International Waste Directive

This page is part of the Guidance Document Repository (GDR).

Looking for related documents?
Search for related documents in the Guidance Document Repository

TAHD-DSAT-IE-2002-17-6
October 15, 2012

Amendments: Clarifications added to various responsibilities.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Legislation

Definitions

Background

Appendix 1: Responsibilities of Individuals and Organizations

  • Section I - Responsibilities of Owner or Person in Charge of an Aircraft or Ship
  • Section II - Responsibilities of Owner or Person in Charge of Transportation of International Waste (Haulers)
  • Section III - Responsibilities of Owner or Person in Charge of a Disposal Site
  • Section IV - Responsibilities of the CFIA
  • Section V - Responsibilities of the CBSA

Appendix 2: Requirements for the Handling, Removal, and Disposition of International Waste at Points of Entry into Canada (Airports and Marine Terminals, and Land Crossings)

  • Section I - Arrival Areas - General Information
  • Section II - Requirements for Clearly Identified by Colour International Waste Bag Program at Any Point of Entry Into Canada (i.e. "Orange" Bag Program)
  • Section III - Tarmac and Transfer Areas - General Information and Requirements for Containers Used
  • Section IV - Off-Loading Areas for Flight Kitchens and Ships' Galleys
  • Section V - Land Crossings

Appendix 3: Requirements for Transporters of International Waste (Haulers)

Appendix 4: Requirements for Approval of Transport Routes and Landfill Sites for the Disposal of International Waste (Landfill Disposal)

  • Section I - Requirements for Approval of a Transport Route by the CFIA
  • Section II - Requirements for Approval of a Landfill Site by the CFIA
  • Section III - Initiation of the Approval Process of a Landfill Site to Receive International Waste (Performed by the Local CFIA Animal Health Office)
  • Section IV - General Procedures Pertaining to the Transport of International Waste to an Approved Disposal Site

Appendix 5: Requirements for Approval of a Transport Routes and Incinerator Sites for the Disposal of International Waste

  • Section I - Requirements for Approval of a Transport Route by the CFIA
  • Section II - Requirements for Approval of an Incinerator Site by the CFIA
  • Section III - Initiation of the Approval Process for an Incinerator Site to Receive International Waste (Performed by the Local CFIA Animal Health Office)
  • Section IV - Procedures Pertaining to an Approved Incinerator Facility

Appendix 6: Process for Approval of an Autoclave for the Treatment of International Waste for Disposal (Autoclave Treatment)

  • Section I - Requirements for Approval of an Autoclave for Preparation of International Waste for Disposal
  • Section II - Procedures Pertaining to an Approved Autoclave Facility

Appendix 7: Disinfectants to Be Used on Instruments and Containers of International Waste

Introduction

The International Waste Directive applies to the following:

  1. waste removed from aircrafts (from any country, including the U.S.) and from ships arriving in Canada from overseas; and
  2. any commodities regulated by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) that are prohibited or do not meet CFIA import requirements, including things that are forfeited or voluntarily surrendered by international travellers arriving in Canada.

In late 2004, the CFIA and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) came to an agreement whereby the control, monitoring and disposal of international waste (IW) falls within the responsibility of the CBSA. Program design and approval of disposal routes and sites remain the responsibility of CFIA. Monitoring of transportation is a joint CBSA-CFIA responsibility.

It is not mandatory for aircraft landing or ships docking in Canada to remove any onboard IW. The owner may return the IW to the country of origin or proceed to a third country before removing such material. If, however, IW is removed from international flights/ships landing/docking in Canada, the removal may or may not occur at the first point of landing/docking. Flights or ships may land to refuel or discharge passengers and continue to a second or subsequent landing/docking point before removing waste for disposal.

It is the aircraft/ship owner's responsibility, if unloading IW into Canada, to dispose of it in accordance with this directive. However, CBSA inspectors at the initial and subsequent landing/docking sites are to verify that proper disposal procedures have been followed or that the waste has remained on board the aircraft/ship.

Legislation

The authority to mandate specific methods of disposal for things defined as either IW within this directive (i.e. things that do not meet CFIA import conditions for animal or plant health commodities) and disinfection of containers is derived from the Health of Animals Act, section 17, and the Health of Animals Regulations, section 47 and subsection 105(3), as well as the Plant Protection Act, section 8.3, and the Plant Protection Regulations and all associated Regulations.

Definitions

Aircraft garbage: Waste that contains, or is suspected of containing, animal products or by-products that originated either as food taken on board or as a result of transportation of animals in an aircraft. Applies to waste from aircraft from any country, including the U.S.

Forfeited materials: Animal or plant products and by-products which do not meet CFIA import requirements and which therefore are forfeited or voluntarily surrendered by international travellers at the first point of entry.

Handler of International waste: Person who is responsible for collecting or supervising the collection of IW at a point of entry into Canada (i.e. airport authorities, employees charged with bringing IW to a transfer area) as well as arranging and carrying out the transportation and disposal of IW via approved routes and to approved sites.

International waste: For the purposes of this directive, refers to aircraft garbage, forfeited materials, manure and ship's refuse as defined above. All IW will be handled, transported, stored, and disposed of in accordance with this directive.

Note: In recognition of the risk of introducing pests and diseases that threaten plant health, the requirements of the Plant Protection Act and Plant Protection Regulations must also be enforced; for furthur clarification on these requirements please refer to CFIA Plant Protection procedures and specialists.

