Processed Egg Manual - Chapter 8 – Imports

Table of Contents

8.1 Objective of activity

To ensure that processed egg products imported into Canada meet Canadian regulatory requirements and standards for safety, labelling, packaging, and composition.

8.2 References

8.3 Required equipment

  • CFIA stamp and ink pad
  • Tin snips (to cut metal seals)
  • Long stem thermometer

8.4 Required forms

  • Certificate of Inspection for Processed Egg (CFIA/ACIA 2684)
  • Inspection Report of Shell/Processed Egg (CFIA/ACIA 5109)
  • Notice of Detention (CFIA/ACIA 3256)
  • Release from Detention (CFIA/ACIA 3257)
  • Application for Inspection (Egg or Processed Egg) (CFIA/ACIA 5435)
  • Request for documentation review (CFIA/ACIA 5272)

8.5 Guidelines

8.5.1 Eligibility

To be eligible to enter Canada, processed egg must originate from a country that has requirements and standards that are substantially equivalent to those set out in the Canadian Processed Egg Regulations. The country must also have system of inspection for processed egg and establishments that prepare processed egg that are substantially equivalent to that in Canada.

Foreign establishments must be registered with the CFIA to be eligible to export processed egg products to Canada. Refer to the list of approved establishments for the current listing of eligible establishments under the Canada Agricultural Products Act and the Processed Egg Regulations.

Foreign establishments that wish to export processed egg products to Canada and which are not listed with the CFIA must contact their country's competent authority to initiate the application process.

8.5.2 Notification

A company wanting to ship processed egg to Canada must contact the CFIA Area office (or alternate if assigned) nearest to the final destination in Canada to notify them that a load of product is going to be shipped. Notification is required 3 days before the load is shipped and may be provided by fax or electronic mail. The notification should list the name and number of the processed egg establishment that is shipping the product, the destination in Canada, and a description of the product being shipped including number of containers, total weight, lot numbers, and date of departure.

The responsible person at the Area office or designate will determine if the product was prepared in an establishment that is authorized to export to Canada. If the establishment is on the CFIA list and previous loads have been acceptable, permission is generally granted to ship the load. Plants not on the approved listing will be denied entry into Canada.

It is the responsibility of the Canadian importer to ensure that the label meets all Canadian requirements. To reduce the risk of loads being held, it is recommended that any new or revised label be faxed to the responsible person at the Area Office or designate prior to shipment. The responsible person at the Area Office or designate will determine if the labels meet regulatory requirements and will advise the establishment if they are acceptable before the load leaves that country. If the labels do not meet regulatory requirements for imports, the establishment will be advised that the labels do not comply and that the load will not be permitted entry into Canada.

The exporter/importer is required to submit all relevant documents along with a Request for Release Approval (CFIA/ACIA 5272) to the Import Service Centre (ISC) prior to a product's arrival in Canada. The ISC enters all information pertaining to the import load into the Import Control and Tracking System (ICTS). The information captured under ICTS includes, but is not restricted to, the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT) permit number, foreign egg products export certificate number, foreign processing establishment number, Canadian further processing establishment name and registration number, establishment where product will be inspected, type of product, volume of product, inspection type ("Visual" or "Full" inspection), International Harmonized System (HS) Code for the product. ICTS provides real-time status of the import from the time the product reaches the border until the time an inspector reviews the documentation, inspects the load and enters the result of the inspection.

The importer of the processed eggs must fax an Application for Inspection (Egg or Processed Egg) (CFIA/ACIA 5435) to the local CFIA office at least 48 hours in advance of a shipment, to request an inspection. The following information must be included:

  • name and plant number of shipper or seller,
  • name of receiver or buyer in Canada,
  • estimated time and date of arrival,
  • requested date of inspection,
  • inspection location,
  • number and type of containers,
  • net weight per container,
  • total weight or total units in lot

8.5.3 Documentation

All shipments of processed egg must be accompanied by the proper documents to be permitted entry into Canada. Each load of processed egg that contains at least 50% egg (except cooked egg products and inedible egg) must be accompanied by the original export certificate issued by the exporting country's competent authority.

