impact factors)

DSF 9.3: Data Source and Frequency: Annual monitoring and reporting of laboratory reports and databases (internal records),

National Microbiological Laboratory Quality System (internal records)

General information
Name of horizontal initiative Food Safety Oversight
Lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Federal partner organization(s) Health Canada
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15
End date of the horizontal initiative Ongoing
Total federal funding allocated (2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 151,999,631 and 35,606,377 ongoing
Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2016 (dollars) 40,480,959
Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2016 (dollars) 34,187,501
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Governance structures

The CFIA and Health Canada currently work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates. This is supported by a memorandum of understanding, signed in 2008, which provides the foundation for building a clear understanding of their respective roles and responsibilities as they relate to human health and to provide links across the organizations to improve the design and delivery of integrated health-related solutions.

A governance model exists for the partner organizations to regularly convene and discuss food safety issues of mutual concern and responsibility.

This governance framework includes an Assistant Deputy Minister-level and Director General-level Committees on Food Safety that meet regularly to discuss and plan approaches for addressing joint food safety issues.

CFIA and Health Canada will continue to work horizontally through these governance committees. As complementary components of the health portfolio, the two organizations will report results within an integrated, collaborative performance measurement framework.

Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Richard Arsenault
Executive Director
Program Performance and Emergency Management Directorate
Policy and Programs Branch
Telephone: (613) 773-6156

Dr. Aline Dimitri
A/Executive Director
Food Safety Science Directorate
Science Branch
Telephone: (613) 773-5542

Tom Graham
Senior Director
National Inspection Division
Operations Branch
Telephone: (613) 773-5301

Health Canada
Karen McIntyre
Director General
Food Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
Telephone: (613) 957-1821

Results information
Description of the horizontal initiative

The objectives of this horizontal initiative are to strengthen the CFIA's and Health Canada's food safety oversight of the fresh fruits and vegetables sector, the fish and seafood sector and the manufactured food products sector.

These objectives will be achieved through the implementation of new programming and increased oversight activities.

These objectives are aligned to the Government of Canada Outcome of "Healthy Canadians".

The two federal organizations, the CFIA and Health Canada, received a total spending authority of $152 million over five years and $35.6 million on an ongoing basis for this initiative.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation CFIA plans to conduct an evaluation of food safety oversight in 2018-19.
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 10: Enhanced Preventive Food Safety Program Management
Performance indicator(s) PI 10: Strengthened design and management of Preventive Food Safety Programing
Target(s) T 10: List of events and materials to support program delivery
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Data source: A comprehensive review of relevant program design initiatives, communications, products, and tools is developed based on input from subject matter experts.

Frequency: Annually (ie. for Departmental Performance Report).

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 11: Enhanced Inspection Activities
Performance indicator(s) PI 11: Increase in inspection activities to the non-meat food areas.
Target(s) T 11: Number of inspections conducted in the non-meat food area.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Reporting: CFIA reports this information internally on a quarterly basis.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 12: Enhanced Sampling, Testing, and Analysis
Performance indicator(s) PI 12: Increase in sampling, testing and analysis
Target(s)

T 12a: Sample testing reports, results and analysis completed in the non-meat food areas for the additional 6000 planned samples.

T 12b: Validated methods developed and implemented to support increased testing in the non-meat food areas.

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

DSF 12a:

Data source: Test reports and analytical results are accessible to CFIA employees through the internal Laboratory Information Management System.

Frequency: Actionable results which may be a food safety risk are communicated immediately to the appropriate CFIA personnel responsible for follow-up and investigation. Number of samples received and tested are reviewed and reported on a quarterly basis. A final internal sample delivery report is compiled on an annual basis.

DFS 12b:

Data source: Methods that were developed and validated in previous years will now be implemented for use in regulatory testing.

Frequency: This will be ongoing for the 2017-18 fiscal year

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 13: Improved Safety in Imported Food
Performance indicator(s) PI 13: Increase in Foreign Country Assessments of priority areas
Target(s) T 13: Establish baseline of foreign country assessments and show increase of foreign country assessments.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Data source: Reports of foreign country assessments.