Landfill site: Place where one disposes of waste under the supervision of a competent authority.

Leak-proof container: A container whose sides and bottom prevent the escape of solids and liquids and with a tight-fitting, securely closing lid that prevents the escape of solids and the entry of animals or vermin.

Manure: For the purpose of this directive, means manure, urine, and other bodily fluid and used disposable bedding materials containing or suspected of containing manure, urine and other bodily fluid or any item that cannot be cleaned and disinfected that is suspected of containing manure, urine and/or other bodily fluid, that is produced by animals on board a ship or aircraft while en route to or after arrival in Canada.

Ship's refuse: Refuse that contains or is suspected of containing an animal product or an animal by-product and that originated a) as food taken on board a  vessel, or b) as a result of transportation of animals on board a vessel.

Background

IW is normally prohibited from entry into Canada because of the risk of introducing plant diseases, pests, and important animal diseases of concern such as foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, African swine fever, hog cholera (classical swine fever), swine vesicular disease, Newcastle disease, avian influenza, African horse sickness, and many other animal diseases.

IW may be removed for disposal in Canada if a CBSA inspector is satisfied that the off-loading and discharge of such material meets the requirements of the Directive and thus would not, or would not likely, result in the introduction into Canada or the spread within Canada of a vector, disease, or toxic substance. This International Waste Directive is not based on country classification because of the number of countries and the wide variety of products involved. The directive applies to international waste originating in all countries but not to commercial import of domestic waste (Municipal Solid Waste or MSW) from the U.S. entering via land borders. In addition, it does not apply to ship's refuse from ships originating in the U.S. (This exemption for U.S.-origin items does not apply to items confiscated due to Plant Protection concerns or other CFIA program requirements).

If a thing or domestic waste is mixed with IW, the thing/domestic waste then becomes IW and must be disposed of in accordance with the requirements outlined in this directive and under the authority of the above-named legislation.

Appendix 1: Responsibilities of Individuals and Organizations

This appendix is divided into the following sections:

  • Section I - Responsibilities of Owner or Person in Charge of an Aircraft or Ship
  • Section II - Responsibilities of Owner or Person in Charge of Transportation of International Waste (Haulers)
  • Section III - Responsibilities of Owner or Person in Charge of a Disposal Site
  • Section IV - Responsibilities of the CFIA
  • Section V - Responsibilities of the CBSA

I. Responsibilities of Owner or Person in Charge of an Aircraft or Ship

It is the responsibility of the aircraft or ship owner, or the owner's agent, to ensure that all parties involved in the collection, transportation (i.e. drivers and haulers), and disposal of IW within Canada, from their aircraft or vessel, comply with the requirements of the Health of Animals Act and the Health of Animals Regulations, the Plant Protection Act and the Plant Protection Regulations, as well as any other pertinent Government of Canada legislation.

II. Responsibilities of Owner or Person in Charge of Transportation of International Waste (Haulers)

The owner of the IW hauling company, or the owner's agent, is responsible for the following:

  1. contacting the CFIA to seek approval of the route and subsequent renewals of the route for IW disposal (which must be done prior to any transport occurring);
  2. training their employees as follows:
    1. on the risks of IW,
    2. on the emergency spill plan, and
    3. to monitor the handling of the IW under their control; and
  3. maintaining the training of their employees outlined in number 2.

Subsequent appendices provides further information to assist the owner (or persons or organization in charge) of these responsibilities.

III. Responsibilities of Owner or Person in Charge of a Disposal Site

The disposal site owner or owner's agent is responsible for the following:

  1. contacting the CFIA to seek approval for the site and subsequent renewals of the site to handle IW; and
  2. demonstrating to the satisfaction of the CFIA the ability to comply with the requirements of the International Waste Directive through:
    1. on-site visits by the CFIA,
    2. the disposal sites' written plan for the following:
      1. employee training,
      2. spill contingency, and
      3. any other requirements listed within their approval from the CFIA;
    3. training their employees in the following:
      1. the risks of IW, and
      2. the emergency spill plan;
    4. monitoring the handling of the IW under their control; and
    5. maintaining the training of their employees in all of the above.

IV. Responsibilities of the CFIA

The CFIA is responsible for the following activities:

  1. The Policy and Programs Branch maintains and updates this International Waste Directive, and distributes and explains it to its officers, the Operations Branch and the CBSA.
  2. The Operations Branch (at the district veterinarian level) approves routes and disposal sites (landfill sites, incinerators and autoclaves).
  3. The Operations Branch (at the district veterinarian level) reviews approvals (sites and routes) on an annual basis.
  4. The Operations Branch (at the district veterinarian level) is responsible for renewing approvals every three years, provided the disposal site still meets requirements and wishes to remain eligible to receive IW.
  5. The CFIA regularly (minimum annually) reviews activities under the responsibility of the CBSA by virtue of this directive, and consults with the CBSA.
  6. On-site audits of disposal sites and review of approved routes will be conducted by the CFIA (Operations Branch at the district veterinarian level) to verify compliance with this directive on a regular basis (minimum annually).
  7. The Policy and Programs Branch examines any new or substantially modified CBSA Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) related to IW.
  8. The Policy and Programs Branch and the Operations Branch are responsible for training and feedback to the CBSA on the International Waste Directive. Ongoing two-way dialogue at the field level is encouraged.
  9. The Policy and Programs Branch provides training and feedback to the Operations Branch on this International Waste Directive.
  10. The Operations Branch provides the CBSA with copies of approved routes and lists of currently approved disposal sites for each region.
  11. The Operations Branch (at the District veterinarian level) ensures the revision, monitoring, and auditing of disposal sites' and transportation companies' SOPs for training and emergency plans (spill containment, emergency contact lists, etc.).
  12. The Operations Branch (at the district level) must co-ordinate auditing of the regulated party with the CBSA at the point of entry (POE) so, that over a 12-month period, the entire system for handling IW at a perticular POE has been reviewed. This will include a review of CBSA monitoring and a review of records of the POE IW activities.