For countries designated free from velogenic Newcastle disease (VND) and highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), the export certificate must show that the origin of the products or animals used to manufacture the processed egg products is a designated country or part thereof according to Sections 34 and 34.1 of the Health of Animals Regulations. For non-designated countries, processed egg products may be imported with an import permit and an export certificate which states the treatments the products have been subjected to (see below) and that necessary precautions were taken to avoid contact of the egg products with any source of VND and HPAI.

The certificate also includes the results of the laboratory analysis of the products, i.e. aerobic colony count (ACC), coliform count, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella spp. and contains a statement that the products were prepared, processed, packed and labelled in manner and under conditions that are equivalent to those set out in the Canadian Processed Egg Regulations.

Heating requirements - Liquid processed egg
Liquid processed egg Minimum temperature of the processed egg at the automatic diversion valve (in °CF)) Minimum heating time (in minutes)
  • Albumen (without chemical additives)
54 (130) 3.5
  • Whole egg with less than 24% egg solids
60 (140) 3.5
  • Whole egg with no less than 24% and no more than 38% egg solids
  • Whole egg mix with less than 2% added salt or sweetening agent, or both
  • Whole egg mix with no less than 2% and no more than 12% added sweetening agent
  • Yolk
  • Yolk mix with less than 2% added salt or sweetening agent, or both
  • Egg product with less than 24% total solids Table Note 1
a) 61 (142)
or
b) 60 (140)
a) 3.5
or
b) 6.2
  • Whole egg mix with no less than 2% and no more than 12% added salt
  • Yolk mix with no less than 2% and no more than 12% added sweetening agent
  • Yolk mix with no less than 2% and no more than 12% added salt
  • Ova
  • Egg product with more than 38% total solids Table Note 1
a) 63 (146)
or
b) 62 (144)
a) 3.5
or
b) 6.2
  • Egg product with no less than 24% and no more than 38% total solids Table Note 1
a) 62 (144)
or
b) 61 (142)
a) 3.5
or
b) 6.2

Table Note

Table Note 1

Regardless of the total solids content, egg product must be heated to 63°C (146°F) for 3.5 minutes or to 62°C (144°F) for 6.2 minutes if there is no less than 2% and no more than 12% added sweetening agent or salt, or both.

Return to table note 1  referrer

Heating requirements - Dried albumen
Dried albumen Minimum temperature of the processed egg in the heat-treating room (in °CF)) Minimum heating time (in days)
  • Spray-dried albumen
54 (130) 7
  • Pan-dried albumen
52 (125) 5

The export certificate must include the following tombstone information:

  • full name and address of consignor
  • full name and address of the consignee
  • certificate reference number
  • name of the competent authority
  • place of origin and approval number
  • place of loading
  • date and time of departure
  • means of transport
  • temperature of the product
  • seal and container numbers
  • place of destination and approval number
  • point of entry in Canada
  • intended use of the products
  • identification of the commodities
  • total number of packages
  • other accompanying documents

An import permit issued by the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade is also a required document, although an importer may chose to pay a tariff, and bring the load in under General Import Permit (GIP 100).

Exemptions: An export certificate from the country of origin is not required if the shipment is:

  • 20 kg or less and is not intended for sale in Canada
  • part of an immigrant's effects
  • not intended for resale in Canada
  • weighs 100 kg or less and is intended for use in analysis, evaluation, testing or research or in a national or international food exhibition
  • carried on any vessel, train, motor vehicle, aircraft or other means of transportation, for use as food for the crew or passengers
  • imported from the United States onto the Akwesasne Reserve for use by an Akwesasne resident
  • a product containing less than 50% egg
  • a cooked egg product

