Potatoes
5. Shape

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The shape of potatoes should be considered from the standpoint of shape characteristic of a particular variety. Some varieties have peculiar characteristics that make them outstanding from the standpoint of shape (e.g. fingerlings).

The term "fingerling" refers to shape, not colour or texture. While classic varieties are either round or oval (long), fingerlings have a slender, elongated form with many eyes. Most varieties have red or yellow skin and yellow, waxy flesh. (See Appendix IV for more information on fingerlings.)

Misshapen specimens could take different forms. The potato may be curved, pointed or creased, have the form of a dumbbell, a bottle neck or have knobs on the tuber. The most common causes of misshapen potatoes are environmental factors affecting growth such as irregularities in soil moisture and nutrients. (See Appendix II)

Misshapen Specimens

Misshapen specimens should be scored when the potatoes are:

A) Canada No. 1

  1. materially pointed; or
  2. materially dumb-bell shaped or otherwise materially deformed.

B) Canada No. 2

  1. seriously pointed; or
  2. seriously dumb-bell shaped or otherwise seriously deformed.

Folded Ends

Folded end is the term used to describe areas that fold inward on potatoes. These areas develop during the growing process and generally occur on the end of the potato.

Score folded ends when:

A) Canada No. 1

  1. materially detracting from the appearance of the potato.

B) Canada No. 2

  1. seriously detracting from the appearance of the potato.

Visual Aids Refer to POT-L-May 1998 photos 114 – 117 (USDA)

Second Growth

Second growths are commonly attributed to high field temperatures and drought. They may, however, result from regeneration following any condition causing irregular rates of tuber development, such as uneven availability of nutrients or moisture, extremes in temperature, or vine-defoliation from hail or frost. When growing conditions improve, resumption of tuber growth becomes evident as second growth. (For visual aid, refer to diagram of "Knobby Tubers" in Appendix II)

Second growths are to be scored when:

A) Canada No. 1

  1. materially detracting from the appearance of the potato.

B) Canada No. 2

  1. seriously detracting from the appearance of the potato.
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