Reporting: Final reports of foreign country assessments will be accessible through the CFIA website.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 14a: Standard Setting Support
Performance indicator(s) PI 14a: Development of new and/or updated standards is initiated in 100% of cases where there is an identified need to do so in order to address food safety risks
Target(s) T 14a 100% of cases where there is an identified need to do so in order to address food safety risks
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Manual and CFIA systems
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 14b: Standard Setting Support
Performance indicator(s) PI 14b: Number and type of involvement activities associated with standard setting initiatives
Target(s) T 14b: To be determined since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 14c: Standard Setting Support
Performance indicator(s) PI 14c: Number of risk assessments developed in support of standard setting initiatives
Target(s) T 14c: To be determined since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 14d: Standard Setting Support
Performance indicator(s) PI 14d: Number of detection methods developed and enhanced in support of standard setting initiatives
Target(s) T 14d: To be determined since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 15: Enhanced Food Safety Risk Assessments
Performance indicator(s) PI 15: Timely response to emerging food and nutrition safety incidents including foodborne illness outbreaks
Target(s) T 15: 90% of health risk assessment provided to CFIA within standard timelines to manage food safety incidents
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Planning summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Inventory Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from 2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 2017-18 Planned spending (dollars) 2017-18 Expected results 2017-18 Performance indicators 2017-18 Targets Link to department's Strategic Outcomes Link to govern- ment priorities
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Preventive Food Safety Program Management 11,786,965 and 2,138,827 ongoing 2,138,827 ER 10 PI-10 T-10 A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Healthy Canadians
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Enhanced Inspection Activities 90,809,417 and 22,189,785 ongoing 22,189,785 ER-11 PI-11 T-11 A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Healthy Canadians
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Increased Sampling, Testing, and Analysis 22,283,451 and 5,411,341 ongoing 5,411,341 ER-12 PI 12 T-12a
T-12b
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Healthy Canadians
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Foreign Country Assessments 6,293,373 and 1,245,327 ongoing 1,245,327 ER-13 PI-13 T-13 A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Healthy Canadians
Health Canada 2.2.1
Food Safety
Standard Setting 14,246,254 and 3,080,927 ongoing 3,080,927 ER-14a
ER-14b
ER-14c
ER-14d
PI 14a
PI 14b
PI 14c
PI 14d
T-14a
T-14b
T-14c
T-14d
Strategic Outcome 2: Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians Priority II: Strengthen openness and transparency as modernization of health protection legislation, regulation and service delivery continues.
Health Canada 2.2.1
Food Safety
Health Risk Assessments 6,580,170 and 1,540,170 ongoing 1,540,170 ER-15 PI 15 T-15 Strategic Outcome 2: Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians Priority II: Strengthen openness and transparency as modernization of health protection legislation, regulation and service delivery continues.
Total for all federal organizations 151,999,631 and 35,606,377 ongoing 35,606,377

ER 10: Expected Result: Enhanced Preventive Food Safety Program Management

PI 10: Performance Indicator: Strengthen design and management of Preventive Food Safety Programing

T 10: Targets: List of events and materials to support program delivery.

ER 11: Expected Result: Enhanced Inspection Activities

PI 11: Performance Indicator: Increase in inspection activities to the non-meat food areas.

T 11: Targets: Number of inspections conducted in the non-meat food area.

ER 12: Expected Results: Enhanced Sampling, Testing, and Analysis

PI 12: Performance Indicator: Increase in sampling, testing and analysis

T 12a: Targets: Sample testing reports, results and analysis completed in the non-meat food areas for the additional 6000 planned samples.

T 12b: Targets: Validated methods developed and implemented to support increased testing in the non-meat food areas.

ER 13: Expected Result: Improved Safety in Imported Food

PI 13: Performance Indicator: Increase in Foreign Country Assessments of priority areas

T 13: Targets: Establish baseline of foreign country assessments and show increase of foreign country assessments.

ER 14a: Expected Result: Standard Setting Support

ER 14b: Expected Result: Standard Setting Support

ER 14c: Expected Result: Standard Setting Support

ER 14d: Expected Result: Standard Setting Support

PI 14a: Performance Indicators: Development of new and/or updated standards is initiated in 100% of cases where there is an identified need to do so in order to address food safety risks.

PI 14b: Performance Indicators: Number and type of involvement activities associated with standard setting initiatives.

PI 14c: Performance Indicator: Number of risk assessments developed in support of standard setting initiatives.