All documents, including a Request for Release Approval (CFIA/ACIA 5272), are presented to the CFIA Import Service Center (ISC), where a Point of Entry Import Specialist enters details into the Import Control and Tracking System (ICTS) and determines whether to permit the load into Canada, based on current requirements in the CFIA Automated Import Reference System (AIRS) or special directives as issued by the program, as applicable. Once the ISC is satisfied that the import load has met all of the documentation requirements, they will issue a Multi Commodity Activities Program (MCAP) Import Inspection Report, release the load into. When the processed egg load is entered into the computer system, the MCAP Import Inspection Report will identify the load as a "Full" or "Visual" inspection. The system will assign a "Full" inspection to the first 10 imports entering Canada from an individual foreign processor to develop a compliance history. Following 10 satisfactory import inspection results for this processor, the system will randomly assign a "Full" inspection on a 1 in 10 basis. If an import inspection reveals unsatisfactory results, then the foreign processor will return to an "intensified" frequency of inspection until ten consecutive lots are found to be acceptable.

Inspectors must enter the results of all inspections into the Import Control Tracking System (ICTS) as soon as possible, but only after submitting the LSTS form for any samples, in order to track the number of loads imported from an individual company in the exporting country. If these results are not entered, the exporting plant will continue to remain on "intensified" inspection. Subsequently, each load of imported processed egg originating from this particular plant will continue to generate "Full" inspections.

8.5.4 Inspection procedures

Product certification - visual inspections for loads for further processing (unpasteurized/raw product) or cooked products

Loads for further processing (unpasteurized/raw) must be conveyed to a registered processed egg station. These types of processed egg imports are not physically sampled to determine compliance with regulatory requirements.

The inspection for a further processing import includes:

  • ensuring that the proper documentation is received with the load; (original certificate, signed by the responsible government official in the exporting country and CFIA MCAP Import Inspection Report)
  • checking and breaking seals;
  • taking product temperatures;
  • performing an odour evaluation;
  • inspecting the product for labelling compliance
  • completing the required documentation. Certificate of Inspection for Processed Egg (CFIA/ACIA 2684)

Product certification – full inspection for pasteurized product. These types of processed egg imports are physically sampled to determine compliance with regulatory requirements.

The full inspection of a pasteurized product import includes:

  • ensuring that the proper documentation is received with the load; (original export certificate, signed by the responsible government official in the exporting country and CFIA MCAP Import Inspection Report)
  • checking and breaking seals (seals are not mandatory for pre-packaged products but must be used on loads that come in tankers or where the product is not packed in tamper-evident packages; the seal must be intact and correspond with those recorded on the certificate)
  • verifying that the products, lot numbers and number of packages match the information provided in the export certificate
  • taking product temperatures
  • performing an odour evaluation
  • inspecting the product(s) for labelling compliance;
  • sampling the product (liquid, frozen, dried) as required by sampling plans
  • completing the sample submission through LSTS and submission of samples to the laboratory
  • completing the Certificate of Inspection for Processed Egg (CFIA/ACIA 2684)
  • entering the results in ICTS.

Product certification – visual inspection for pasteurized product – These types of processed egg imports are not physically sampled to determine compliance with regulatory requirements. Generally, finished product packages are not opened when conducting a "Visual inspection".

The visual inspection of a pasteurized product inspection includes:

  • ensuring that the proper documentation is received with the load; (original certificate, signed by the responsible government official in the exporting country and CFIA MCAP Import Inspection Report)
  • checking and breaking seals; (seals are not mandatory for pre-packaged products but must be used on loads that come in tankers or where the product is not packed in tamper-evident packages; the seal must be intact and correspond with those recorded on the certificate)
  • verifying that the products, lot numbers and number of packages match the information provided in the export certificate
  • inspecting the load for labelling compliance;
  • completing the Certificate of Inspection for Processed Egg (CFIA/ACIA 2684)
  • entering the results in ICTS.

8.5.4.1 Import tankers, totes and other containers (for further processing)

Inspectors are required to use fall arrest equipment when opening tankers. Please see Chapter 13 of the Processed Egg Manual for further information.

