Chapter 5 - Export to the U.S.

5.1 General

General Requirements

1. The following U.S. import requirements are prescribed in Part 93 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations:

  1. the animal was born in Canada or the U.S. and has not been in any other country; or
  2. the animal has been legally imported into Canada from some other country and unconditionally released into Canada as to be eligible to move freely within Canada without restriction of any kind and has been in Canada after such release for 60 days or longer. An exception to these provisions: if a permit was obtained from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to import into the U.S. animals that have been in Canada less than 60 days. If this situation arises, the district veterinarian should be contacted for more information.

2. The USDA requires export health certificates to be completed in English.

3. An export certificate is considered fully complete and valid only after it has been endorsed and stamped with the official export stamp by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) veterinary inspector. This is usually the district veterinarian or veterinary inspector responsible for the geographic district in which the herd of origin is located, or another veterinary inspector if prior arrangements have been made.

4. The period of time that an export certificate remains valid is not only based on the date that the completed certificate is endorsed by a CFIA veterinarian, but may also be based on the actual date that the inspection, testing, or treatment commenced.

Interpretations

5. Animals: Cattle, sheep, goats, other ruminants, swine, horses, asses, mules, zebras, dogs, cats, and poultry.

6. Cattle: Members of the species Bos taurus (domestic cattle), Bos indicus (Zebu-type cattle), and Bison bison (American buffalo).

7. Test date: The date on which the samples were drawn, not the date on which the test was performed in the laboratory or on which the results were reported. The exceptions to this definition are the test dates for the performance of intradermal tests for tuberculosis. In this case, the test date is the date on which the test is read and not the date of injection.

8. Exhibition: Any publicly recognized exposition, race, horse show, rodeo, circus or stage exhibition in Canada or the U.S.

9. Communicable Disease: Any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease of domestic livestock, poultry, or other animals.

10. Birds: All members of the class Aves, including hatching eggs, other than "poultry."

11. Zoological Park: For export purposes, a professionally operated zoo, park, garden, or other place maintained under the constant surveillance of a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, for the exhibition of live animals, pigeons or birds, for the purpose of public recreation or education.

12. Herd: Any group of animals maintained on common ground for any purpose, or two or more groups of animals of the same species under common ownership or supervision, which are geographically separated but among which there is an interchange or movement of animals without regard to health status.

13. Accredited Veterinarian: Non-federal veterinarian who is licensed to practice veterinary medicine and is formally authorized by means of an Accredited Veterinarian Agreement (CFIA/ACIA 1625) with the CFIA to perform inspections, tests, and activities for specified purposes.

14. Poultry: For the purposes of export to the U.S., chickens, ducks, geese, swans, turkeys, doves, pheasants, grouse, pigeons, partridges, quails, guinea fowl, and peafowl of all ages, including "poultry" hatching eggs.

Import Permits

15. No import permits are required from the USDA if the animals are presented for import at one of the U.S. land border ports listed at the end of this section and if they meet the specific requirements described in the following sections.

16. An import permit is required from the USDA for the following:

  1. any livestock (including semen or embryos), poultry, birds, or semen that are destined to enter the U.S. by air, sea or an inland port of entry other than those listed below;
  2. all fresh/frozen embryos that enter the U.S. without having been transferred to an eligible recipient;
  3. uncastrated sheep and goats for feeding;
  4. all animals, poultry, or semen from animal donors if the animals, poultry, or animal donors have been imported into Canada from a country other than the U.S., and have been resident in Canada less than 60 days, excluding any Canadian quarantine period; and
  5. An import permit may be required for Canadian animals transiting the U.S. for export to a third country.

17. Applications for import permits can be obtained from the following address:

U.S. Department of Agriculture
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
Veterinary Service, National Center for Import and Export
4700 River Road, Unit 39
Riverdale, Maryland 20737
Telephone: 301-734-3277
Facsimile: 301-734-4704

18. For certain species, it may be necessary to obtain one or more Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) permits. Applications for CITES import/export permits can be obtained from the following addresses:

U.S. import permit:

Department of the Interior
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
4401 North Fairfax Drive, Room 432
Arlington, Virginia 22203
Telephone: 703-358-2104
Facsimile: 1-800-358-2104

Canadian export permit:

CITES Administrator
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3
Telephone: 819-997-1840 or 1-800-668-6767
Facsimile: 819-953-6283

Federal Requirements vs. State Requirements and Requirements of Other Organizations

19. Although it is recognized that each state has the prerogative to establish import movement controls that may be more stringent than the national (USDA) health requirements, the state authorities cannot prevent the entry into the U.S. from Canada of animals that meet established federal conditions. However, once animals have gained entry to the state, individual state authorities have the legal mandate to deal with such animal as they see fit.

20. Exporters should be advised that individual state requirements may exceed or differ from the USDA requirements. It is the exporter's responsibility to ensure that any additional requirements are met through arrangements made with the importer either on the arrival of the animals or in advance of their departure.

The USDA has provided the following information source for interstate requirements: US State and Territory Animal Import Regulations.

21. Tests that are performed to meet specific state requirements but are not required for entry into the U.S. must be submitted to a provincial or private laboratory. The results do not constitute part of the official certification and are not to appear on the export health certificate; however, the test results may be attached to the export document.

22. It is the exporter's responsibility to check whether any conditions are imposed by other organizations (e.g., requirements concerning endangered species) and to meet any such conditions.

23. The following List of State Veterinary Offices is provided to enable exporters to determine whether the state to which they are exporting imposes any restrictions that may affect their ability to access such markets.
State Telephone
Alabama 334-240-7255
Alaska 907-375-8200
Arizona 602-542-4293
Arkansas 501-907-2400
California 916-654-0881
Colorado 303-239-4161
Connecticut 860-713-2505
Delaware 302-739-4811
Florida 850-410-0900
Georgia 404-656-3671
Hawaii 808-483-7111
Idaho 208-332-8540
Illinois 217-782-4944
Indiana 317-227-0300
Iowa 515-281-5305
Kansas 785-296-2326
Kentucky 502-564-3956
Louisiana 225-925-3980
Maine 207-287-3701
Maryland 410-841-5810
Massachusetts 617-626-1795
Michigan 517-373-1077
Minnesota 651-296-2942
Mississippi 601-359-1170
Missouri 573-751-3377
Montana 406-444-2043
Nebraska 402-471-2351
Nevada 775-688-1180
New Hampshire 603-271-2404
New Jersey 609-292-3965
New Mexico 505-841-6161
New York 518-457-3502
North Carolina 919-733-7601
North Dakota 701-328-2655
Ohio 614-728-6220
Oklahoma 405-522-6141
Oregon 503-986-4680
Pennsylvania 717-772-2852
Rhode Island 401-222-2781
South Carolina 803-788-2260
South Dakota 605-773-3321
Tennessee 615-837-5120
Texas 512-719-0777
Utah 801-538-7160
Vermont 802-828-2421
Virginia 804-692-0601
Washington 360-902-1878
West Virginia 304-558-2214
Wisconsin 608-224-4872
Wyoming 307-777-6443

Land Ports of Entry

24. The following land ports of entry are designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of animals from Canada:
State Port Name Telephone Work Days Hours
Idaho Eastport 208-267-2396 Monday to Friday 8:00-16:30
Maine Houlton 207-532-6099 Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 9:00-14:00
Maine Jackman 207-622-8248 By Appointment n/a
Michigan Detroit 313-226-4428 Monday to Friday 8:00-16:30
Michigan Port Huron 810-985-5433 Monday to Friday 8:00-16:30
Michigan Sault Ste-Marie 906-647-6512 By Appointment n/a
Minnesota Baudette 218-285-7044 By Appointment n/a
Montana Opeim 406-487-5955 By Appointment n/a
Montana Raymond 406-487-5955 By Appointment n/a
Montana Sweetgrass 406-335-2142 Monday to Friday 8:00-16:30
New York Alexandria Bay 315-482-2601 Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 8:00-16:30
New York Champlain 518-298-2191 Tuesday 9:00-15:30
New York Niagara Falls 716-297-6203 Monday to Friday 8:00-16:30
North Dakota Dunseith 701-263-3364 Monday, Thursday and Friday 8:00-16:30
North Dakota Pembina 701-825-6262 Monday to Friday 8:00-16:00
North Dakota Portal 701-926-4281 Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
By Appointment
9:00-15:30
Vermont Derby Line 802-873-9338 Wednesday 10:00-14:00
Vermont Highgate Springs 802-868-2556 Monday, Thursday and Friday 8:00-16:30
Washington Oroville 509-476-2635 Monday to Friday 8:00-16:30
Washington Sumas 360-988-5715 Monday to Friday 8:00-16:30

Because of limited inspection services at some ports of entry, exporters should be advised to schedule the arrival of their animals with the USDA/APHIS veterinarian.

