Fish Products Inspection Manual
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Bulletin 41 - Use of the "Canada Inspected" Logo

No. 41 - 16/11/01

PDF (61 kb)

To: All Holders of the Fish Products Inspection Manual

Subject: Use of the "Canada Inspected" Logo

The purpose of this bulletin is to inform manual holders of the changes to the requirements for the use of the "Canada Inspected" logo on labels of fish products. The changes are as a result of the new approach to the Quality Management Program (QMP) and Regulatory Verification.

As of the date of this bulletin, the requirements of section 28 of the Fish Inspection Regulations shall be applied as follows:

  • Establishments registered under the Fish Inspection Regulations are entitled to use the "Canada Inspected" logo on fish product(s) prepared under an acceptable QMP;
  • No application for use of the logo is required;
  • There is no requirement for the labels bearing the logo to be evaluated and accepted by fish inspection authorities;
  • An establishment is recognized to have an acceptable QMP following the issuance of a valid certificate of registration;
  • Only fish products that are considered "Product of Canada" are eligible for use of the logo;
  • The emblem of the logo shall present a maple leaf and its form and design shall be chosen from the examples of the logos shown below;
  • There are no restrictions as to the size and the colour of the logo, however, it must be separate and distinct, and it cannot interfere with any mandatory labelling information;
  • Controls for use of the logo must be addressed in the QMP Plan. The policies and procedures pertaining to system verification and compliance verification of the QMP Plan apply for the purpose of assessing QMP controls related to the CI logo.
  • Entitlement to use the CI logo is nullified if the QMP is found to be unacceptable, as described in the Facilities Inspection Manual, and/or when the registration certificate is inactivated, suspended, voided, or revoked.

Under no circumstances can a processor that is not federally registered use the CI logo on their fish products.

Richard Zurbrigg
A/Director
Fish, Seafood and Production Division

Examples of "Canada Inspected" Logo

With Registration Number

Canada Inspected logo with registered number - negative
Canada Inspected logo with registered number - positive

Without Registration Number

Canada Inspected logo without registered number - negative
Canada Inspected logo without registered number - positive

Bulletin 39 - Determination of Percent Fish in Breaded and Battered Fish

No. 39 - 14/07/00

PDF (83 kb)

To: All Holders of the Fish Products Inspection Manual

Subject: Determination of Percent Fish in Breaded and Battered Fish

N.B. This Bulletin supersedes and replaces Bulletin no. 38

The purpose of this bulletin is to inform manual holders of the procedures to be used in the determination of percent fish flesh in breaded and battered fish.

Effective immediately, the attached method, no. 996.15 - Fish Flesh Content (FFC) in Frozen Coated Fish Products, from the "Official Methods of Analysis" of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC), will be the accepted method for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency for determining fish flesh in breaded or battered fish.

To account for the inherent variability of the method the following adjustment factors will be applied:

  • 2% for raw breaded product and batter-dipped product;
  • 4% for pre-cooked products.

A sample unit is defined as one of a number of individual containers, or a portion of a fish or a primary container examined or evaluated as a single unit.

Note: The attached methodology and associated tolerances will be applied when final product sampling for determination of percent fish is utilised.

Cameron Prince
Director
Fish, Seafood and Production Division

- 2 -

35.1.03

AOAC Official Method 996.15
Fish Flesh Content (FFC)
In Frozen Coated Fish Products
First Action 1996

(Applicable to the determination of the FFC in frozen coated fish products.)

(Caution: Use protective gloves when immersing and holding test sample in water bath set at >43°C.)

A. Principle

Method uses (1) combination of heat and H2O to breakdown adhesive properties of coating (batter and/or breading) and (2) hands to assist in determining when coating's ability to adhere to flesh's frozen surfaces is diminished and can be easily removed.

B. Apparatus

  1. Waterbaths --- Primary (17-49°C) and secondary (17-30°C).
  2. Thermometers --- Two; immersion type, capable of accurately measuring to ± 1°C
  3. Thermometer holders --- Two; with clips.
  4. Balance --- Capable of accurately weighing to 0.1 g.
  5. Stop watch --- Capable of reading seconds.
  6. Paper towel
  7. Spatula --- 4 in. (ca 10 cm) blade with rounded tip.
  8. Nut pick

C. Preparation of Test Sample

Maintain integrity of frozen test sample by storing in freezer until ready to remove batter and/or breading. Take into account all applied coating when weighing coated test samples.

D. Determination

Set primary H2O bath temperature between 17-49°C. Set secondary H2O bath temperature between 17-30°C

Weigh and record weight of each test sample while it is hard frozen. Using hands, immerse and hold test sample in primary H2O bath until batter and/or breading becomes soft and can be removed easily from still-frozen flesh.