When a tanker or other container of liquid egg arrives at a registered processed egg plant, the inspector must first obtain the document package from the plant to determine that all of the proper documentation has accompanied the load. The inspector should find the original export certificate, and the MCAP Import Inspection Report issued by the Import Service Center. If these documents are not with the load, the inspector should immediately notify plant management. The plant manager is responsible for providing them. If these documents can be tracked down and an arrangement made to receive them, permission will usually be given to open the load. If the original cannot be located the responsible person at the Area Office or designate will ask the exporting country to re-issue a certificate for the load and mail it to the Area Office.

Load condition: When a CFIA inspector is present in the processed egg plant, they are to verify that the seals on the import tanker, trailer or totes match those listed on the foreign country export certificate and that the tanker or other container has been sealed in a manner to ensure the product has not been tampered. Should the inspector find a problem with the seals on the tanker or other container, they are to notify their supervisor for further instructions. If there is no problem the inspector is to break the seals. For unpasteurized loads from the USA that are used to produce product for the USA, the tank used to receive the raw product must be inspected for cleanliness (pre-op), prior to unloading the tanker.

Temperature and odour: Before product is off loaded, a product temperature is to be taken, and an odour evaluation performed. Liquid products must be received at 40°F (4.4°C) or lower. If the product temperature is found to be above these limits, or the product has an off odour (sour/musty), the processed egg station must be notified and CFIA supervisor should be contacted for further instructions. After an evaluation of the problem, the CFIA may choose to accept the product or reject the product and send it back to the exporting country. The processed egg station may also choose to reject the product.

Note: When a CFIA inspector is not present in the plant, a designated plant employee may be given permission to receive the tanker and break the seals under the following conditions. The designated employee must take and record the product temperature, evaluate the product for off odours or contamination and save all the seals and documentation for the CFIA inspector. If the product will be used to produce product for the USA, the plant must hold the product in a separate tank until it can be inspected by a CFIA inspector. The seals and import documents must be presented to the inspector when he/she arrives at the plant. If upon opening a tanker, the plant employee notices any problem with the seals, temperature, odour, etc, they must immediately contact the CFIA for further instructions. If these conditions are not adhered too, the breaking of seals on import tankers by a plant employee will be disallowed. If the plant employee fails to notify the CFIA of a problem with the tanker, and the liquid is received into the plant, it becomes the plant's responsibility to deal with the problem liquid.

Labelling - There are no labelling requirements for bulk tankers [PER 12. (1)].

Certification - If all inspection criteria are satisfactorily met, the inspector is to complete a Certificate of Inspection for Processed Egg (CFIA/ACIA 2684) as detailed in 8.5.5. and enters the inspection results into ICTS (See section 8.5.4)

8.5.4.2 Pasteurized liquid, frozen and dried packaged products

These imports are usually finished product which have been packaged and labelled. They may also be pasteurized products in tankers and totes destined for direct packaging. The inspector is required to perform tasks depending on whether a visual or full inspection has been generated by the Import Control Tracking System. See 8.5.4 above for list of tasks. This may involve taking samples for composition or micro and a labelling verification.

Documents - When a shipment of packaged product arrives at destination, the inspector must first obtain the document package from the plant to determine that all of the proper documentation has accompanied the load. The inspector should find the original export certificate, and the MCAP Import Inspection Report issued by the Import Service Center. If these documents are not with the load, the inspector should immediately notify the importer. The importer is responsible for finding documents. These documents may have been left at the exporting station, port of entry, or misplaced by the driver. If these documents can be tracked down and an arrangement made to receive them, permission will usually be given to accept the load. If the original cannot be located the responsible person at the Area Office or designate will ask the exporting country to re-issue a certificate for the load and mail it to the Area Office.

Load condition - Seals are not normally used for these types of products and the inspectors do not have to be present to break the seals.