V. Responsibilities of the CBSA

The CBSA is responsible for the following activities:

  1. Communicating any concerns or questions about this International Waste Directive as required, to both the Policy and Programs Branch and the Operations Branch. Ongoing two-way dialogue at the field level is encouraged.
  2. Verifying that the owner or person in charge of the aircraft/ship and the port authority are aware of their responsibilities under the Health of Animals Regulations andthe Plant Protection Regulations, to ensure all parties involved in the collection, storage, and transportation of IW are in compliance with the Regulations.
  3. Ensuring that international travellers are aware of their responsibilities under the Health of Animals Regulations andthe Plant Protection Regulations with regard to complying with CFIA requirements, via such programs as the "Be Aware & Declare" program, and first and secondary inspections of travellers.
  4. Ensuring that international travellers' non-compliant animals, plants or animal or plant products/by-products do not enter into the country.
  5. Monitoring handlers of IW and co-ordinating with the CFIA for a process reviewFootnote 1 as follows:
    1. reviewing and monitoring handlers' SOPs for training and continuing the education of employees handling IW;
    2. reviewing and monitoring handlers' and haulers' SOPs for emergency plans (spill containment, contact lists, etc.);
    3. reviewing and monitoring haulers' training protocols for drivers, including breakdown and spill containment and contingencies; and
    4. reviewing and monitoring maintenance and cleaning and disinfection protocols for the following:
      1. transport vehicles' IW containers, and POE IW containers; and
      2. any other instruments used in the transfer, transport or hauling of IW.
  6. Monitoring, including occasionally observing the hauler during the collection and transport of IW in accordance with this directive and its appendices.
  7. Ensuring truck manifests are completed and reconciled for each load of IW that moves to an approved premises for disposal. Truck manifests from approved premises should be reviewed for accuracy by CBSA inspectors to ensure that no diversion to non-approved sites of IW occurs. Records of these reviews and findings are to be maintained by the CBSA. Non-compliances are to be documented and forwarded to the CFIA for consultation and review. (The frequency of this activity is dependant on the quantity of IW generated at the POE.)
  8. On occasion, following trucks moving waste to an approved disposal site to ensure that any containers on the truck are not leaking, and that the truck arrives at the intended destination with no off-loading at unapproved sites or use of unauthorized routes. (The frequency of this activity is dependant on the quantity of IW generated at the POE.)
  9. Performing a monthly review of the maintenance plan for trucks, containers, and any other equipment used in the handling, transport, and disposal of IW.
  10. Monitoring and ensuring that all containers used in the handling of IW are leak-proof; closed when not in use; with secure, tight-fitting lids that prevent escape of solids and entry of vermin or other animals; and clearly identified as being IW. For the purposes of this directive, leak-proof containers are defined as containers whose sides and bottom prevent the escape of solids and liquids, with a tight-fitting, securely closing lid that prevents the escape of solids or the entry of animals or vermin. IW containers must be stored in a manner that would prevent this waste from being mixed with domestic waste, and prevent spills and exposure of wildlife, livestock, birds or insects to IW, thereby helping to prevent the introduction of, or spread within Canada of important animal diseases of concern, vectors and toxic substances, and plant diseases and plant pests.
  11. Ensuring that waste and tipping manifests are completed and contain all applicable information to ensure there are no discrepancies in the weight or the time or date of waste delivery to the approved disposal site.
  12. Completing invoices for the charges relating to monitoring IW. (Please refer to the CBSA table of International Waste, Manifest Review, Inspections for a complete list of applicable fees.)
  13. Ensuring that parties responsible for IW handling and hauling (airport authorities, seaport authorities, marinas, IW haulers, etc.) are fully aware of their responsibilities under the Health of Animals Regulations and the Plant Protection Regulations with regards to IW, and that they are compliant with this directive.

Appendix 2: Requirements for the Handling, Removal, and Disposition of International Waste at Points of Entry Into Canada (Airport and Marine Terminals, and Land Crossings)

Requirements I to V below refer to the collection and transfer of IW at the airport or marine terminals in three areas: arrival areas; tarmac/dock/transfer areas; and flight kitchens and ships' galleys off-loading areas. Requirement V refers to land crossing requirements.

This appendix is divided into the following sections:

  • Section I - Arrival Areas - General Information
  • Section II - Requirements for Clearly Identified by Colour International Waste Bag Program at Any Point of Entry Into Canada (i.e. "Orange" Bag Program)
  • Section III - Tarmac and Transfer Areas - General Information and Requirements for Containers Used
  • Section IV - Off-Loading Areas for Flight Kitchens and Ships' Galleys
  • Section V - Land Crossings

I. Arrival Areas - General Information

These include the areas from aircraft arrival or ship docking to secondary inspection. Many larger airports have implemented an "orange" bag program to help reduce confusion distinguishing between domestic and international waste. Such a program could be instituted by marine terminals or marinas, should they choose to do so.