Remove test sample from H2O bath and blot lightly with enough paper towel to absorb excess H2O. Complete blotting in < 7 s. Scrape and remove batter and/or breading from flesh with spatula. If batter and/or breading is difficult to remove, using hands, redip and hold partially debattered or debreaded test sample in secondary H2O bath until batter and/or breading becomes soft and can be removed easily from still-frozen flesh.

Remove test sample from H2O bath and blot lightly with enough paper towel to absorb excess H2O. Complete blotting in < 7 s. Scrape and remove batter and/or breading from flesh with spatula. When necessary, repeat redipping procedure and use nut pick to remove batter and/or breading from any voids (holes, spaces, or depressions) until all batter and/or breading has been removed from still-frozen flesh. Reweigh and record weight of debattered and/or debreaded test sample.

(Note: Several preliminary trials may be necessary to determine optimum H2O bath temperatures, dip times, and number of dips required for debattering and/or debreading test samples. The correct dip time is the minimum time of immersion in H2O baths required before batter and/or breading on test sample can be scraped off easily, provided that debattered or debreaded test sample is still solidly frozen.)

As a guide, no more than 1 initial dip (17-49°C) and 2 redips (17-30°C) for a maximum of 2.5, 0.5, and 0.5 min, respectively, should be necessary.

E. Calculations

Calculate content of fish flesh, %, in test sample as follows:

  • % Flesh = (Wd ÷ Wb) × 100
  • where Wd = weight of debattered and/or debreaded test sample; Wb = weight of battered and/or breaded test sample.

Reference: J. AOAC Int. 80, 1235(1997).

Revised: March 1998

Bulletin 35 - Container Integrity Evaluation Sampling and Tolerance Plan for Canned Fish and Canned Fish Products

No. 35 - 19/02/99

PDF (51 kb)

To: All Holders of the Fish Products Inspection Manual

Subject: Container Integrity Evaluation Sampling and Tolerance Plan for Canned Fish and Canned Fish Products

Note: This bulletin supersedes and replaces Bulletin no. 15 of the Fish Products Inspection Manual. Please remove this bulletin from your Manual.

The purpose of this bulletin is to inform manual holders that inspectors of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency will follow the sampling and tolerance plan outlined below for container integrity evaluation of all canned fish and fish products. The procedures to be followed reflect the requirements of the Government of Canada Visual Inspection Protocol, and are used to assess lot compliance according to Canadian requirements.

Four aspects of the following sampling and tolerance plan are not reflected in the Government of Canada, Visual Inspection Protocol and will be retained by the Fish, Seafood and Production Division, CFIA:

  1. suspended inspections will continue to be offered (Fish Products Inspection Manual, Chapter 2, Subject 1);
  2. re-inspections will not be limited to lots that have been culled as outlined in the Government of Canada Visual Inspection Protocol (Fish Inspection Regulations, Section 10);
  3. a minimum sample consisting of 6 units will be selected for destructive examination (teardown and sectioning) from all lots being inspected. Destructive examination procedures as outlined in the Metal Can Defects Manual will be carried out on the canner's end for a two-piece can, and on the canner's end and the manufacturer's end for a three-piece can; and
  4. the definition of a lot (from the Fish Inspection Regulations): "lot" with respect to fish, other than fresh fish, means a shipment or part of a shipment of fish that is of the same species, is processed in the same manner by the same producer, is packaged in the same size of container and bears the same label.

1. Destructive Sampling

Any defects identified from the destructive examination are to be used to determine lot compliance.

2. Initial and Suspended Inspections - Compliance Sampling

Initial Inspection:

A sample consisting of 200 units shall be inspected with labels removed.

A maximum of 5 sample units may be withdrawn from any single case in the lot. This will require a minimum of 40 cases to be opened when conducting an initial or suspended inspection. If the number of cases in the lot is less than 40 then all of the cases will be opened and the sample units per case adjusted accordingly.

A sample for destructive examination (teardown and sectioning) is obtained from the 200 can sample.

If no serious defects are found, the lot passes initial inspection.

If one or more serious defect(s) is (are) found, a suspended inspection may be offered if the lot has the potential to be culled or reconditioned. If the option to suspend an initial inspection is not requested by the owner/agent, then the lot fails the initial inspection and a re-inspection may be offered.

Suspended Inspection:

If a suspended inspection is granted, the owner/agent must remove defective units from the lot according to a cull proposal that has been approved by the CFIA. The defective units will be disposed of in a manner acceptable to the CFIA.

Once the culling operation is completed the initial inspection resumes and a new sample consisting of 200 units shall be inspected with labels removed.