When the load has seals and a CFIA inspector is present in the establishment, they are to verify that the seals on the conveyance match those listed on the export certificate and that the conveyance has been sealed in a manner to ensure the product could not have been tampered with. Should the inspector find a problem with the seals they are to notify their supervisor for further instructions. If there is no problem, the inspector is to break the seals. The transport vehicle should be clean, in good repair and meet the other requirements set out in section 23 of the Processed Egg Regulations. If the condition of the conveyance is satisfactory, the product may be off loaded. If unsatisfactory, the inspector should take photographs and document findings in an inspection report. Their Supervisor is to be notified for further direction.

Product verification - As product is off loaded, the inspector should confirm products, lot numbers and quantities correspond to those recorded on the export certificate. Packaging should be clean, dry and in good condition. If a problem is found, the inspector is to document their findings in an inspection report and contact their supervisor for further direction. The responsible person at the Area Office or designate will contact the foreign government official to try and resolve the issue. This may involve requesting a new or amended certificate or making arrangements for the return of the product. If all is in order, the inspector should continue with appropriate inspection tasks. In addition, the inspector should verify that the information detailed on the original documents corresponds with the data provided in the MCAP Import Inspection Report. If discrepancies are found, the Import Service Centre is to be advised so the information in ICTS can be corrected.

Labelling - Product labels should be reviewed at this time to ensure labelling regulations are met (See Chapter 7: Packaging and Labelling for further detail). Although a label review was conducted by the responsible person at the Area Office or designate prior to shipping, the inspector must confirm that the accepted labels are what is presented on the packaging. If a non-compliance is found, the inspector is to provide details to the responsible person at the Area Office or designate and their Supervisor and await further direction. Copies or photographs of the labels may be needed to determine a course of action. Product may be returned or re-labelled to meet regulatory standards.

Temperature and odour - Temperature and odour evaluations are performed for "Full" Inspections. Finished product is not to be opened for "Visual" inspections unless there is reason to believe that product may have been adversely affected by transport conditions. To minimize handling and loss of product, these evaluations may be performed on the same packages of product selected for laboratory testing. All products must be handled in an aseptic manner. Liquid products must be received at 4°C (40°F) or lower. Frozen Products must be hard frozen or at −12°C and may need to be drilled. It is not necessary to take a temperature of dried product although consideration should be given to any storage instructions provided on the label as no processed egg shall be held at a temperature or humidity level that may cause the processed egg to deteriorate or become inedible. If temperatures/holding conditions are not met or the product has an off odour (sour/musty), the supervisor should be contacted for further instructions. After an evaluation of the problem, the CFIA may choose to accept the product or reject the product and send it back to the exporting country.

Laboratory sampling - A "Full" import inspection requires the collection of samples for laboratory submission for microbial analysis. Sample numbers are assigned under sampling plan E205 and the product is tested for Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, total aerobic colony count (ACC), and coliforms. Aseptic sampling techniques are to be followed at all times to ensure sample integrity. Follow sampling protocols as outlined in Processed Egg-Sampling Chapter (section 6.4.3 Product Sampling Technique). Additional samples may be required for the testing of solids, moisture or nutrition and composition. An inspector should review annual sampling plans to determine what additional samples to collect. Plan E100 is used to sample dried egg imports for moisture, plan E101 is used to sample for total egg solids in imported liquid/ frozen whole egg and yolk products. On occasion, an imported egg product may be marked with nutritional claims that should be verified. These are sampled under plan E104. Follow the appropriate sampling procedures provided in section 6.8.

Certification - An import inspection cannot be completed until all analytical results are known. Once an inspector receives notification of results, the import inspection results can be entered into ICTS. If results are satisfactory, the inspector completes a Certificate of Inspection for Processed Egg (CFIA/ACIA 2684) as detailed in 8.5.5. In the event of an unsatisfactory result the steps outlined in 8.5.6 are to be followed. If product has been distributed, and there is a Health and Safety risk associated with the unsatisfactory result, recall proceedings will need to be initiated.

The Inspectorate will notify the Food Import Export Division (FIED) of any port-of-entry violations using the established communication pathways. FIED may initiate consultation with the exporting country's competent authority to advice about the non-satisfactory findings.