Note: Colours other than orange for the IW bag program may be used so long as there is a clear and uniform distinction between domestic and international waste bags approved by the CBSA.

Under the "orange" bag program, all domestic or international waste placed in the bags is deemed IW and is handled accordingly. The movement and monitoring of the "orange" bag program is conducted under the direct supervision of a CBSA inspector.

Larger airports may also have a program like this in place at the Customs areas for international travellers en route to or from the U.S. Products that do not meet Canadian import conditions and are thus forfeited are placed in "orange" bags and handled according to this directive.

Depending on the size of the airport, the "orange" bag program [also known as Prohibited Products Bins (PPB)] may be implemented in other areas such as the pre-Customs primary and international carousel arrival areas. In the Customs primary areas, the "orange" bag program enables CBSA inspectors to dispose of agricultural products removed from declaring passengers carrying these products in handbags, carry-on luggage or other means. This reduces the number of items forfeited at the secondary areas and complements the Prohibited Products Bins program. Airports or marine terminals with no "orange" bag program must segregate international and domestic waste (in closed, leak-proof, clearly identified containers for IW) to the satisfaction of a CBSA inspector.

II. Requirements for Clearly Identified by Colour International Waste Bag Program at Any Point of Entry Into Canada (i.e. "Orange" Bag Program)

  1. All IW bags must be as follows:
    1. clearly identifiable, with a colour difference between domestic and international waste bags (for example, only orange-coloured bags used);
    2. used in clearly designated areas for IW collection only; and
    3. double-tied before being removed from designated areas.
  2. Signs indicating the colour of the IW bags must be clearly posted in all areas where they are used (i.e. "Orange bags are for international waste only").
  3. Once tied, the IW bags must only be opened in the presence of a CBSA inspector.
  4. IW bag contents must not be handled or removed from the IW collection and storage areas, except for transport to IW containers.
  5. All IW bags must be placed directly in IW containers while allowing the lid to be closed securely (no piling or storing of contents alongside).
  6. IW bags are to be moved directly to the IW containers without entering any areas reserved for domestic waste.
  7. If a hole or leak occurs in an IW bag, it must be double-bagged in another "orange" bag and the spill cleaned and disinfected to the satisfaction of a CBSA inspector.
  8. Only IW bags are to be used in the international restricted arrival areas or any other areas designated for the collection or storage of IW.

III. Tarmac and Transfer Areas - General Information and Requirements for Containers Used

Tarmac and transfer IW waste containers should be placed in strategic locations on the tarmac or dock close to the aircraft/ship. They must be clearly identified as being for IW. Depending on the size of the airport/marine terminal and the volume of traffic, all IW containers may be designated for IW or, at smaller airports or marine terminals, separate containers may be provided for IW and domestic garbage, as long as the CBSA inspector is satisfied that this practice meets the requirements of this Directive in preventing the introduction of, or spread within Canada of important animal diseases of concern, vectors, or plant diseases or plant pests.

Transfer Area

In larger airports/marine terminals, there may be a garbage transfer area in which IW collected from the tarmac or dock is taken to a central location to be picked up by an approved IW carrier for transport to the approved disposal site.

  1. Containers must be leak-proof to the satisfaction of a CBSA inspector. (Please refer to the "Responsibilities of the CBSA" section.)
  2. Containers must be stored so that any leakage would not contaminate the surrounding soil and water supply.
  3. All "orange" bags must be double-tied when placed in the containers.
  4. All containers must be in areas free of wild animals, rodents, birds and vermin.
  5. Lids on IW containers must be tight-fitting and closed at all times.
  6. IW containers must be kept in good repair.

The tarmac/dock and transfer area must be monitored by the CBSA for compliance with the requirements and restrictions in this directive.

Disposal of Liquids

Compaction is practised in many airports and marine terminals for removal of liquids, reduction in waste volume and ease of handling. Such a practice may result in large amounts of liquid waste being generated. The liquid waste must not be allowed to contaminate the soil, water supply, or surface water of the area where it is generated or during transportation to another location for waste water treatment. This liquid waste from IW must be captured and handled on location or transported to another location for waste water treatment. It is the responsibility of the disposer of liquid waste to ensure compliance with all municipal, provincial, and federal requirements on liquid waste disposal within their area.

IV. Off-Loading Areas for Flight Kitchens and Ships' Galleys

General Information and Requirements

The size of the airport/marine terminal determines the number of flight kitchens and ships' galleys involved in the collection of IW. Some flight kitchens and ships' galleys off-loading areas may have Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plans in place and, in such instances, IW should be added as a critical control point.

Depending on the size and design of the flight kitchen or ship's galley off-loading area, kitchen staff may separate IW from domestic sources. If waste is separated, either an "orange" bag program must be followed or a HACCP-type plan must be in place. The IW must be segregated from the domestic stream in such a manner that the CBSA inspector is fully satisfied that the written procedures are followed, are effective, and will not result in cross-contamination of domestic and international waste. If there is contamination with IW into the domestic stream, the entirety becomes IW and must be disposed of as indicated in this directive.

  1. Bay doors must remain closed when not in use.
  2. Designated areas for IW must be kept separate from domestic waste.
  3. A vermin (insect and rodent) control program must be in place.
  4. Containers must be leak-proof.
  5. Containers must be stored so that any spills would not contaminate the surrounding soil and water supply.
  6. The IW collection area must have a sanitation program to satisfy the CBSA inspector that this procedure prevents the introduction into Canada of important animal diseases of concern, vectors, or plant diseases or plant pests.

