ARCHIVED - 2011-12 Annual Report on the Access to Information Act

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Table of Contents

1) Introduction

The Access to Information Act gives Canadian citizens, as well as people and corporations present in Canada, the right to access records under the control of federal government institutions to limited and specific exceptions. The Act is intended to complement existing procedures for access to government information and not to limit, in any way, information that is normally available to the public.

Section 72 of the Access to Information Act requires the heads of federal government institutions to submit a report to Parliament on their institutions' administration of the Act for each fiscal year. This report, along with all Access to Information annual reports, is tabled in Parliament in accordance with section 72 of the Act. This report describes how the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) administered the Access to Information Act for fiscal year 2011-12 and was prepared in accordance the reporting requirements outlined by Treasury Board Secretariat.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is mandated to safeguard Canada's food supply and the plants and animals upon which safe and high-quality food depends. The CFIA ensures that food is as safe as possible for Canadian families and that consumers are protected by targeting unsafe practices.

About the Canadian Food Inspection Agency

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canada's largest science-based regulatory agency. It has over 7 300 employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western). The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animals and plants, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy.

CFIA develops legal requirements and delivers inspection and other services to:

  • prevent and manage food safety risks;
  • protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species;
  • prevent and manage animal diseases;
  • contribute to consumer protection; and
  • contribute to market access for Canada's food, plants, and animals.

CFIA bases its activities on science, effective management of risk, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its mandate.

The CFIA's activities help protect Canadian and international food consumers, Canadian agricultural production (including forestry) and our environment. This benefits all people in the agriculture-food continuum, such as farmers, fishers, foresters, processors and distributors (including importers and exporters), and consumers.

The CFIA is responsible for administering and enforcing 13 federal statutes and 38 regulations that govern the safety and labelling of food sold in Canada and that support a sustainable plant and animal resource base. The CFIA shares many areas of responsibility with other federal departments and agencies; with provincial, territorial and municipal authorities; and with other stakeholders.

Within a complex operating environment, the Agency works with its partners to implement food safety measures; to manage food, animal and plant risks and emergencies; and to promote the development of food safety and disease-control systems to maintain the safety of Canada's high-quality agriculture, aquaculture and fisheries, and agri-food products. The Agency's activities include verifying domestic and foreign industry compliance; registering and inspecting establishments; testing food, animals, plants and their related products; and approving the use of many agricultural inputs.

The CFIA is led by its President, who reports to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food. The Agency is structured so that all branch heads have specific accountabilities that contribute to achieving each of the CFIA's strategic objectives.

With its headquarters in the NCR, the CFIA is organized into four operational Areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and the West) that are subdivided into 18 regional offices, 185 field offices (including border points of entry) and 408 offices in non-governmental establishments (such as processing facilities). The Agency also works in 14 laboratories that provide scientific advice, develop new technologies, provide testing services and conduct research.

Administration of the Act

The administration of the Access to Information Act is the primary responsibility of the ATIP Office in the Integrity and Redress Secretariat. The ATIP Office processes all requests for information and coordinates all activities related to the Act, along with associated regulations, directives and guidelines. The ATIP Office is headed by a manager who reports to the Chief Redress Officer, Integrity and Redress Secretariat. As of March 31, 2012, there were 12 full-time employees working in the ATIP Office.

Dedicated ATIP Advisor positions have been established in the core Branches, who report directly to the Branch Head on Branch–related ATIP issues and activities. These Branch Advisors work with the ATIP Office to ensure an efficient and effective process.

Resources

An estimated $659 873.00 in salary costs and $1 494 841.00 in operating costs were incurred by the ATIP Office to administer the Access to Information Act for the reporting period. These costs do not include resources expended by CFIA program areas to meet the requirements of the Act.