When the issue warrants the delisting of the exporting establishment, no further shipments will be permitted from the establishment until written assurances have been provided by the exporting country's competent authority that the problem has been corrected. FIED will provide messaging if needed of any necessary changes. The establishment will be put on an intensified inspection and 10 consecutive shipments would have to pass the intensified inspection, before it reverts to the regular inspection schedule.

8.5.4.3 Egg products with an extended shelf life

Liquid egg products with extended shelf life claims may be exported to Canada provided the station has confirmed through laboratory testing that the product remains organoleptically and microbiologically acceptable through the end of its expiry date. This information must be provided to the responsible government official prior to certification. The foreign government official must make a statement on the export certificate that they have received and accepted the shelf life data provided by the station. In addition to the inspection procedures outlined in 8.5.4.2 the inspector is to verify that this statement is on the export certificate. If it does not appear on the certificate, the responsible person at the Area Office or designate is to be notified. If the foreign government official can access the necessary information, an amended certificate will be requested. If the information is not available, the product will be refused.

8.5.4.4 Substitute egg products

Substitute egg products, as defined in the Food and Drug Regulations section B.22.032) are only eligible for export to Canada if they have been produced and packaged in an establishment eligible to export egg products to Canada. These products must be accompanied by an export certificate issued by the exporting country's competent authority. Establishments wanting to export substitute egg products to Canada must receive prior approval from the appropriate responsible person at the Area Office or designate who will determine if all regulatory requirements have been met.

8.5.4.5 Cooked egg products

Cooked egg products include, but are not limited to, boiled eggs, egg patties, scrambled eggs, and cooked omelettes. Some of the cooked scrambled egg mixes contain meat and therefore must also meet the requirements of the Meat Inspection Act and Regulations. Companies wishing to export cooked egg omelettes to Canada that contain 2% meat product or less may apply for an exemption from the requirements of the Meat Inspection Act & Regulations. Products that contain more than 2% meat, trigger the requirements of the Meat Inspection Act & Regulations.

USA Cooked egg products do not fall under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Agriculture, so a USDA certificate will not accompany these products. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the USA regulates cooked egg products.

Cooked egg products may be imported from countries other than the USA on the condition that the importer provides:

  • description of the product, package size and total volume that will be imported
  • satisfactory lab results for micro
  • process flow diagram
  • list of ingredients
  • statement that the product is fully cooked
  • copy of the label

Once these documents have been reviewed and accepted, the responsible person at the Area Office or designate will write a letter to the importer providing permission to import the cooked product.

8.5.4.6 Inedible egg products

Inedible egg is egg product which is not fit for human consumption. It may be prepared from shell eggs which are ineligible for use as grading or breaking stock because of leakers, bloods, rots, dirt, mould or it may be egg product which has been rejected as not being wholesome or failing to meet regulatory requirements.

Restrictions

If an animal disease is identified in the country of origin, (for example, Exotic Newcastle Disease), the CFIA Animal Health Division may put restrictions in place regarding the importation or use of raw inedible egg destined for animal feed or pet food.

Inedible egg may only be imported into Canada by companies that are eligible to receive inedible egg and process it into products that are not for human consumption. These are typically pet and animal food manufacturers and mink ranches. Inedible egg may be imported in the liquid, frozen or dried form and must be identified as either denatured or non-denatured.

The user facility is to receive an unannounced inspection twice per year by a CFIA inspector, to ensure that the inedible egg is being used only for manufacturing products that are not for human consumption. The CFIA inspector is to complete an Inspection Report of Shell/Processed Egg (CFIA/ACIA 5109) outlining the inspection findings.

Labelling

Inedible egg must be labelled with the words "Inedible Processed Egg – Not for Human Consumption" and "Oeufs transformés non comestibles – Impropres à la consommation humaine" in letters not less than 1.2 cm in height. The container of inedible processed egg must be marked with the words "Product of" and "Produit de" followed by the name of the country of origin.

Notification

The exporting company must provide the responsible person at the Area Office or designate with 3 days advance notice of any non denatured inedible egg shipment. Details of the shipment are to include the quantity being shipped, the origin and destination of the load and estimated date of arrival.