5.2 Cattle and Bison Born on or After March 1, 1999

This section describes inspection and certification requirements for the export of cattle and bison to the U.S., following the implementation of the Final Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) Rule by the USDA on November 19, 2007.

This section supersedes and replaces modules 5.2 and modules 5.3 of April 2006.

Authorization

Veterinarians authorized to certify cattle born on or after March 1, 1999, for export to the U.S. may certify both slaughter and non-slaughter categories of cattle.

Veterinarians authorized under these requirements are required to maintain records to document how certification elements have been met for each shipment.

Health Certification Requirements

1. In both slaughter and non-slaughter categories, the animals must have been:

  1. born in the U.S. or Canada, or were legally imported into Canada from a region recognized by the USDA as a region not restricted due to BSE.
  2. under no movement restrictions within Canada or the U.S. for at least 60 days prior to export to the U.S.
  3. inspected and found to be free from any evidence of communicable disease and, as far as it can be determined, must not have been exposed to any such disease during the 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment.
  4. born on or after March 1, 1999, which is the date determined by the APHIS to be the effective enforcement of a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban.
  5. not be in quarantine in Canada.
  6. in Canada in a period during which the country must have been free from foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, surra (trypanosomiasis), and contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.
  7. individually identified with an approved Canadian ear tag (or any tag deemed equivalent under the livestock identification and traceability program), applied prior to each animal's entry into the U.S.
  8. inspected and certified for export within 30 days of export by an accredited veterinarian.

2. Age Determination and Certification:

A record of the methods employed in determining the age of cattle is to be maintained for each shipment certified by an accredited veterinarian. The following will apply to age determination:

  1. Visual inspection: Visual age verification is allowable for certification of younger animals that may be presented to an accredited veterinarian. Visual inspection may be used for animals that are under 3 years of age. It is recognized that the experienced practitioner is able to estimate the age of these young animals upon visual inspection, and that the accredited veterinarian is often knowledgeable about the cattle to be exported (e.g., feedlots where cattle are essentially penned according to birth year or veal operations). Visual verification should only be used when the accredited veterinarian is confident about the age of the animals. If there is any concern that the animal(s) being inspected do not fall into this category, the accredited veterinarian should choose option ii or iii (below) for age verification. As the animals get closer to an estimated age of 3 years, the accredited veterinarian should have more knowledge regarding the history of the animals, especially if the animals have been just recently assembled.
  2. Birth record: Agri-traçabilité Québec (ATQ) database, purebred record and registration certificate, Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA) database, or other record that provides evidence (including birth farm records) acceptable to the accredited veterinarian indicating the animal was born on or after March 1, 1999. If animals being certified fall into this category, the accredited veterinarian must validate the information and maintain records of the information source of information with each shipment that is certified for export. The word of an exporter by itself is insufficient to satisfy the requirement of a birth record. Information about birth records and measures employed to validate those records should be made available to a CFIA veterinarian upon request.
  3. Dentition: animals may be exported to the U.S. after a visual inspection of dentition, provided the eighth permanent incisor has not erupted. The definition of eruption is the emergence/penetration of the tooth/teeth through the gingiva (the gum line). If the eighth incisor has erupted, the age of the cattle will need to be verified by a birth record (see definition in option ii above). For additional information, please visit the following Website: United States Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service - Using Dentition to Age Cattle.

Click on image for larger view
Dentition

Description of Diagram 1 - Handy guide to determining the age of cattle by the teeth

At birth to 1 month: Two or more of the temporary incisor teeth present. Within first month, entire 8 temporary incisors appear.

2 years: As a long-yearling, the central pair of temporary incisor teeth or pinchers is replaced by the permanent pinchers. At 2 years, the central permanent incisors attain full development.

21/2 years: Permanent first intermediates, one on each side of the pinchers, are cut. Usually these are folly developed at 3 years.

31/2 years: The second intermediates or laterals are cut. They are on a level with the first intermediates and begin to wear at 4 years.

41/2 years: The corner teeth are replaced. At 5 years the animal usually has the full complement of incisors with the corners fully develope

Note:

  • Verification of age does not need to be done within the 30 days before departure as long as the accredited veterinarian can assure that the animals examined in advance are the same as those that are being exported.
  • Cattle or bison must not bear a light blue, Allflex, tamper proof , dangle tag in their left ear, marked with CFIA/ACIA and a 4-digit number, as these animals cannot be certified for export to any country.

light blue ear tag

3. Additional Certification Requirements and Procedures for Non-Slaughter Category (breeding, shows, feeders, etc.):

Animals exported on the HA1941 Export of Cattle or Bison to the United States certificate must:

  1. 1) be permanently and humanely identified with a distinct and legible "C^N" mark that has been applied with a freeze brand or hot iron, that is easily visible on the live animal. Apply the mark to each animal's right hip, high on the tail-head and not less than two inches nor more than three inches high; or
    2) bear a legible tattoo of the letters "CAN" applied to the inside of the left ear. Tattoo pliers recommended by a manufacturer for use in cattle should be used for tattoo application; or
    3) be permanently and humanely identified by any other alternative method approved by the USDA before the shipment reaches the port of entry into the U.S.
  2. originate from a brucellosis-free province or territory or from a brucellosis-free herd.
  3. have continuously resided in a tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) free or accredited advanced province in Canada, or their U.S. equivalent (e.g., tuberculosis accredited free or modified accredited advanced State).
  4. if having resided at any time in the province of Manitoba within 60 days of export, be tested within 60 days of the date of export with negative results using the caudal fold intradermal test, unless they:
    1. are steers and/or spayed heifers;
    2. are at least five days of age but not more than four weeks of age; or
    3. are sexually intact heifers moving to a U.S. feedlot for subsequent slaughter.
  5. be accompanied by the original and two photocopies of the export certificate. Contrary to slaughter animals, one export certificate per truck is required.

4. Specific Certification Requirements and Procedures for Slaughter Category:

  1. Cattle and bison certified for slaughter in the U.S. on HA2183 do not require tattoos, brands, or other identification, as described in section 3a in this module.
  2. The certificate HA2183, as described below, requires the entry of specific statements concerning the routing of shipments to slaughter.
  3. A shipment of animals to direct slaughter may consist of animals from a single place of export that are transported in several vehicles that will proceed to the same U.S. destination. The trucks must cross the border at the same location on the same working day. The specific number of animals in each truck must be recorded by the agent/owner/exporter on the appendix page before departure.
  4. For shipments of slaughter animals of several truck loads, the first truck in the shipment requires the original certificate signed and endorsed by the CFIA official veterinarian, plus two copies. Subsequent trucks require three copies of the Canadian health certificate, one of which must bear a red CFIA export seal on every page.

5. How to Complete the Canadian Health Certificate:

  1. The accredited veterinarian must use the most recent version of the HA1941/HA2183 Bovine export certificate available on the CFIA Website or through a CFIA district office.
  2. When completing out the HA2183 Export of Cattle or Bison for Immediate Slaughter to the United States of America certificate, the routing of the shipment must be based on information provided by the exporter. The routing starts at the U.S. port of entry and must include all main roads to be followed in the U.S.
  3. No strikeouts are required on the certificate, with the exception of selecting cattle or bison, as appropriate in the line just above the signature block at the bottom of the certificate.
  4. The total number of animals inspected and listed on the certificate is to be placed in the blank next to the line mentioned in point c.
  5. The appendix of the certificate (identification page) may be substituted with a list of animals containing the same information as this page, including the number of animals in the truck. The reference number is to be recorded at the top of each page, and all pages are to be numbered. An export stamp and the accredited veterinarian initials are required on every page, and the last page must bear a completed date and signature block for both the accredited veterinarian and the CFIA veterinarian in the same manner as it appears in the appendix itself. In addition, the statement blocks stating the number of animals in the truck and the name of the agent/owner/exporter must also appear on the substituted last page in the same manner as in the appendix.

    The accredited veterinarian must assure that the identification of animals on the certificate matches the identification of animals that were inspected for export.

  6. An export manifest is available on the Website of the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency and Agri-Traçabilité Québec. If being used, birth dates are automatically recorded if present in the database.
  7. The "row" column is only a sequential numerical entry (1, 2, 3, . . .) Its purpose is to facilitate discussions between the USDA and the CFIA when they have questions about one or many animals.
  8. Approved tags bear a unique identification number. The identification numbers of tags approved for cattle start with "124 000 0", "124 000 1" or "124 000 2". Other approved tags that start with "982048" or tags that are considered equivalent under the livestock identification and traceability program that start with "840" are also acceptable as official identification. Approved tags for bison start with "124 000 300" to "124 000 304".

    Note:

    Although it is not a USDA requirement that the ear tag numbers be listed in ascending numerical order on the certificate, accredited veterinarians are encouraged to complete the certificates in this manner. This practice will facilitate inspection at the U.S. port of entry and minimize delays.