CBSA inspectors are to monitor on a regular basis and at random times the IW off-loading areas for flight kitchens and ships' galleys for cleanliness (absence of signs of vermin), adequate segregation of international and domestic waste (if practised), cross-contamination and HACCP monitoring (if applicable). Monitoring is conducted on a weekly or monthly basis depending on the volume of IW and the compliance history of the owner or person responsible for the flight kitchens and ships' galleys IW off-loading areas.

V. Land Crossings

International travellers entering Canada via the U.S. may be carrying plant products/by-products from the U.S. or agricultural products (food, plant or animal) from a third country which do not meet import requirements (i.e. dried meat products from Asia or Africa), and which pose a significant risk of introducing animal disease or plant pests. CBSA inspectors must be aware of this potential and should treat any such products, forfeited by the traveller for not meeting the import requirements of the CFIA, as IW. Such products are to be stored and disposed of in accordance with this directive.

All IW collected at land crossings must be handled, stored, transferred and disposed of in accordance with this directive and in accordance with the Health of Animals Regulations.

For remote crossings with minimal amounts of waste, contact the CFIA local Animal Health office (by province) for guidance on appropriate transportation and disposal methods. CBSA and CFIA are to pre-arrange transfer to either an approved disposal site or the nearest district office for disposal as biohazard material (deep burial, incinerated or autoclaved) under CFIA control; adequate biosecurity measures must be followed.

Appendix 3: Requirements for Transporters of IW (Haulers)

Aircraft/ship owners are responsible for arranging the transportation of IW to approved disposal sites. These requirements are intended for haulers of IW to ensure that the transportation of the IW from the port of entry to an approved disposal site is carried out in accordance with the Health of Animals Regulations and this directive.

The owner, or agent of the owner, of the transportation company (hauler) of IW, is responsible for the following:

1. Training Plans

Standard operating procedures (SOPs) must be written, known and understood by employees, and implemented and delivered to the satisfaction of a CBSA/CFIA (as co-ordinated between the Agencies) inspector. These SOPs must include the following elements:

  1. driver training;
  2. handler training; and
  3. a storage plan.

Regarding the requirement for driver training, to prevent the introduction of, or spread within Canada of important animal and plant diseases of concern, drivers must be trained in the risks involved in hauling IW. These risks include spills and deviating from approved routes (thereby potentially exposing livestock or plant crops to important diseases and pests of concern).

2. Maintenance Plan

A written maintenance schedule is required for containers and any other equipment used in the handling, transport, and disposal of IW. This plan's records shall be reviewed monthly by CBSA inspectors. The frequency of this activity is dependant on the quantity of IW generated at the POE.

3. IW Containers

Containers must be as follows:

  1. leak-proof and must be approved by a CBSA inspector;
  2. stored so that any leakage would not contaminate the surrounding soil and water supply;
  3. clearly identifiable for IW (and prominently numbered to facilitate record-keeping); and
  4. cleaned and disinfected to satisfaction of the CBSA/CFIA inspector after drop-off at the disposal site.

4. Routing Map

  1. The CFIA's advance approval is required for the transportation route from the POE to the approved disposal site. In the event of emergency road closure, an alternate route is also required and must be pre-approved by the CFIA.
  2. Copies of approved routes will be provided by the CFIA to the local CBSA office dealing with the IW hauler.

5. Spill Contingency Plan

A written contingency plan must be in place in case of an accident resulting in spillage of IW. CBSA and CFIA contact names and numbers must be part of the contingency plan. The contingency spill plan must be approved by the CFIA in advance.

6. Waste Manifest

Each truckload requires a waste manifest, or some other form of proof of delivery. These are to be reviewed periodically by CBSA inspectors and must be made available when requested by the CBSA or the CFIA.

Appendix 4: Requirements for Approval of Transport Routes and Landfill Sites for the Disposal of International Waste (Landfill Disposal)

This appendix is divided into the following sections:

  • Section I - Requirements for Approval of a Transport Route by the CFIA
  • Section II - Requirements for Approval of a Landfill Site by the CFIA
  • Section III - Initiation of the Approval Process of a Landfill Site to Receive International Waste (Performed by the Local CFIA Animal Health Office)
  • Section IV - General Procedures Pertaining to the Transport of International Waste to an Approved Disposal Site

I. Requirements for Approval of a Transport Route by the CFIA

  1. The route chosen between the POE and the approved disposal site should be the shortest distance and within a reasonable distance of the POE, while avoiding livestock and agricultural crop areas. The route must be restricted to major roads, if possible.
  2. An alternate route must also be on file in case the designated one is unavailable.
  3. Exceptional circumstances where livestock areas and crops cannot be avoided may be approved by the CFIA if it is clearly demonstrated that there are no other possible routes and as long as only major roads are used. In these exceptional circumstances, the trucks and containers must be inspected more often by CBSA inspectors and the transport followed by the CFIA or the CBSA (to be arranged in advance between the two Agencies).
  4. A transportation route requiring the lengthy transportation of IW on a routine basis through an area with a significant livestock population or intensive agricultural crop production will not be approved.