Denatured inedible egg

Denatured inedible egg is egg product that has been mixed with a substance which creates a readily noticeable colour change or distinct odour change to the egg. Denaturants which may be used in liquid or dried egg include:

  • meat and fish byproducts
  • grain milling byproducts
  • powdered charcoal (for dried egg)
  • formaldehyde (for tanning eggs in the liquid state only)
  • benzaldehydes (for eggs in the liquid state only)
  • the addition of dyes
  • kerosene, pine oil, fuel oil, creosote
  • aromatic cedar, eucalyptus, pine, wintergreen
  • caramel colour

Loads of denatured inedible egg do not have to be sealed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) for control purposes. Documents with the load must indicate that the inedible egg was produced from eggs that originated in the USA or Canada and what denaturant was used in the product. Inspection of denatured inedible egg products is not required.

Non-denatured inedible egg

This is inedible egg that has not had a denaturant added to it to create a noticeable colour change or a distinct odour change. Since non-denatured inedible egg can look and smell like edible egg, it must be controlled to ensure it is not mistakenly used for human consumption. To control the movement of this product, all loads of non-denatured inedible egg from the USA must be sealed with USDA seals by a USDA inspector. These seals can only be broken by a CFIA inspector or with the permission of a CFIA inspector once the load has arrived at the user facility (i.e. pet food manufacturer) in Canada.

Documents with the load must indicate that the inedible egg was produced from eggs that originated in the USA or Canada. The user facility must retain copies of all shipments documents and seals for the CFIA inspector. If the CFIA inspector receives the load and breaks the seals he/she is to complete a Certificate of Inspection for Processed Egg (CFIA/ACIA 2684) with details of the shipment. Certification clauses should be crossed out and initialled, as appropriate.

8.5.4.7 Samples intended for use in analysis, evaluation, testing or research, or in a national or international food exhibit

The CFIA is responsible for reviewing all requests for the importation of processed egg samples weighing 100 kg or less. These samples may originate from any foreign country, provided there are no animal health restrictions imposed by the CFIA. These samples are intended to be used for analysis, evaluation, testing or research or in a national or international food exhibit and are not eligible for sale, distribution or consumption by the public at a place other than a national or international food exhibit.

It is the importers responsibility to contact the CFIA in writing prior to receiving the sample(s) identifying the product, quantity, intended use, address of destination, and date of arrival. An additional permission may be required from Animal Health. The CFIA will then write back to the importer either permitting or denying the request. Please find template of the letter in Appendix III. If permission is granted the importer is to contact the egg processor in the exporting country and provide them with a copy of the letter from the CFIA. This letter and lab results for the samples are to accompany the samples to their final destination. A CFIA inspector may verify the information supplied by the importer in their original request.

8.5.5 Procedures for satisfactory inspection

If the imported processed egg has been found to be acceptable, the inspector issues a Certificate of Inspection for Processed Egg (CFIA/ACIA 2684) and checks off the import box. This certificate should be completed to include the mandatory information as well as the seal numbers, product temperature on arrival, export certificate number, Import Control number, and the permit number. The weight of the imported processed egg is to be stated on the certificate in kilograms. All import certificates are to be stamped with the CFIA stamp using red ink. Each copy is to be stamped beside the inspector's name.

Once completed, the forms are distributed as follows:

  • Email the scan copy of the certificate to Market and Industry Services Branch (MISB) at poultry-volaille@agr.gc.ca
  • 1 copy with the Import Inspection Report and original USDA certificate attached to the markets information clerk at Area Office
  • For loads of unpasteurized product, a copy with statement of volume received on USDA certificate to be sent back to the USDA inspector at the plant of origin. The statement to be written on the certificate is: The volume of egg product stated on this certificate was received at "plant name and address" on "date". Inspector's signature. This statement is accompanied by the CFIA stamp.
  • 1 copy with the Import Inspection Report and copy of the USDA certificate attached, for the file in the inspector's office.

