Compliance and Assessment Guide for Schedule I and II of the Fish Inspection Regulations (Registered Establishments)
Chapter 3

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3.1 Water Supply

Regulations

Schedule I Section 14

(1) Adequate supplies of water that meet one of the following requirements shall be provided in every establishment under a minimum operating pressure of 140 kPa for fish processing, establishment cleaning and disinfection, ice making, employee sanitation and personal hygiene and the operation of toilets:

  1. the water has a coliform bacteria count, determined by a method acceptable to the President of the Agency, of not more than 2 per 100 millilitres; or
  2. the water is derived from a source approved by the President of the Agency.

(2) For the purpose of providing a safe and sanitary supply of water to an establishment, an inspector may require that water supply sources be chlorinated or otherwise treated.

(3) Despite subsection (2), the President of the Agency may allow live shellfish to be held in an establishment in untreated water derived from a source approved by the President if:

  1. the median or the geometric mean of the faecal coliform most probable number in the water does not exceed 14 per 100 millilitres and not more than 10% of the water samples exceed a faecal coliform most probable number of 43 per 100 millilitres, as determined by a method acceptable to the President; and
  2. the use of the water poses no threat of cross-contamination in the establishment.

(9) An establishment may use water that does not meet the requirements of subsections (1) to (3) for fire protection, boilers or auxiliary services if there is no connection between the other water systems providing water to the establishment and all feed lines and pipes are clearly labelled or coloured so that the purpose of each is readily discernable by an inspector.

(10) Adequate supplies of hot water at a temperature of at least 43°C shall be provided throughout processing areas for cleaning and disinfection and at all handwash stations.

(11) Hoses and other water-delivery devices in ready-to-eat fish and shellfish process operations shall be equipped with backflow preventers or vacuum breakers.

(12) Each operator of an establishment constructed after the coming into force of this Schedule shall keep and make available to an inspector, blueprints or other suitable drawings or sketches that show all water supply and water waste disposal systems, including sources of supply, intake locations, piping runs, treatment systems employed, location of water-sampling valves for the taking of water samples before and after its treatment and the outfall or sewage hook-up locations.

Intent

Water must not be allowed to become a potential source of contamination for food products. Clean, uncontaminated water is essential for use in cleaning and processing.

Compliance Guide

An adequate supply of clean water must be supplied for processing and sanitation purposes. The water must show a bacterial coliform count, based on standard bacteriological analysis, of two per 100 millilitres (mL) or less, or else its use must be approved by the CFIA. Approval will be based on the general sanitary and environmental conditions of the area, giving consideration to potential sources of chemical and bacterial contamination, and the presence of mud, silt or other material in the water. These requirements apply to municipal water supplies as well.

All source intakes must be located in a manner that prevents contamination of the water, and storage tanks must be designed to prevent contamination as well.

When the water source is not protected from human or environmental contamination or may be exposed to contamination from time to time, chlorination or some equivalent treatment (such as UV light or filtration) is required. In addition, chlorination of water (or other treatment) must be carried out when it is deemed essential by the CFIA.

Health Canada policy states that residual chlorine in the processing water may not exceed 10 ppm (mg/L), when the water will come into direct contact with fish. The use of chlorine is limited to the disinfection of water supplies and as an aid in sanitation. Higher concentrations may be used in sanitation procedures, provided the water does not contact fish directly. The direct application of excessive levels of chlorine to fish or fish products for the purposes of disinfecting the product is not permitted.

In general, chlorination alone is adequate for water with less than 100 coliform per 100 mL), while chlorination and filtration is needed for water with more than 100 but less than 4,000 coliform per 100 mL . Grossly contaminated sources of water (over 4,000 coliform MPN (most probable number) per 100 mL) will not be approved.

The application of ozone to the water supply is permitted as an acceptable water treatment provided that the following conditions are met:

1. The amount of ozone added to the water does not exceed the minimum required to effectively reduce the microbial levels in the water (including water to make ice) to acceptable levels in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs). (A processor and the manufacturer of the ozone generating equipment should determine and validate the amount of ozone needed to achieve disinfection and no more than that amount would be added).

2. The concentration of residual ozone in the water that may come into direct contact with the fresh food is negligible (i.e., as indicated above, GMPs would be applied and no more ozone other than that which is needed for disinfection would be applied to the water resulting in minimal or no residual ozone).

3. If present, residual ozone in the water would not bring about a change in the characteristics of the fresh food.

4. The ozone in the system is not used for the purpose of preservation of the fresh food.

Water used for depuration must have a coliform count of less than two per 100 mL after treatment. The quality of the untreated water must be as good or better than that of the harvest area.

The use of untreated water for holding live fish is acceptable, provided that:

  1. the source is approved by the CFIA,
  2. there is no cross-connection to any approved system,
  3. the holding tanks are situated in an area where no other fish processing operations are being carried out, and
  4. there is no danger of the overflow from the holding tanks contaminating the floors and processing equipment in other rooms of the facility where processing operations are being carried out.

The water supply in ready-to-eat and shellfish processing operations must be protected against backflow and back siphonage. All outlets subject to back siphonage must be equipped with a vacuum interrupt-type backflow prevention device.

For requirements for retort cooling water, please refer to Chapter 5.2/6.2, Canneries, of the Facilities Inspection Manual.

Water Supply
Assessment Guide Table - Schedule I

Example situations
Table Summary

This table contains the Construction, design, plants and surroundings, including the Worksheet Line Item, Minor and Serious Critical Assessment Guide.