A maximum of 5 sample units may be withdrawn from any single case in the lot. This will require a minimum of 40 cases to be opened when conducting an initial or suspended inspection. If the number of cases in the lot is less than 40 then all of the cases will be opened and the sample units per case adjusted accordingly.

A sample for destructive examination (teardown and sectioning) is obtained from the 200 can sample.

If no serious defects are found, the lot passes initial inspection.

If one or more serious defect(s) is (are) found then the lot is rejected.

3. Initial Inspection - Mechanical Screening

The Fish, Seafood and Production Division, CFIA, recognizes the Canned Screening Program utilized by the British Columbia Canned Salmon Industry.

The British Columbia canned salmon industry may assess lots under the Mechanical Screening Program, using check weighing equipment, double-dud detectors and a biased sample. This assessment is to ensure that the lot meets Canadian requirements regarding container integrity before being offered for sale.

During a Quality Management Program (QMP) audit the Canadian Food Inspection Agency will receive documented information from the can-screening line-audit program, which will indicate whether the equipment used to carry out the screening process was operating and operated correctly. This information, in conjunction with a review of the submitted Can Screening Report, will be used to determined whether approved mechanical screening procedures were followed.

If the lot contains equal to or less than 25 serious defective units per 100,000 units the lot passes initial inspection.

If the lot contains more than 25 serious defective units per 100,000 units, the lot fails initial inspection and may be submitted for reinspection.

A compliance sample will be obtained from a mechanical screening line during a CFIA audit.

4. Reinspection

When a re-inspection has been granted the owner/agent may cull defective units from the lot according to a cull proposal that has been approved by the CFIA. Re-inspections will not be limited to lots that have been culled.

A sample consisting of 1250 units shall be inspected with labels removed.

A maximum of 5 sample units may be withdrawn from any single case in the lot. This will require a minimum of 250 cases to be opened when conducting a reinspection. If the number of cases in the lot is less than 250 then all of the cases will be opened and the sample units per case adjusted accordingly.

A sample for destructive examination (teardown and sectioning) is obtained from the 1250 can sample.

If no serious defects are found the lot passes reinspection.

If one or more defect(s) is (are) found, the lot fails reinspection.

5. General

Only Inspectors who have successfully passed a recognized container integrity course are permitted to carry out container integrity evaluations.

Note

In accordance with the Government of Canada Visual Inspection Protocol, if at any time during an inspection a leaker, flipper or swollen can is found, the inspection shall be discontinued until such time that the lot has been evaluated to determine if the defect is due to under-processing or post-process contamination. If the defect is due to under-processing or post-process contamination the lot fails, and no suspended inspection or reinspection of the lot shall be permitted.

Cameron Prince
Director
Fish, Seafood and Production Division

Bulletin 33 - Responsibility for Labelling of Pouched and Canned Fish

No. 33 - 15/01/99

PDF (14 kb)

To: All Holders of the Fish Products Inspection Manual

Subject: Responsibility for Labelling of Pouched and Canned Fish

The purpose of this bulletin is to inform manual holders of the policy concerning responsibilities for proper labelling of pouched/canned fish.

As per the Fish Inspection Regulations, proper labelling of pouched/canned fish is the responsibility of the processor.

Normally, labels are applied in the plant (or the warehouse) where the processing takes place. However, in some cases unlabelled cans/pouches are sold to the distributor and the distributor applies their own labels. In these situations, labelling is delegated from the processor to the distributor. This practice is acceptable but must be supported by a written agreement stating that the distributor accepts responsibility for label compliance. The processor remains responsible for providing the distributor with complete and truthful information regarding the product which is required for proper labelling.

Please note that the production code on each pouch/can must always be applied at the plant.

Cameron Prince
Director
Fish, Seafood and Production Division

Bulletin 31 - Use of the Term "Dolphin Friendly" and Similar Non-mandatory Statements on Labels

No. 31 - 16/10/98

PDF (14 kb)

To: All Holders of the Fish Products Inspection Manual

Subject: Use of the Term "Dolphin-Friendly" and Similar Non-mandatory Statements on labels

The purpose of this bulletin is to inform manual holders of the guidelines to be followed when statements such as "Dolphin friendly", "Dolphin safe", etc., are placed on labels of canned tuna.

Section 27 of the Fish Inspection Regulations reads: "No person shall package any fish or mark or label any container of fish in a manner that is false, misleading or deceptive."

It is the responsibility of the importer to ensure that all information contained on labels of canned tuna is truthful. All importers of canned tuna who wish to place such statements on the labels must develop their own procedure to ensure that the tuna they distribute was harvested using methods not injurious to dolphins. Upon request, documentation providing proof of these methods must be available to an Inspector of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. In instances where the importer cannot provide proof that the statements are accurate, the lot in question is to be rejected for false labelling.

