2017-18 Departmental Plan
Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

This section describes what we plan to achieve in our four main programs: the Food Safety Program the Animal Health and Zoonotic Program, the Plant Resources Program and International Collaboration and Technical Agreements.

Program 1.1: Food Safety Program

Description

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization and Program Redesign

The CFIA plans to modernize regulations and redesign some parts of the Food Safety Program. The sections that follow provide more detail on these changes.

Safe Food for Canadians Act and Regulations

The CFIA is committed to food safety oversight for Canadian families, and this is reflected in the Safe Food for Canadians Act and its regulations. Once fully in force, this legislation would achieve these goals:

  • Improve food safety oversight to better protect consumers through:
    • tougher prohibitions, penalties and fines for activities that put health and safety at risk
    • better control over imports
    • a more consistent inspection approach across all food commodities
    • strengthened traceability for food
  • Enhance international market opportunities for the Canadian food industry by providing authority to certify any food commodity for export
  • Provide for licensing of importers to ensure a consistent approach for all food commodities

Safe Food for Canadians Act

The Safe Food for Canadians Act (SFCA) will provide one suite of authorities with updated and simplified language and modernized inspection powers. The legislation provides more explicit authority for inspectors.

We have consulted and continue to consult Canadians on the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. Depending on the amount and complexity of feedback we receive from Canadians after its publication in the Canada Gazette, Part I, the final publication of the regulations and coming-into-force date for this Act could be as early as 2017-18.

The CFIA is proposing a staged implementation of the legislation over a three year period following its final publication in Canada Gazette, Part II.

In 2017-18, we will make regulatory guidance materials available to Canadian stakeholders to help them understand the proposed regulatory requirements for food. These materials will be in plain language to meet the different needs of a broad and varied audience. We anticipate that the materials will be released incrementally, beginning with Canada Gazette I.

The objectives of Canada Gazette, Part I, comment period will be to assist industry and other stakeholders to better understand the proposed regulatory requirements. This will help them to provide informed comments and feedback that will be taken into consideration for final publication in Canada Gazette, Part II. Industry and other stakeholders will also have early awareness of the impact the proposed new requirements will have on their businesses. It will also reassure that assistance and resources are available to support them in the future.

We will prepare updated operational guidance documents for the food sector as part of the Integrated Agency Inspection Modelimplementation. This is an important first step towards being ready to implement the Safe Food for Canadians Act. We are preparing a draft training module about the Safe Food for Canadians Act for delivery in 2017-18.

Food Labelling Modernization

Canadians are looking for more diverse and innovative food choices. They are increasingly aware and knowledgeable about labels on products. Consumers expect improved transparency and accountability. The food industry continues to be innovative and adaptable in response to market drivers and global trends. The objective of the Food Labelling Modernization initiative is to meet the needs of Canadians by developing a more modern food labelling system. This system includes improved labels with more useful information to Canadians, tools for building consumer awareness and promoting compliance. The system empowers consumers to play a more active role in the marketplace.

Food labelling

Food labelling provides consumers with important information that helps them make informed decisions about the food they purchase for themselves and their families. This includes:

  • what the food is and how much you are buying
  • nutrition information, ingredient lists and allergen declarations
  • other characteristics such as organic and local.

During 2015-16, CFIA completed Phase II of its engagement activities with stakeholders on options to modernize food labelling. More than 1,600 Canadians participated.

Based on the feedback provided, in 2017-18, the CFIA will prepare instructions, in collaboration with Health Canada, for drafting new labelling provisions. These labelling provisions will be included in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations and in new or revised labelling provisions in the Food and Drug Regulations.

We will integrate the Food Compositional Standards and Standard Container Sizes into the Food Labelling Modernization initiative. In 2017-18, the CFIA will work closely with Health Canada to align and coordinate engagement activities, proposals, consultations, and coming-into-force dates for these additional proposed regulatory changes.

Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program in Federal Slaughter Establishments

The CFIA continues to implement its Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program in federal slaughter establishments. The purpose of the Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program is to improve food safety through a consistent application of policy in all slaughter houses. The program is risk based, efficient, and is recognized by our trading partners. As it is recognized by our trading partners, it will benefit the Canadian economy by helping to support market access. In 2017-18, the CFIA will work closely with the United States Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) to improve the alignment of the two countries' meat inspection systems. The CFIA will also continue an international comparison of meat inspection systems to assist in improving access to international trade for Canadian meat.

Establishment-Based Risk Assessment Model

The Establishment-Based Risk Assessment Model is a proactive, science-based and risk-based tool. Its purpose is to help the CFIA detect and act upon potential emerging trends that may jeopardize food safety. The model will provide a more consistent, predictable, and transparent assessment process for industry. It will provide industry with feedback on their risks, which would assist them to improve and strengthen their food safety practices, which would in turn increase confidence in Canada's food safety system.

When fully operational, the Establishment Risk Assessment Model will evaluate food establishments based on the level of risk they represent to consumers. The model will help the CFIA use greater precision in the way it designs its programs and work plans and help the CFIA to prioritize its oversight activities and to allocate its resources.

In 2017-18, CFIA expects to implement the Establishment-Based Risk Assessment Model for most commodities in the food sector. The model will also be adapted for importers.

Surveillance

Biosurveillance is a process of gathering, integrating, interpreting, and communicating essential information that might relate to disease activity and threats to human, animal, or plant health. Biosurveillance capabilities across Canada and the world play a key role in arming the CFIA with the tools and expertise required to take decisive and pre-emptive action to respond to animal disease threats, animal health, human health and the security of the food supply. A number of collaborative networks provide early warning surveillance to strengthen our ability to anticipate, detect and respond to animal disease threats. Examples of these networks include the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network, Canadian Food Safety Information Network and the Community for Emerging and Zoonotic Disease Integrated Intelligence and Response. The CFIA is taking an integrated approach to make use of multiple data repositories to ensure that complete, robust datasets are available for trending and analysis. The CFIA is leading the development of a risk intelligence framework to facilitate the conversion of risk information into risk-based intelligence that will enhance a One Agency decision making at the CFIA.