  9. In the column "AGE", record the actual birth date of each animal if a birth record is available; if not, the year of birth is sufficient as long as it is not 1999. If age is determined by dentition or visual inspection, an estimate in years may be used.
  10. The accredited veterinarian must complete the export health certificate by entering all the necessary information. The "reference number" is assigned by the CFIA district office. The completed and signed health certificate (including name in block capitals) will be submitted to CFIA for review, and if all requirements are met, it will be endorsed. Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. A fee is charged for CFIA endorsement. Once endorsed, certificates are returned to the accredited veterinarian or the exporter. The health certificate is valid for 30 days from the date of inspection.

    Note: the USDA have confirmed that they do not require an original signature from the accredited veterinarian on the export certificates HA 1941, HA 2183 and HA 2610. Therefore, accredited veterinarians may choose to transmit these certificates for endorsement to the CFIA district office according to the regular method described in Module 4.1 (personal or sealed envelope delivery), or transmit these export certificates by fax or electronically as long as the following conditions are met:

    1. Accredited veterinarians who wish to send export certificates to a district office via fax or e-mail must first inform the district veterinarian of their intention and must provide the fax number or the e-mail address that will be used. Only fax numbers or e-mail addresses associated with the issuing accredited veterinarian will be accepted.
    2. Certificates received by fax or electronically must be printed on legal size paper. Before signing these certificates, endorsing CFIA veterinarians will ascertain that they contain a valid issuing signature and that it originated from an approved fax or e-mail address.
    3. The USDA has confirmed that certificates bearing a copy of the accredited veterinarian`s signature will be accepted by their port of entry veterinarians. However, they must still bear an original stamp and an original signature from the CFIA veterinarian.
  11. Drawing a line to indicate the same data between a column of animals is acceptable for the following columns: age, sex, breed and description. The information must be completed for the first animal and the last animal in the group.
  12. There can be up to 20% more animals on the export certificate than what is actually being exported. No strikeouts are necessary for the animals not loaded, but the owner/agent/exporter must record, on the day of shipment, the number of animals in each truck in the designated spot on each copy of the certificate that will accompany that truck.

    For example, if an exporter expects to send a truck of 45 animals, approximately nine–ten animals in excess could be added on the certificate as "reserve animals". If he expects to send a shipment of four trucks (4 x 45 animals, depending on the age and the size), approximately 36 animals could be recorded in excess on the certificate.

  13. Where brucellosis or tuberculosis testing has been completed, a copy of the test chart and results of test must be presented to the CFIA district office at the time that the export certificate is endorsed by a CFIA veterinarian. Please refer to Sections 3.1 Tuberculosis Testing and 3.2 Serologic Testing of this manual for information on required reporting of tuberculin tests and on submission of serum samples to CFIA accredited laboratories for brucellosis testing.

Inspections at U.S. Ports or Entry

  1. Cattle exported, other than for immediate slaughter, should be normally unloaded at the U.S. port of entry for individual inspection at the discretion of the USDA veterinarian.

    For bison, if no satisfactory handling installations are available at the border, a USDA veterinarian will provide an inspection at their final destination in the U.S.

  2. Trucks transporting slaughter animals will be sealed at the U.S. port of entry for direct movement to the designated slaughterhouse.
  3. The animals must be presented at the U.S. port of entry by appointment. The shipment must be accompanied by U.S. Veterinary Services Form 17-29 Declaration of Importation and the official Canadian health certificate (HA1941 or HA2183).
  4. Refer to section 5.1 General for the list of land ports of entry designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of animals from Canada. Although this list was provided by the USDA, it is the exporters' responsibility to present their animals to a U.S. port of entry that has the facilities required for the unloading and inspection of such animals.

5.2A Export to the U.S. – Certification Requirements of Cattle & Bison for Multi-Shipments

1. Export of cattle and bison with different export certificates in the same truck:

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) allows the export of cattle using multiple export certificates. Please adhere to the following rules:

It is possible to export animals in the same truck using multiple certificates. However, there is one basic rule: this is possible only for animals of the same category i.e. that animals going to direct slaughter (HA2183) can never be mixed with feeder/breeder/show animals (HA1941).

Animals must be exported in one truck only. It has never been allowed to export feeder/breeder/show animals in multiple trucks, and we have been informed by the USDA that FSIS could have problems with animals under multiple export certificates arriving at slaughterhouses in different trucks.

Animals going to direct slaughter must all go to the same destination since the truck is sealed at the U.S. border.

It is possible to put feeder/breeder/show animals not going to the same destination in the same truck, as long as they all have a valid export certificate specifying the final destination.

It is possible to assemble animals in the same truck even if they are not coming from the same exporter.

Animals don't need to be assembled in one place; the truck can make multiple pickups.

Animals exported under different export certificates may be commingled in the truck; the USDA doesn't require the different groups to be separated. However, in the case of direct to slaughter animals, the exporter should check with the slaughterhouse (management and/or FSIS) that they agree with this procedure.

The number listed by the agent/owner/exporter on their health certificate should be the number of animals they loaded from their specific certificate, not a grand total for all certificates.

As usual, it is the responsibility of the exporter and/or accredited veterinarian to ensure that the State(s) of destination or slaughterhouse agree with multiple shipments in one truck.

Exporters must be aware that the whole truck may be refused if a problem is found with a part of the truckload so this method may be more at risk than single load shipments

2. Cattle and bison from different locations exported on the same export certificate:

Because of the trace-back possibilities provided by the Canadian Cattle National Identification System, the USDA accepts that animals coming from different farms/assembly points be put on the same certificate as long as:

  • the exporter is the same for all animals
  • the importer and destination are the same for all animals
  • the accredited veterinarian is the same for all animals

The certificate HA1941 for the export of cattle or bison to the USA will not change for the moment. There is no need to record the different places of origin on the export certificate or on a separate sheet.

The certificate HA2183 for the export of cattle for immediate slaughter gives the possibility of recording different places of origin, thus every physical location where the animals are exported from should be recorded on the certificate.

3. Previously imported bob calves re-exported to the USA for immediate slaughter

For animals imported from the United States under Part III, Section 17 of the Import Reference Document on feeder calves, and re-exported with export certificate HA2610, the above instructions do not apply completely since the animals are placed in quarantine upon arrival in Canada.

  • Bob calves from different locations may be assembled in one shipment as long as they all belong to the same exporter.
  • If an exporter wants to export bob calves under quarantine with other groups in the same truck, it must be clearly written on the transport license that the exporter has been given the permission to mix the different groups together.
  • In the case where such shipment would be refused at the border, the exporter must have a contingency plan for quarantining all these animals in a place(s) that has/have been pre-approved for this purpose by the CFIA district staff.

5.3 Cattle and Bison for Temporary Stay

This section provides guidelines on certification requirements for cattle and bison being imported into Canada or exported from Canada on a temporary basis. A common example of a temporary stay is a livestock show or exhibition.

1. U.S. Cattle and Bison Exported for a Temporary Stay in Canada Requirements for Return to the U.S.

  1. U.S. animals for temporary stay in Canada if less than 60 days:
    1. A copy of the United States Health Certificate including a proof of the date of entry into Canada; and
    2. No Canadian tattoo or branding is required.
  2. After 60 days of residence in Canada they must be treated as Canadian animals unless they obtain an exemption from the USDA:
    1. Animals will be required to meet the export certification requirements of Section 5.2 Cattle and Bison Born on or After March 1, 1999 of this manual, including the requirements for:
      • a tattoo or brand
      • certification using certificate HA1941

2. Canadian Cattle and Bison Exported for Temporary Stay in the U.S.

For animals that have been exported for temporary stay in the U.S. must meet the export certification requirements of Section 5.2 of this manual, including the requirements for:

  1. a tattoo or brand
  2. certification using certificate HA1941

Requirements for Return to Canada

  1. For animals that have been exported to the U.S. for less than 30 days:
    1. a Canadian Veterinary Health Certificate indicating the date of exportation is required.
  2. For cattle exported from Canada to the U.S. more than 30 days but less than 60 days before the date of re-importation into Canada, the animal must be accompanied by the following documents:
    1. Canadian import permit
    2. zoosanitary export certificate of an official veterinarian of the U.S., or a certificate of a veterinarian endorsed by an official veterinarian of the U.S. that shows that the animal proved negative to tests for brucellosis and anaplasmosis within 30 days before the date of importation.
    3. Canadian zoosanitary export certificate of a veterinary inspector, or a certificate of a veterinarian endorsed by a veterinary inspector, that clearly identifies the animal and states that it was exported to the U.S.

The above-mentioned conditions can be found at the following:

Automated Import Reference System (AIRS)

For more details, the importer must contact his or her CFIA district veterinarian.

3. Cattle and Bison Transiting the U.S. for Export to Mexico

  1. Shipments of cattle and bison transiting the U.S. for export to Mexico will require an "in transit" permit from the USDA and the export certificate for the final destination.
  2. No tattoo or branding is required.
  3. Loads will be sealed at the U.S. port of entry. Refer to Section 5.1 for more information.