8.5.6 Procedures for non-satisfactory inspection

Processed egg products enter Canada either as raw (unpasteurized) products intended for further processing or as pasteurized products for use directly as food or for use in the food system.

These processed egg products are initially cleared through a review of the documentation supplied by the broker or USA company to the Import Service Centres. If the documentation is incomplete or incorrect or the plant is not on the list of plants eligible to export to Canada then the product will be refused entry by the Import Service Center.

Should problems occur with the product, the product may be required to be returned to the country of origin. The CFIA must ensure that procedures are in place to ensure that the product will be permitted re-entry to the country of origin.

Product may be rejected and returned to the country of origin for the following reasons:

  • Improper documentation (i.e.) no original export certificate
  • Processing plant is not eligible to export to Canada
  • Failure to comply with requirements based on inspection at destination
  • Failure to comply with requirements based on product testing

If a load moves to the destination for inspection, and for any other reasons the product is refused entry, then the following procedures are to be followed:

  1. If a load will be rejected, the responsible person at the Area Office or designate is to be notified with the details of the shipment.
  2. The CFIA inspector completes the Notice of Detention (CFIA/ACIA 3256) which includes seal number under the "Authority to Move" section.
  3. The appropriate competent authority is notified of the product failure by the responsible person at the Area Office or designate.
  4. The appropriate competent authority is notified by the CFIA that the load is being returned with information on the reason for return, day of departure back to the plant of origin, seal number(s), and the detention number.
  5. It is the responsibility of the appropriate competent authority to notify their inspection staff that the product is being returned.
  6. The Authority to Move section may be completed by the CFIA inspector when the destination of the product is determined.
  7. Two copies of the detention notice are to be shipped with the load.
  8. The appropriate competent authority inspector is to notify the CFIA inspector by fax/email that the load has been received back in the country of origin and seals were intact upon arrival.
  9. The CFIA inspector will then write up a Release from Detention (CFIA/ACIA 3257) and attach the fax/email from the appropriate competent authority inspector stating that the load has been received.

Loads that have physical contamination are to be returned to the country of origin. Under no circumstances will these loads be permitted re-entry to Canada.

8.5.7 Sampling

All imports of processed egg may be subject to sampling and analysis to determine compliance with Canadian requirements. The Canadian importer should be advised that samples were taken. Should the results of a shipment be unsatisfactory for health and safety reasons, no further shipments will be permitted until assurances are provided by the importer that the problem has been corrected.

See Chapter 6, the Sampling chapter of this manual for sampling plans for processed egg imports.

Appendix I - Certificate of Inspection for Processed Egg

Under review

Appendix II - MCAP Import Inspection Report

Under review

Appendix III – Template letter for import of samples

[Address of CFIA Office]

[Date]

[Name of importer, name and address of establishment]

Subject: [Subject]

Dear [name of importer]:

This is in response to a request from [name of establishment] on [date]. You requested approval to import a sample of [name of product] produced by [exporting establishment], at [foreign city], [foreign plant #], an egg products facility in [exporting country], recognized as eligible to export processed egg products to Canada. This sample of [number of containers] weighing [net weight] will be shipped to [address of final destination], for product evaluation purposes. The product is not to be sold or further distributed for public consumption.

Based on the information stated in the request, authority is granted under section 21(2)(c) of the Processed Egg Regulations to import samples of this product for product evaluation purposes only. This authorization is subject to the following provisions:

The product must be identified as "Experimental [name of product] – Not For Sale" followed by the ingredient statement, declaration of net contents, and the producer's name and address.

This approval is limited to 100 kg.

A copy of this letter must accompany the product to the Canadian port-of-entry for presentation to a Canada Border Services Agency official.

Your firm is responsible for keeping inventory, usage, and shipping records for the product received. These records must be maintained by your firm for a minimum of 2 years and be available for review by a CFIA representative upon request.

This product is for research and development purposes only and will not be further distributed or sold.

If you have any question please call me at the number below.

Sincerely,

[Name, title and contact information of Area Egg Specialist]

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