Staff Training and Awareness

The ATIP Office provided 25 training sessions to 376 employees in the National Capital Region during the 2011–12 Fiscal Year. ATIP officials also participated in 2 CFIA orientation sessions targeted at new employees. Approximately 60 employees received ATIP training during these sessions. Overall, 436 employees received ATIP training during 2011–12. During the year, work was undertaken on creating an online course to raise awareness of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act.

Policies, Guidelines and Procedures

The CFIA has implemented a set of process improvements for ATIP in order to provide greater oversight and accountability. The process improvements include the following: the creation of an ATIP Advisor function in the core Branches; a streamlined approval process; more senior management engagement at the beginning of the ATIP process; new internal control processes, and a requirement by subject matter experts in the Branches to provide recommendations and identify sensitivities when providing records to the ATIP Office. These enhanced procedures provide a more focused approach to the tasking of ATIP requests and help address the Information Commissioner's recommendations for CFIA from her 2012 Special Report to Parliament—to improve the delivery of access to information services at the Agency.

2) How Requests Were Processed Under the Act

In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the CFIA's information holdings, resulting in a significant increase in the volume, size and complexity of ATIP requests. This growth, accelerated by certain high-profile incidents and the need to address a backlog of requests, led to delays in the release of requested information. Processing of requests is also contingent on external factors, such as required consultations with other parties and the volume of records.

The CFIA received 289 new requests under the Access to Information Act between April 1, 2011, and March 31, 2012. There were 135 outstanding requests from the previous year, bringing the total to 424 requests that required processing. Of this total, 329 were completed during the reporting period and 96 were carried forward to 2012–13. This represents a decrease of 95 requests (22%) processed over last year, in which 424 were completed.

The following table outlines the cycle of ATI requests at CFIA for the last five Fiscal Years (FYs).
Fiscal Year 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Received 433 472 347 351 289
Completed 416 327 340 424 329
Outstanding from previous FY 39 56 201 208 135
Carried forward 56 201 208 135 96

As of December 2011, CFIA adopted new procedures to streamline the ATI process to reduce delays in the release of requested information. Part of this new process is the identification of routine and complex requests. Complex requests are those that involve multiple consultations or require a more detailed approval. From that point until the end of the FY, 18 requests (20.5%) out of a total of 88 requests were deemed complex.

The complexity of files continues to increase. This is shown in the increase in size of files - from 82 pages in 2007-08 to almost 1000 pages last fiscal year – and in the number of consultations that we undertake. During the reporting period, CFIA consulted on 1115 cases with third parties and federal/provincial government institutions. Some responses required over 100 consultations.

The following represents a breakdown of the sources of requests received during the fiscal year:

  • 104 requests from Business (36%);
  • 46 requests from Media (16%);
  • 26 requests from Organizations (9%);
  • 109 requests from the Public (38%); and
  • 4 requests from Academia (1%).

The ATIP Office reviewed a total of 75 146 pages during the fiscal year for requests completed pursuant to the Act, of which 62 656 were released. This is a decrease of 71 739 pages (51%) over last year, in which 146 885 pages were reviewed. Of the 329 requests completed, 19 exceeded 1 000 pages. The decrease in pages reviewed is explained by the fact that CFIA has a number of very large files that have been worked on during the Fiscal Year, but were not closed.

Consultations

During the reporting period, the CFIA received 75 consultations from other government institutions concerning the release of Agency records. This represents a decrease of 2 consultation requests (>1%) over last year, in which 77 consultations were received. These consultations resulted in the review of 7 433 pages, an increase of 3 867 pages (208%) over the previous year.

Fiscal Year 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Consultations 68 74 64 77 75
Pages Reviewed 1999 2296 3030 3566 7433

As can be seen from this table, the number of consultations has stayed fairly constant over the last few years but the number of pages reviewed has significantly increased, especially during the reporting period.

Completion Times and Extensions

The 329 completed requests in 2011–12 were done in the following time frames:

  • 115 within 30 days or less (35%);
  • 41 within 31 to 60 days (12%);
  • 74 within 61 to 120 days (23%); and
  • 99 over 121 days (30%).