5.4 Sheep and Goats Under 12 Months for Feeding

Health Certification

1. The feedlot of destination must have prior approval from U.S. Veterinary Services to receive feeder sheep and goats from Canada.

2. The HA2186 Export Sheep or Goats for Feeding from Canada to the United States of America export certificate and the "Owner's and Exporter's Declaration" must be used.

3. The sheep and goats for export must have been kept in Canada or the U.S. during the 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment to the U.S. and, during those 60 days, Canada must have been free from foot-and-mouth disease and rinderpest.

4. Sheep and goats for export must not be pregnant or must have been castrated.

5. The animals for export must not be in quarantine in Canada.

6. Uncastrated sheep and goats must be accompanied by an import permit obtained in advance from the following:

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
Veterinary Services (VS)
National Center for Import and Export (NCIE)
4700 River Road, Unit 39
Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231

The import permit application can be found online.

The permit is valid for 14 days from the date specified on the application as the "proposed arrival date."

7. Sheep and goats must be less than 12 months of age when imported into the U.S.

8. The sheep and goats must have been subject to a ruminant feed ban equivalent to the requirements established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

9. Sheep and goats for export must have been inspected and found to be free from any evidence of communicable disease and, as far as it can be determined, must not have been exposed to any such disease during the 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment.

10. No tests are required for sheep and goats exported to the U.S. for feeding.

Certification Procedure

11. Within the 30 days before the planned export date, an accredited veterinarian or CFIA veterinarian must examine each animal presented for export.

12. The sheep and goats must be permanently and humanely identified before arrival at the port of entry to the U.S. Each animal must bear a "C" mark applied with a freeze brand, hot iron, or other permanent method. This mark must be easily visible and legible on the live animal. The mark must also be visible on the carcass before skinning. The mark cannot be less than one inch or more than 1¼ inches high and must have been applied on the animal's right hip, high on the tail-head.

13. Other means of permanent identification may be used if requested in writing and approved before export by the National Center for Import and Export (NCIE) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Age determination

14. All the animals in the shipment must be under 12 months of age.

15. The determination of the age of the animals may be based on information obtained from the CCIA or ATQ databases from producer records, or on the examination of the dentition of each animal by the accredited veterinarian or their designated technician. Methods for determining age on the basis of dentition are described below.

16. If the dental examination is used to determine age, it is preferable for the inspection to be conducted during the 14 days preceding export.

Note: For the purposes of certification of sheep and goats for export to the U.S., an animal is considered to be less than 12 months of age if all the deciduous incisors are present. Any sheep or goat that has shed one of the first deciduous incisor teeth is considered to be 12 months of age or older, whether or not the permanent incisor teeth have started to erupt.

Small Ruminant Dentition

Description of Image - Small Ruminant Dentition

One page with 8 images in two columns of four images.

First image left column consists of a lamb's head with the teeth exposed by human hands holding back the animal's lips. Under the image is the word "lamb."
To the right of the first image is a top view drawing of a sheep's jaw with the teeth numbered and captions for "'median line" pointing to the centre of the palate and the word "Lamb."

Second image left column consists of a lamb's head with the teeth exposed by human hands holding back the animal's lips with the caption "Two Tooth (1-2 yrs old) two permanent incisors"
To the right of the second image is a top view drawing of a sheep's jaw with the teeth numbered and the caption "Age 1-1½ years old".

Third image left column consists of a lamb's head with the teeth exposed by human hands holding back the animal's lips with the caption "2-3 year old".
To the right of the third image is a top view drawing of a sheep's jaw with the teeth numbered and the caption " Age 2-2½ yrs"

Fourth image left column consists of a lamb's head with the teeth exposed by human hands holding back the animal's lips with the caption "3-4 year old".
To the right of the fourth image is a top view drawing of a sheep's jaw with the teeth numbered and the caption "Age 3-3½ yrs".

How to Complete the Canadian Health Certificate (HA2186)

17. The accredited veterinarian must use the most recent version of the HA2186 export certificate.

18. In the column "AGE (Months)(Estimated)," the actual age or an estimated age in months must be indicated. An entry such as "less than 12 months" is not acceptable.

19. The accredited veterinarian must complete the export health certificate by entering all the necessary information with the exception of the number of animals in the shipment and the seal numbers. The "Reference number" is assigned by the CFIA district office. The completed and signed health certificate and owner/exporter's declaration will be submitted to a CFIA veterinary inspector to review and, if all requirements are met, endorse. Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. A fee is charged for CFIA endorsement. Once endorsed, certificates are returned to the accredited veterinarian, and the owner/exporter's declaration is kept at the district office with a copy of the certificate. The health certificate is valid for 30 days from the date of examination.

20. The accredited veterinarian or their technician must, on the day of export, return to the farm and apply CFIA seals to the transporting vehicles, after verifying that only the animals listed on the export certificate are included in the shipment. A CFIA seal must be applied to every door on the trailer.

21. The accredited veterinarian or their technician must record the number of animals in the shipment and the CFIA seal numbers in the appropriate sections on the endorsed original health certificate, and initial the appropriate section. It is not necessary to repeat this information on the copies of the certificate, but veterinarians must record it on the copy kept in their offices.

22. During loading, if animals must be removed from the shipment after the health certificate has been endorsed by the CFIA veterinary inspector, accredited veterinarians should not cross out any of these animals that are listed on the health certificate. In such cases the accredited veterinarian or their technician must provide two copies of an Addendum: one copy to accompany the shipment, and one to be included in the accredited veterinarian's file. Sample copies of an addendum are available in the district offices. This is not a CFIA document and does not bear the CFIA logo. It may be used as is or printed on the veterinary clinic's letterhead. The addendum must include a description of the animals that were not loaded and their CCIA or ATQ identification numbers.

23. If the seals are broken or missing, or if they do not match the seal numbers recorded on the health certificate, the shipment will be refused entry into the U.S.

24. For sheep, the official ear tag is a tag approved by the CFIA for use in the Canadian Sheep Identification Program or, in Quebec, the ATQ tag. All tags must be clean and readable. All numbers that appear on the ear tag must be recorded on the export certificate.

25. For goats, the official ear tag is a CFIA HofA tag, which must be applied to the left ear. Goats may only be exported in this manner if the accredited veterinarian knows the birth premises of each animal being shipped. While the birth premises does not have to be included on the export certificate, the veterinarian must keep a permanent record of the premises in case of inquiry by the USDA or audit. All tags must be clean and readable. All numbers that appear on the ear tag must be recorded on the export certificate.

Note: While it is not a USDA requirement that the ear tag numbers be listed in ascending numerical order on the certificate, accredited veterinarians are encouraged to complete certificates in this manner. This practice will facilitate inspection at the U.S. port of entry and minimize delays.

26. The routing of the shipment must be based on information provided by the exporter and must include the names of the main highways to be followed in Canada and the U.S. and the name of the location where the animals were loaded in Canada.

27. The official Canadian health certificate (HA2186) endorsed by a CFIA veterinary inspector and two copies of the certificate must accompany each export shipment. A separate health certificate must be issued for each vehicle.

Note: Each truckload constitutes one shipment; therefore, a separate original health certificate must be issued for each vehicle.

28. Before arrival at the U.S. border, the seals cannot be broken by anyone other than a CFIA inspector or a person under the inspector's supervision. If the exporter asks to transfer animals from one truck to another after leaving the farm of origin, the transfer must be performed under the direct supervision of a CFIA inspector. The CFIA inspector will issue an official letter to confirm the change in the seal numbers. The CFIA will charge a fee for this service.

Inspections at U.S. Ports or Entry

29. The sheep and goats for feeding will be unloaded at the U.S. port of entry for individual inspection.

30. The animals must be presented at the U.S. port of entry by appointment. The shipment must be accompanied by U.S. Veterinary Services Form 17-29 (Declaration of Importation) and the official Canadian health certificate (HA2186).

31. Refer to Section 5.1 for the list of land ports of entry designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of animals from Canada. Although the list was provided by the USDA, it is the exporters' responsibility to present their animals to a U.S. port of entry that has the facilities required for the unloading and inspection of such animals.

References

Export certificate HA2186 and the Agent or Owner and/or Exporter's Declaration from the CFIA Website.

A sample of the Addendum for Animals Not Included in the Shipment, which can be printed on your official letterhead, is available from your district veterinarian.

5.5 Sheep and Goats Under 12 Months for Immediate Slaughter

Health Certificate

1. The export certificate HA2185 Export Sheep and Goats for Slaughter from Canada to the United States of America and the "Owner's and Exporter's Declaration" must be used.

2. Sheep and goats for export must have been kept in Canada or the U.S. during the 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment to the U.S. and, during those 60 days, Canada must have been free from foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, and contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.