Cameron Prince
Director
Fish, Seafood and Production Division

Bulletin 24 - Artificially Coloured Cooked Shrimp - USA

No. 24 - 21/06/96

PDF (14 kb)

To: All Holders of the Fish Products Inspection Manual

Subject: Artificially Coloured Cooked Shrimp - U.S.A.

The purpose of this bulletin is to inform manual holders of a recent change in the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) policy concerning the use of artificial colours on cooked shrimp.

Earlier this year the Office of Seafood, USFDA, decided to permit the use of an artificial colour, FD&C Red No. 40 (Allura Red in the Canadian Food and Drug Regulations), on cooked shrimp if the principal display panel indicates the product as being artificially coloured cooked shrimp and the colouring agent used is declared in the list of ingredients.

In accordance with the Food and Drug Regulations, colouring agents are not permitted on cooked shrimp sold in Canada. Therefore if product is imported and labelled as "artificially coloured", the lot is to be rejected for non-permitted additives. Also, if imported shrimp are suspected to contain a colouring agent, specifically allura red, the lot should be detained, sampled and analyzed for the presence of this agent.

David Rideout
Director General
Inspection Directorate

Bulletin 22 - Fish Inspection Regulations - Section 6(2) (a) - Identity of the Establishment Packing Fish

No. 22 - 14/05/96

PDF (17 kb)

To: All Holders of the Fish Products Inspection Manual

Subject: Fish Inspection Regulations - Section 6(2) (a) - Identity of the Establishment Packing Fish

The purpose of this bulletin is to clarify the interpretation of Section 6(2)(a) of the Fish Inspection Regulations (FIR).

Section 6(2)(a) of the FIR states that "No person shall import into Canada or attempt to import into Canada any fish unless:

(a) the identity of the establishment at which the fish is packed and the day, month and year of packing are legibly marked on one end of the carton or case in which the containers of fish are shipped."

The master carton may identify the packer of the fish by either the packer's name or by code. When a code is used to identify the packer and/or date of packing, the importer is responsible for providing Inspection Directorate with a key that identifies the name of the establishment and/or date of packing.

David Rideout
Director General
Inspection Directorate

Bulletin 11 - Safety Precautions to be Followed in the Sensory Evaluation of Canned Fish and Fish Products

No. 11 - 27/03/92

PDF (15 kb)

To: All Holders of the Fish Products Inspection Manual

Subject: Safety Precautions to be Followed in the Sensory Evaluation of Canned Fish and Fish Products

The purpose of this bulletin is to inform all personnel involved in the sensory evaluation of canned fish and fish products of the precautionary steps which must be followed prior to the sensory evaluation of such products. The term "canned" includes all fish and fish products which have been subjected to a heat process as defined under Section 34 of the Fish Inspection Regulations whether packed in metal or glass containers, pouches or any other hermetically sealed container.

  1. Metal containers must have their labels removed and end seams and side seams must be checked for integrity;
  2. Glass containers and their caps must be checked for acceptability;
  3. Pouches must be checked for punctures, holes, acceptability of seals and any other defects which may adversely affect the integrity of the pouch;
  4. Any containers which are unacceptable as defined in 1), 2) and 3) above or which show signs of swelling or gas production shall not be subjected to sensory analysis. Other containers from the same lot or code shall not be subjected to sensory evaluation until it has been proven beyond a doubt that the swelling or gas production is not due to under processing.

These criteria have been set for the safety of the evaluators and must be followed at all times.

B.J. Emberley
Director General
Inspection, Regulations and Enforcement

Bulletin 6 - Labelling and Weight Determination of Sliced Smoked Salmon

No. 6 - 5/06/90

PDF (17 kb)

To: All Holders of the Fish Products Inspection Manual

Subject: Labelling and Weight Determination of Sliced Smoked Salmon

This bulletin is being issued to clarify previous correspondence on this subject dated October 20, 1989 and March 7, 1990.

  1. Where the skin has been detached from the flesh of the product but is included in the package, the weight of the skin must be excluded from the net weight of the product.
  2. Where the skin has been detached from the flesh of the product and is not included in the package, the net weight of the product shall be the total contents of the package.
  3. Where the skin is still attached to the flesh of the product or is partially attached to maintain "kosher" requirements, the weight of the skin shall not be included in the net weight of the product unless the label indicates that the skin is included in the declared weight.

Note: The weight of the plastic dividers inserted between the smoked salmon slices shall be excluded from the declared weight of the product.

B.J. Emberley
Director General
Inspection Services Directorate

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