Collaboration and Partnerships

Canadian Food Safety Information Network

The CFIA is partnering with Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, and with interested provinces and territories in the Canadian Food Safety Information Networkinitiative. This network seeks to strengthen our ability to anticipate, detect and respond to food hazards by enabling laboratories to share urgently needed surveillance information and food safety data. This sharing of information helps reduce food safety incidents in Canada and safeguards the health of Canadians. The CFIA anticipates signing data-sharing arrangements with more provinces in 2017-18, which will increase the database available.

In 2017-18, the CFIA will continue to build on the collaborative network and plan the technical infrastructure required to share food safety data with its partners. The Canadian Food Safety Information Network will use the Public Health Agency of Canada's existing web-based platform. The CFIA will integrate multiple data storage systems to ensure that complete, robust data sets are available for trending and analysis.

Foreign Food Safety Systems Recognition

Canada currently uses a range of tools and approaches to control imports. These are based on Canada's legislative and regulatory framework. The tools and approaches assign inspection resources to check for compliance with requirements, in line with international rights and obligations. As the CFIA modernizes its food safety regulatory system, it has an opportunity to make greater use of tools that could optimize its risk management activities for imports.

The CFIA will continue to work with the United States to align regulatory approaches. This will result in improved Canada-United States trade, while maintaining high standards for food safety. The objective for 2017-18 is to develop a work plan, under the Regulatory Cooperation Council, and to review how the two countries are implementing the existing Food Safety Systems recognition agreements.

Increasing Safety in Imported Foods

Through Federal Budget 2016, the CFIA received funds to increase our ability to collaborate with foreign authorities. Together we share best practices and information on food safety standards and practices, with an overall goal of improving the safety of imported food.

The objective of this initiative is to improve the safety of food imports into the Canadian market. We do this by identifying unsafe or non-compliant imported food products in the country of origin or export before the products arrive in Canada.

This initiative includes three different types of activities:

  • targeted verification activities of foreign establishments to address perceived or known food safety risks
  • enhanced assessments of a foreign country's national food control systems, such as regulatory framework, inspection resources and oversight across food commodities
  • technical assistance to countries of origin to proactively address non-compliance of imported food products before the products arrive in Canada

For 2017-18, the targeted countries and activities are:

  • China, India and Turkey for the assessment of their national food control systems
  • China, India, Thailand and Central America for technical assistance in order to address non-compliance of imported food products.

Innovation and Experimentation

Ask CFIA

In 2016-17, the CFIA implemented a new service called 'Ask CFIA'. This service was established in response to needs identified by stakeholders, namely the need for straightforward access to consistent and easy to understand information and the desire for access to technical expertise in the Agency. Ask CFIA provides regulated parties with one point of entry to ask questions to help them understand and comply with CFIA regulatory requirements. Increased regulatory understanding and compliance will provide Canadians with a safer and stronger food system, and plant and animal resource base. Ask CFIA was initially made available to the following sectors: dairy, fish and seafood, fresh and processed fruits and vegetables, maple products, honey and egg and egg products. Additional sectors will be phased in until all CFIA regulated sectors are included. The Agency will continue to test and refine our internal processes and plans to evaluate the performance of the Ask CFIA service. The resources associated with this CFIA initiative are $1.3 million.

Proactive Offshore Preventative Activities

The CFIA is increasing its proactive offshore preventative activities to assist trading partners in complying with Canada's import food regulations. In this approach, compliance is verified at exporting countries' establishments through assessing manufacturing practices and/or inspection systems. This is a change from verifying compliance with import requirements at the Canadian port of entry.

In 2017-18, the CFIA will focus on proactive offshore activities in three areas:

  • technical assistance – sharing best practices and clarifying import requirements to the export community; and providing technical interpretations (resource profile: $1.02 million in 2017-18)
  • foreign establishment verifications – verifying that an exporting establishment is meeting the relevant Canadian import requirements to address an identified area with issues. (resource profile: $3.39 million in 2017-18)
  • foreign systems assessments – an enhanced assessment of a foreign countries' national food safety control system. (resource profile: $1.27 million in 2017-18)

The CFIA will work directly with the foreign food safety competent authority to foster understanding of, and compliance with, Canadian import requirements.

Canada will continue to implement import controls at the Canadian port of entry; however, these controls will now be supported by offshore preventative activities. This is a shift away from reacting to food safety risks to preventing them at source.

The long term performance of these offshore measures will be a reduction in the number, and scope, of imported products that are determined to be non-compliant with Canada's food import requirements. Short term progress will be measured by an increase in the number of activities conducted in the three areas of activity stated above.

Supporting information on lower-level programs is available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Planned Results

Evaluations that Affect Our Plans for Achieving Planned Results

Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Program

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Program was evaluated on its relevance and performance with respect to food safety and food quality goals during the period of 2008-13.

The finding was that the Agency needed to focus on grading (quality) and assistance to industry. The finding confirmed that a proactive and preventive approach to food safety, focussing on whole supply chain, instead of targeting specific commodities, was necessary.

As part of the CFIA's modernization agenda, each regulation applicable to Fresh Fruit and Vegetables was reviewed. As a result of the review and Fresh Fruit and Vegetable evaluation, the Agency is modernizing its Food Safety Regulations and a Fresh Fruit and Vegetables performance measurement strategy is being developed.

The following tables show our planned results for the Food Safety Program.