Worksheet Line Item Minor Serious Critical
adequate water supply with sufficient pressure provided for processing, cleaning, toilets, etc. do not use insufficient water supply/pressure for processing, cleaning, toilets etc. (5)

no water for process operations (4)

no water for cleaning operations (4)

no water for hand washing (4)

(a) bacteriologically acceptable at point of use do not use do not use
(b) source approved do not use do not use
sources chlorinated or otherwise treated if necessary do not use do not use water treatment system not functioning when required (i.e., no chlorine residual, UV or ozone treatment system not functioning, etc.)(2,3,4)
May use approved, untreated water for live shellfish if (a) bacteriologically acceptable (overlay standard) do not use do not use
May use approved, untreated water for live shellfish if (b) no threat of cross contamination do not use do not use
unapproved water used for boilers etc. has no connection to approved water system. All feed lines and pipes clearly labelled. do not use do not use
adequate supply of hot water provided hot water less than 43°C (9) no hot water for hand washing (5) Not Generally Applicable
hoses and other water delivery devices in ready-to-eat and shellfish operations equipped with anti-backflow preventers or vacuum breakers do not use each hose not equipped with anti back flow devices in shellfish and RTE operations (7) Not Generally Applicable
Table Note 3detailed blueprints of water supply and outfall/sewage hook-up locations available for inspection. Not Generally Applicable Not Generally Applicable

Table Notes

Table Note 3

New Construction Only

Return to table note 3  referrer

3.2 Steam

Regulations

Schedule I Section 14

(4) Steam

  1. directly in contact with fish shall not contain any substance that is a hazard, and
  2. shall be supplied in adequate quantities for retorting and any other purpose as specified in the establishment's quality management program

Intent

Steam used for cooking or disinfection comes into direct contact with equipment and product and therefore must not be allowed to become a potential source of contamination.

Compliance Guide

An adequate supply of steam must be provided at sufficient pressure when required for the operations of an establishment. Steam used for cooking or disinfecting must not contain any hazardous substances. Boiler additives must be approved for contact with food products.

Steam used in canning operations must meet the requirements of Chapter 5.2/6.2, Canneries, of the Facilities Inspection Manual.

Assessment Guide Table - Schedule I

Example situations
Table Summary

This table contains the Construction, design, plants and surroundings, including the Worksheet Line Item, Minor and Serious Critical Assessment Guide.

Worksheet Line Item Minor Serious Critical
steam in contact with fish has no hazardous substances do not use do not use unapproved boiler additives (3)
supplied in adequate quantities for the purpose insufficient steam but not serious or critical (8) insufficient steam for a cleaning process (5) insufficient steam for a product preservation process (2)

3.3 Ice

Regulations

Schedule I Section 10

(5) Despite subsection (1), ice screws or augers that are in contact with ice may be constructed of galvanized metal.

Schedule I Section 14

(5) Ice making or ice storage facilities shall:

  1. be operated in a manner that minimizes frost build-up;
  2. be maintained in a sound condition for ease of cleaning and disinfection; and
  3. if constructed after the coming into force of this Schedule, be built in accordance with sections 3 to 8 of this Schedule.

(6) No ice making facility or ice storage facility constructed after the coming into force of this Schedule shall use wood on any surface that makes contact with ice.

(7) Ice that is for use in an establishment shall be handled and transported in a manner that prevents its contamination.

(8) No ice shall be used in an establishment unless it has been made from water that meets the requirements of this Schedule and is stored in a manner that prevents its contamination.

Intent

Ice comes into direct contact with equipment and food products and therefore must not be allowed to become a potential source of contamination.

Compliance Guide

Ice must be made with acceptable water. All ice making and storing facilities must be cleaned and disinfected as often as required by operating conditions.

Ice making or storing facilities constructed after April 1999 must comply with the requirements described previously for floors, drains, walls, ceilings, overhead fixtures, and windows (Sections 1.2-1.6 of this document). Wood is not permitted as a construction material for any surface that comes in contact with ice.

Ice must be handled and transported, both inside and outside the establishment, in a manner that prevents its contamination. If personnel are required to enter a bulk ice storage area and/or walk on the ice, then clothing and footwear must be clean and sanitized prior to entry. Single use foot coverings, smocks, and or dedicated clothing may be used.

The use of galvanized metal for screws or augers that are in contact with ice will be permitted provided that it does not result in contamination of the ice.

Ice
Assessment Guide Table - Schedule I

Example situations
Table Summary

This table contains the Construction, design, plants and surroundings, including the Worksheet Line Item, Minor and Serious Critical Assessment Guide.

Worksheet Line Item Minor Serious Critical
(a) ice making/storage facilities operated in a manner that minimizes frost build-up frost build up on ice making unit (9) Not Generally Applicable Not Generally Applicable
(b) ice making/storage facilities maintained for ease of cleaning and disinfection do not use

bare wood walls/ceiling (7)

exposed fiberglass insulation (7)

Not Generally Applicable
Table Note 4 (c) ice making/storage facilities shall be constructed as per sections 3-8 Not Generally Applicable
Table Note 4ice contact surfaces of ice making/storage facilities not constructed of wood do not use Not Generally Applicable
ice handled in a manner that prevents its contamination do not use

dirty totes/containers/utensils used to handle ice (7)

ice not covered or protected (7)

dirty footwear/clothing in contact with ice (5)

contaminated totes/ containers/ trucks used to handle ice
all ice used is made from approved water and stored in a manner that prevents its contamination do not use ice not stored in a manner to protect from contamination (7) ice contaminated in storage

Table Notes

Table Note 4

New Construction Only

Return to table note 4  referrer

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