3. The animals for export must not have been in quarantine in Canada.

4. Sheep and goats for export have been inspected and found to be free from any evidence of communicable disease and, as far as it can be determined, have not been exposed to any such disease during the 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment.

5. The females for export must not be pregnant.

6.Sheep and goats must be less than 12 months of age when imported into the U.S.

7. Sheep and goats must have been subject to a ruminant feed ban equivalent to the requirements established by the U.S. FDA.

8. The sheep and goats must not have tested positive or suspect for a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE).

9. The sheep and goats have not resided in a flock or herd that has been diagnosed with BSE.

10. The movement of the sheep and goats must not have been restricted within Canada as a result of exposure to a TSE.

11. No tests are required for sheep and goats for immediate slaughter.

Certification Procedure

12. Within the 30 days before the planned export date, an accredited veterinarian or CFIA veterinarian must examine each individual animal presented for export.

Age Determination

13. All the animals in this shipment must be under 12 months of age.

14. The determination of the age of the animals may be based on information obtained from the CCIA or ATQ databases from producer records or on the examination of the dentition of each animal by the accredited veterinarian or their designated technician. Methods for determining age on the basis of dentition are described below.

15. If a dental examination is used to determine age, it is preferable for the inspection to be conducted during the 14 days preceding export.

Note: For the purposes of certification of sheep and goats for export to the U.S., an animal is considered to be less than 12 months of age if all the deciduous incisors are present. Any sheep or goat that has shed one of the first deciduous incisor teeth is considered to be 12 months of age or older, whether or not the permanent incisor teeth have started to erupt.

Small Ruminant Dentition

Description of Image - Small Ruminant Dentition

One page with 8 images in two columns of four images.

First image left column consists of a lamb's head with the teeth exposed by human hands holding back the animal's lips. Under the image is the word "lamb."
To the right of the first image is a top view drawing of a sheep's jaw with the teeth numbered and captions for "'median line" pointing to the centre of the palate and the word "Lamb."

Second image left column consists of a lamb's head with the teeth exposed by human hands holding back the animal's lips with the caption "Two Tooth (1-2 yrs old) two permanent incisors"
To the right of the second image is a top view drawing of a sheep's jaw with the teeth numbered and the caption "Age 1-1½ years old".

Third image left column consists of a lamb's head with the teeth exposed by human hands holding back the animal's lips with the caption "2-3 year old".
To the right of the third image is a top view drawing of a sheep's jaw with the teeth numbered and the caption " Age 2-2½ yrs"

Fourth image left column consists of a lamb's head with the teeth exposed by human hands holding back the animal's lips with the caption "3-4 year old".
To the right of the fourth image is a top view drawing of a sheep's jaw with the teeth numbered and the caption "Age 3-3½ yrs".

How to Complete the Canadian Health Certificate (HA2185)

16. How to Complete the Canadian Health Certificate (HA2185).

17. In the column "AGE (Months)(Estimated)" the actual age or an estimated age in months must be indicated. An entry such as "less than 12 months" is not acceptable.

18. The accredited veterinarian must complete the export health certificate by entering all the necessary information with the exception of the number of animals in the shipment and the seal numbers. The "Reference number" is assigned by the CFIA district office. The completed and signed health certificate and owner/exporter's declaration will be submitted to a CFIA veterinary inspector to review and, if all requirements are met, endorse it. Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. A fee is charged for CFIA endorsement. Once endorsed, certificates are returned to the accredited veterinarian, and the owner/exporter's declaration is kept at the district office with a copy of the certificate. The health certificate is valid for 30 days from the date of examination.

19. The accredited veterinarian or their technician must, on the day of export, return to the farm and apply CFIA seals to the transporting vehicles, after verifying that only the animals listed on the export certificate are included in the shipment. A CFIA seal must be applied to every door on the trailer.

20. The accredited veterinarian or their technician must record the number of animals in the shipment and the CFIA seal numbers in the appropriate sections on the endorsed original health certificate, and initial the appropriate section. It is not necessary to repeat this information on the copies of the certificate, but veterinarians must record it on the copy kept in their offices.

21. During loading, if animals must be removed from the shipment after the health certificate has been endorsed by the CFIA veterinary inspector, accredited veterinarians should not cross out any of these animals that are listed on the health certificate. In such cases the accredited veterinarian or their technician must provide two copies of an Addendum: one copy to accompany the shipment, and one to be included in the accredited veterinarian's file. Sample copies of an addendum are available in the district offices. This is not a CFIA document and does not bear the CFIA logo. It may be used as is or printed on the veterinary clinic's letterhead. The addendum must include a description of the animals that were not loaded and their CCIA or ATQ identification numbers.

22. If the seals are broken or missing, or if they do not match the seal numbers recorded on the health certificate, the shipment will be refused entry into the U.S.

23. For sheep, the official ear tag is a tag approved by the CFIA for use in the Canadian Sheep Identification Program or, in Quebec, the ATQ tag. All tags must be clean and readable. All numbers that appear on the ear tag must be recorded on the export certificate.

24. For goats, the official ear tag is a CFIA HofA tag, which must be applied to the left ear. Goats may only be exported in this manner if the accredited veterinarian knows the birth premises of each animal being shipped. While the birth premises does not have to be included on the export certificate, the veterinarian must keep a permanent record of the premises in case of inquiry by the USDA or audit. All tags must be clean and readable. All numbers that appear on the ear tag must be recorded on the export certificate.

Note: While it is not a USDA requirement that the ear tag numbers be listed in ascending numerical order on the certificate, accredited veterinarians are encouraged to complete certificates in this manner. This practice will facilitate inspection at the U.S. port of entry and minimize delays.

25. The routing of the shipment must be based on information provided by the exporter and must include the names of the main highways to be followed in Canada and the U.S. and the name of the location where the animals were loaded in Canada.

26. An official Canadian health certificate (HA2185) endorsed by a CFIA veterinary inspector and one copy of the certificate must accompany each export shipment. A separate health certificate must be issued for each vehicle.

Note: Each truckload constitutes one shipment; therefore, a separate original health certificate must be issued for each vehicle.

27. Before arrival at the U.S. border, the seals cannot be broken by anyone other than a CFIA inspector or a person under the inspector's supervision. If the exporter asks to transfer animals from one truck to another after leaving the farm of origin, the transfer must be performed under the direct supervision of a CFIA inspector. The CFIA inspector will issue an official letter to confirm the change in the seal numbers. The CFIA will charge a fee for this service.

Inspections at U.S. Ports of Entry

28. The animals must be presented at the U.S. port of entry by appointment. The shipment must be accompanied by U.S. Veterinary Services Form 17-29 (Declaration of Importation) and the official Canadian health certificate (HA2185).

29. Refer to Section 5.1 for the list of land ports of entry designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of animals from Canada. Although the list was provided by the USDA, it is the exporters' responsibility to present their animals to a U.S. port of entry that has the facilities required for the unloading and inspection of such animals.

References

Export certificate HA2185 and the Agent or Owner and/or Exporter's Declaration from the CFIA Website.

A sample of the Addendum for Animals Not Included in the Shipment, which can be printed on your official letterhead, is available from your district veterinarian.

5.6 Horses

Health Certification

1. There are two ways to certify horses for export to the U.S. In both cases, the export health certificate must be issued by the accredited veterinarian who inspected the animal(s). All the horses must be individually identified, and all requirements as listed on the export certificate must be fully met. Export certificates must be completed in English.

2. The export certificate HA1964 Veterinary Health Certificate—Export of Horses to the United States of America is used to certify individual animals. Horses certified on this certificate may enter the U.S. for temporary or permanent entry. Horses certified with the export certificate HA 1964 entering the U.S. for a stay longer than 30 days after the date of inspection by an accredited veterinarian must be declared as permanent entry. Animals exported for less than 30 days, may be considered as temporary exportation. However, U.S. Customs have full authority to grant a "Temporary Customs Authorization" to these exportations, depending on the purpose of export. For example, horses exported for show or pleasure could qualify for this temporary authorization.  Horses exported to the U.S. under "Temporary Customs Authorization" may enter without U.S. veterinary inspection and the certificate issued is valid for an unlimited number of importations into the U.S. during the 30-day period, provided that the EIA test is valid on entry to the U.S. Horses exported into the U.S. for claiming race, breeding or diagnostic testing and treatment may not be granted this temporary authorization, even if entering the U.S. for less than 30 days. Customs could then refer them for USDA veterinary inspection. Exporters should verify with the U.S. Customs that their exportation is eligible for the temporary authorization.