In 214 instances, the CFIA found it necessary to extend the original time limit of 30 calendar days as prescribed in the Act. Of these extensions, 109 were for third-party notifications pursuant to section 27 of the Act for a total of 842 third party notifications and another 273 consultations with federal or provincial authorities. In some cases requests required over 100 third party notifications.

Disposition of Completed Requests

There were 329 requests completed in 2011-12. The disposition of the completed requests is as follows:

  • 44 were fully disclosed (13%);
  • 214 were partially disclosed (65%);
  • 1 was excluded in its entirety (0%);
  • 5 were exempted in their entirety (2%);
  • 30 could not be processed (9%); and
  • 35 were abandoned by the applicants (11%).

Exemptions and Exclusions

The CFIA invoked exemptions pursuant to the Act a total of 674 times. The exemptions were invoked as follows:

  • 30 instances for records dealing with information obtained in confidence (s. 13);
  • 4 for records concerning federal-provincial affairs (s. 14);
  • 39 for records deemed injurious to the conduct of international affairs and defence (s. 15);
  • 43 for records concerning law enforcement and investigations (s. 16);
  • 6 for safety of individuals (s. 17);
  • 4 for economic interests of Canada (s. 18);
  • 205 for records containing personal information (s. 19);
  • 175 for records containing third-party business information (s. 20);
  • 122 for records relating to the internal decision-making processes of government (s. 21);
  • 7 for records relating to internal audits and test procedures (s. 22);
  • 36 for records containing solicitor-client privilege (s. 23);
  • 1 for statutory prohibitions against disclosure (s. 24); and
  • 2 for material to be published (s. 26).

Exclusions were invoked 13 times during the reporting period for published materials or Confidences of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada.

The following table outlines the use of exemptions invoked by CFIA over the last five Fiscal Years (FYs). It shows the total number of exemptions and highlights the frequency of use of the sections used most frequently by CFIA.

Fiscal Year 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Total 549 303 372 654 674
Section 19 166 151 163 237 205
Section 20 249 88 127 180 175
Section 21 57 19 37 96 122

Fees

During the reporting period, the CFIA collected a total of $12 413 in fees under the Act, of which $1 445 was collected in application fees, $109 in reproduction fees, and $10 859 in searching costs. The Agency waived fees in the amount of $16 148 in cases where search fees were under $25, when the request was for less than 125 pages, or when legislated time frames were not met.

3) Complaints and Investigations

The CFIA received 12 complaints from the Office of the Information Commissioner in 2011–12 This represents a decrease of 6 complaints (33%) over the previous reporting period, in which 18 complaints were received. The reasons cited for the new complaints are as follows:

  • 2 concerned extensions;
  • 3 concerned delays in the release of information;
  • 1 concerned fees;
  • 3 concerned the exemption of information; and
  • 2 concerned the general refusal of information (i.e. requester felt that they did not receive all of the requested records or that the Agency did not meet the statutory time frame for release of records).

During the 2011–12 Fiscal Year, 12 complaints were completed, and the conclusions were as follows:

  • 4 complaints were discontinued;
  • 3 complaints were resolved and deemed not well-founded; and
  • 5 complaints were resolved and deemed well-founded, mostly due to delays in the release of the requested information or the release of additional information.

4) Court Cases

Two new applications were filed with the Federal Court of Canada during the reporting period. These applications were filed pursuant to section 44 of the Act. One of these court cases was closed during the reporting period.

Appendix A: Statistical Report

Statistical Report on the Access to Information Act

Name of institution: Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Reporting Period: 2011/04/01 to 31-Mar-12

Part 1 - Requests under the Access to Information Act

1.1 Number of Requests
Number of Requests
Received during the reporting period 289
Outstanding from previous reporting period 135
Total 424
Closed during reporting period 329
Carried over to next reporting period 95
1.2 Sources of requests
Source Number of Requests
Media 46
Academia 4
Business (Private Sector) 104
Organization 26
Public 109
Total 289

Part 2 - Requests closed during the reporting period

2.1 Disposition and completion time
Disposition of requests Completion Time
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 Total
All disclosed 6 16 6 10 1 2 3 44
Disclosed in part 7 28 32 60 20 32 35 214
All exempted 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 5
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
No records exist 10 19 1 0 0 0 0 30
Request transferred 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 25 2 1 2 3 1 1 35
Treated informally 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 49 66 41 74 24 35 40 329
2.2 Exemptions
Section Number of Requests
13(1)(a) 23
13(1)(b) 1
13(1)(c) 5
13(1)(d) 1
13(1)(e) 0
14(a) 4
14(b) 0
15(1) - I.A. Table Note 1 36
15(1) - Def. Table Note 2 3
15(1) - S.A. Table Note 3 0
16(1)(a)(i) 0
16(1)(a)(ii) 1
16(1)(a)(iii) 0
16(1)(b) 0
16(1)(c) 4
16(1)(d) 0
16(2)(a) 0
16(2)(b) 0
16(2)(c) 38
16(3) 0
16.1(1)(a) 0
16.1(1)(b) 0
16.1(1)(c) 0
16.1(1)(d) 0
16.2(1) 0
16.3 0
16.4(1)(a) 0
16.4(1)(b) 0
16.5 0
17 6
18(a) 1
18(b) 1
18(c) 0
18(d) 2
18.1(1)(a) 0
18.1(1)(b) 0
18.1(1)(c) 0
18.1(1)(d) 0
19(1) 205
20(1)(a) 15
20(1)(b) 80
20(1)(b.1) 0
20(1)(c) 60
20(1)(d) 20
20.1 0
20.2 0
20.4 0
21(1)(a) 44
21(1)(b) 54
21(1)(c) 16
21(1)(d) 8
22 4
22.1(1) 3
23 36
24(1) 1
26 2

Table Notes

Table Note 1

I.A.: International Affairs

Return to table note 1  referrer

Table Note 2

Def.: Defence of Canada

Return to table note 2  referrer

Table Note 3

S.A.: Subversive Activities

Return to table note 3  referrer

2.3 Exclusions
Section Number of Requests
68(a) 0
68(b) 0
68(c) 0
68.1 0
68.2(a) 0
68.2(b) 0
68(1)(a) 1
68(1)(b) 0
68(1)(c) 0
68(1)(d) 0
68(1)(e) 1
68(1)(f) 0
69(1)(g) re (a) 3
69(1)(g) re (b) 0
69(1)(g) re (c) 4
69(1)(g) re (d) 0
69(1)(g) re (e) 2
69(1)(g) re (f) 2
69.1(1) 0
2.4 Format of information released
Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 43 1 0
Disclosed in part 210 4 0
Total 253 5 0
2.5 Complexity
2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of requests Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
All disclosed 3484 3484 44
Disclosed in part 70057 59172 214
All exempted 146 0 5
All excluded 126 0 1
Request abandoned 1333 0 35
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Less than 100 pages processed 101-500 pages processed 501-1000 pages processed 1001-5000 pages processed More than 5000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages dis- closed Number of requests Pages dis- closed Number of requests Pages dis- closed Number of requests Pages dis- closed Number of requests Pages dis- closed
All disclosed 35 695 8 1997 1 792 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 113 3165 66 4928 16 9866 18 26009 1 5204
All exempted 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 31 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0
Total 184 3860 77 16925 19 10658 18 26009 1 5204
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation required Assessment of the fees Legal advice sought Other Total
All disclosed 9 11 0 4 24
Disclosed in part 164 94 9 59 326
All exempted 3 1 0 1 5
All excluded 1 0 1 1 3
Abandoned 2 25 0 10 37
Total 179 131 10 75 395
2.6 Deemed refusals
2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline Principal Reason
Workload External consultation Internal consultation Other
130 126 3 1 0
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of days past deadline Number of requests past deadline where no extension was taken Number of requests past deadline where an extension was taken Total
1 to 15 days 6 9 15
16 to 30 days 4 15 19
31 to 60 days 3 8 11
61 to 120 days 2 13 15
121 to 180 days 5 13 18
181 to 365 days 8 18 26
More than 365 days 12 14 26
Total 40 90 130
2.7 Requests for translation
Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Part 3 - Extensions