Expected Result - Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated
Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Number of commodity areas where inspected federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 31 March 2018 5 out of 6 5 out of 6 5 out of 6
Meat and Poultry 98% 31 March 2018 98% 97.7% 95.60%
Egg 98% 31 March 2018 97% 97% 96.22%
Dairy 98% 31 March 2018 96% 98% 99.00%
Fish and Seafood 98% 31 March 2018 99% 98.7% 98.11%
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 98% 31 March 2018 97% 90.9% 98.85%
Processed Products 98% 31 March 2018 98% 96.8% 97.77%
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision Table Note 1 100% 31 March 2018 100% 99.6% 95.03%
Percentage of Public Warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision Table Note 2 95% 31 March 2018 95% 100% 100%

Table Notes

Table Note 1

Class I - represents a situation in which there is a reasonable probability that the consumption or exposure to a food will lead to adverse health consequences which are serious or life-threatening, or that the probability of a foodborne outbreak situation is considered high.

Return to table note 1  referrer

Table Note 2

Class II - represents a situation in which there is a reasonable probability that the consumption or exposure to a food will lead to temporary or non-life threatening health consequences or that the probability of serious adverse consequences is considered remote.

Return to table note 2  referrer

Expected Result - Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14
Actual Results
2014-15
Actual Results
2015-16
Number of commodity areas where tested domestic food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 31 March 2018 6 out of 6 6 out of 6 6 out of 6
Meat and Poultry 95% 31 March 2018 95% 97.7% 97.32%
Egg 95% 31 March 2018 97% 98.7% 99.00%
Dairy 95% 31 March 2018 99% 96.1% 97.94%
Fish and Seafood 95% 31 March 2018 98% 97.6% 97.61%
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 95% 31 March 2018 99% 98.8% 98.95%
Processed Products 95% 31 March 2018 98% 98.1% 98.12%
Number of commodity areas where tested imported food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 31 March 2018 5 out of 6 4 out of 6 4 out of 6
Meat and Poultry 95% 31 March 2018 98% 99.6% 98.62%
Egg 95% 31 March 2018 99% 98.9% 99.53%
Dairy 95% 31 March 2018 98% 90.6% 88.54%
Fish and Seafood 95% 31 March 2018 85% 89% 87.89%
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 95% 31 March 2018 97% 96.8% 96.83%
Processed Products 95% 31 March 2018 95% 96.2% 96.98%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Food Safety Program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

As the CFIA is developing a new Departmental Results Framework for implementation in 2018-19 the associated expected results and targets will be aligned with the new framework.

The following tables present the CFIA's Planned Spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20. This excludes funding extensions for initiatives that are scheduled to sunset.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
348,722,065 349,600,493 302,688,731 292,616,400
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
2,890 2,732 2,627

The Planned Spending for the Food Safety Program decreases by $57.0 million and 263 full-time equivalents from 2017-18 to 2019-20. This spending decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of the following initiatives and programmes in 2017-18: the Federal Infrastructure Initiative, the Budget 2016 improving food safety for Canadians initiative, the Electronic Service Delivery Platform initiative. The spending decrease is also related to the sunsetting of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy funding and the Canadian Food Safety Information Network initiative in 2018-2019.

Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding. The Agency will assess initiatives sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in the Agency's budget authorities. Agency level information, including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph.

Information on the CFIA's lower-level programs is available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Program 1.2: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Description

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, limiting risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instils confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Planning Highlights

Regulatory Modernization and Program Redesign

The CFIA plans to modernize regulations and redesign some parts of the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program. The sections that follow provide more detail on these changes.

Humane Transport Regulatory Modernization

Following several years of broad consultations with Canadians, the CFIA is proposing amendments to Part XII of the Health of Animals Regulations. Modernizing the animal transport regulations will better align Canada with industry's best practices and current scientific knowledge about animal welfare during transportation. After publication in Canada Gazette, Part I, following consultations with industry and other stakeholders, we anticipate that these proposed amendments will be published in Canada Gazette, Part II, in 2017-18.

Humane Transport Regulatory Modernization

The proposed regulations would enhance requirements regarding feed, water and rest, and require improved record-keeping and training of commercial carriers. They will be closely aligned with the World Organization for Animal Health guidance, as well as the regulatory frameworks of our trading partners, contributing to continued and enhanced market access.

Traceability Regulatory Modernization

Livestock traceability is the ability to track an animal or a group of animals through all stages of its life. The objective of livestock traceability is to protect the health of animals and Canadians. It achieves this through efficient surveillance and control of diseases, microbes and toxic substances that affect animals and, in some instances, may spread to humans.

The quicker the response, the easier it is to contain a disease within its origins. Livestock traceability helps us to control and remove the disease, preventing it from spreading to other parts of the country. In some cases, the spread of disease does not take long and containing it quickly reduces the subsequent economic, health, environmental and social impacts on Canadians.

The CFIA anticipates that amendments to the Traceability section of the Health of Animals Regulations will be published in Canada Gazette, Part I, in 2017-18. The proposed amendments will strengthen existing livestock identification traceability requirements in Canada to enable effective and timely disease control investigations. The proposed amendments will improve how we manage animal health issues, further protect Canadian public health, and improve our ability to maintain market access and confidence in Canadian consumers.

The CFIA will also complete the compliance support communications products for regulated parties who may be affected by this initiative.

Traceability National Information Portal

Livestock identification, movement, location and ownership information is collected across the country in multiple information systems. These information systems are managed by different organizations and provincial governments. The CFIA's ability to efficiently and effectively conduct disease control and surveillance activities, along with compliance verification inspections, is hampered by this multiple data collection model.

The goal of the CFIA's livestock identification and traceability program is to provide rapid access to accurate and up-to-date traceability information. Traceability includes three basic elements: animal identification, premises identification and animal movement information. This information can be used to manage animal diseases, food safety issues and natural disasters, such as floods or fires that require the movement of animals.

In 2017-18, the CFIA will continue its planned enhancements to the Traceability National Information Portal (TNIP). We will sign new data-sharing arrangements with more Provinces and link additional information systems to the single-window Portal. This will allow the CFIA to respond more quickly to animal health issues and will support market access. In addition, Canadian veterinarians and epidemiologists will have access to accurate, complete and up-to-date information for a more effective support of disease control and surveillance activities.