3. The export certificate HA1963 Veterinary Health Certificate—Export of Horses to the United States of America is used to certify shipments of more than one horse for permanent entry to the U.S., provided that:

  1. all the animals are consigned by a single consignor and originate from the premises where they were inspected;
  2. all the animals are being consigned to the same destination in the same vehicle. All the horses in the shipment must be identified with "visibly numbered" back tags, mane tags, or necklace-type tags. Each horse must be numbered differently, and this number must be entered in the "Tag No." column on the HA1963 certificate. It is recommended that this visible number be recorded on the equine infectious anaemia (EIA) test form to speed up border inspections;
  3. the original of the most recent certificate CFIA/ACIA 3937—Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) Serum Test Report and Certificate, and identifying each horse must be attached to the export certificate. The laboratory reference number in the top right-hand corner of the CFIA/ACIA 3937 certificate must be entered in the "EIA Laboratory Code" column on the HA1963 export certificate;
  4. to reduce the risk of fraud after a completed certificate has left the control of an accredited veterinarian, the accredited veterinarian:
    1. initials the first page, signs and legibly prints or stamps his or her name at the bottom of last page of the health certificate;
    2. initials below the last entry, and crosses through unused blank lines;
    3. enters the total number of horses travelling under the certificate in the last page of the certificate;
    4. refers to the instructions for foals at foot in paragraph 11. below.
  5. only one truckload of horses is certified by one HA1963 form.

4. The horses must have been in Canada or the U.S. during the 60 days preceding the date of export to the U.S. If this requirement is not met, an import permit will be required. Contact your district office for further informations.

5. As far as it can be determined, no cases of African horse sickness, dourine, glanders, surra, epizootic lymphangitis, ulcerative lymphangitis, equine piroplasmosis, or Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis have occurred on the premises of origin or on adjoining premises during the 60 days preceding the date of shipment.

6. The horses have not been in a country that is considered affected with contagious equine metritis (CEM) during the twelve (12) months immediately prior to its exportation, except for those horses that have met Canadian import requirements for CEM for permanent entry.

7. Some states have additional requirements, such as the need for an import permit or Coggins certificate. Exporters are responsible for determining whether any of such requirements apply and for complying with them.

Certification Procedure

8. The horses were inspected on the premises of origin and found to be free from evidence of contagious disease and, as far as it can be determined, have not been exposed to any such disease during the 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment.

9. All horses (except foals born after their dam was tested and are accompanying their dam) must test negative to an officially approved test for EIA within the 180 days before entry to the U.S.

10. Horses must not have been vaccinated with a live or attenuated or inactivated vaccine during the 14 days preceding the date of export.

11. Foals born after the mare has been tested for EIA are exempt from the EIA test requirement, provided that they accompany their dam. To ensure that every animal in the shipment is properly identified, the accredited veterinarian must:

  1. describe the foal on a separate HA1964 form and indicate that the EIA test date is the same as for the dam; and on the dam's certificate must write "plus foal at foot, born space." The description should be sufficient to identify the foal.
  2. on the HA1963 multi-horse certificate, describe the foal by linking it to its dam by her visible number and EIA certificate code. Date of birth must be included.

How to Complete the Canadian Health Certificates

12. The accredited veterinarian must use the most recent version of the export certificate.

13. The descriptions and marks indicated on the HA1964 and the description indicated on the HA1963 must match those indicated on the EIA test document (CFIA/ACIA 3937). The animal's marks must be indicated in red on the export certificate and described in the appropriate sections. The physical description includes marks, scars, brands, tattoos, whorls, cowlicks, etc.

14. The date on which the horses were inspected on the premises of origin must be indicated.

15. The date on which the blood sample for the EIA test was taken and the date on which the laboratory result was obtained must be indicated. The export certificate must not be signed by the accredited veterinarian before negative EIA results are received.

16. The HA 1964 export certificate may be used more than once if the "Temporary" box is checked off, the exportation meets the "Temporary Customs Authorization" and each entry is made within 30 days of the date of inspection. Only the first destination needs to be specified on the export certificate. The exporter/importer retains the original of the certificate and presents it to Customs each time the horse crosses the border. As Customs officers often want to keep a copy of the certificate, it is advisable to make photocopies if the animal will be making several border crossings.

17. The HA1964 and HA1963 export certificates are valid for entry to the U.S. for 30 days from the inspection date written on the certificate, provided that the EIA test is valid on entry to the U.S. (negative result within the preceding 180 days).

18. The completed certificate will be submitted to a CFIA veterinary inspector to review and, if all requirements are met, endorse. The "Reference number" is assigned by the CFIA district office. Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. A fee is charged for CFIA endorsement.

Inspections at U.S. Ports or Entry

19. Horses certified on the multi-horse certificate HA1963 and horses certified on HA 1964 entering the U.S. for a permanent stay  require USDA veterinary inspection upon entry. Exporters are responsible to verify availability of the USDA port veterinarian and make an appointment if required.

20. Horses certified with export certificate HA1964 entering the U.S. for a temporary stay (a period of 30 days or less after their inspection by the accredited veterinarian) are inspected at ports of entry by U.S. Customs officials. They will not require a USDA veterinary inspection, if they meet the temporary stay authorization.

21. In cases where a USDA veterinary inspection is required, the original of the export certificate will be retained by the veterinary inspector.

22. Exporters should bring the original or a certified copy of their EIA test document at the border.

Return/Entry to Canada

23. Horses entering Canada from the U.S. are inspected by Canada Border Services Agency officials as long as their paperwork is in order. Under certain circumstances—such as a disease outbreak in the U.S.—veterinary inspection may be required. Horses can return to Canada at any port of entry if they do not require a veterinary inspection at the Canadian border.

24. The CFIA conducts a border inspection in the following situations:

  • Horses have been imported to the U.S. from a third country and presented for import into Canada less than 60 days after their arrival in the U.S.;
  • Horses entering Canada are in transit to another country;
  • Horses being imported for immediate slaughter.

25. Horses can return to Canada accompanied by the Canadian Zoosanitary Export Certificate (HA1964 or HA1963), provided that they return within 60 days of the date of entry to the U.S. This means that there must be proof of the date of entry to the U.S. (This may be in the form of a USDA import inspection certificate [VS Form 17-30] or a customs stamp, or, as a last resort, the date of endorsement of the certificate can be used as the last day in Canada.) The CFIA will accept a photocopy of the CFIA export certificate for the return entry process into Canada.

26. The requirements for the certification of foals to enter Canada differ from the U.S. requirements. Occasionally, foals under five months of age can enter Canada without testing, but will be refused entry when returning to the U.S. because the dam's test was done after the foal was born. The USDA port veterinarian should be consulted.

U.S.-Origin Horses Returning to the U.S.

27. Horses with a USDA certificate may return to the U.S.:

  • without veterinary inspection, if they return to the U.S. within 30 days of the date of issuance indicated on the certificate;
  • with USDA veterinary inspection, if they return to the U.S. within 90 days of the date of entry to Canada for the purposes of participating in a recognized show in accordance with 5.11 U.S.—Origin Animals Returning from a Recognized Exposition in Canada to the U.S. The EIA test must be valid upon entry to the U.S.

Equine Semen to the U.S.

28. On October 20, 2000, the USDA deregulated the importation of horse semen. U.S. Customs will accept a verbal declaration concerning this product, and the traveller will not be directed to the USDA for inspection of the product.

References

Copies of export health certificates HA1963, and HA1964.

5.7 Cervids

Health Certificate

1. The export certificate HA1891 Export of Farmed Cervids to the United States must be used.

2. All cervids described on the health certificate must have been captive farmed. Continuous records of animal identification and herds of residence for the animals being exported, from the time of birth until export, must have been verified. Animals born in the wild are ineligible for entry to the U.S. under this protocol.

3. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) must never have been diagnosed in the herd of origin.

4. The herd of origin is enrolled in the Canadian Chronic Wasting Disease Voluntary Herd Certification Program and has achieved Fully Certified status.

5. The herd of origin must be a herd of negative status for tuberculosis and brucellosis according to the provisions of the CFIA captive ungulate program, and there must have been no direct or indirect contact between the herd of origin and any known source infected with tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) or brucellosis (Brucella abortus).

6. Farmed cervids originating from Manitoba (or Manitoba farmed cervids which are added to a herd in another province) must be isolated for at least 60 days before performing the individual tuberculosis test required in article 10.1 of the export certificate HA1891

7. The herd of origin must not contain animals from any herd where tuberculosis or brucellosis has ever been diagnosed.

8. Neither tuberculosis nor brucellosis has been diagnosed on the premises of origin during the five years preceding the start of testing for export.

9. On the premises of origin, there must not be any M. bovis or B. abortus—susceptible ruminants that have not attained the status of a herd officially recognized as being free from tuberculosis and brucellosis or a herd of negative status for tuberculosis and brucellosis under the Canadian Animal Health Program for Farmed Cervids.

10. Animals for export must not be the direct offspring of any animals that have been diagnosed with CWD nor can they have resided at any time in a herd in which the disease has been diagnosed.

11. If less than one year of age, animals for export must be natural additions to the herd of origin.

12. Animals intended for export must have been included in a herd recertification test (herd of negative status), except when the animals were natural additions to the herd after the recertification test, or if the animals originated from other herds of negative status for tuberculosis and brucellosis or from U.S. Accredited Free herds.