3.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
Disposition of requests where an extension was taken 9(1)(a) Interference with operations 9(1)(b) Consultation 9(1)(c) Third party notice
Section 69 Other
All disclosed 8 1 3 7
Disclosed in part 28 3 47 97
All exempted 0 0 1 2
All excluded 0 1 0 0
No records exist 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 3 3
Total 36 5 54 109
3.2 Length of extensions
Length of extensions 9(1)(a) Interference with operations 9(1)(b) Consultation 9(1)(c) Third party notice
Section 69 Other
30 days or less 14 0 6 0
31 to 60 days 17 0 17 99
61 to 120 days 5 1 19 8
121 to 180 days 0 4 12 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0 2
365 days or more 0 0 0 0
Total 36 5 54 109

Part 4 - Fees

Fee Type Fee Collected Fee Waived or Refunded
Number of requests Amount Number of requests Amount
Application 289 $1,445 0 $0
Search 67 $10,859 35 $1,637
Production 0 $0 0 $0
Programming 0 $0 0 $0
Preparation 0 $0 0 $0
Alternative format 0 $0 0 $0
Reproduction 2 $109 259 $14,511
Total 358 $12,413 294 $16,148

Part 5 - Consultation received from other institution and organizations

5.1 Consultations received from other government institutions and organizations
Consultations Other government institutions Number of pages to review Other organizations Number of pages to review
Received during reporting period 71 7210 1 39
Outstanding from the previous report 4 223 0 0
Total 75 7433 1 39
Closed during the reporting period 72 7268 0 0
Pending at the end of the reporting period 3 165 1 39
5.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other government institutions
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 Total
Disclose entirely 47 16 0 0 0 0 0 63
Disclose in part 4 2 2 0 0 0 0 8
Exempt entirely 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 52 18 2 0 0 0 0 72
5.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 Total
Disclose entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 6 - Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences

Number of days Number of responses received Number of responses received past deadline
1 to 15 0 0
16 to 30 0 0
31 to 60 1 4
61 to 120 4 1
121 to 180 0 0
181 to 365 1 1
More than 356 0 0
Total 6 6

Part 7 - Resources related to the Access to Information Act

7.1 Costs
Expenditures Amount
Salaries $659,873
Overtime $211
Goods and Services $834,757
Professional services contracts  $762,262
Other $72,495
Total $1,494,841
7.2 Human Resources
Resources Dedicated full-time to ATI activities Dedicated part-time to ATI activities Total
Full-time employees 9.84 0.00 9.84
Part-time and casual employees 0.00 0.00 0.00
Regional staff 0.00 0.00 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 3.61 0.00 3.61
Students 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total 13.45 0.00 13.45

Appendix B: Delegation Order

ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACT DELEGATION ORDER

The President of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency pursuant to section 73 of the Access to Information Act (Act), hereby delegates the persons holding the positions set out in the Schedule annexed hereto to exercise the powers and perform the duties and functions of the President as the head of the government institution under the sections of the Act as set out in the Schedule.