To support the new regulations, the CFIA will continue to develop guidance, training and education materials for inspectors and industry.

Feeds Regulations Modernization

Feed is an integral component that supports food production in Canada. Safe and effective feeds contribute to the production of healthy livestock and safe foods of animal origin for human consumption. The CFIA will continue to modernize its regulatory framework for feeds. The modernized Feeds Regulations will support fair and competitive trade in the market and minimize regulatory burden on stakeholders. At the same time, the modernized regulations will continue to safeguard feeds and the food production continuum.

The CFIA consulted with Canadians, regulated parties, stakeholders, including federal partners, and other levels of government, in February and March 2016.

We anticipate that the proposed amendments will be published in Canada Gazette, Part I, in 2017-18, followed by final publication in Canada Gazette, Part II. To support the proposed regulations, the CFIA will develop and implement guidance, training and education materials for inspectors and industry.

Community for Emerging and Zoonotic Disease

The Community for Emerging and Zoonotic Disease-Integrated Intelligence and Response will continue to enhance our capability to generate intelligence and our capacity to detect and respond to emerging and zoonotic diseases. This provides Canadians with confidence in our food and animal health systems. The initiative is aimed at identifying early warning signals by gathering information from open information sources, including web-based and community-supplied information. Its purpose is to generate timely intelligence that meets the needs of decision makers and operational personnel. The Community for Emerging and Zoonotic Disease will continue to actively participate as a member network of the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System. The community's participation ensures that the information and intelligence it provides will be useful to the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System community. It also makes it possible for members of the network to explore ways for the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System community to contribute information and intelligence to the Community for Emerging and Zoonotic Disease.

Collaboration and Partnerships

Maintaining Market Access during a Foreign Animal Disease Outbreak

In October 2012, the United States Department of Agriculture and the CFIA entered into an Arrangement under the Regulatory Cooperation Council initiative to recognize each other's zoning decisions during a foreign animal disease outbreak. The CFIA and the United States Department of Agriculture used the Regulatory Cooperation Council zoning arrangement for the first time during the 2014-15 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza outbreaks in British Columbia and Ontario. In September 2015, the CFIA and the United States Department of Agriculture agreed to a streamlined approval process for Regulatory Cooperation Council zoning requests for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza outbreaks.

There is now an initiative at the Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council and the Beyond the Border Declaration to expand the Canada-United States Zoning arrangement to include Australia and New Zealand. This initiative will recognize members' disease control zones in case of a foreign animal disease outbreak, so as to reduce the impact on trade. The ultimate objective is to establish a common zoning framework for foreign animal diseases. The purpose of the proposed framework is twofold. First, it will ensure that members are protected against foreign animal diseases. Second, in the event of a disease outbreak in any of the four countries, bilateral trade can continue between zones that are free of the disease. This initiative will benefit the Canadian economy because recognizing foreign animal disease control and eradication zones will ensure trade continues with non-affected zone, while the disease is contained and managed within the affected zones.

In 2017-18, the CFIA will renew the existing arrangement with the United States Department of Agriculture, which is scheduled to expire in 2017. We will also complete Veterinary Infrastructure evaluations, and in collaboration with the North American Virtual Animal Disease Modelling Centre, we will develop tools that will help to plan zoning.

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Program Integrity

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) is a progressive, fatal disease of the nervous system of cattle. In the past 30 years, Canada has had 19 cases of BSE in cattle born in Canada. Ongoing surveillance confirms that BSE continues to remain under effective control.

The CFIA has identified eight priority areas for improvement in its BSE program for Canada, some of which address evaluation commitments. In 2017-18, the CFIA will implement these improvements in the following ways:

  • developing a system to gather data on BSE awareness activities
  • developing and implementing an action plan to fulfill current and forthcoming identified gaps in BSE expertise at CFIA
  • implementing a strategy to increase the number of samples for BSE
  • implementing a new Specified Risk Material Permit and Inspections Data System
  • delivering training to personnel involved in the inspection and audit of specified risk material controls in non-federally registered abattoirs
  • conducting audits to ensure that products and by-products exported from Canada meet foreign requirements on cross contamination by specified risk material and/or with bovine material of Canadian origin
  • analyzing how programs perform to recommend reallocation of the existing BSE resources
  • starting the implementation of improvements identified in the previous year

BSE surveillance

The CFIA is a co-lead of working groups under the national collaborative surveillance structure called CanSurveBSE. It continues to be science-based and serves the interests of all stakeholders. Its objectives are to work together nationally to ensure that:

  • Canada continues to have a credible and efficient surveillance program that clearly demonstrates BSE remains under effective control; and
  • a sufficient level of surveillance is maintained to support the marketing of Canadian cattle and beef products and by-products.

The CFIA also conducts ongoing outreach through direct contact with veterinarians and producers to promote participation in the program.

In addition, the Agency supports provincial initiatives that remind producers of the importance of continuing to submit BSE samples.

International Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Laboratories Network

The CFIA, in partnership with the Canadian Safety and Security Program, is leading the formation of the Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Laboratories Network. This is to respond to serious global concern about the risk of emerging viral agents, most often originating in animals. Outbreaks are becoming more frequent and spreading more widely, which could result in devastating damage to human health, agriculture resources and national economies. At present, a high number of containment animal health institutions exist world-wide; however, these institutions face barriers to collaborating effectively, preventing the efficient exchange of information, materials, and expertise. The CFIA will establish and sustain biosafety level 4 trusted partnerships. This will strengthen international coordination, improve knowledge sharing and make use of integrated capacity for diagnosing, researching and training for pathogens of high consequence.

Antimicrobial Resistance and Use

An antimicrobial is an agent that kills microorganisms or inhibits their growth. Antimicrobials play an important role for animals. They reduce suffering and help farmers raise healthy animals, which in turn provide safe food, including meat, milk and eggs, for Canadian consumers. Antimicrobials are routinely used in livestock feed for growth promotion and to prevent infections in food-producing animals. However, the misuse of antimicrobials contributes to the development of resistant bacteria, which poses a risk.

In 2017-18, the CFIA will continue to work with other government departments on the Federal Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance and Usage in Canada. In collaboration with the Public Health Agency of Canada, Health Canada, and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the CFIA will develop an integrated risk assessment model to help prevent the spread of antimicrobial resistance. The CFIA will focus on the three pillars outlined in the Federal Action Plan: Surveillance, Stewardship and Innovation. Applying these pillars to antimicrobial use in animals, we will ensure that a comprehensive data set is available through the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance.

Supporting information on lower-level programs is available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Planned Results

Evaluations that Affect Our Plans for Achieving Planned Results

Enhanced Feed Ban

The Enhanced Feed Ban initiative was evaluated in 2013 with the objective of assessing whether the ban remained necessary and whether it had achieved expected outcomes. The scope for the evaluation was 2004-05 to June 2011.

The evaluation found that the circumstances and factors that prompted the introduction of the enhanced feed ban had not changed significantly and warrant continuation of the ban. It also found that there were ongoing efforts led by the CFIA to identify potential modifications to the design and delivery of the enhanced feed ban that would better address the needs of CFIA partners and stakeholders, including the industries regulated by the enhanced feed ban. The evaluation made four recommendations which have been actioned by the CFIA.

In addition, the report concluded that the Enhanced Feed Ban is an important component of the Government of Canada's response to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), given the ongoing need to reduce the risk of transmission of BSE in the Canadian cattle herd to protect animal and public health and to facilitate market access for Canadian beef and other related products. Given its alignment with long-term federal government priorities and goals as well as current departmental responsibilities (including regulatory responsibilities), the enhanced feed ban continues to remain relevant to the mandate of the CFIA.

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Management Program

In 2013, the CFIA conducted an internal evaluation of its Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Management Program to ensure that it was relevant to the needs and priorities of its major stakeholders, international trading partners and organizations, as well as consistent with both government-wide priorities and its own mandate.

The evaluation resulted in several actions taken across the Agency to ensure that its Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Management Program was operating effectively and efficiently. The Agency committed to the following key deliverables as a result of the evaluation:

  • Develop a process where BSE-specific data could be readily compiled in a useful format without manual validation.
  • Continue to engage stakeholders in order to maintain ongoing awareness of the enhanced feed ban and to increase the surveillance sample numbers.
  • A succession plan specific to BSE will be developed by the Agency.
  • The CFIA is updating BSE control training materials and adapting it to a newly developed inspection model that includes standard training, tools and competencies for inspection staff.

The following tables show our planned results for the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program.

Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada through specified regulated pathways 0 31 March 2018 0 0 0
Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease 100% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements 99% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%
Canada's status on the OIE disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk" Status maintained 31 March 2018 Status maintained Status maintained Status maintained
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease 100% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate trans-boundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed 100% of all necessary manual updates are completed 31 March 2018 100% of all necessary manual updates are completed 33% of
necessary
manual updates
were completed
75% of
necessary
manual updates
were completed
Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises in which CFIA participates 9 31 March 2018 11 23 11
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion 100% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%
Percentage of cases where the CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease 100% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Animal Health and Zoonotics indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

As the CFIA is developing a new Departmental Results Framework for implementation in 2018-19, the associated expected results and targets will be aligned with the new framework.

The following tables present the CFIA's Planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20. This excludes funding extensions for initiatives that are scheduled to sunset.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
124,518,784 125,411,593 119,526,241 97,389,616
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
942 929 760

The Planned Spending for the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program decreases by $28.0 million and 182 full-time equivalents from 2017-18 to 2019-20. This spending decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of the following initiatives and programmes in 2017-18: the Federal Infrastructure Initiative, the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector in seizing market opportunities and securing agriculture market access initiative, and the Growing Forward 2 initiative. The spending decrease is also related to the sunsetting of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy funding.

Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding. The Agency will assess ending initiatives. We will seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in the Agency's budget authorities. Agency level information, including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph.

Information on the CFIA's lower-level programs is available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Program 1.3: Plant Resources Program

Description

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instils confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Planning Highlights

The CFIA plans to modernize regulations and redesign some parts of the Plant Resources Program. The sections that follow provide more detail on these changes.

Regulatory Modernization and Program Redesign

Fertilizer Regulatory Modernization

The CFIA is proposing to amend the Fertilizers Regulations to address gaps and inconsistencies in the current regulations. The proposed amendments are intended to reflect current science and emerging risks. They aim to be more responsive to industry needs while maintaining strong, risk-based and consistent oversight of the safety of products entering the Canadian marketplace and environment. We anticipate that the proposed amendments will be published in Canada Gazette, Part I, in 2017-18.

Grain Export Certification

In 2017-18, the CFIA will redesign its Grain Export Certification program to provide more service choices to expedite, improve the speed and efficiency of weed seed examinations. This will help with the timely export of Canadian grain. We will be consulting with Canadians and stakeholders on the approach and we will also start a pilot program.

Grain industry

Did you know…

For 2016, total grain exports reached nearly $20.6 Billion, a 31.2% increase compared to the $15.7 billion of 2011.

Top 5 markets in 2016 for grain exports (pulses, cereals and oilseeds), including associated seeds for propagation: China ($ 4.0B), U.S. ($2.4B), Japan ($2.2B), India ($1.14B) and Mexico ($1.11B)

Regulatory Cooperation Council, Beyond the Border and International initiatives

Post-Entry Quarantine Program

Certain plants from designated countries must be grown for up to two years under specific post-entry quarantine conditions to be eligible to be imported into the United States. This requirement also applies to these plants if they first enter Canada prior to re-export to the United States. Delivering upon commitments in the Regulatory Cooperation Council, in 2017-18, CFIA will establish import requirements equivalent to those of the United States through the Post-Entry Quarantine Program. This program will provide a process that allows the United States to recognize plants grown in Canada as meeting their phytosanitary import requirements. These plants will no longer require post-entry quarantine. The CFIA is developing this program with the United States Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. The program will make it easier to trade in these plants, will contribute to Canada's economy, and will provide additional plant safety assurance to the United States.