13. During the 60 days before export to the U.S., the cervids for export and the herd of origin must have remained free from symptoms of infectious or contagious disease and, as far as it can be determined, have not been exposed to any such disease.

14. Canada must be free from foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, contagious bovine pleuropneumonia, and surra.

Certification Procedure

15. Tuberculosis: Within the 60 days before export, each cervid must be tested with negative results for bovine tuberculosis using the Canadian Mid-Cervical Test (MCT). Any cervid classified as a responder to the MCT is ineligible for entry to the U.S. However, if the status of all responders can be established by comparative testing or by post-mortem examination and tissue culture, negative contact animals may be considered for entry.

16. Brucellosis: Within the 30 days before export, cervids must test negative to a buffered plate agglutination test (BPAT) for B. abortus. Any animal that tests positive is ineligible for entry to the U.S. The animal must be removed from the group and test negative to a complement fixation test at a dilution of 1:5 in order for the test-negative contact animals to be considered for entry to the U.S.

17. Cervids under 6 months of age at the time of export, when travelling at the side of their dam, are exempt from the test requirements.

How to Complete the Canadian Health Certificate (HA1891)

18. The accredited veterinarian must use the most recent version of the HA1891 export certificate.

19. All the cervids must be identified with an official unique individual (HofA or ATQ) ear tag, or tattoo and must also have a large readable bangle ear tag that allows the bangle numbers to be checked without offloading the animals. during inspection. The bangle tag numbers and corresponding official tag or tattoo numbers must be recorded on the official health certificate.

20. The completed and signed health certificate will be submitted to a CFIA veterinary inspector to review and, if all requirements are met, endorse. Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. A fee is charged for CFIA endorsement. Endorsed certificates are returned to the accredited veterinarian. The health certificate is valid for 30 days from the date of examination.

21. The original and two copies of the official Canadian health certificate must be issued for each vehicle in a shipment.

Inspections at U.S. Ports of Entry

22. The animals must be presented by appointment at the U.S. port of entry. The port veterinarian will conduct a visual health examination of the cervids and verify individual identification and the information on the official health certificate.

23. Refer to Section 5.1 for the list of land ports of entry designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of animals from Canada. Although the list was provided by the USDA, it is the exporters' responsibility to present their animals to a U.S. port of entry that has the facilities required for the unloading and inspection of such animals.

Export of Cervids for Immediate Slaughter

24. Captive cervidae may be exported for immediate slaughter at USDA approved slaughter establishments without a health certificate. The USDA publishes a list of approved plants - PDF (79 kb) on its Website.

References

A copy of export health certificate HA1891.

5.8 Camelidae

Health Certification

1. Export certificate HA1940 Export of Camelidae to the United States of America must be used.

2. Camelids for export to the U.S. must be of U.S. or Canadian origin, or have been in Canada and free to move without restriction within Canada for a period of 60 days before export. If the camelids are offspring of animals imported into Canada from a country other than the U.S., New Zealand or Australia, the period of movement without restriction in Canada must be increased to 90 days before the date of export to the U.S.

3. The animals have been resident of the herd of origin in Canada for a minimum period of 60 days before export and do not originate from a premises containing ruminant or swine species that are not part of a herd recognized by CFIA to be tuberculosis free.

4. Neither M. bovis, M. tuberculosis nor B. abortus has been diagnosed clinically, by diagnostic test or by post-mortem examination, in a llama or alpaca on the premises of origin within the3 years preceding the issuance of the export certificate.

5. Unless at the foot of their dam, all animals being exported must be at least 6 months of age and fully weaned at least 1 month before shipping. Animals less than 6 months of age and travelling at the foot of their dam must be identified on the health certificate, but do not require testing for tuberculosis or brucellosis.

6. All camelids must be permanently and individually identified. If a microchip transponder is used, an electronic reader capable of reading the microchip must accompany the animal(s) to the U.S. port of entry.

7. During the 60 days before export, camelids must have had no direct or indirect contact with any animals that are not of equivalent health status.

8. Accredited veterinarians authorized to certify camelids for export to the U.S. must, as a prerequisite, be authorized to conduct intradermal tuberculin testing at the post-axillary site. Intradermal tuberculosis testing must occur within 60 days of export to the U.S. For a description of the post-axillary test, refer to Section 3.1.

9. Deaths during pre-export: all animals over the age of 6 months that die during the 30-day period before export to the U.S. are subject to post-mortem examination. Contact the CFIA district veterinarian in every case.

10. Animals being exported to the U.S. will be transported in cleaned and disinfected trucks directly from the premises of origin to the USDA port of entry.

Certification Procedure

11. If the animals to be exported are removed from the main herd for the 60-day pre-export isolation period, only the animals eligible for testing in this group must be tested. If the export animals remain in the main herd, all the animals in the main herd eligible for the test must be tested. This complies with the condition described in paragraph 7 above.

12. Brucellosis: Within the 30 days before export, each camelid in the group must be tested for brucellosis (B. abortus) with negative results using the buffered plate agglutination test (BPAT) or the tube agglutination test (TAT).

13. Tuberculosis: Within the 60 days before export, each camelid in the group must be tested for tuberculosis (M. bovis) with negative results using an intradermal tuberculin test at the post-axillary site. (For a description of this test, please refer to Section 3.1.)

14. Upon examination before departure for export to the U.S., camelids must show no clinical signs of communicable disease.

How to Complete the Canadian Health Certificate (HA1940)

15. The accredited veterinarian must use the most recent version of export certificate HA1940.

16. The accredited veterinarian must complete the export health certificate by entering all required information according to the directions provided above. The "Reference number" is assigned by the CFIA district office. The completed and signed health certificate will be submitted to a CFIA veterinary inspector to review and, if all requirements are met, endorse. Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. A fee is charged for CFIA endorsement. Once endorsed, certificates are returned to the accredited veterinarian. The health certificate is valid for a period of 30 days from the date of the examination.

Inspections at U.S. Ports or Entry

17. Animals must be presented at the U.S. port of entry by appointment.

18. Refer to Section 5.1 for the list of land ports of entry designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of animals from Canada. Although the list was provided by the USDA, it is the exporters' responsibility to present their animals to a U.S. port of entry that has the facilities required for the unloading and inspection of such animals.

References

A copy of export health certificate HA1940.

5.9 Swine

Breeding Swine
Health Certificate

1. The export certificate HA1938 Export of Swine to the United States must be used.

2. Exporters should be advised that individual states may have stricter requirements than the USDA. It is the exporter's responsibility to contact the authorities of the destination state to determine the state requirements and, among other things, whether an import permit is required. A contact list for each state is included in Section 5.1.

3. The swine must be inspected on the premises of origin within 30 days of export.

4. Swine must originate from premises that have been free from classical swine fever (hog cholera) or swine plague during the 60 day period before the date of shipment.

5. All contiguous/adjacent premises to the premises of origin must have been free from classical swine fever (hog cholera) or swine plague during the 60 day period before the date of shipment.

6. Swine that are under quarantine for any disease are not eligible for export to the U.S.

7. Swine, after clinical examination, displaying symptoms or evidence of contagious or infectious disease or exposure to contagious or infectious disease are not eligible to be certified for export to the U.S.

8. Unique individual animal "permanent" identification is required by the USDA. Specific requirements may apply. "HofA" ear tags, tattoos and plastic tags, which are officially approved by the CFIA and allow for trace back to herd of origin, are also acceptable. Exporters should be advised that it is preferable to verify that their tags are in compliance by contacting the USDA veterinary services at the port of entry where they will present their swine for export.

9. There are no federal test requirements for breeding swine exported to the U.S.

Certification Procedure

10. Animals being exported must have been examined by an accredited veterinarian within the 30 days before the date of export.

11. Some states have specific requirements for entry of swine into the state. To comply with these requirements, analyses must be performed in a laboratory accredited for this purpose. Confirmation of state requirements with respect to pseudorabies (Aujeszky's disease) and brucellosis is the responsibility of the exporter. A complete list of state veterinary offices is provided in Section 5.1.

12. When identified as a mandatory state requirement, samples must be drawn and submitted for analysis within the time frame mandated by the state.

13. In those instances in which pseudorabies and/or brucellosis tests have been performed as identified above (paragraph 11), a copy of the laboratory report is to be attached to HA1938.

Zoo Swine Species
Health Certification

14. The export certificate HA2230 Export of Zoo Swine Species to the United States must be used.

15. Swine must be inspected on the premises of origin as close as possible to the day of departure.

16. Swine must originate from premises that have been free from classical swine fever (hog cholera) or swine plague during the 60-day period before the date of shipment.

17. Animals to be exported must have been tested with negative results for brucellosis within the 30-day period before the date of export and tuberculosis during the 60-day period before the date of export.