Date: October 6, 2009, President, Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Canadian Food Inspection Agency Delegation Schedule

Delegation of Powers, Duties and Functions Pursuant to Section 73 of the Access to Information Act
Sections Powers, Duties, and Functions Position / Titles
Manager ATIP Team Leader ATIP Analyst ATIP
4(2.1) To assist the applicant, respond to his/her request and provide access to the record X X X
7 To notify the applicant and to give access to the record X X -
8(1) To transfer the request of a record to another government institution and give a notice of the transfer to the applicant X X -
9(1) To extend the time limits and to issue notice to the applicant X X X
9(2) To notify the Information Commissioner of an extension exceeding 30 days X X X
11(2) To require additional payment before access is given X X X
11(3) To require payment when a record is produced as a result of the request from a machine readable record X X X
11(4) To require a deposit before search or production of a record X X X
11(5) To notify the applicant of required payment X X X
11(6) To waive requirement to pay a fee or other amount for the record or may refund the fee or other amount paid. X X -
12(2)(b) To have the record translated if it is in the public interest. X - -
12(3) To have a record made accessible in alternative format X X -
13(1) To refuse disclosure of information obtained in confidence from another government, an organization or an institution X X -
13(2) To disclose information if the government, organization or institution from which the information was obtained either consent to its disclosure or makes it public X X -
14 To refuse disclosure of information the disclosure re: federal provincial affairs X X -
15 To refuse disclosure of information re: international affairs and defence X X -
16 To refuse disclosure of information re: law enforcement, investigations, security and policing services X X -
16.5 To refuse disclosure of information re: Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act X X -
17 To refuse disclosure of information re: safety of individuals X X -
18.1(1) To refuse disclosure of information re: economical interests of certain government institutions X X -
18.1(2) To disclose under subsection 18(1) if information relates to the general administration of an institution referred to in any of paragraphs 18(1)(a) or 18(1)(d) or any activity of the Canada Post Corporation that is fully funded out of moneys appropriated by Parliament X X -
19(1) To refuse disclosure of records containing personal information as defined in s. 3 of the Privacy Act X X -
19(2) To disclose records containing personal information pursuant to paragraphs 19(2)(a) to 19(2)(c) of the Act X X -
20(1) To refuse disclosure of a record that contains third party information X X -
20(2) To disclose a record containing the results of product or enviornmental testing X X -
20(3) To provide written explanation of the methods used in testing X X -
20(5) To disclose with the consent of the third party to whom the information relates X X -
20(6) To disclose in the public interest X - -
21(1) To refuse disclosure of information re: advice, recommendations, etc. X X -
22 To refuse disclosure of information re: testing or auditing procedures or techniques, tests or audits X X -
22.1(1) To refuse disclosure of a record that contains a draft report of an internal audit of a government institution or any related audit working paper X X -
23 To refuse disclosure of a record that contains information subject to solicitor-client privilege. X X -
24(1) To refuse disclosure of a record that is restricted by statutory prohibitions. X X -
25 To server exempt information from records and to disclose remaining information X X -
26 To refuse disclosure of a record when the information will be published X X -
27(1) To notify a third party of a request and the intention of disclosing the information X X X
27(4) To extend time limit for third party notification process X X X
28(1) To give to a third party with an opportunity to make representations and to make a decision X X X
28(2) To waive the requirement of third parties providing representations in writing X X -
28(4) To allow disclosure of the record to the applicant X X -
29(1) To notify the applicant and a third party of the disclosure of a record. X X -
33 To advise the Information Commissioner of a third party involvement X X X
35(2) To have the right to make representations to the Information Commissioner X X X
37(4) To give the complainant access to the record X X -
43(1) To give notice of the application to third parties X X -
44(2) To give notice to the person of the application who requested access to the record X X -
71(1) To give notice to the person of the application who requested access to the record X X -
71(2) To refuse to disclose information severed from manuals X X -
72(1) To prepare an annual report for submission to Parliament X X -

Legend:

Analyst ATIP: Analyst, Access to Information and Privacy
Manager ATIP: Manager, Access to Information and Privacy
Team Leader ATIP: Team Leader, Access to Information and Privacy
X: Authority has been delegated
-: Authority has not been delegated

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