PI 14d: Performance Indicators: Number of detection methods developed and enhanced in support of standard setting initiatives.

T 14a: Targets: 100% of cases where there is an identified need to do so in order to address food safety risks.

T 14b: Targets: To be determined since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed.

T 14c: Targets: To be determined since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed.

T 14d: Targets: To be determined since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed.

ER 15: Expected Result: Enhanced Food Safety Risk Assessments.

PI 15: Performance Indicators: Timely response to emerging food and nutrition safety incidents including foodborne illness outbreaks.

T 15: Targets: 90% of health risk assessment provided to CFIA within standard timelines to manage food safety incidents.

General information
Name of horizontal initiative Canadian Food Safety Information Network
Lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Federal partner organization(s)

Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Health Canada

The Public Health Agency of Canada is a federal partner in a project capacity only and is not contributing to the Canadian Food Safety Information Network program.

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15
End date of the horizontal initiative 2018-19
Total federal funding allocated ( 2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 12,133,149
Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2016 (dollars) 3,744,532
Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2016 (dollars) 3,207,747
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Governance structures

The CFIA's Vice President, Science, is the Executive Sponsor for the implementation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network.

A Canadian Food Safety Information Network federal, provincial and territorial Steering Committee provides integrated federal, provincial and territorial leadership, input, guidance, and decision-making authority for the development and implementation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network program component and associated food safety activities.

The Senior Management Committee, chaired by the CFIA President, provides direction for the initiative and is accountable for overall implementation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network.

The CFIA, Health Canada, and the Public Health Agency of Canada work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates and meet regularly to discuss food safety issues of mutual concerns. Additionally, regularly scheduled, targeted discussions regarding the implementation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network occur.

Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency:
Christiane Villemure
Executive Director, Canadian Food Safety Information Network
Telephone: (613) 773-5811

Health Canada:
Karen McIntyre
Director General, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch
Telephone: (613) 957-1821

Results information
Description of the horizontal initiative

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network will respond to recommendations from the Report of the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak [Weatherill Report; recommendations 33 and 34]. The initiative will strengthen the ability of Canada's federal, provincial and territorial (federal, provincial and territorial) food safety authorities to share data and information to anticipate, detect and respond to foodborne hazards and minimize the impact of food safety events. Canadian Food Safety Information Network is expected to link federal, provincial and territorial food safety authorities and food testing laboratories across Canada by leveraging the Public Health Agency of Canada's web-based informatics platform, the Canadian Network for Public Health Intelligence.

Canadian Food Safety Information Network complements the federal public service's modernization strategy, Blueprint 2020, in two of its priority areas. Canadian Food Safety Information Network contributes to Innovative Practices and Networking by sharing food safety data and information across federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions. It also contributes to the Technology Priority of Blueprint 2020 by providing a web-based solution combining automated early warning with advanced data analysis for risk-based modelling and planning.

Canadian Food Safety Information Network supports the Government of Canada's approach to evidence-based policy. Aggregated food safety data will increase the reliability of scientific evidence in risk-based decision-making to strengthen Canada's food safety system.

Additionally, the Canadian Food Safety Information Network aligns with the Government of Canada's objective to improve relationships with federal, provincial and territorial partners. The initiative represents a pan-Canadian approach to food safety and requires that federal, provincial and territorial partners work collaboratively to achieve its goals.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation 2017-18
Shared outcome of federal partners Increase Canada's ability to detect and prevent food safety incidents through an automated early warning system and coordinated, preventive and risk-based approaches to food safety activities.
Performance indicator(s)
  1. The number of times Canadian Food Safety Information Network integrated data is used to support investigations or public health actions (e.g., preventive actions, food recalls, public health messaging)
  2. The number of times Canadian Food Safety Information Network notifications are used to initiate a food safety or outbreak investigation
  3. The number of times an early warning is generated using Canadian Food Safety Information Network integrated data indicating a possible food safety incident
Target(s)
  1. Short-term: 60 times per year across all Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners - from year 1 to 2

    Mid-term: 150 times per year across all Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners - from year 3 to 5

    Long-term: 500 times per year across all Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners - from year 5 to 7

  2. Short-term: 5 times per year across all Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners - from year 1 to 2

    Mid-term: 10 times per year across all Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners - from year 3 to 5

    Long-term: 20 times per year across all Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners - from year 5 to 7

  3. Short-term: 1 time per year across all Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners - from year 1 to 2

    Mid-term: 3 times per year across all Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners - from year 3 to 5

    Long-term: 5 times per year across all Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners - from year 5 to 7

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting
  1. Canadian Food Safety Information Network surveys will be used to gather the required information. The results of the surveys will be reported quarterly for years 1 to 2 and semi-annually from year 3 onward
  2. Reports produced by the Canadian Food Safety Information Network food safety module on the Canadian Network for Public Health Intelligence. The system will produce reports quarterly for year 1 to 2 and semi-annually from year 3 onward (reports produced on demand)
  3. CFIA's internal databases and analytical capabilities will be monitored quarterly for year 1 to 2 and semi-annually from year 3 onward
Shared outcome of federal partners Faster response times and resolution of food safety incidents and outbreaks, with enhanced access to resources, by optimizing laboratory capacity to manage testing of large volumes of samples and strengthened capabilities. This will result in improved response times and coordination among Canadian Food Safety Information Network federal, provincial and territorial partners.
Performance indicator(s)
  1. Reduction in average response time for food safety incidents and outbreaks (of comparable food/hazard combination)
  2. A reduction in average resolution time for food safety incidents and outbreaks (of comparable food/hazard combination)
  3. The percentage of times the Canadian Food Safety Information Network food safety module is used during a food safety incident for near real-time sharing of data and/or information and/or expertise compared to not using the Canadian Food Safety Information Network
  4. The number of times information on the Canadian Food Safety Information Network food safety module was used to obtain laboratory surge capacity for a food safety incident
Target(s)
  1. Short-term: 10% decrease in average response time from year 1 to 2

    Mid-term: 20% decrease in average response time from year 3 to 5

    Long-term: 25% decrease in average response time after 7

  2. Short-term: 5% decrease in average resolution time from year 1 to 2

    Mid-term: 10% decrease in average resolution time from year 3 to 5

    Long-term: 15% decrease in average resolution time after 7

  3. Short-term: 20% of food safety incidences utilizing Canadian Food Safety Information Network from year 1 to 2

    Mid-term: 50% of food safety incidences utilizing Canadian Food Safety Information Network from year 3 to 5

    Long-term: 90% of food safety incidences utilizing Canadian Food Safety Information Network from year 5 to 7

  4. Short-term: 1 time from year 1 to 2

    Mid-term: more than 1 time from year 3 to 5

    Long-term: more than 10 times from year 5 to 7

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Data will be obtained from the CFIA National Emergency Operation Centre and CFIA's internal databases. The results will be reported quarterly for year 1 to 2 and semi-annually from year 3 onward. Data will be stored in the Canadian Food Safety Information Network.
Shared outcome of federal partners Support international trade by enabling the generation of additional scientific evidence to demonstrate a safe food supply and effective pan-Canadian food safety system to trading partners. Enhance response to food safety issues.
Performance indicator(s)
  1. The number of times Canadian Food Safety Information Network is demonstrated to trading partners
  2. The percentage of trading partner audits positively referring to Canadian Food Safety Information Network
  3. The percentage increase of Canadian Food Safety Information Network integrated food safety data available to support international audits
Target(s)
  1. Short-term: 1 time per year from year 1 to 2

    Mid-term: 3 times per year from year 3 to 5

    Long-term: 5 times per year from year 5 to 7

  2. Short-term: 75% of trading partner audits from year 1 to 2

    Mid-term: 80% of trading partner audits from year 3 to 5

    Long-term: 85% of trading partner audits from year 5 to 7

  3. Short-term: 5% increase annually from year 1 to 2

    Mid-term: 40% increase annually from year 3 to 5

    Long-term: 60% increase annually from year 5 to 7

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Data source is to be determined
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Planning summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Inventory Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from 2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 2017-18 Planned spending (dollars) 2017-18 Expected results 2017-18 Performance indicators 2017-18 Targets Link to department's Strategic Outcomes Link to govern- ment priorities
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Data Support, Coordination and Outreach 9,901,987 2,285,403 ER 16
ER 17
ER 18
PI 16
PI 17
PI 18
T 16
T 17
T 18
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Evidence-based decision making
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Internal Services Environmental Scanning 1,060,365 251,138 ER 19 PI 19 T 19 A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base Evidence-based decision making
Health Canada Food Safety and Nurtrition Data Support, Coordination, and Outreach 1,170,797 263,423 ER 20 PI 20 T 20 Strategic Outcome 2: Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians Priority II: Strengthen openness and transparency as modernization of health protection legislation, regulation and service delivery continues.
Total for all federal organizations 12,133,149 2,799,964

ER 16: Expected Results: In fiscal year 2016-17, extensive consultations took place between the Canadian Food Safety Information Network program team, CFIA business experts, and federal, provincial and territorial partners. From these consultations, a detailed list of business requirements was gathered. These requirements will:

Ensure that the Canadian Food Safety Information Network food safety module within the Public Health Agency's Canadian Network for Public Health Intelligence has the capabilities and business functions required to meet the needs of Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners.

PI 16: Performance Indicators: A report containing the business requirements gathered and listed by functionality and priority level.

T 16: Targets: A completed report that has been validated and approved by the Canadian Food Safety Information Network federal, provincial and territorial Steering Committee.

Activity: Data Support Coordination and Outreach

ER 17: Expected Results: Two completed pilot projects:

  1. Testing data exchange with a provincial partner to determine which data elements will be shared through the Canadian Food Safety Information Network; and
  2. Testing various food classification systems to support data sharing and integration activities with Canadian Food Safety Information Network federal, provincial and territorial partners.

PI 17: Performance Indicators:

  1. Agreement on the data elements to be shared among partners; and
  2. A decision regarding the food classification system to be used for the Canadian Food Safety Information Network.

T 17: Targets:

  1. One completed technical annex to the Canadian Food Safety Information Network bilateral MOU detailing the specific data elements to be shared among Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners.
  2. A completed report summarizing the findings from the pilot project.

Activity: Data Support Coordination and Outreach

ER 18: Expected Results: The CFIA will continue outreach activities with federal, provincial and territorial partners and formalize participation in the Canadian Food Safety Information Network through bilateral data sharing arrangements.

PI 18: Performance Indicators: Number of data sharing arrangements signed by Canadian Food Safety Information Network with federal, provincial and territorial partners.

T 18: Targets: Five signed data sharing arrangements.

Activity: Data Support, Coordination and Outreach

ER 19: Expected Results: Working with federal, provincial and territorial partners to advance a more collaborative and systematic approach to improve food safety programs. Continue the development for a systematic pan-Canadian approach to searching and cataloguing intelligence and information by developing an algorithm to detect relevant food safety information.

PI 19: Performance Indicators:

  1. The development of a food safety specific algorithm; and
  2. The number of Canadian Food Safety Information Network federal, provincial and territorial partners contributing to the testing of the algorithm (i.e., rating and ranking the sources of information found by the algorithm to determine its success in providing relevant information)

T 19: Targets:

  1. Develop and test one food safety specific algorithm; and
  2. Five Canadian Food Safety Information Network federal, provincial and territorial partners participating in the rating and ranking of sources.

Activity: Environmental Scanning

ER 20: Expected Results: Improved ability of government agencies and the industry to anticipate, prepare, and efficiently respond to food safety issues and emergencies. Coordination and outreach support that primarily supports Canadian Food Safety Information Network and expanded use of CANLINE within Health Canada food science laboratories.

PI 20: Performance Indicators: Outreach and training sessions held with Health Canada Food Directorate's research and regulatory community; Food laboratory research results uploaded to CANLINE

T 20: Targets: One refresher training session for the food laboratories and fifteen food laboratory research results uploaded to CANLINE.

Activity: Data Support, Coordination and Outreach

Upcoming evaluations over the next five fiscal years

Fiscal year (of the planned date for deputy head approval of the evaluation report) Title of the evaluation Completion of last evaluation Link to department's Program Inventory Planned spending associated with the program(s) evaluated (dollars)
2017-18

Animal Health Program Part One

(Terrestrial and Aquatic Animal Health)

Evaluation of the National Aquatic Animal Health Program (2010-11)

Animal Health & Zoonotics Program (1.2)

Sub programs:

Terrestrial Animal Health (1.2.1)

Aquatic Animal Health (1.2.2)

$104,691,813
2018-19

Animal Health Program Part Two (Feed)

Evaluation of CFIA's Enhance Feed Ban (2013-14)

Evaluation of the Feed Program (2007-08)

Animal Health and Zoonotics Program (1.2)

Sub-program:

Feed (1.2.3)

$20,719,780
2018-19 Food Safety Program: Food Safety Oversight

Evaluation of Meat Programs

Evaluation of the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program 2014-15)

Evaluation of the Daily Shift Inspection Process (2014-15)

Evaluation of the Food Safety Action Plan (2013-14)

Food Safety Program Sub Programs:

Egg (1.1.2)

Dairy (1.1.3)

Fish & Seafood (1.1.4)

Fresh Fruit & Vegetables (1.1.5)

Processed Products (1.1.6)
Imported &

$188,394,975
2018-19 cont'd Food Safety Program: Food Safety Oversight

Evaluation of the Food Vulnerability Assessment Capacity Building Project (2011-12)

Evaluation of Interdepartmental

Interfaces Related to Food Safety (2011-12)

Evaluation of On Farm Food Safety Recognition Program (2009-10)

Evaluation of the CFIA's Food Recalls and Emergency Response System (2009-10)

Manufactured Products (1.1.7)
2018-19 cont'd Canadian Food Safety Information Network N/A Food Safety Program (1.1) N/A Table Note 3
2018-19 cont'd

Plant Program Part One

(Seed, Fertilizer, Intellectual Property Rights)

Evaluation of the Fertilizer Program (2013-14)

Plant Resources Program (1.3)

Sub-programs:

Seed (1.3.2)

Fertilizer (1.3.3)

Intellectual Property Rights (1.3.4)

$16,718,631
2019-20 Food Safety Program Modernization Part Two Food Safety Program Modernization Part One Food Safety Program (1.1) N/A Table Note 3
2020-21

Plant Program Part Two

(Plant Protection)

Evaluation of the Plant Protection Program (2014-15)

Plant Resources Program (1.3)

Sub-program:

Plant Protection (1.3.1)

$61,945,582
2021-22 To be decided in June 2017
Total organizational spending $392,470,781

Table Notes

Table note 3

Evaluations required by Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. Program value is not assigned.

Return to table note 3 referrer

Programs with no planned evaluations in the next five years
Link to the departmental Program Inventory Completion of last evaluation Rationale for not evaluating in the current five-year cycle Planned spending associated with the programs not planned to be evaluated (dollars)
Meat and Poultry (1.1.1) Evaluation of Meat Programs (2016-17) Prioritization decisions to be completed for current five-year cycle in early 2017-18, eg, meat could be included in whole or in part in 2021-22 $161,205,518
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements (1.4)

Evaluation of the Daily Shift Inspection Presence (2014-15)

Evaluation of the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (2014-15)

Evaluation of the Plant Protection Program (2014-15)

Evaluation of Continuing a Comprehensive Strategy for Managing BSE in Canada (2014-15)

Evaluation of the Fertilizer Program (2013-14)

Evaluation of the National Aquatic Animal Health Program (2010-11)

Evaluation of CFIA's Enhanced Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Programming (2008-09)

In the past, the planned spending for International Collaboration and Technical Agreements was divided and added to the three main programs (Food Safety, Animal Health and Plant Protection).

Evaluations examine International Collaboration and Technical Agreements when evaluating one of the three main programs.

The following planned evaluations will examine international collaboration and technical agreements in addition to the program/sub-program(s):

  • Meat & Poultry
  • Food Safety Program
  • Animal Health Part One
  • Animal Health Part Two
  • Plant Program Part One
  • Plant Program Part Two

$0

As noted in Rationale, the spending has historically been divided among the Agency's other programs

($36,418,999)

Total organizational spending $161,205,518

Total planned organizational spending in dollars (programs planned to be evaluated in the next five years plus programs with no planned evaluations in the next five years): $553,676,299.

Upcoming internal audits for the coming fiscal year

Title of internal audit Internal audit subject Status Expected completion date
Audit of National Chemical Residue Monitoring Program Program Management Controls In progress December 2017
Audit of CFIA Inspector General Office Program Management Controls Planned Table Note 4 March 2018
Audit of Administration of CFIA Designations Program Management Controls Planned Table Note 4 March 2018
Joint Audit of IM/IT Service Management (CFIA/AAFC) IM/IT Controls Planned Table Note 4 March 2018

Table Notes

Table note 4

Audits identified as "Planned" may be subject to change due to shifting of priorities based on annual evaluation of risk elements. The proposed audit projects for fiscal years 2017-2018 will be approved by April 1, 2017.

Return to table note 4 referrer

User fees and regulatory charges

Fee proposal name Fees for services provided under the Safe Food for Canadians Act (new and amended fees)
Fee type(s) Regulatory and Other Products and Services
Fee-setting authority Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
Reason for planned change of existing fee or introduction of new fee

The current fee structure has remained largely unchanged since 1997. It is complex, out of step with costs to deliver activities and inconsistent between and within industry sectors. New fees to be introduced to replace current fees identified in the CFIA Fees Notice:

  • Part 1 - Dairy Products Fees
  • Part 2 - Egg Fees
  • Part 3 - Processed Egg Fees
  • Part 6 - Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Fees (excluding fees for Destination Inspection Services)
  • Part 7 - Honey Fees
  • Part 8 - Livestock and Poultry Carcass Grading Fees
  • Part 9 - Maple Product Fees
  • Part 10 - Meat Products Inspection Fees
  • Part 13 - Processed Products Fees
  • Part 16 - Fish Inspection Fees
Effective date of planned change of existing fee or introduction of new fee 2018
Consultation and review process planned Consultations 2017
Fee proposal name Fees for services provided in fertilizer program (amended)
Fee type(s) Regulatory and Other Products and Services
Fee-setting authority Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
Reason for planned change of existing fee or introduction of new fee

The current fee structure has remained largely unchanged since 1997. It is complex, out of step with costs to deliver activities and inconsistent between and within industry sectors. Amendment of fees to replace current fees identified in the CFIA Fees Notice:

  • Part 5 - Fertilizer Fees
Effective date of planned change of existing fee or introduction of new fee 2018
Consultation and review process planned Consultations 2017
Fee proposal name Fees for services provided in feed program (amended)
Fee type(s) Regulatory and Other Products and Services
Fee-setting authority Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
Reason for planned change of existing fee or introduction of new fee

The current fee structure has remained largely unchanged since 1997. It is complex, out of step with costs to deliver activities and inconsistent between and within industry sectors. Amendment of fees to replace current fees identified in the CFIA Fees Notice:

  • Part 4 - Feeds Fees
Effective date of planned change of existing fee or introduction of new fee 2018
Consultation and review process planned Consultations 2017
Fee proposal name Fees for services related to animal health program (amended)
Fee type(s) Regulatory and other products and services.
Fee-setting authority Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
Reason for planned change of existing fee or introduction of new fee

The current fee structure has remained largely unchanged since 1997. It is complex, out of step with costs to deliver activities and inconsistent between and within industry sectors. Amendment of fees to replace current fees identified in the CFIA Fees Notice:

  • Part 11 - Health of Animals Fees
Effective date of planned change of existing fee or introduction of new fee 2018
Consultation and review process planned Consultations 2017
Fee proposal name Fees for services related to the plant health program (amended)
Fee type(s) Regulatory and other products and services.
Fee-setting authority Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
Reason for planned change of existing fee or introduction of new fee

The current fee structure has remained largely unchanged since 1997. It is complex, out of step with costs to deliver activities and inconsistent between and within industry sectors. Amendment of fees to replace current fees identified in the CFIA Fees Notice:

  • Part 12 - Plant Protection Fees
  • Part 14 - Seeds Fees
  • Part 15 - Seed Potato Fees
Effective date of planned change of existing fee or introduction of new fee 2018
Consultation and review process planned Consultations 2017

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report of Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
1400 Merivale Road,
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9
Canada
Telephone: 800-442-2342 / 613-773-2342
Internet: Contact Us

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)

An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (Plan ministériel)

Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)

A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)

A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.

Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)

Consists of the department's Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.

Departmental Results Report (Rapport sur les résultats ministériels)

Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)

For the purpose of the 2017-18 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiatives (initiative horizontale)

A horizontal initiative is one in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (e.g. by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.

Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats)

A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

Performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)

A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

Performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)

The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

plans (plan)

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

Priorities (priorité)

Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program (programme)

A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d'alignement des programmes)

A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

results (résultat)

An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)

A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program (programme temporisé)

A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target (cible)

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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