II. Requirements for Approval of a Landfill Site by the CFIA

  1. A current valid permit or licence from the appropriate provincial (and where required, regional) environmental authority to operate as a landfill is needed.
  2. The CFIA inspector must be satisfied that the landfill site is completely enclosed, physically situated, or operated so that no domestic and feral animals have access, direct or indirect, to the IW. This can be accomplished either by its being fenced or by its having natural geographic barriers that prevents the entry of animals, so that the landfill site is free of domestic, feral, and wild animals such as swine, other domestic livestock and poultry, and wild ruminants such as deer and moose.
  3. No livestock or poultry are kept on any premises within 0.5 km of the perimeter of the fence/natural barrier enclosing the site.
  4. No waste is removed from the landfill site.
  5. IW from aircraft/ships must be completely covered with a minimum of 1.8 m of domestic garbage or other standard covering materials upon arrival at the approved landfill. IW must be covered as soon as possible and should only be accepted at the landfill during hours of operation that ensure that there will be adequate covering material available at the end of the day.
  6. A landfill site requiring the lengthy transportation of IW on a routine basis through an area with an intensive livestock population or agricultural crop production will not be approved.

III. Initiation of the Approval Process of a Landfill Site to Receive International Waste (Performed by the Local CFIA Animal Health Office)

  1. Landfill site operators or their agents must submit a written request for IW disposal site approvals to the CFIA local animal health office (by province).
  2. An inspection of the site by CFIA staff will determine compliance with the requirements of this directive.
  3. Approvals will be reviewed on an annual basis. If found non-compliant, the landfill site may lose its approval to dispose of IW, or approval may be temporarily suspended until the completion of corrective actions to the satisfaction of the local CFIA Animal Health office that granted the initial approval. A written warning with a deadline for the completion of corrective measures will be sent to the landfill operator by the local district veterinarian of the CFIA. Continuous or flagrant non-compliance will result in the immediate removal of the approval for the receipt of IW upon the written recommendation of the local district veterinarian of the CFIA. This notice of loss of approval to receive IW shall be sent in writing from the local Inspection Manager to the disposal site, upon such written recommendation by the local district veterinarian of the CFIA. For information purposes, a copy of this notice will be forwarded to the CBSA.

IV. General Procedures Pertaining to Transport of International Waste to an Approved Disposal Site

  1. The CBSA inspector must be satisfied that the IW removed from the POE is transported to the approved landfill in a closed leak-proof container.
  2. The containers must be clearly identified for IW and should be prominently numbered to facilitate record-keeping.
  3. Records of transportation of loads of IW must be maintained by the hauler of IW or their agent, and the landfill operator.
  4. If the waste is not taken directly from the port of entry to the disposal site, a secure holding area must be pre-approved by the CFIA Animal Health office. Containers or storage areas used for temporarily housing IW in holding areas require locks or the use of official seals.
  5. Waybills and other records pertaining to the storage, transportation, and disposal of IW must be maintained on the premises of the landfill and be available to the CBSA/CFIA inspector upon request. Waybills will be verified regularly by CBSA/CFIA inspectors to ensure that all trucks leaving the POE are arriving at the landfill site.
  6. After dumping, the IW containers must be clean, free of debris, and disinfected with an approved disinfectant at the nearest designated wash area. Transport vehicles that are not completely dedicated to the transport of IW must also undergo this cleaning and disinfection. Fully dedicated vehicles must be cleaned and disinfected on a regular basis, at the nearest designated wash area, but not necessarily after every load.
  7. Any contractor handling IW must have a spill contingency plan in case of emergencies. The plan must include the emergency phone number of the CBSA/CFIA inspector to be contacted in case of a spill.

In the case of operational non-compliance or unsatisfactory maintenance of an approved disposal site, that cannot be or is not corrected during an inspection by the CFIA, a written warning with a deadline for the completion of corrective measures will be sent to the landfill operator by the local district veterinarian of the CFIA. Continuous or flagrant non-compliance will result in the immediate removal of the approval for the receipt of IW upon the written recommendation of the local district veterinarian of the CFIA. This notice of loss of approval to receive IW shall be sent in writing from the local inspection manager to the disposal site upon such recommendation by the local CFIA district veterinarian. A copy of this notice will be forwarded to the CBSA for information purposes.

Appendix 5: Requirements for Approval of a Transport Routes and Incinerator Sites for the Disposal of International Waste

This appendix is divided into the following sections:

  • Section I - Requirements for Approval of a Transport Route by the CFIA
  • Section II - Requirements for Approval of an Incinerator Site by the CFIA
  • Section III - Initiation of the Approval Process for an Incinerator Site to Receive International Waste (Performed by the Local CFIA Animal Health Office)
  • Section IV - Procedures Pertaining to an Approved Incinerator Facility

I. Requirements for Approval of a Transport Route by the CFIA

  1. The route chosen between collection areas of IW and the approved disposal site should be the shortest distance and within a reasonable distance of the port of entry, while avoiding livestock and agricultural crop areas. The route must be restricted to major roads, if possible.
  2. An alternate route must also be on file in case the designated one is unavailable.
  3. Exceptional circumstances where livestock areas and crops cannot be avoided may be approved by the CFIA if it is clearly demonstrated that there are no other possible routes and as long as only major roads are used. In these exceptional circumstances, the trucks and containers must be inspected more often by CBSA inspectors and the transport followed by the CFIA or the CBSA (to be arranged in advance between the two Agencies).
  4. A transportation route requiring the lengthy transportation of IW on a routine basis through an area with a significant livestock population or intensive agricultural crop production will not be approved.