18. Unique individual animal "permanent" identification is required by the USDA. Specific requirements may apply. HofA ear tags, tattoos and plastic tags officially approved by the CFIA which allow for trace back to herd of origin are also acceptable. However, exporters should be advised that it is preferable to verify that their tags are in compliance by contacting the USDA veterinary services at the port of entry where they will present their swine for export.

Certification Procedure

19. Animals being exported must have been examined by an accredited veterinarian within the 30-day period before the date of export.

20. Animals for export must be tested for brucellosis and tuberculosis.

Wild Boar
Health Certification

21. The export certificate HA2228 Export of Wild Boars to the United States must be used.

22. During the 60-day period immediately preceding the day of export, the premises of origin or adjoining premises must be free of swine erysipelas or swine plague.

23. The animals must be isolated for a period of 30 days before export.

24. The swine for export were not previously imported into Canada from countries designated by the USDA as affected with foot and mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine fever, hog cholera, or swine vesicular disease.

25. The swine for export have been in Canada for a minimum of 60 days immediately preceding the date of export to the U.S.

26. The swine were not vaccinated with a live, an attenuated, or an inactivated vaccine during the 14 days preceding export to the U.S.

27. The animals must be individually identified.

28. The animals for export must be tested for brucellosis.

Certification Procedure

29. Animals for export must be examined within the 30 days prior to the date of export.

30. The animals for export must be tested with negative results for brucellosis within the 30-day period before the date of export.

How to Complete the Canadian Health Certificate (HA1938, HA2228 and HA2230)

31. The accredited veterinarian must use the most recent version of the export certificate.

32. When required, the U.S. import permit number must be entered in the appropriate section.

33. The date of the tests performed for certificate HA2230 must be indicated on the export certificate.

34. The results of tests that are performed to meet specific state requirements do not constitute part of the official certification and are not to appear on the export health certificate; however, the test results can be attached to the export document.

35. The accredited veterinarian must complete the export health certificate by entering all required information according to the directions provided above. The "Reference number" is assigned by the CFIA district office. The completed and signed health certificate will be submitted to a CFIA veterinary inspector to review and, if all requirements are met, endorse. Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. A fee is charged for CFIA endorsement. The health certificate is valid for a period of 30 days from the date of the examination.

Swine for Immediate Slaughter to the U.S.

36. Inspection, testing or certification is not required for swine consigned from the port of entry directly to a slaughter facility. Identification to facilitate trace back to farm of origin is required. A statement signed by the exporter showing the farm(s) of origin and the approved U.S. slaughter plant to which the load is consigned must be presented to the USDA veterinarian at the port of entry. Some states restrict swine from farms where edible residual material is known to be fed. The exporter should therefore be advised to check with the destination state to determine if any of these restrictions apply to the swine being exported.

Inspections at U.S. Ports of Entry

37. Animals must be presented at the U.S. port of entry by appointment. The veterinarian at the port of entry will conduct a visual health examination of the animals and verify the identification of each animal as well as the information on the official health certificate.

38. Refer to Section 5.1 for the list of land ports of entry designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of animals from Canada. Although the list was provided by the USDA, it is the exporters' responsibility to present their animals to a U.S. port of entry that has the facilities required for the unloading and inspection of such animals.

References

Copies of export health certificates HA1938, HA2228, and HA2230.

5.10 Birds, Poultry and Hatching Eggs

Interpretation

Bird: all members of the class Aves other than poultry.

Poultry: means domestic fowl and pigeons, including any bird in captivity: chickens, doves, ducks, geese, grouse, guinea fowl, partridges, pea fowl, pheasants, pigeons, quail, swans and turkeys (and their eggs for hatching).

Day-Old Poultry and Hatching Eggs (HA1942)
Health Certification

1. Export certificate HA1942 Export of Day-Old Poultry/Hatching Eggs to the United States of America must be used to certify day-old poultry and/or hatching eggs.

2. The flocks of origin and hatchery must have been inspected within 30 days of export and found to be free of any evidence of communicable diseases of poultry and, as far as it is possible to determine, must not have been exposed to any such disease in the 90-day period preceding the date of export.

3. The flock of origin must have participated in a pullorum eradication program recognized by Canadian veterinary officials.

4. The flock of origin of the day-old chicks or hatching eggs must have been maintained in the region from which they are being exported for at least 90 days immediately preceding the date of export.

5. Newcastle disease, fowl plague, or highly pathogenic avian influenza has not occurred on the premises of origin, or on any adjoining premises during the 90-day period preceding exportation.

6. The area where the premises of origin are located has not been under quarantine for avian diseases during the preceding 90 days.

7. Chicks or eggs are shipped in new, clean containers.

8. The exporter is responsible for determining and complying with any specific state or show requirements.

Poultry (Except Day-Olds and Hatching Eggs) (HA1943)
Health Certification

9. Export certificate HA1943 Export of Poultry to the United States of America must be used to certify poultry.

10. The birds must have been inspected within 30 days of export and found to be free of any evidence of communicable diseases of poultry and, as far as is possible to determine, have not been exposed to any such disease during the 90 days preceding the date of export.

11. The flock of origin must participate in a pullorum eradication program recognized by the veterinary officials of Canada or the flock of origin must have had its pullorum status confirmed through the use of other sampling methods such as environmental/fluff samples within the 90 days preceding export. Doves and pigeons are exempt from this requirement.

Samples must have been taken by the accredited veterinarian and submitted to provincial laboratories or to the Ontario Guelph laboratory.

12. The poultry must have been maintained in the region from which they are being exported for at least 90 days immediately preceding the date of export or since hatching, except in the case of show poultry, where poultry must have been maintained in the region of exportation and/or the U.S. for the 90-day period preceding exportation.

13. Newcastle disease, fowl plague, or highly pathogenic avian influenza has not occurred on the premises of origin, or on any adjoining premises during the 90-day period preceding exportation.

14. The area in which the premises of origin are located must not have been under quarantine for avian diseases during the 90 days before export.

15. Pigeons entering the U.S. must have been vaccinated with a killed avian pneumoencephalitis vaccine at least 30 days and not more than 180 days before departure.

Note: This is also a Canadian requirement for return entry into Canada.

16. The exporter is responsible for determining and complying with any specific state or show requirements.

Export of Birds (Including Ratites) (HA1945)
Health Certification

17. Export certificate HA1945 Export of Birds to the United States of America must be used to certify birds.

18. The birds must have been inspected immediately before export and found to be free of any evidence of communicable avian diseases and, as far as is possible to determine, must not have been exposed to any such disease during the 90 days before the date of export.

19. The birds must not have been vaccinated with live Newcastle disease vaccine.

20. The birds must have been maintained in the region from which they are being exported for at least 90 days immediately preceding the date of export or from the time of hatching. Show birds must have been maintained in the region of export and/or the U.S. for the 90-day period before export.

21. Newcastle disease, fowl plague, or highly pathogenic avian influenza must not have occurred on the premises of origin or on any adjoining premises during the 90 days immediately before export.

22. The area in which the premises of origin are located has not been under quarantine for avian diseases during the preceding 90 days.

23. The birds must have been individually identified by means of wingbands, legbands or microchip, and the numbers recorded on the certificate.

24. The exporter is responsible for determining and complying with any specific state or show requirements.

How to Complete Canadian Health Certificates (HA1942, HA1943 and HA1945)

25. The accredited veterinarian must use the most recent version of the export certificate and should consult the CFIA district veterinarian to obtain copies.

26. The accredited veterinarian must complete the export health certificate by entering all required information according to the directions provided above. The "Reference number" is assigned by the CFIA district office. The completed and signed health certificate will be submitted to a CFIA veterinary inspector to review and, if all requirements are met, endorse. Any incomplete export certificates will be returned to the accredited veterinarian for completion. A fee is charged for CFIA endorsement. The health certificate is valid for a period of thirty (30) days from the date of the examination.

References

Copies of export health certificates HA1942, HA1943, and HA1945.

5.11 U.S. Origin Animals Returning to the U.S. from a Recognized Exposition in Canada

General Requirements

1. All animals (including poultry) from the U.S. which have been exhibited at a publicly recognized exposition in Canada are eligible to return to the U.S. without Canadian health or test certification provided that:

  1. the animals have not been in Canada more than 90 days from the date of their entry from the U.S.;
  2. the animals are accompanied by copies of the U.S. health certificate which permitted their entry into Canada;
  3. the animals offered for re-entry are, upon examination by the veterinary inspector at the U.S. port of entry, found to be free of communicable diseases and exposure thereto;
  4. the animals are determined to be the identical animals covered by said certificates, or are the natural increase of such animals born after official test dates certified on the dam's health certificate; and
  5. the animals meet any specific conditions for that species.

2. This provision does not apply to animals that have entered Canada for any purpose other than exhibition. A specific exception exists for U.S. cattle and bison imported for less than 60 days for any other purpose, as described in Section 5.3.1.

3. A list of the recognized exhibitions can be obtained from the CFIA district office.