Beyond the Border Initiative

To protect biodiversity and Canada's plant resource base, the CFIA works to minimize risks to Canada's plant resource base by developing and enforcing import and export controls, performing inspections related to plant resources, and advancing and applying plant science. In 2017-18, CFIA will continue to collaborate with the United States to further enhance and expand the Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) certification program and foreign outreach activities for other plant health risk pathways and pests.

Asian Gypsy Moth

The Asian gypsy moth is an invasive insect. It poses a significant threat to Canada's forests, biodiversity and economy. These moths can feed on a wide range of economically important tree species, as well as other important plants. Ships and cargo including containers and used vehicles can carry the egg masses of these moths to Canada from China, Japan, South Korea and Russia (far east region). In the right conditions, caterpillars hatch from these egg masses and they can go great distances with the wind to find food.

Collaboration and Partnerships

The CFIA plans to grow partnerships as part of the Plant Resources Program. The sections that follow provide more detail on these plans.

Plant Health Network

As a science-based regulator, the Agency will continue to build its scientific capacity and partnerships, while focusing on outcome-based results. Similar to the approach we took to build an animal health network and a food safety network, we will develop a national network of experts in plant health. This network will resolve collective challenges, providing more rapid access to specialised knowledge and expertise in support of the Agency's regulatory and policy decisions. This initiative will help plant scientists and diagnosticians work with other federal government scientists and with national and international academic and industry partners on sharing information and managing data. This will lead to efficiencies, both internally and externally, and to improved plant protection in Canada.

Innovation and Experimentation

Emergency Management Framework for Agriculture in Canada

The emergency management framework for agriculture in Canada sets the strategic direction for partners to collaboratively prepare for and manage emergencies facing the agriculture sector. It prepares all partners to act in a predictable, cohesive, practical and forward-thinking manner. In many cases, effective emergency management systems and practices are already in place, but they may not be well integrated. The framework guides the development and eventual implementation of emergency management activities. This will allow us to better use collective capacities and expertise in order to fully prepare for and manage emergencies.

The CFIA continues to be a partner in the emergency management framework for agriculture in Canada. In 2017-18, the federal, provincial, territorial and industry partners will build upon the framework by pursuing direct actions related to the emergency management framework. These actions include scheduling regular emergency management exercises, such as tabletop and live plays, and cover all areas of agricultural risk. We will review these exercises to identify gaps and areas for improvement. In 2017-18 the federal, provincial and industry partners will build upon the framework by developing a national plant and animal health strategy.

Plant and Animal Health Strategy

This strategy is intended to ensure that Canada is best positioned to safeguard its plant and animal resources and the related wellbeing of Canadians in regard to the increasing magnitude and complexity of the risks presented. Activities in 2016 concluded in a major stakeholder forum at which key objectives and expected results for inclusion in the strategy were identified. It is intended that the strategy will be presented to federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture for endorsement in July 2017 and that its implementation will lead to more focus and activity in the area of prevention, which should provide the best return on investment for related government and industry resources.

In 2017-18, development of the strategy will continue, as well as planning for its implementation. This is expected to include the development of specific performance measures. The Agency will dedicate approximately $1.1 million worth of combined resources from the Plant Resource and Animal Health and Zoonotics Program to this innovative and collaborative approach.

Planned Results

Evaluations that Affect Our Plans for Achieving Planned Results

Fertilizer Program

The evaluation of the CFIA's Fertilizer Program was conducted during the 2012-13 fiscal year and focussed on whether the program continued to meet its objectives in terms of making sure that fertilizer products are safe and labelled correctly.

The report determined that the program remains necessary and meets the needs of stakeholders. It noted that the program was on track in focusing on fertilizer and supplement safety to Canadians, animals and plants.

Modernization of the Fertilizer Regulations is currently under way. It represents an opportunity for additional changes to program administration with a further shift towards risk-based approaches and outcome-based regulations. It also aims to lessen regulatory burden on products that are deemed safe and have a well-established history of use and to remove prescriptive provisions from the regulations thus providing for greater flexibility and less red tape on the regulated sector.

The following tables show our planned results for the Plant Resources Program.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves 0 31 March 2018 0 0 0
Domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements 90% 31 March 2018 92% 98% 96.16%
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk- mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issued 100% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%
Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner 90% 31 March 2018 100% 100% 100%
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirements 99% 31 March 2018 99% 99.7% 99.75%

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Plant Resources Program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports:

As the CFIA is developing a new Departmental Results Framework for implementation in 2018-19, the associated expected results and targets will be aligned with the new framework.

The following tables present the CFIA's Planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20. This excludes funding extensions for initiatives that are scheduled to sunset.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
78,138,366 78,664,213 76,076,780 75,956,733
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
688 678 678

The Planned Spending for the Plant Resources Program decreases by $2.7 million and 10 full-time equivalents from 2017-18 to 2019-20. This spending decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of the following initiatives and programmes in 2017-18: the Federal Infrastructure Initiative, the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector in seizing market opportunities and securing agriculture market access initiative, and the Growing Forward 2 initiative. The spending decrease is also related to the sunsetting of the Genomics Research and Development Initiative funding.

Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding. The Agency will assess ending initiatives. We will seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in the Agency's budget authorities. Agency level information, including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph.

Information on the CFIA's lower-level programs is available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Program 1.4: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Description

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives through actively participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues contribute to market access.

Planning Highlights

The CFIA actively participates in developing international rules and standards for food safety and the health of animal and plant resources. The CFIA will continue to lead Canada's participation in the following organizations: the World Trade Organization Sanitary and Phytosanitary Committee, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), and the North American Plant Protection Organization. We will continue to partner with Health Canada at Codex Alimentarius. Of particular significance, the CFIA is providing in-kind contributions to international organizations, specifically the Food and Agriculture Organizations, the World Organisation for Animal Health and the International Plant Protection Convention. In 2017-18, we will provide CFIA scientific experts on assignment to these organizations to support the development of international standards.

Through these engagements, Canada influences the development of rules and standards that are consistent with Canada's needs and objectives. Through the engagements, Canada also encourages harmonization on matters related to food safety and consumer protection, plant resources, and animal health and zoonotics. Engagement approaches include formal bilateral mechanisms established under international agreements and arrangements, ad hoc mechanisms, and technical cooperation activities. In addition, Canada continues to promote its regulatory approaches, encourage the adoption of risk- and science-based regulations and their associated best practices on a global level.

For example, the CFIA will collaborate with other government departments to:

  • simplify the flow of low-risk goods, while ensuring proper protection against phytosanitary risks
  • reduce trade and border delays at both the perimeter and Canada-United States border
  • promote greater international and domestic awareness of and compliance with Canadian requirements

The CFIA will implement a food safety strategy through offshore verification activities and technical assistance to foreign countries. This will improve compliance of imported products before they arrive at Canadian ports of entry.

The CFIA will continue to work with its international regulatory counterparts in likeminded countries, such as the United States and member countries of the European Union, and in emerging economies. We will strengthen and expand partnerships to achieve the following objectives:

  • manage risks before they arrive at the Canadian border
  • share and learn best regulatory practices
  • strengthen capacity in the international regulatory framework to achieve food safety, animal health and plant health objectives
  • actively promote the Canadian science-based regulatory system with counterparts in key trading countries
  • negotiate to resolve scientific and technical issues and to support greater market access for the Canadian agriculture industry.

Planned initiatives include:

  • support for Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement implementation
  • support for the negotiation of Free Trade Agreements with other key trading partners
  • deliver off-shore preventive activities

Innovation and Experimentation

Global Food Safety Partnership

CFIA is a part of the Global Food Safety Partnership which, under the auspices of the World Bank, enables effective and coordinated food safety capacity building through a robust public-private partnership aiming to improve public health and economic development outcomes.

In 2017-18, the CFIA will use this partnership to fund global food safety initiatives for laboratory capacity building for food safety in India and to help India and several African countries in preparing an international strategy to support their food safety systems.

The global food safety partnership will contribute to a safer supply of food imported to Canada. Canada supports capacity building for food safety in developing countries to improve the safety of imported food world-wide. The CFIA will help to strengthen the capacity of governments in the relevant science and to improve the national food safety regulatory systems in developing countries who qualify for the global food safety partnership funding and who also meet the requirements for exporting food to Canada.

We plan to verify the results we are trying to achieve through the use of performance indicators such as: the number of collaborations continued, established or broadened, CFIA stakeholders and international bodies participating in the collaborations, and the number of individuals trained and methods/procedures/ideas shared towards the strengthening of science-based regulations and regulatory frameworks. The Agency has dedicated the equivalent of $330,000 in resources to this innovative partnership.

Planned Results

The following tables show our planned results for the International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Program.

Expected Result Performance Indicators Target Date to be Achieved Target Actual Results
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in Sanitary and Phytosanitary negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests 36 31 March 2018 40 43 38
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants, and their products Number of unjustified non - tariff barriers resolved 45 31 March 2018 50 40 57
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA-led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 4 31 March 2018 6 7 6
Number of CFIA-led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments 8 31 March 2018 9 13 11

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

As the CFIA is developing a new Departmental Results Framework for implementation in 2018-19, the associated expected results and targets will be aligned with the new framework.

The following tables present the CFIA's Planned spending and full-time equivalents, as approved by Treasury Board, for 2017-18 through to 2019-20. This excludes funding extensions for initiatives that are scheduled to sunset.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
31,736,983 36,418,999 29,531,085 25,494,437
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
310 277 256

The Planned spending for the International Agreements and Technical Collaboration Program decreases by $10.9 million and 54 Full-time equivalents from 2017-18 to 2019-20. This spending decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of the following initiatives and programmes in 2017-18: the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector in seizing market opportunities and securing agriculture market access initiative, the Growing Forward 2 initiative and the improved market access for Canadian agricultural products initiative. The spending decrease is also related to the sunsetting of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy funding in 2018-19.

Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding. The Agency will assess ending initiatives. We will seek renewal as required to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in the Agency's budget authorities. Agency level information, including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph.

Information on the [name of department]'s lower-level programs is available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Planning highlights

Service Delivery

The CFIA is in the first year of implementing its client-centred Service Management Strategy. We are currently defining, streamlining and modernizing the way in which we deliver services. We are striving for clear and transparent standards, for accountabilities and for feedback mechanism available to clients.

In 2017-18, we will streamline the service inventory to ensure services are defined from the perspective of clients. The inventory will be used to standardize our processes and the experiences of clients. It will also be used to develop service standards that are focused on clients. We will track the standards against metrics and report on them publicly. We will begin this tracking with Permissions, or regulatory authorizations, which we have identified as priority services, due to volume and the needs of clients. The Agency is working to define an approach to better manage the ways in which it interacts with its clients and with Canadians by working towards a single, integrated window to access CFIA services.

In 2017-18, the CFIA will also implement Phase 2, of its e-Retrieval initiative. This initiative will optimize access to information services within the Agency by digitizing the information. As a result, we will operate more efficiently and reduce the costs for retrieving information in response to access to information requests.

Federal Science and Technology Infrastructure

The CFIA is working with the Government of Canada's other science-based departments and agencies to deliver an adaptable federal science and technology infrastructure enterprise for current and future science and innovation challenges. The new model for federal science and technology infrastructure will foster partnerships among industries, research institutions, federal departments and different levels of government by providing physical space, information technology, and support that is targeted to tackling multidisciplinary science challenges. These research and innovation hubs will also become magnets for Canadian and global research talent, investors and leading companies.

Web Renewal

The Government of Canada Web Renewal Initiative is a government-wide priority. Canada.ca features 15 user-centred themes based on the top information and tasks that visitors are looking for. Over a period of three years, approximately 1,500 individual websites will be brought together under Canada.ca to make it easier for Canadians to find information.

The Agency is in Stream 3 of the web renewal process. The CFIA will join this initiative in 2017, at a time to be determined by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. In 2017-18 the CFIA will continue to ensure content is ready to move over to Canada.ca.

Open Government

The CFIA's transparency agenda is part of the CFIA's ongoing transformation to be a more service-oriented, responsive and accountable organization. We are aligning with the new requirements under Open Government and the organizational changes under Agency Transformation.

In 2017-18 the CFIA will review its own experience and its key considerations to develop an approach for its next phase of the transparency agenda by doing the following:

  • developing a framework to give Canadians free access to more information.
  • consulting with stakeholders on the CFIA approach to transparency and Open Government.
  • continuing the activities under the Open Government Implementation Plan

Enhancing Project Management

The CFIA will increase project management awareness and maturity across the agency. This will help us to further develop currently recognized best practices and disciplines. The continued improvement of project management in the Agency will increase CFIA's Organizational Project Management Capacity Assessment rating. This is the rating that Treasury Board Secretariat uses to assess the ability of government departments to manage their investments. The higher rating will give the CFIA the authority to manage more complex projects or those with bigger monetary value than before.

Investment Planning and the Enterprise Project Management Office will expand project management training to include a course specific to CFIA Executives. It will also complete a full review and release of the Enterprise Project Management Framework.

People Management

The Human Resources branch has made increasing student recruitment a priority for 2017-18, with a special focus on Indigenous students and students with disabilities. In addition, the next stages of service modernization will be taken to align human resources with the current and future needs of the Agency, including in our plans and Talent Management.

One Agency

By 2020, CFIA will implement a "One Agency" Talent Management Framework with the following features: a common performance assessment tool; an elaboration of Agency job families and related competencies and career development programs and tools; a governance structure; a policy framework; and guidelines, tools and training for talent management.

The Communications and Public Affairs Branch will continue to encourage open and collaborative communication among all Agency employees in two key ways:

  • updating its existing internal communications methods
  • providing advice and direction on how to use new, modern tools.

Information Management and Information Technology

The CFIA is currently modernizing more than it ever has since its creation. Among our many initiatives for change, the CFIA is moving to a "digital by default" approach for communicating with Canadians. We will achieve this by using web and social media strategies for communicating our messages to Canadians. We will also fulfil our commitment to deliver an Improved Food Inspection Model and a new Electronic Service Delivery Platform.

The electronic platform will standardize and automate business processes, make the use of resources more efficient and strengthen trade by using electronic signatures on export certificates and import permits. The Electronic Service Delivery Platform project will make it possible for us to provide services on-line. It will also help us to plan, track and assign activities, and will improve business reporting.

Electronic Service Delivery Platform

Winter 2016: The CFIA began rolling out the Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP), a secure digital tool supporting a suite of online services.

Spring 2017: The CFIA will expand access to ESDP to additional users of specific and targeted commodities that were not included in the first phase.

Fall 2017: The CFIA plans to expand access to the ESDP to additional users of specific and targeted commodities that were not included in previous phases.

Spring 2018: The CFIA plans to move to a complete roll-out of ESDP to proposed users in specific and targeted commodities.

In order to support the Government of Canada's direction to standardize and consolidate its activities, the Agency is moving to common administrative service platforms. The platforms are shared by all Government of Canada partners for common services, including email, document management, human resources management, financial management and the web. Moving to a common platform will eliminate redundancy, improve operations, and increase collaboration. Currently, the CFIA is involved in working on the following changes: planning and implementing an upgrade to PeopleSoft, moving from our current document management system called RDIMS to the common Government of Canada document management system called GCDOCS, moving from GroupWise to Microsoft Outlook, and moving its website to Canada.ca.

Emergency Management

The threat posed by diseases and invasive pest continues to evolve, due to increased urbanization and the global movement of people, animals, plants and goods. With consumers having access to foods from all over the world, risks from foodborne illness are also greater. A robust emergency management program is essential to meet the challenges in this ever-changing environment.

The CFIA will continue to align our emergency plans for prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery with our processes for transforming the business. For example, the Plant and Animal Prevention and Modernization strategy is aimed at improving Federal/Provincial/Territorial, industry and stakeholders approach to managing plant and animal risks by instituting more proactive and collaborative measures, leveraging partnerships, and positioning Canada to meet current and emerging pressures. For example, the Plant and Animal Prevention and Modernization strategy will improve the ways Canadian federal, provincial and territorial governments, industry and stakeholders manage plant and animal risks. The strategy will do this by instituting more proactive and collaborative measures, making use of partnerships, and positioning Canada to meet current and emerging challenges. Additionally, the CFIA will regularly update plans to reflect changes and find efficiencies. This will allow the Agency to maintain essential business functions during emergencies.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
121,533,396 121,954,294 119,943,910 117,310,435
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018-19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-20
Planned full-time equivalents
861 853 835

The Planned spending for Internal Services decreases by $4.6 million and 26 full-time equivalents from 2017-18 to 2019-20. This spending decrease is primarily related to the sunsetting of the following initiatives and programmes in 2017-18: the Budget 2016 improving food safety for Canadians initiative funding and the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector in seizing market opportunities and securing agriculture market access initiative. The spending decrease is also related to the sunsetting of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy funding in 2018-2019.

Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding. The Agency will assess initiatives that are sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in the Agency's budget authorities. Agency level information, including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph.

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