II. Requirements for Approval of an Incinerator Site by the CFIA

  1. A current valid permit or licence to operate as an incinerator is required from the appropriate provincial (and where applicable, regional) environmental authority.
  2. Waste must be reduced completely to ash (having zero detectable protein) by incineration at a temperature equal to or greater than 850°C in the primary chamber. The period of time required to reduce all organic material inputs to ash (having zero detectable protein) will vary depending on the volume and the nature of IW placed into the chamber.
  3. The CFIA inspector must be satisfied that the incinerator site is enclosed, physically situated, and operated so that no animal has access to the IW.
  4. The incinerator site must be free of domestic, feral, and wild animals such as swine, other domestic livestock and poultry, and wild ruminants such as deer and moose.
  5. No livestock or poultry are kept on any premises within 0.5 km of the site.
  6. No waste (either domestic or IW) can be removed from the site. Only incinerated material (ash) can be removed from the site for disposal.
  7. If waste is tipped onto the floor before being loaded into the incinerator, there must be no delay in incineration.
  8. IW not incinerated immediately upon arrival at the disposal site must be stored in secured (locked or officially sealed), leak-proof containers.

III.  Initiation of the Approval Process for an Incinerator to Receive International Waste (Performed by the Local CFIA Animal Health Office)

  1. Incinerator operators and their agents must forward a written request for the approval of facilities receiving IW to the local CFIA Animal Health office.
  2. CFIA staff should visit the premises during the hours of operation to verify that the fire is suitable for the safe disposal of IW in a manner that prevents the introduction of, or spread within Canada of important animal diseases of concern, vectors, or plant diseases.
  3. For incinerators that are not currently in operation, a time/temperature chart and operating parameters must be presented to the CFIA inspector to verify that this process is sufficient to prevent the introduction of, or spread within Canada of such diseases, vectors, or pests and that there is a complete reduction of the organic material to ash (zero detectable protein).
  4. An inspection of the site by CFIA staff will determine compliance with the requirements of this directive.
  5. Approvals will be reviewed on an annual basis. (See below.)

IV. Procedures Pertaining to an Approved Incinerator Facility

  1. CBSA inspectors must be satisfied that IW removed from the POE is transported to the approved incineration facility in a closed leak-proof container.
  2. The containers must be clearly designated for IW and should be prominently numbered to facilitate record-keeping. Records must be maintained by the agent, the trucking contractor moving the waste to the incinerator, and the incinerator operator.
  3. If the waste is not taken directly from the POE to the incinerator site, a secure holding area must be approved by the CFIA Animal Health office.
  4. Waybills and other records pertaining to the storage, transportation, and incineration of IW must be maintained on the premises and be available to the CBSA inspector upon request. Waybills will be verified regularly by inspectors to ensure that all trucks leaving the POE are arriving at the incinerator site.
  5. After dumping, the IW containers must be clean, free of debris, and disinfected with an approved disinfectant at the nearest wash area.
  6. Any contractor handling IW must have a spill contingency plan in case of emergencies. The plan must include the phone number of the CBSA inspector and the CFIA inspector to be called in the event of a spill.

If found non-compliant with CFIA requirements, the site may lose its approval to dispose of IW, or approval may be temporarily suspended until the completion of recommended corrective actions to the satisfaction of the local CFIA Animal Health office. In the case of operational non-compliance or unsatisfactory maintenance of an approved facility that cannot be or is not corrected during an inspection by the CFIA, a written warning with a deadline for the completion of corrective measures will be sent to the incinerator operator by the local district veterinarian of the CFIA. Continuous or flagrant non-compliance will result in the immediate removal of approval for the receipt of IW upon the recommendation of the local district veterinarian of the CFIA. This notice of loss of approval to receive IW shall be sent in writing from the local inspection manager to the disposal site upon such recommendation by the local district veterinarian of the CFIA. For information purposes, a copy of this notice will be forwarded to the CBSA.

Appendix 6: Process for Approval of an Autoclave for the Treatment of International Waste for Disposal (Autoclave Treatment)

This appendix is divided into the following sections:

  • Section I - Requirements for Approval of an Autoclave for Preparation of International Waste for Disposal
  • Section II - Procedures Pertaining to an Approved Autoclave Facility

I. Requirements for Approval of an Autoclave for Preparation of International Waste for Disposal

  1. A current valid permit or licence from the appropriate provincial (and, where required, regional) environmental authority is needed to operate as an autoclave.
  2. Autoclave operators and their agents must forward written requests for the approval of facilities receiving IW to the local CFIA Animal Health office.
  3. The CFIA inspector must be satisfied that the autoclave site is enclosed, physically situated, or operated so that no animal has access to the waste subject to regulation.
  4. The route of transportation of IW to the autoclave site must be approved by the CFIA using a similar process as for approval of routes of transportation to a landfill site, i.e. the shortest distance possible should be used, avoiding livestock and agricultural crop areas. The route should be restricted to major roads if possible. An alternate route must also be on file in case the designated route becomes unavailable for any reason.
  5. Autoclaves used for treatment of IW must be calibrated to heat material throughout to a temperature of at least 100°C for at least 30 minutes. Time/temperature charts must be available to CFIA inspectors upon request.
  6. For autoclaves already in use, the CFIA staff inspection of the premises must occur during the hours of operation to verify that the process is suitable for the safe disposal of waste in a manner that prevents the introduction of, or spread within Canada of important animal diseases, vectors, and plant pests and plant diseases of concern.
  7. For autoclaves that are not currently in operation, a time/temperature chart must be presented to the CFIA inspector to verify that this process is sufficient to prevent the introduction of, or spread within Canada of such diseases.
  8. If waste is tipped onto the floor before being loaded into the autoclave, there must be no delay in autoclaving. Waste not autoclaved upon arrival must be stored in locked or sealed leak-proof containers.
  9. Once the autoclaving process is completed, the IW is rendered inactivated and may be moved to a landfill site or other method of disposal.
  10. Approvals will be reviewed on an annual basis. (See below.)

II. Procedures Pertaining to an Approved Autoclave Facility

  1. CBSA inspectors must be satisfied that IW removed from the POE is transported to the approved facility in a closed leak-proof container and without delays.
  2. The containers must be clearly designated for IW and should be prominently numbered to facilitate record-keeping. Records must be maintained by the agent, the trucking contractor moving the waste to the autoclave, and the autoclave operator.
  3. Waybills and other records pertaining to the storage, transportation, and autoclaving of IW must be maintained on the premises and be available to the CFIA inspector upon request. These records will be verified regularly by inspectors to ensure that all trucks leaving the POE are arriving at the autoclave site.
  4. After dumping the waste at the autoclave site, containers must be clean, free of debris and disinfected with an approved disinfectant at the nearest wash area.
  5. Trucks delivering autoclaved material to a landfill site must not be the same trucks used for transport from the POE to the autoclave site. Material that has been autoclaved is considered of lower risk than IW before autoclaving, and the two must not be mixed.

If found non-compliant to the CFIA requirements, the site may lose its approval to dispose of IW. Or, approval may be temporarily suspended until the completion of recommended corrective actions to the satisfaction of the local CFIA Animal Health office. In the case of operational non-compliance or unsatisfactory maintenance of an approved facility that cannot be or is not corrected during an inspection by the CFIA, a written warning with a deadline for the completion of corrective measures will be sent to the incinerator operator by the local district veterinarian of the CFIA. Continuous or flagrant non-compliance will result in the immediate removal of approval for the receipt of IW upon such recommendation by the local district veterinarian of the CFIA. This notice of loss of approval to receive IW shall be sent in writing from the local inspection manager to the disposal site upon such recommendation by the local district veterinarian of the CFIA. A copy of this notice will be forwarded to the CBSA for information purposes.

Appendix 7: Disinfectants to Be Used on Instruments and Containers of International Waste

General

  1. Hand washing with soap and warm water is generally effective for handlers of IW if they wear gloves while handling the waste. For certain pathogens, such as foot- and-mouth disease (FMD) Virus, other products may be required. Products effective for decontamination of the hands and the skin are limited for FMD virus. Virkon is reported to have low toxicity and to be effective.
  2. Citric acid may be added to washing water to induce antiviral conditions by lowering the pH.
  3. Vinegar and household bleach are both common disinfectants and effective when used for the purposes and concentrations recommended. (See the table below.)
ACIDS
Disinfectant Group Form (usual) Strength of Usual Dilution
(final concentration)
Strength Final Dilution
weight/volume
Contact Time
minutes
Applications
Citric acid powder 2 grams/litre 0.2% (weight/volume) 30 Safe for clothes.
Acetic Acid (household vinegar) liquid 4% 2% 30 Similar used to above but mildly corrosive.
Hydrochloric acid concentrated acid (10 Mole) 1:50 2% (weight/volume) 10 Used only when better disinfectants not available. Corrosive for many metals and concrete.
OXIDIZING AGENTS
Disinfectant Group Form (usual) Strength of Usual Dilution
(final concentration)
Strength Final Dilution
weight/volume
Contact Time
minutes
Applications
Virkon powder 20 grams/litre 2% (weight/volume) 10 Excellent disinfectant for use on human housing, machinery, vehicles, aircraft and clothing.
Sodium hypochlorite NaOC1 (household bleach) concentrated liquid (5.25% available chlorine) 1:10 5.25% available chlorine (52,500 ppm) 10-30 Effective for clothing, except when in the presence of organic material. Less stable in warm, sunny conditions above 15°C.
Calcium hypochlorite Ca (CIO)2 solid 30 grams/litre 2-3% available chlorine (20,000 - 30,000 ppm) 10-30 Effective for clothing, except when in the presence of organic material. Less stable in warm, sunny conditions above 15°C.
ALKALIS (Do not use in the presence of aluminium and derived alloys.)
Disinfectant Group Form (usual) Strength of Usual Dilution
(final concentration)
Strength Final Dilution
weight/volume
Contact Time
minutes
Applications
Sodium hydroxide pellets 20 grams/litre 2% (weight/volume) 10 Very effective for use in the environment, water tanks, dams.
Sodium carbonate
- anhydrous (Na2CO3)
- washing soda (Na2 CO3. 10H2O)

powder

crystals

40 grams/litre

100 grams/litre

4% (weight/volume)

10% (weight/volume)

10

30

Recommended for use in the presence of high concentrations of organic material.

Note: Use of this table should be verified with an inspector of the CBSA or the CFIA. Varying the pH of the environment of certain microbes outside of the range pH 5-10 is a practical method of destroying them provided that all organic material has been adequately removed. [Adapted from AUSVETPLAN - PDF (1.52 mb)]

Dilution rates for various disinfectants relate to effectiveness when applied to a clean surface only. A dirty surface must be thoroughly cleaned before it can be satisfactorily disinfected because the dirt may make the disinfectant useless. Ensure that the surface or material is thoroughly cleaned with detergent (or soap) and hot water, making sure that all feces, litter, and organic material is removed prior to application of the disinfectant.

Date modified: