Information within the Nutrition Facts Table

Table of Contents

Mandatory Information and Serving Size

The Food and Drug Regulations (FDR) states under section B.01.401 that the label of a pre-packaged product shall carry a Nutrition Facts table (NFT) that contains only the information as set out in the FDR. The FDR also sets out in the tables following sections B.01.401 and B.01.402 the manner in which energy and nutrient values must be declared in the Nutrition Facts Table.

Figure 3.1 (Bilingual)
This is an example of a Nutrition Facts table displaying the core mandatory information. Description Follows
Description of Image - Figure 3.1 (Bilingual)

General information for the content within the NFT:

  • a normal width font is to be used along with an 8 point type except as indicated
  • Thin rule lines (0.5 point) centred between text separate each row unless otherwise indicated.

Going down the NFT vertically from top to bottom, the contents are as follows:

  • English title: Nutrition Facts, 13 point bold type
  • French title: Valeur nutritive, 13 point bold type
  • Serving Size: per 125 mL (87 g) / par 125 mL (87 g)
  • 2 point rule (horizontal line)
  • Left side title 'Amount' (with 'teneur' underneath) and right side title '% Daily Value' (with '% valeur quotidienne' underneath) – 6 point bold type
  • 1 point rule (horizontal line)
  • 'Calories / Calories 80' on left side
  • 'Fat / Lipides 0.5 g' on left side and '1%' on right side
  • 'Saturated / saturés 0 g' on left side, '+ Trans / trans 0 g' underneath, '0% on right side' – 6 point indent
  • 'Cholesterol / Cholestérol 0 mg' on left side
  • 'Sodium / Sodium 0mg' on left side, '0%' on right side
  • 'Carbohydrate / Glucides 18 g' on left side, '6%' on right side
  • 'Fibre / Fibres 2 g' on left side, '6%' on right side – 6 point indent
  • 'Sugars / Sucres 2 g' on left side - 6 point indent
  • 'Protein / Protéines 3 g' on left side
  • 2 point rule (horizontal line)
  • 'Vitamin A / Vitamine A' on left side, '2%' on right side
  • 'Vitamin C / Vitamine C' on left side, '10%' on right side
  • 'Calcium / Calcium' on left side, '0%' on right side
  • 'Iron / Fer' on left side, '2%' on right side

B.01.450(1) of the FDR, in conjunction with Schedule L, prescribes the order in which the listings must appear, as well as dimensions, spacing and the use of upper and lowercase letters and bold type (see section Presentation of the Nutrition Facts Table).

The requirements for nutrient declarations (nutrients and/or units) are different for;

See the appropriate sections for details.

Nutrition Facts Tables from Other Countries

Since the nutrition information requirements of other countries do not match the Canadian requirements, labels and advertisements with nutrition information other than that permitted by the FDR are considered to be labelled or advertised contrary to Canadian legislation. Therefore, only the Canadian NFT may be used to provide nutrition information in Canada, and nutrition labelling systems from other countries are not acceptable in Canada. Hence, the use of both the Canadian NFT and a nutrition information table from another country together is also not permitted (e.g. a food product with both the Canadian and American NFT is not allowed).

One objective of Canada's nutrition labelling regulations is to provide a standardized system for conveying information about the nutrient content of foods. Mandatory declarations, reference values and formats which differ from the one adopted by Canada make it difficult for consumers to compare foods at the point of purchase. These, therefore do not support an informed consumer choice for Canadians.

Language requirements are available in the Presentation of the Nutrition Facts Table section.

Serving Size

The nutrient information presented in a Nutrition Facts table is based on a specific amount of food (edible portion). The amount is indicated under the Nutrition Facts heading using the phrase "Serving (naming the serving size)", "Serving Size (naming the serving size)" or "Per (naming the serving size)". The serving size is a quantity of food that can be reasonably consumed at a single eating occasion.

Serving sizes set out in the table under Reference Amounts and Serving Sizes are usually presented as a range. This allows manufacturers some flexibility when determining serving sizes for products of varying density and size, such as cookies or slices of bread. In order not to mislead consumers, the same serving size should be used whenever a serving size is mentioned on the label (e.g., in the Nutrition Facts table, the directions for use, etc.). For example, if a box of pudding mix says that it makes 6 servings, the Nutrition Facts table should be based on one-sixth of the box and the directions for use should indicate how to make six servings.

General Requirements

The serving size is based on the edible portion of the food as offered for sale [B.01.002A(1), FDR]. It must be expressed in the Nutrition Facts table as a consumer friendly measure (first) and in metric units (Second, in brackets, in the same units as the net quantity declaration).

Consumer Friendly Measures

For the purposes of serving sizes, the expression "consumer friendly measure" means:

  • a fraction of food; e.g. foods usually divided into pieces before consumption, such as ⅛ cake or ¼ pizza;
  • a common visual measure of food - e.g., household measures such as cups, tablespoons, teaspoons, 250 ml, 125 ml, 15 ml, 5 ml, etc.;
  • a unit of food - e.g., square of chocolate; slice of bread, 1 cookie, pat of butter, X mm slice, etc.;
  • a single serving, if it meets the criteria described in the section Single Serving Containers below [B.01.002A(2), FDR]; e.g. an entire container.
Metric Serving Sizes

Most formats of the Nutrition Facts table require that the serving size be declared in both a consumer friendly measure and in a metric measure. The metric measure is declared in:

  • Grams (g) when the net quantity of the product is declared by weight or by count, or
  • Millilitres (ml) when the net quantity of the product is declared by volume.

There are three exceptions to this rule. Although the net quantity of olives, pickles and fruit used for garnish or flavour, such as maraschino cherries, is declared by volume, a serving must be expressed in grams [items 78, 149, and 150 in the Food and Drug Regulations, Schedule M].

Usually the units used for the serving size are the same as the units used for the reference amount (see Schedule M, FDR).

Metric values are rounded to the nearest 0.1 for quantities of less than 10 and to the nearest whole number for quantities of 10 or more. These rounding rules are found in the table to B.01.401, FDR, and the Core Nutrition Information Table.

Abbreviations for Units of Measure

Certain abbreviations, which are considered bilingual, must always be used in the Nutrition Facts table for the corresponding unit of measure:

  • mg (milligram)
  • g (gram)
  • ml or mL (millilitres)

Other abbreviations are optional and should only be used when space constraints exist.

  • tsp (teaspoon)
  • tbsp (tablespoon)
  • c. à thé or cuil. à thé (cuillère à thé)
  • c. à soupe or cuil. à soupe (cuillère à soupe)
When Consumer Friendly Measure = Metric Measure

Certain metric measures are visibly measurable and are considered consumer friendly measures. For liquid foods, these declarations fulfill the requirement to declare a serving size in both a consumer friendly measure and a metric unit.

measuring cup and measuring spoons

The following metric measures are considered consumer friendly measures. You will note that these measurements provide for multiples of the metric teaspoon (5 ml), metric tablespoon (15 ml) and fractions and multiples of the metric cup (250 ml).

  • ml
  • 10 ml
  • 15 ml
  • 25 ml
  • 30 ml
  • 45 ml
  • 50 ml – 500 ml, in increments of 25 ml

Other non-usual metric volumes, such as 185 ml, 240 ml, 287 ml, etc., are not considered consumer friendly measures and may not be used alone to fulfill the serving size requirements. (Exceptions to this rule apply to single serving containers. See the section Single Serving Containers below for further clarification).

Determining a Reasonable Serving Size

Although there is considerable variation in the manner of declaration of the serving size among the different Nutrition Facts table formats, there is always a requirement for the serving size to be declared for the product as sold. This serving is based on the edible portion of the food and is the amount of food that one adult would reasonably eat at one eating occasion. The manufacturer has some flexibility in determining serving sizes.

A list of reasonable serving sizes is available in the Tables: Reference Amounts and Serving Sizes, and it may be used as a reference tool and guide when evaluating the appropriateness of a serving size.

Manufacturers have the option of using serving sizes that differ from the suggestions in the table provided they are reasonable and not misleading. Note that there are very specific requirements for single serving containers. The manner in which the serving size is presented must be as per the FDR.

Note: When the food is pre-portioned into units commonly consumed by a person, then the serving size should be the unit or a multiple of the unit – e.g., 1 burger, 1 steak, 1 granola bar, 2 cookies, 2 slices of bread, etc. (not ⅞ of a burger, 1 ½ cookies, 1 ½ slices of bread).

Additional guidance for determining a reasonable serving size on the following products or types of products is also provided:

  • Products with a non-uniform shape
  • Deli meats
  • Spaghetti
  • Foods requiring preparation and for which the nutrition information is the same for the food "as sold" and "as prepared"
  • Food sold by count
  • Single serving containers
Products with a Non-uniform Shape

Certain products have a non-uniform shape, such as roasts, hams or whole fish. For these products, consumer friendly measures such as an "x mm slice" or a fraction of product are not useful measures. In these cases, a single metric declaration in weight, i.e., 100 grams, will suffice to fulfill the requirement to declare a serving size in both a consumer friendly measure and a metric unit.

fish

ham

roast

For non-uniform products, such as those shown above, a simple weight declaration of 100 g is acceptable as a serving size declaration.

Deli Meats

In the case of deli meats sold in chubs or industrial formats the serving size may be declared using a consumer friendly measure and a metric unit in the following manner "Per approximately 3 slices (55 g)" or by declaring a single metric measure of "100 g". If choosing the second option, only "100 g" may be used; other metric values may not be used.

spaghetti

Spaghetti

In the case of long, dry noodles which are difficult to measure, the following options are possible:

  • "per ¼ box (85 g)", or
  • "per 85 g (about 1 cup prepared al dente)"

Foods requiring preparation and for which the nutrition information is the same for the food "As Sold" and "As Prepared": In cases where the nutrient content of a food is not altered by the preparation of the food, the food may use the Standard, Horizontal or Linear format and declare the serving size of both the food as sold and the food as prepared, e.g., drink crystals: "Per 1 tbsp (2 g) (about 1 cup prepared)". This provision is always optional. Examples: frozen concentrated orange juice or drink crystals that are prepared through the addition of water, some popping corn, etc.

On the Nutrition Facts table, under the title Nutrition Facts, the serving size of both the food as sold and as prepared is declared for example Per 1 Tablespoon (2grams) and (about 1 cup prepared).

In the case of the Dual Format – Foods Requiring Preparation, the serving size is declared for the product as sold and as prepared. As well, in both the Dual Formats – Different Amounts of Food and Aggregate Formats – Different Amounts of Food, two serving sizes are provided.

Food Sold by Count

Under the FDR, item 1 of the table to B.01.401 indicates how the serving size of a food is to be declared in the Nutrition Facts table. For items sold by count, the number of units or a common household measure or fraction of the food would be shown first, followed by the weight, expressed in grams, in parentheses; e.g. 1 apple (150 g) or 2 cups lettuce (120 g) or ½ grapefruit (118 g).

Single Serving Containers

The entire net quantity in the package is considered to be the serving size in the following cases [B.01.002A(2), D.01.001(3), FDR]:

  • The food packaged in the container could reasonably be eaten by one person at a single sitting.

    For example, a 600 ml bottle of juice dispensed from a vending machine is normally consumed during a single occasion. Such a bottle is considered a single serving, despite the fact that juice has a 250 ml reference amount and a serving size range of 175 – 250 ml.

  • The reference amount of the food is less than 100 g or 100 ml and the package contains less than 200 % of that reference amount.

    For example, consider a 55 g bag of mixed nuts. The reference amount for mixed nuts is 50 g . The package contains less than 200 % of 50 g (less than 100 g) and therefore, the 55 g bag is considered to be a single serving container, with a serving size of 55 g.

  • The reference amount is 100 g or 100 ml or more and the package contains 150% or less of that reference amount.

    For example, consider a soft drink in a 500 ml bottle. The reference amount for soft drinks is 355 ml. Since the bottle 1 contains less than 150 % of the 355 ml (150 % of 355 = 532.5 ml) reference amount, the 500 ml bottle is considered to be a single serving container, with a serving size of 500 ml.

    The provision for a single serving container is not an optional requirement. Products that meet the requirements must provide nutrition information based on the net quantity of the entire package. For example, a 355 ml can of soft drink must base its nutrition information on 355 ml and may not declare a 250 ml serving size.

The Food and Drug Regulations, Schedule M or the Tables: Reference Amounts and Serving Sizes provide reference amounts.

Serving Size Declarations for Single Serving Containers

The consumer friendly measure for a single serving container is the entire container. Consequently, the serving size for a single serving container should be declared in the following manner, "Per 1 container (75 g)", "Per 1 can (355 ml)", "Per 1 entrée (240 g)", "Per 1 drinking box (200 ml)", "Per 1 pouch (56 g)", etc. Although the declaration of both the consumer friendly measure and the metric measure is strongly encouraged, no exception is taken to the declaration of only the metric unit. For example, a 355 ml can of soft drink may declare "Per 1 can (355 ml)" or simply "Per 355 ml".

Additional information (Q&A) about specific serving sizes cases is available.

Serving Size Examples and Infractions

Certain metric volumetric measures (ml) are visibly measurable and fulfil the requirements for both a consumer friendly measure and a metric measure for liquid foods.

Nutrition Facts table – the serving size Per 250 millilitres is visibly measurable and meets requirements for measuring liquids.

A single metric weight declaration is generally not an acceptable serving size. A consumer friendly measure (1st) and a metric measure (2nd, in brackets) are required for most foods. Exceptions exist for oddly shaped foods for which no consumer friendly measure exists and single serving containers of food.

Nutrition Facts table – The declaration serving size 100 grams is usually not an acceptable serving size declaration since a consumer-friendly measure and metric measure in brackets are required for most foods.

Note that the serving declarations have been reversed. The consumer friendly measure should be declared first followed by the metric measure in brackets.

Nutrition Facts table - declares Per 50 grams (about 27 chips); serving declarations have been reversed in this case.

In this example the serving size is declared as "52 ml (20 g)". When metric units of volume (ml) are used as a consumer friendly measure, they should be rounded to the nearest 25 ml. A more appropriate serving size declaration would be "Per 50 ml (20 g)".

Nutrition facts table - when metric units of volume are used as a consumer friendly measure, they should be rounded to the nearest 25 millitres.

On this 100 g package, the serving size is declared as "130 ml (50 g)". 130 ml is not a standardized measure. The consumer friendly measure should be rounded and the serving size declared as "Per 125 ml (50 g)" or "Per ½ package (50g)".

Nutrition facts table - the serving size is not a standardized measure.

This 355 ml can of soft drink declares a 250 mL serving. However, this product is obviously a single serving, i.e., it is usually consumed at a single eating occasion and meets the requirements of a single serving container. Therefore, the information must be provided for the entire product, not a portion of the product, i.e., Serving Size: "Per 1 can (355 ml)" or "Per 355 ml".

Nutrition facts table - can soft drink is a single serving therefore the information must be provided for the entire product.

Core Nutrition Information

The sample bilingual Nutrition Facts Table below indicates the core information that must always be included in the Nutrition Facts Table and the order in which it must be presented.

This sample bilingual Nutrition Facts table shows the correct order of information. Description follows.
Description of image - Core Nutrition Information
  • Standard "Nutrition Facts" heading ("valeur nutritive" or "valeurs nutritives" in French)
  • Serving Size
  • Subtitle "Amount" – actual amount of nutrient in the stated serving of food listed for macronutrients
  • Subtitle "% Daily Value" (% DV)
  • Declarations of:
    • Calories
    • 13 nutrients:
      1. Fat – grams and % Daily Value (% DV)
      2. Saturated Fat – grams* 
      3. Trans Fat – grams*
      4. Cholesterol – milligrams (and optionally, % DV)
      5. Sodium – milligrams and % DV
      6. Carbohydrate – grams and % DV
      7. Fibre – grams and % DV
      8. Sugar – grams
      9. Protein – grams
      10. Vitamin A – % DV
      11. Vitamin C – % DV
      12. Calcium – % DV
      13. Iron – % DV

        * The sum of saturated and trans fat is declared in % DV.

Table: Core Nutrition Information

The table Core Nutrition Information refers to the core nutrition information which is mandatory for most Nutrition Facts tables (exceptions exist for Simplified Formats, and Foods Intended Solely for Children Under two Years of Age). This table is not an exact replica of the table in the Food and Drug Regulations [B.01.401, FDR].

  1. Column 1 sets out the information in the correct order and also prescribes, under the heading "Nomenclature", the terms that must be used for describing this information. It is a combination of columns 1, 2 and 3 from the tables set out in the Food and Drug Regulations. This column also sets out the units of measurement required for expressing the information.
  2. Column 2 sets out the manner of expression, including rounding rules for these values/amounts.
  3. Columns 3-5 provide a user-friendly resource to identify the correct rounding rules for quantities and % daily values.

Please note that serving size and % daily value (% DV) are important elements of the table below. The appropriate sections provide further information on these topics and will contribute to the proper use of the table.

Rounding and Manner of Expression for Nutrition Facts Table Core Information
Required InformationRounding
Nomenclature and UnitsManner of ExpressionQuantityMetric Unit% DV

1. Serving of stated size

Nomenclature

"Serving Size (naming the serving size)", "Serving (naming the serving size) " or "Per (naming the serving size)"

Units

(1) (a) in the case of a food that is usually divided into pieces before being consumed (such as cake, pie and pizza), a fraction of the entire food;

(b) in the case of a food described in subsection B.01.002A(2),the entire container; and

(c) in all other cases, in a commonly used unit in which the quantity is visibly measurable, such as millilitres, cups, tablespoons or "(naming the unit of food)"

(2) The size expressed in accordance with sub item (1) is followed by the size expressed in grams or millilitres, as specified by paragraph B.01.002A(1)(b).

(1) The size in metric units:

(a) less than 10 g or 10 mL, to the nearest multiple of 0.1 g or 0.1 mL;

(b) 10 g or 10 mL or more, to the nearest multiple of 1 g or 1 mL

(2) The size when expressed as a fraction is represented by a numerator and a denominator separated by a line.

(3) The size shall include the word "assorted" if the information in the Nutrition Facts table of a prepackaged product that contains an assortment of foods is set out as a composite value. e.g. Per 5 assorted candies (15 g)"

< 10 g or ml multiple of 0.1 g or ml
≥ 10 g or ml multiple of 1 g or ml

2. Energy value

Nomenclature

"Calories", "Total Calories" or "Calories, Total"

Units

Calories per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 5 Calories

(i) if the product meets the conditions set out in column 2 of item 1 of the table to B.01.513 for the subject "free of energy", set out in column 1, to "0" Calorie, and

(ii) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 1 Calorie;

(b) when 5 to 50 Calories, to the nearest multiple of 5 Calories; and

(c) when more than 50 Calories, to the nearest multiple of 10 Calories

< 5 Calories, meets "Calorie-free" 0 Calories
< 5 Calories, all other cases nearest 1 Calorie
≥ 5 to ≤ 50 Calories nearest 5 Calories
> 50 Calories nearest 10 Calories

3. Amount of fat

Nomenclature

"Fat", "Total Fat" or "Fat, Total"

Units

(1) grams per serving of stated size; and

(2) percentage of the daily value per serving of stated size

(1) The amount in grams:

(a) when less than 0.5 g

(i) if the product meets the conditions set out in column 2 of item 11 of the table following B.01.513 for the subject "free of fat" set out in column 1; and the amounts of saturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids are declared as "0" in the Nutrition Facts table or are omitted from that table in accordance with subsection B.01.401(6) and no other fatty acids are declared in an amount greater than "0", to "0 g"; and in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 0.1 g;

(b) when 0.5 g to 5 g, to the nearest multiple of 0.5 g; and

(c) when more than 5 g, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

(2) The percentage:

(a) when the amount is declared as "0 g", to "0 %"; or

(b) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 1%

Fat free: < 0.5 g and meets "free of fat"

Saturated free: < 0.5 g and meets "sat free"

Trans free: < 0.5 g and meets "trans free

g 0 %
< 0.5 g, all other cases nearest 0.1 g nearest 1 %
≥ 0.5 g to ≤ 5 g nearest 0.5 g nearest 1 %
> 5 g nearest 1 g nearest 1 %

4. Amount of saturated fatty acids

Nomenclature

"Saturated Fat", "Saturated Fatty Acids", "Saturated" or "Saturates"

Units

grams per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 0.5 g

(i) if the product meets the conditions set out in column 2 of item 18 of the table following B.01.513 for the subject "free of saturated fatty acids" set out in column 1 to "0 g"; and

(ii) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 0.1 g;

(b) when 0.5 g to 5 g, to the nearest multiple of 0.5 g; and

(c) when more than 5 g, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

Saturated free: < 0.5 g and meets "sat free" g
< 0.5 g, all other cases nearest 0.1 g
≥ 0.5 g to ≤ 5 g nearest 0.5 g
> 5 g nearest 1 g

5. Amount of trans fatty acids

Nomenclature

"Trans Fat", "Trans Fatty Acids" or "Trans"

Units

grams per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 0.5 g

(i) if the product meets the conditions set out in column 2 of item 22 of the table following B.01.513 for the subject "free of trans fatty acids" set out in column 1 to "0 g"; and

(ii) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 0.1 g;

(b) when 0.5 g to 5 g, to the nearest multiple of 0.5 g; and

(c) when more than 5 g, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

Trans free: < 0.5 g and meets "trans free" g
< 0.5 g, all other cases nearest 0.1 g
≥ 0.5 g to ≤ 5 g nearest 0.5 g
> 5 g nearest 1 g

6. The sum of saturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids

Nomenclature

"Saturated Fat + Trans Fat", "Saturated Fatty Acids + Trans Fatty Acids", "Saturated + Trans" or "Saturates + Trans"

Units

percentage of the daily value per serving of stated size

(a) when the amounts of saturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids are declared as "0 g", to "0 %"; and

(b) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 1 %

< 0.5 g and meets "sat free" and "trans free" 0 %
< 0.5 g, all other cases nearest 1 %

7. Amount of cholesterol

Nomenclature

"Cholesterol"

Units

(1) milligrams per serving of stated size; and

(2) (optional) expressed as a percentage of the daily value per serving of stated size

(1) The amount in milligrams:

(a) if the product meets the conditions set out in column 2 of item 27 of the table following B.01.513 for the subject "free of cholesterol" set out in column 1, to "0 mg"; and,

(b) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 5 mg;

(2) The percentage

(a) when the amount is declared as "0 mg" to "0 %"; and

(b) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 1 %

< 2 mg and meets "free of cholesterol" mg 0 % (optional)
all other cases nearest 5 mg nearest 1 % (optional)

8. Amount of sodium

Nomenclature

"Sodium"

Units

(1) milligrams per serving of stated size; and

(2) percentage of the daily value per serving of stated size

(1) The amount in milligrams:

(a) when less than 5 mg

(i) if the product meets the conditions set out in column 2 of item 31 of the table following B.01.513 for the subject "free of sodium or salt" set out in column 1 to "0 mg", and

(ii) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 1 mg;

(b) when 5 mg to 140 mg, to the nearest multiple of 5 mg; and

(c) when greater than 140 mg, to the nearest multiple of 10 mg.

(2) The percentage:

(a) when the amount is declared as "0 mg" to "0 %"; or

(b) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 1 %

< 5 mg and meets "free of sodium or salt" mg 0 %
< 5 mg, all other cases nearest 1 mg nearest 1 %
≥ 5 mg to ≤ 140 mg nearest 5 mg nearest 1 %
> 140 mg nearest 10 mg nearest 1 %

9. Amount of carbohydrate

Nomenclature

"Carbohydrate", "Total Carbohydrate" or "Carbohydrate, Total"

Units

(1) grams per serving of stated size; and

(2) percentage of the daily value per serving of stated size

(1) The amount in grams:

(a) when less than 0.5 g, to "0 g"; and

(b) when 0.5 g or more, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

(2) The percentage:

(a) when the amount is declared as "0 g", to "0 %"; or

(b) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 1 %

< 0.5 g g 0 %
≥ 0.5 g nearest 1 g nearest 1 %

10. Amount of fibre

Nomenclature

"Fibre", "Fiber", "Dietary Fibre" or "Dietary Fiber"

Units

(1) grams per serving of stated size; and

(2) percentage of the daily value per serving of stated size

(1) The amount in grams:

(a) when less than 0.5 g, to "0 g"; and

(b) when 0.5 g or more, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

(2) The percentage:

(a) if the amount is declared as "0 g", to "0 %"; or

(b) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 1 %

< 0.5 g g 0 %
≥ 0.5 g nearest 1 g nearest 1 %

11. Amount of sugars

Nomenclature

"Sugars"

Units

grams per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 0.5 g, to "0 g"; and

(b) when 0.5 g or more, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

< 0.5 g g
≥ 0.5 g nearest 1 g

12. Amount of protein

Nomenclature

"Protein"

Units

grams per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 0.5 g, to the nearest multiple of 0.1 g; and

(b) when 0.5 g or more, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

< 0.5 g nearest 0.1 g
≥ 0.5 g nearest 1 g

13. Amount of

"Vitamin A" or "Vit A" "Vitamin C" or "Vit C" "Calcium" "Iron"

Units

percentage of the daily value per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 2 %

(i) if the product contains less than 1 % of the daily value per reference amount and per serving of stated size, to "0 %", or

(ii) in all other cases, to "2 %";

(b) when 2 % to 10 %, to the nearest multiple of 2%;

(c) when more than 10 % to 50 %, to the nearest multiple of 5 %; and

(d) when more than 50 % (including values greater than 100 %), to the nearest multiple of 10 %

< 1 % DV per serving and reference amount 0 %
≥ 1 % to < 2 % 2 %
≥ 2 % to ≤ 10 % nearest 2 %
> 10 % to ≤ 50 % nearest 5 %
> 50 % nearest 10 %

Additional Nutritional Information

This sample Nutrition Facts table illustrates all core and additional information which may be declared in an NFT. Only the additional information included in Figure 18.1(E)&(F) or 19.1(B) of Schedule L in the FDR is permitted in the Nutrition Facts table. Declaration of additional information is often voluntary, but in some cases it is triggered and must be declared. See the section Triggers: When Additional Information is Mandatory for the list of triggers.

Figure 19 of Schedule L
This sample Nutrition Facts table shows the core information, as well as additional information which may be declared in the NFT. Description follows.
Description of Image - Figure 19 of Schedule L

Note: Figure above is not a format choice.

Displayed information to note:

  • Item 1 shows how to declare "Servings Per Container"
    • Note: a declaration of servings per container when the serving size is based on "cups" or "tablespoons" is prohibited (see B.01.402(8)) in the FDR because these measures are specifically defined in the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Regulations, in imperial units [33(3), CPLR]. For example, a serving size of "per 1 cup (250 mL)" may not declare "servings per container 4".
  • Item 2 shows additional ways to declare energy value (e.g. expressed in kilojoules, Calories from Fat, Calories from Saturated and Trans Fat, etc.)
  • Item 3 shows amount of poly-, omega-6 poly-, omega-3 poly-, and mono-unsaturated fatty acids
  • Item 4 shows various additional components of carbohydrates – soluble fibre, insoluble fibre, sugar alcohol, starch
  • Item 5 shows an optional footnote to explain the basis for calculating % DVs declared in the NFT – Figures 18.1(E), 18.1(F), or 19.1(B) in Schedule L of the FDR contain the four optional footnotes that can be used for this purpose. For Figure 19.1(B), in particular, the "Note" at the bottom of the page indicates that the footnote presented in Figure 19.1(B) may be replaced by the shorter footnote options shown in Figures 19.1(E) and (F).
  • Item 6 shows Optional footnote that presents energy conversion factors for fat, carbohydrate and protein

Table: Additional Nutrition Information

The table Additional Nutrition Information refers to all additional information that may voluntarily be included, or which must be included in the Nutrition Facts table if specifically required by the Regulations. This table is not an exact replica of the table in the FDR [B.01.402].

  1. Column 1 sets out the information in the correct order and also prescribes, under the heading "Nomenclature", the terms that must be used for describing this information. It is a combination of columns 1, 2 and 3 from the tables set out in the Food and Drug Regulations. This column also sets out the units of measurement required for expressing the information.
  2. Column 2 sets out the manner of expression, including rounding rules for these values/amounts.
  3. Columns 3-5 provide a user-friendly resource to identify the correct rounding rules for quantities and % daily values.

Please note that serving size and % daily value (% DV) are important elements of the table below. The appropriate sections provide further information on these topics and will contribute to the proper use of the table.

Manner of Expression for Additional Nutrition Information
Required InformationRounding
Nomenclature and UnitsManner of ExpressionQuantityMetric Unit% DV

1. Servings per container

Nomenclature

"Servings Per Container" or "(number of units) Per Container"

Units

number of servings

(1)(a) when less than 2, to the nearest multiple of 1;

(b) when 2 to 5, to the nearest multiple of 0.5; and

(c) when more than 5, to the nearest multiple of 1

(2) If a quantity is rounded off, it shall be preceded by the word "about".

(3) If the product is of a random weight, the quantity may be declared as "varied".

< 2 servings or > 5 servings multiple of 1
≥ 2 to ≤ 5 servings multiple of 0.5

2. Energy value

Nomenclature

"kilojoules" or "kJ"

Units

kilojoules per serving of stated size

to the nearest multiple of 10 kilojoules nearest 10 kilojoules

3. Energy value from fat

Nomenclature

"Calories from Fat" or "Calories from Total Fat"

Units

Calories per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 5 Calories

(i) if the amount of fat is declared as "0 g" in the Nutrition Facts table, to "0" Calorie, and

(ii) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 1 Calorie;

(b) when 5 Calories to 50 Calories, to the nearest multiple of 5 Calories; and

(c) when more than 50 Calories, to the nearest multiple of 10 Calories

< 5 Calories and fat declared as 0 g 0 Calories

4. Energy value from the sum of saturated and transfatty acids

Nomenclature

"Calories from Saturated + Trans Fat", "Calories from Saturated + Trans Fatty Acids", "Calories from Saturated + Trans" or "Calories from Saturates + Trans"

Units

Calories per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 5 Calories

(i) if the amounts of saturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids are declared as "0 g" in the Nutrition Facts table, to "0" Calorie, and

(ii) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 1 Calorie;

(b) when 5 Calories to 50 Calories, to the nearest multiple of 5 Calories; and

(c) when more than 50 Calories, to the nearest multiple of 10 Calories

< 5 Calories and Saturates + Trans declared as 0 g 0 Calories
< 5 Calories, all other cases nearest 1 Calorie
≥ 5 to ≤ 50 Calories nearest 5 Calories
> 50 Calories nearest 10 Calories

5. Amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids

Nomenclature

"Polyunsaturated Fat", "Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids" , "Polyunsaturated" or "Polyunsaturates"

Units

grams per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 1 g, to the nearest multiple of 0.1 g;

(b) when 1 g to 5 g, to the nearest multiple of 0.5 g; and

(c) when more than 5 g, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

< 1 g nearest 0.1 g
≥ 1 g to ≤ 5 g nearest 0.5 g
> 5 g nearest 1 g

6. Amount of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids

Nomenclature

(1) If the table includes polyunsaturated fatty acids: "Omega 6" or any listed in (2) below

(2) In all other cases"Omega-6 Polyunsaturated Fat", "Omega-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids", "Omega-6 Polyunsaturates" or "Omega-6 Polyunsaturated"

Units

grams per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 1 g, to the nearest multiple of 0.1 g;

(b) when 1 g to 5 g, to the nearest multiple of 0.5 g; and

(c) when more than 5 g, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

< 1 g nearest 0.1 g
≥ 1 g to ≤ 5 g nearest 0.5 g
> 5 g nearest 1 g

7. Amount of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

Nomenclature

(1) If the table includes polyunsaturated fatty acids: "Omega 3" or any listed in (2) below

(2) In all other cases "Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fat", "Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids", "Omega-3 Polyunsaturates" or "Omega-3 Polyunsaturated"

Units

grams per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 1 g, to the nearest multiple of 0.1 g;

(b) when 1 g to 5 g, to the nearest multiple of 0.5 g; and

(c) when greater than 5 g, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

< 1 g nearest 0.1 g
≥ 1 g to ≤ 5 g nearest 0.5 g
> 5 g nearest 1 g

8. Amount of monounsaturated fatty acids

Nomenclature

"Monounsaturated Fat", "Monounsaturated Fatty Acids", "Monounsaturates" or "Monounsaturated"

Units

grams per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 1 g, to the nearest multiple of 0.1 g;

(b) when 1 g to 5 g, to the nearest multiple of 0.5 g; and

(c) when greater than 5 g, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

< 1 g nearest 0.1 g
≥ 1 g to ≤ 5 g nearest 0.5 g
> 5 g nearest 1 g

9. Amount of potassium

Nomenclature

"Potassium"

Units

(1) milligrams per serving of stated size; and

(2) percentage of the daily value per serving of stated size.

(1) The amount in milligrams:

(a) when less than 5 mg

(i) if the product contains less than 5 mg of potassium per reference amount and per serving of stated size, to "0 mg", and

(ii) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 1 mg;

(b) when 5 mg to 140 mg, to the nearest multiple of 5 mg; and

(c) when more than 140 mg, to the nearest multiple of 10 mg.

(2) The percentage:

(a) when the amount is declared as "0 mg" to "0%"; or

(b) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 1%.

< 5 mg, < 5 mg/serving and ref. amt. mg 0 %
< 5 mg, all other cases nearest 1 mg nearest 1 %
≥ 5 mg to ≤ 140 mg nearest 5 mg nearest 1 %
> 140 mg nearest 10 mg nearest 1 %

10. Amount of soluble fibre

Nomenclature

"Soluble Fibre" or "Soluble Fiber"

Units

grams per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 0.5 g, to "0 g"; and

(b) when 0.5 g or more, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

< 0.5 g g
≥ 0.5 g nearest 1 g

11. Amount of insoluble fibre

Nomenclature

"Insoluble Fibre" or "Insoluble Fiber"

Units

grams per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 0.5 g, to "0 g"; and

(b) when 0.5 g or more, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

< 0.5 g g
≥ 0.5 g nearest 1 g

12. Amount of sugar alcohol

Nomenclature

(1) If the food contains only one type of sugar alcohol, "Sugar Alcohol", "Polyol" or "(naming the sugar alcohol)"

(2) In all other cases "Sugar Alcohols" or "Polyols"

Units

grams per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 0.5 g, to "0 g"; and

(b) when 0.5 g or more, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

< 0.5 g g
≥ 0.5 g nearest 1 g

13. Amount of starch

Nomenclature

"Starch"

Units

grams per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 0.5 g, to "0 g"; and

(b) when 0.5 g or more, to the nearest multiple of 1 g

< 0.5 g g
≥ 0.5 g nearest 1 g

14. Amount of vitamins/minerals

Nomenclature

(a) "Vitamin D" or "Vit D"

(b) "Vitamin E" or "Vit E"

(c) "Vitamin K" or "Vit K"

(d) "Thiamine", "Thiamin", "Thiamine (Vitamin B1)", "Thiamine (Vit B1)", "Thiamin (Vitamin B1)" or "Thiamin (Vit B1)"

(e) "Riboflavin", "Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) or "Riboflavin (VitB2)"

(f) "Niacin"

(g) "Vitamin B6" or "Vit B6"

(h) "Folate"

(i) "Vitamin B12" or "Vit B12"

(j) "Biotin"

(k) "Pantothenic Acid" or "Pantothenate"

(l) "Phosphorus"

(m) "Iodide" or "Iodine"

(n) "Magnesium"

(o) 'Zinc"

(p) "Selenium"

(q) "Copper"

(r) "Manganese"

(s) "Chromium"

(t) "Molybdenum"

(u) "Chloride"

Units

percentage of the daily value per serving of stated size

(a) when less than 2%

(i) if the product contains less than 1% of the daily value per reference amount and per serving of stated size , to "0 %", and

(ii) in all other cases, to the nearest multiple of 2%;

(b) when 2 % to 10 %, to the nearest multiple of 2 %;

(c) when 10 % to 50 %, to the nearest multiple of 5 %, and

(d) when more than 50 % to the nearest multiple of 10 %

< 1 % DV per serving and reference amt. 0 %
≥ 1 % – < 2 % 2 %
≥ 2 % to ≤ 10 % nearest 2 %
> 10 % to ≤ 50 % nearest 5 %
> 50 % nearest 10 %

15. Basis of the percent daily values

An explanation of the basis for calculating the percent daily values declared in the Nutrition Facts table

One of the following four footnotes regarding % Daily Value as set out in Figures 18.1(E) & (F) and Figure 19.1(B) of Schedule L.

1) "Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 Calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your Calorie needs + table
or
2) "Based on a 2,000 Calorie diet."
or
3) "Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 Calorie diet."
or
4) "Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 Calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your Calorie needs."

Notes:

  • In the version of the footnote that refers to nutrients (i.e., version 1 above), the following apply:

    (a) the daily value for potassium is included only if the amount of potassium is declared in the Nutrition Facts table; and

    (b) the daily value for cholesterol is included only if the amount of cholesterol is declared in the Nutrition Facts table as a percentage of the daily value per serving of stated size.

  • Versions 2, 3 and 4 above do not include a reference to nutrients.

16. Energy conversion factors

Displayed as: "Calories per gram", "Fat 9", "Carbohydrate 4" and "Protein 4"

Triggers: When Additional Information is Mandatory

The declaration of additional information is generally optional. In addition, the declaration of one nutrient does not necessarily trigger the declaration of other nutrients, unless specifically required by the Regulations.

However, in certain cases, manufacturers may be required to declare certain nutrients in the additional information list in the Nutrition Facts table.

In the following cases, the declaration of "additional information", which is generally optional, becomes mandatory:

  1. The amount of omega-6, omega-3 and monounsaturated fatty acids must all be declared when the amount of any one of these, either on the label or in any advertisement, is declared. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are not required to be declared, but when shown, triggers the three declarations previously mentioned. The amount of any specifically named fatty acid (e.g. linoleic acid), whether on the label outside the Nutrition Facts table or in any advertisement, also triggers the same three declarations [B.01.402(3)];
  2. Any nutrient set out in the table to B.01.402 must be declared when there is any representation (e.g., any mention, reference, indication, statement, claim, etc.) regarding the amount of nutrient anywhere on the label, or in any advertisement made or placed by the manufacturer of the product. Concerning the list of ingredients, it is important to note that this information is also considered a "representation". However, one must pay close attention to the wording of the item in column 1 in the table following B.01.402 when determining if additional information is triggered in the NFT. For example, item 14 (n) of the table states "amount of magnesium". Therefore, if the food additive magnesium carbonate was declared in the list of ingredients, it would not trigger the declaration of the amount of magnesium in the NFT. A representation of the amount of magnesium would need to be present in the list of ingredients in order for B.01.402 (4) to apply in this case (e.g., "x amount of magnesium").
  3. Potassium must be declared when the product contains added potassium salts and when there are claims relating to the salt or sodium content of the food [Items 31 – 36 of the table following B.01.513, B.01.402(5)];
  4. Any sugar alcohol, vitamin or mineral nutrient (except for iodide added to salt and fluoride added to prepackaged water and ice) added to a prepackaged food must be declared [B.01.402(6)]. Sugar alcohols (also known as polyols) include erythritol, hydrogenated starch hydrolysates (HSH), isomalt, lactitol, maltitol, maltitol syrup, mannitol, sorbitol, sorbitol syrup, and xylitol; and
  5. Vitamin or mineral nutrients must be declared when shown as a component of one of the ingredients (except flour) of a prepackaged product [B.01.402(7)]. For example, in a yogurt product made with milk that has been fortified with vitamin D, the amount of vitamin D must be declared in the NFT.

Declaring Nutrition Information in the Nutrition Facts Table

Values Declared in the Nutrition Facts Table

The CFIA uses the Nutrition Labelling Compliance Test to assess the accuracy of the nutrient values on food labels and in advertising via laboratory analysis.

It is the company's responsibility to ensure that the nutrient values presented in the NFT are accurate. There are different ways to generate these values including the use of validated analytical methods by in-house or accredited laboratories or calculation by using credible databases or software. Lab analysis is generally the most accurate method of determining the nutritional profile of a given food, however, calculation may also be used if the manufacturer is confident that the results are accurate. The manufacturer must take into account various factors when choosing how to determine the nutrition values including the nature of the food, possible processing losses, seasonal variations, geographical variations, variable formulations, and so forth. The manufacturer should choose the risk management strategy best suited to the foods to be labelled.

To analyze a product, the CFIA recommends using an in-house or accredited laboratory that uses validated methods for the food to be analyzed. A list of accredited laboratories can be accessed through the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) web site.

The Food and Drug Regulations do not set out which lab methods are to be used to determine the nutrition values to include in the Nutrition Facts table. In assessing compliance, the CFIA currently uses AOAC Methods, 17th Edition, 1st Supplement, however, new methodology will be used as it becomes available. In-house methods validated through collaborative studies can also be used. The methods should be validated for the foods being analysed.

A list of validated laboratory methods and techniques can be found in Appendix 4 of CFIA's Nutrition Labelling Compliance Test.

The CFIA will not be approving or recognizing any database values or systems for use in generating nutrition data on foods. Manufacturers should research the available options if they choose to use databases or calculation software and ensure that the values generated accurately reflect the nutritional profile of the food being represented. In general, some analyses are recommended to verify the accuracy of the calculations resulting from the use of a database.

For more information on getting accurate nutrient values, refer to Health Canada's Guide to Developing Accurate Nutrient Values.

For more information on specific values found in the NFT, please refer to the section Elements within the Nutrition Facts Table.

Rounding Rules

Figures are rounded according to the rules outlined in the table Core Nutrition Information and the table: Additional Nutrition Information, which correspond to column 4 of the table following B.01.401 and the table following B.01.402 in the FDR, respectively.

Some general rounding rules to note:

  • When the first decimal place beyond the required number of significant figures is less than five, round the final significant figure downward by one unit (e.g. 984.49 rounds down to become 984)
  • When the first decimal place beyond the required number of significant figures is five or greater, round the final significant figure upward by one unit (e.g. 984.50 rounds up to become 985)
  • Rounding may be done either before or after the calculation of the % daily value (% DV)
  • Although companies may decide whether to round their label figures either before or after the calculation of the % DV, they are also responsible for meeting the Nutrition Labelling Compliance Test

Declaring Nutrients Outside the Nutrition Facts Table

Quantitative declarations of energy value and the amount of nutrients per serving of stated size are also permitted outside the Nutrition Facts table, on labels or in advertisements. Please refer to Quantitative Declarations Outside the Nutrition Facts Table for more information.

Reference Amounts

A reference amount is a specific regulated quantity of a type of food usually eaten by an individual at one sitting. Reference amounts, as established by Health Canada, are set out in Schedule M of the FDR [B.01.001, FDR] and are provided in the table Reference Amounts and Serving Sizes below. With the exception of prepackaged meals, reference amounts serve as the basis of compositional criteria for nutrient content claims and health claims [B.01.001, B.01.002A, item 1 to table to B.01.401, and Schedule M, FDR]. They are also used for determining what a single serving container is.

Unless otherwise noted, the reference amounts are for the ready-to-serve or almost ready-to-serve form of the food and are based on the main intended use of a food (e.g., milk as a beverage and not as an ingredient in recipes or when added to cereal). Where a product requires further preparation (such as the addition of water or other ingredients) and a reference amount has not been established for the unprepared form, the reference amount will be the quantity of the product required to prepare the reference amount of finished product. For example, 40 g would be the reference amount for a 40 g serving of a powdered meal replacement used to make a 250 ml shake as per directions provided for the preparation of the shake.

Reference amounts refer only to the edible portion of the food and exclude any liquid in which the solid food may be packed or canned, unless the liquid is customarily consumed with the solid food. For example, the reference amounts for olives and feta cheese do not include the brine, only the olives and the cheese, whereas canned fruit packed in fruit juice includes the fruit juice. Pork ribs would not include the bones, only the meat.

Tables: Reference Amounts and Serving Sizes

The table below outlines the reference amounts and serving sizes for various foods. The appropriate sections provide further information on these topics and will contribute to the proper use of the table.

Main Categories:

Bakery Products

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
1 Bread, excluding sweet quick-type rolls 50 g 25-70 g
(1-2 slices) – sliced
50 g – unsliced
2 Bagels, tea biscuits, scones, rolls, buns, croissants, tortillas, soft bread sticks, soft pretzels and corn bread
Pita bread
55 g 25-100 g
3 Brownies 40 g 30-100 g
4 Cake (heavy weight): 10 g or more per 2.5 cm cube, such as cheese cake, pineapple upside-down, cake with at least 35% of the finished weight as fruit, nuts, or vegetables, or any of these combined 125 g 80-150 g
5 Cake (medium weight): 4 g or more per 2.5 cm cube but less than 10g per 2.5 cm cube, such as cake with or without icing or filling, cake with less than 35% of the finished weight as fruit, nuts or vegetables or any of these combined; light weight cake with icing; Boston cream pie, cupcakes, eclairs, or cream puffs 80 g 50-125 g
6 Cake (light weight): less than 4 g per 2.5 cm cube, such as angel food, chiffon, or sponge cake without icing or filling 55 g 40-80 g
7 Coffee cakes, doughnuts, danishes, sweet rolls, sweet quick-type breads and muffins 55 g 50-100 g
8 Cookies, with or without coating or filling; graham wafers
Crackers and cheese dip pack
30 g 30-40 g
9 Crackers, hard bread sticks and melba toast 20 g 15-30 g
10 Dry breads, matzo, and rusks 30 g 15-35 g
11 Flaky type pastries, with or without filling or icing 55 g 50-90 g
12 Toaster pastries 55 g 50-80 g
13 Ice cream cones g 3-25 g
14 Croutons g 7-20 g
15 French toast, pancakes, and waffles 75 g 60-110 g prepared
(2-4 pancakes)
16 Grain-based bars with filling or partial or full coating 40 g 20-50 g
17 Grain-based bars, without filling or coating 30 g 20-50 g
18 Rice cakes and corn cakes 15 g 10-25 g
19 Pies, tarts, cobblers, turnovers, other pastries 110 g 85-120 g
(⅙ of 20 cm diameter pie or ⅛ of 23 cm pie)
20 Pie crust ⅙ of 20cm crust or
⅛ of 23cm crust
⅙ of 20cm pie or
⅛ of 23cm pie
21 Pizza crust 55 g 30-110 g
22 Taco shell, hard 30 g 20-40 g

Beverages

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
23 Carbonated and non-carbonated beverages, ice tea and wine coolers (provided they contain < 0.5% or less of alcohol) 355 ml 250-375 ml
24 Sports drinks and water 500 ml 400-600 ml
25 Coffee: regular, instant and specialty, including espresso, café au lait, flavoured and sweetened 175 ml amount to make 175-250 ml prepared
26 Tea and herbal tea:
(a) regular and instant (hot)
(b)flavoured and sweetened, prepared from mixes
175 ml
250 mL
amount to make 175-250 ml prepared
27 Cocoa and chocolate beverages (hot) 175 ml 5-15 g dry or amount to make 175-250 mL prepared

Cereals and Other Grain Products

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
28 Hot breakfast cereals, such as oatmeal, or cream of wheat 40 g dry,
250 ml prepared
30-40 g dry,
175-335 ml prepared
29 Ready-to-eat breakfast cereals, puffed and uncoated (less than 20 g per 250 ml) 15 g 10-20 g
30 Ready-to-eat breakfast cereals, puffed and coated, flaked, extruded, without fruit or nuts (20 g to 42 g per 250 ml), very high fibre cereals (with 28 g or more fibre per 100 g) 30 g 20-45 g
31 Ready-to-eat breakfast cereals, fruit and nut type, granola (weighing 43 g or more per 250 mL) and biscuit type cereals 55 g 45-80 g
(1-2 biscuits)
32 Bran and wheat germ
Milled flax seeds
Milled hemp seeds
15 g 10-20 g
33 Flours, including cornmeal 30 g 30-60 g
34 Grains, such as rice or barley 45 g dry
140 g cooked
30-45 g dry,
90-140 g cooked
35 Pastas without sauce
Gnocci
85 g dry
215 g cooked
45-100 g dry,
140-250 g cooked
36 Pastas, dry and ready-to-eat, such as fried canned chow mein noodles 25 g 20-25 g
37 Starch, such as cornstarch, potato starch, tapioca starch or wheat starch 10 g 5-15 g
38 Stuffing 100 g 75-100 g

Dairy Products and Substitutes

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
39 Cheese, including cream cheese and cheese spread, except those listed as a separate item 30 g 15-60 g
40 Cottage cheese 125 g 60-250 g
41 Cheese used as an ingredient, such as dry cottage cheese or ricotta cheese 55 g 25-100 g
42 Hard cheese, grated, such as parmesan or romano 15 g 8-30 g
43 Quark, fresh cheese and fresh dairy desserts 100 g 50-200 g
44 Cream and cream substitute, except those listed as separate item 15 ml 10-30 ml
45 Cream and cream substitute, powder g 2-4 g
46 Cream and cream substitute, aerosol or whipped 15 g 10-30 g
47 Eggnog 125 ml 60-250 ml
48 Milk, evaporated or condensed 15 ml 10-30 ml
49 Plant-based beverages, milk, buttermilk and milk-based drinks, such as chocolate milk
Smoothie (if whey/dairy is a main ingredient)
Drinkable yogurt
250 ml 125-250 ml
50 Shakes and shake substitutes such as dairy shake mix 250 ml 125-250 ml
51 Sour cream 30 ml 15-60 ml
52 Yogurt 175 g 125-225 g

Desserts

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
53 Ice cream, ice milk, frozen yogurt, sherbet
Non-dairy desserts sold in tub
125 ml 60-250 ml
54 Dairy desserts, frozen, such as cakes, bars, sandwiches or cones 125 ml 60-175 ml
55 Non-dairy desserts, frozen, such as flavoured and sweetened ice or pops, frozen fruit juices in bars or cups 75 ml 40-150 ml
56 Sundaes 250 ml 125-250 ml
57 Custard, gelatin and pudding 125 ml 80-140 g pudding,
15 g gelatin dessert (dry),
65-250 ml gelatin dessert prepared

Dessert Toppings and Fillings

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
58 Dessert toppings, such as maple butter and marshmallow cream 30 g 15-30 g
59 Cake frostings and icings
Streusal topping
35 g 25-45 g
60 Pie fillings 75 ml 40-150 mL

Egg and Egg Substitutes

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
61 Egg mixtures, such as egg foo young, scrambled eggs, omelets 110 g 50-110 g
62 Eggs, including eggs in the shell, liquid eggs and liquid egg whites 50 g

50-100 g

63 Egg substitutes 50 g 50-100 g

Fats and Oils

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
64 Butter, margarine, shortening, lard
Butter-flavoured spread (mostly vegetable oil)
10 g 5-20 g
65 Vegetable oil 10 ml 5-20 ml
66 Butter replacement, powder g 1-3 g
67 Dressings for salad 30 ml 15-30 ml
68 Mayonnaise, sandwich spread and mayonnaise-type dressing 15 ml 8-30 ml
69 Oil, spray type 0.5 g 0.5 g

Marine and Fresh Water Animals

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
70 Canned anchovies, anchovy paste and caviarTable Note 3 15 g 15-60 g
71 Marine and fresh water animals with sauce, such as fish with cream sauce or shrimp with lobster sauce
Raw fish with sauce
140 g cooked 90-140g
72 Marine and fresh water animals without sauce, such as plain or fried fish or shellfish, or fish or shellfish cakes, with or without breading or batter 125 g raw
100 g cooked
85-130g raw, fresh, frozen
60-100 g cooked
73 Marine and fresh water animals, cannedTable Note 3 55 g 50-100 g
74 Marine and fresh water animals, smoked or pickled, or spreadsTable Note 3 55 g 50-55 g

Fruits and Fruit Juices

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
75 Fruit, fresh, canned or frozen, coated or uncoated, except those listed as a separate item
Apple sauce
140 g
150 ml cannedTable Note 3
110-160 g fresh or frozen,
120-150 ml canned
76 Candied or pickled fruitTable Note 3 30 g 30-40 g
77 Dried fruit, such as raisins, dates or figs 40 g 30-40 g
78 Fruit for garnish or flavour, such as maraschino cherriesTable Note 3 g 1-3 cherries
79 Fruit relishes 60 ml 50-100 ml
80 Avocado, used as an ingredient 30 g 20-40 g
81 Cranberries, lemons and limes, used as ingredients 55 g 50-100 g
82 Watermelon, cantaloupe, honeydew and other melons 150 g 75-300 g
83 Juices, nectars and fruit drinks represented for use as substitutes for fruit juices 250 ml 175-250 ml
84 Juices, used as ingredients, such as lemon juice or lime juice ml 5-10 ml

Legumes

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
85 Bean curd (tofu) or tempehTable Note 3 85 g 85-100 g
86 Beans, peas and lentils, such as white beans, kidney beans, romano beans, soybeans or chick peasTable Note 3 100 g dry,
250 ml cooked or canned
35-100 g dry,
100-250 ml cooked or canned

Meat, Poultry, Their Products and SubstitutesTable Note 4

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
87 Pork rinds and bacon 54 g uncooked
15 g cooked
30-80 g uncooked,
10-30 g cooked
88 Beef, pork and poultry breakfast strips 30 g uncooked
15 g cooked
15-60 g uncooked
10-30 g cooked
89 Dried meat and poultry, such as jerky, dried beef or parma ham, as well as sausage products with a water activity of 0.90 or less, such as salami, dried thuringer or cervelat 30 g 15-60 g
90 Luncheon meats such as bologna, blood pudding, minced luncheon roll, liver sausage, mortadella, ham and cheese loaf or headcheese; pâté, sandwich spread, potted meat food product; taco fillings; meat pie fillings and cretons 75 g uncooked,
55 g cooked
35-100 g uncooked,
25-75 g cooked
91 Sausage products, such as linked sausage, Vienna sausage, wieners, breakfast sausage, frankfurters, pork sausage, bratwurst, kielbasa, Polish sausage, summer sausage, smoked sausage, smoked country sausage, pepperoni, knackwurst, thuringer and cervelat
Sausage made with combination of seafood and pork (mostly seafood)
75 g uncooked,
55 g cooked
75-165 g uncooked,
25-115 g cooked
92 Cuts of meat and poultry without sauce, and ready-to-cook cuts, with or without breading or batter, including marinated, tenderized and injected cuts
Shish kebab (only marinated meat, no vegetables)
Whole chicken (no stuffing)
Turkey roast (no stuffing)
125 g raw,
100 g cooked
80-130 g raw,
50-100 g cooked
93 Patties (including veggie burger patties), cutlettes, chopettes, steakettes, meatballs, sausage meat and ground meat, with or without breading or batter
Falafels
Corn dog on a stick (breaded)
100 g raw,
60 g cooked
80-130 g raw,
50-100 g cooked
94 Cured meat products such as cured ham, dry cured ham, back bacon, cured pork back, dry cured cappicolo, corned beef, pastrami, country ham, cured pork shoulder picnic, cured poultry ham products, smoked meat or pickled meat 85 g raw,
55 g cooked
50-110 g raw,
30-100 g cooked
95 Canned meat and poultryTable Note 3 55 g 50-100 g
96 Meat and poultry with sauce, such as meat in barbecue sauce or turkey with gravy, but excluding combination dishes 140 g 90-150 g

Miscellaneous category

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
97 Baking powder, baking soda, pectin and yeast 0.6 g 0.5-2 g
98 Baking decorations, such as coloured sugars or sprinkles for cookies g 3-5 g
99 Bread crumbs and batter mixes 30 g 15-60 g
100 Cooking wine 30 ml 15-60 ml
101 Cocoa powder g g
102 Non-alcoholic drink mixers, such as pina colada or daiquiri 250 ml amount to make 175-280 ml prepared (without ice)
103 Chewing gum g 3-5 g
104 Salad and potato toppers, such as salad crunchies, salad crispins or substitutes for bacon bits g 5-15 g
105 Salt and salt substitute, as well as seasoned salt such as garlic salt
Seasoning products with salt (e.g. vegetarian seasoning)
Coating mix (with salt as one of main ingredients)
g 0.5-1.5 g
106 Spices and herbs (no salt) 0.5 g 0.5-1.0 g

Combination Dishes

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
107

Measurable with a cup, such as casserole, hash, macaroni and cheese with or without meat, pot pie, spaghetti with sauce, stir fry, meat or poultry casserole, baked or refried beans, wieners and beans, meat chili, chili with beans, creamed chipped beef, beef or poultry ravioli in sauce, beef stroganoff, poultry à la king, Brunswick stew, goulash, stew, ragout or poutine, rice and vegetables, butter chicken with rice
Shepherd's pie

Note: If dish is measurable with a cup but net quantity and serving size declared in grams, item 108 applies

250 ml 200-375g or
200-375 ml
108 Not measurable with a cup, such as burritos, egg rolls, enchiladas, pizza (considered to be "without sauce"), pizza rolls, sausage rolls, pastry rolls, cabbage rolls, quiche, sandwiches, crackers and meat or poultry lunch-type packages, gyros, burger on a bun, frank on a bun, calzones, tacos, pockets stuffed with meat, lasagna, chicken cordon bleu, stuffed vegetables with meat or poultry, shish kabobs (if combination of meat and vegetables), empanadas, fajitas, souvlaki (if combination of meat and vegetables), meat pie or tourtière
Meat-filled cannelloni, no sauce
Stuffed turkey roast
Stuffed chicken
Dish measurable with a cup but net quantity and serving size declared in grams
140 g without gravy or sauce,
195 g with gravy or sauce
90-300 g
including gravy or sauce
109 Hors d'oeuvres 50 g 25-100 g

Nuts and Seeds

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
110 Nuts and seeds, not for use as snacks: whole, chopped, sliced, slivered or ground 30 g shelled 30-75 g
111 Butters, pastes and creams, other than peanut butter 30 g 15-45 g
112 Peanut butter 15 g 15-30 g
113 Flours, such as coconut flour 15 g 10-20 g

Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes and Yams

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
114 French fries, hash browns, skins and pancakes 85 g frozen French fries,
70 g prepared
70-110 g
115 Mashed, candied, stuffed, or with sauce 140 g 100-200 g
116 Plain, fresh, cannedTable Note 3 or frozen 110 g fresh or frozen,
125 g vacuum-packed,
160 g canned
110-150 g

Salads

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
117 Salads, such as egg, fish, shellfish, bean, fruit, vegetable, meat, ham or poultry salad, except those listed as a separate item 100 g 75-150 g
118 Gelatin salad 120 g 100-175 g
119 Pasta or potato salad 140 g 100-200 g

Sauces, Dips, Gravies and Condiments

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
120 Sauces for dipping, such as barbecue, hollandaise, tartar, mustard or sweet and sour sauce 30 ml 15-45 ml
121 Dips, such as legume or dairy-based 30 g 15-45 g
122 Major main entrée sauce, such as spaghetti sauce 125 ml 100-200 ml
123 Minor main entrée sauce such as pizza sauce, pesto sauce, or other sauces used as toppings such as white sauce, cheese sauce, salsa, cocktail sauce or gravy 60 ml 50-100 ml
124 Major condiments, such as ketchup, steak sauce, soy sauce, vinegar, teriyaki sauce or marinades 15 ml 10-20 ml
125 Minor condiments, such as horseradish, hot sauce, mustard, or Worcestershire sauce
Liquid smoke
ml 5-10 ml

Snacks

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
126 Chips, pretzels, popcorn, extruded snacks, grain-based snack mixes and fruit-based snacks, such as fruit chips
Pita chips
50 g 40-60 g
127 Nuts or seeds for use as snacks 50 g shelled 40-60 g
128 Meat or poultry snack food sticks 20 g 15-25 g

Soups

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
129 All varieties 250 ml 175-250 ml prepared,
85-125 ml condensed,
15 g dehydrated or dry

Sugars and Sweets

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
130 Candies, including chocolate bars and other chocolate products, except those listed as a separate item 40 g 30-70 g
131 Hard candies, except those listed as a separate item 15 g 15-30 g
132 Baking candies, such as chocolate chips 15 g 10-20 g
133 Breath mints g 1-3 g
134 Roll-type hard candies and mini size hard candies in dispenser packages g 5-10 g
135 Confectioner's or icing sugar 30 g 15-60 g
136 Bread spreads, except those listed as a separate item, honey and molasses 20 g 15-25 g
137 Jams, jellies, marmalades, fruit butters and spreads 15 ml 10-20 ml
138 Marshmallows 30 g 25-50 g
139 Sugars, except those listed as a separate item g 4-5 g
140 Sugar substitute amount equivalent in sweetness to 4g sugar amount equivalent in sweetness to 4-5 g sugar
141 Syrups, including chocolate, maple and corn syrup 30 ml as ingredient,
60 ml other uses
30-60 ml

Vegetables

Item Product Category Reference AmountTable Note 1 Serving SizeTable Note 2
142 Vegetables without sauce, including cream style corn and stewed tomatoes, but not including vegetables without sauce listed as a separate item
Onion rings
Breaded zucchini sticks
85 g fresh or frozen,
125 ml cannedTable Note 3
70-100 g fresh, frozen
143 Vegetables with sauce 110 g fresh or frozen,
125 ml canned
95-125 g fresh or frozen,
80-175 ml canned
144 Vegetables primarily used for garnish or flavouring, fresh, canned or frozen, but not dried, such as parsley or garlic g 4-5 g
145 Chili pepper and green onion 30 g 25-45 g
146 Seaweed
Dehydrated mushrooms
15 g 10-20 g
147 Lettuce and sprouts 65 g 50-75 g
148 Vegetable juice and vegetable drink 250 ml 125-250 ml
149 OlivesTable Note 3
Sun-dried tomato packed in oil
15 g 10-20 g
3 to 5 olives
1 to 2 sundried tomatoes
150 PicklesTable Note 3
Artichoke hearts
30 g 1 dill pickle, 2 mini-dills or gherkins
1 artichoke heart
151 Relish 15 ml 10-20 ml
152 Vegetable pastes, such as tomato paste 30 ml 25-45 ml
153 Vegetable sauce or purée, such as tomato sauce or tomato purée 60 ml 50-75 ml

Note: Items in italics are not included in Schedule M of the Food and Drug Regulations, but were added upon confirmation with Health Canada.

Daily Intake

Reasonable Daily Intake for Various Foods (Schedule K)

Note: "Reasonable Daily Intake" (or Schedule K) should not be confused with "Recommended Daily Intake".

The Reasonable Daily Intake is used to evaluate, for regulatory purposes, the nutritional contribution of specific foods to the diet. Reasonable Daily Intakes are used as the basis for determining the amounts of vitamin and mineral nutrients that may be present in the food when they are added. A food's protein rating is determined from the quality of the protein (i.e., the protein efficiency ratio) and the quantity of protein provided by a Reasonable Daily Intake.

The Reasonable Daily Intake for most foods is considered to be one average serving of the food. However, in the case of foods such as milk, bread or butter, where several servings may be consumed daily, a reasonable intake has been estimated considering the food habits of Canadians.

A "Reasonable Daily Intake" of a food named in column I of Schedule K, is the amount of that food set out in column II.

Reasonable Daily Intake for Various Foods (Schedule K of the FDR)

Item Column I
Name and Description
Column II
Reasonable Daily Intake
1. Alimentary Pastes, dry oz. 85 g
2. Bacon (side), simulated meat product that resembles side bacon, (cooked) oz. 28 g
3. Beverage Bases and Mixes, Flavoured, for Addition to Milk (ready-to-serve) 16 fl. oz. 454 ml
4. Bread, 5 slices 5.3 oz. 150 g
5. Butter oz. 57 g
6. Buttermilk 30 fl. oz. 852 ml
7. Cereals, Breakfast or Infant oz. 28 g
8. Cereals, puffed 0.5 oz. 14 g
9. Cheese (other than Cottage Cheese) oz. 57 g
10. Cheese, Cottage 3.5 oz. 100 g
11. Condensed Milk 15 fl. oz. 426 ml
12. Cream, whipping oz. 57 g
13. Egg, yolk-replaced egg 3.5 oz. 100 g
14. Evaporated Milk, Evaporated Skim Milk, Evaporated Partly Skimmed Milk 30 fl. oz.
(reconstituted to original volume)
852 ml
(reconstituted to original volume)
15. Fish, Shell Fish 3.5 oz. 100 g
16. Fruits, dried oz. 57 g
17. Fruits, (other than banana, lemon, lime, watermelon) 3.5 oz. 100 g
18. Fruits, Banana 5.3 oz. 150 g
19. Fruits, Lemon 1.8 oz. 50 g
20. Fruits, Lime 1.8 oz. 50 g
21. Fruits, Watermelon oz. 200 g
22. Fruit Drinks, Fruit Nectars (ready-to-serve) fl. oz. 114 ml
23. Fruit Drink Bases, Mixes and Concentrates (ready-to-serve) fl. oz. 114 ml
24. Fruit Juices (other than lemon juice and lime juice) fl. oz. 114 ml
25. Fruit Juices, Lemon fl. oz. 28 ml
26. Fruit Juices, Lime fl. oz. 28 ml
27. Ice Cream, Ice Milk 3.5 oz. 100 g
28. Infant Formulas, Prepared (ready-to-serve) As directed by label As directed by label
29. Instant Breakfast, Ready Breakfast (ready-to-serve) As directed by label As directed by label
30. Margarine oz. 57 g
31. Meat Products 3.5 oz. 100 g
32. Meat Product Extenders 3.5 oz. 100 g
33. Extended Meat Products 3.5 oz. 100 g
34. Milk, whole 30 fl. oz. 852 ml
35. Milk Powder (reconstituted and ready-to-serve) 30 fl. oz. 852 ml
36. (naming the flavour) Milk 30 fl. oz. 852 ml
37. Molasses 1.5 oz. 43 g
38. Nuts oz. 28 g
39. Peanut Butter oz. 28 g
40. Poultry Products 3.5 oz. 100 g
41. Extended Poultry Products 3.5 oz. 100 g
42. Poultry Product Extenders 3.5 oz. 100 g
43. Simulated Meat Products excluding a simulated meat product that resembles side bacon 3.5 oz. 100 g
44. Simulated Poultry Products 3.5 oz. 100 g
45. Skim Milk, Partly Skimmed Milk 30 fl. oz. 852 ml
46. (naming the flavour) Skim Milk, (naming the flavour) Partly Skimmed Milk 30 fl. oz. 852 ml
47. Skim Milk Powder, Partly Skimmed Milk Powder (reconstituted and ready-to-serve) 30 fl. oz. 852 ml
48. Skim Milk with Added Milk Solids, Partly Skimmed Milk with Added Milk Solids 30 fl. oz. 852 ml
49. (naming the flavour) Skim Milk with Added Milk Solids, (naming the flavour) Partly Skimmed Milk with Added Milk Solids 30 fl. oz. 852 ml
50. Soup (ready-to-serve) fl. oz. 200 ml
51. Sterilized Milk 30 fl. oz. 852 ml
52. Vegetable Juices fl. oz. 114 ml
53. Vegetable Drinks fl. oz. 114 ml
54. Vegetable Drink Concentrates, Mixes and Bases (ready-to-serve) fl. oz. 114 ml
55. Vegetable (other than baked beans and cooked potatoes) 3.5 oz. 100 g
56. Vegetables, baked beans 8.5 oz. 250 g
57. Vegetables, cooked potatoes oz. 200 g
58. Yeast 0.5 oz. 14 g
59. Yogurt, plain oz. 150 g

Recommended Daily Intake (RDI)

Note: Recommended Daily Intake should not be confused with Reasonable Daily Intake (Schedule K).

Recommended Daily Intake (RDI) pertains to vitamins and mineral nutrients. It means the amount of a vitamin or mineral nutrient set out in Table I of Divisions 1 and 2 of Part D of the Food and Drug Regulations [D.01.001, FDR].

In the Nutrition Facts table, the term "Daily Value" is synonymous with "Recommended Daily Intake" for vitamins and mineral nutrients [B.01.001, FDR].

The RDI is one of the two reference points upon which the % Daily Value is based. (The other reference point is the Reference Standard which pertains to specific nutrients other than vitamins and mineral nutrients.)

The RDI's are also used to set criteria for the nutrient content claims for vitamins and mineral nutrients.

The table Recommended Daily Intake which follows presents the established Recommended Daily Intakes for vitamins and mineral nutrients. Recommended Daily Intakes are given for two different age groups: children less than two years of age and persons two years of age or older. When using the table, be sure to use the appropriate column.

Recommended Daily Intake
[D.01.013, D.02.006, FDR]
Vitamin or Mineral Nutrient Units Persons
2 years of age or older
Infants and Children
less than 2 years old
Vitamin A RE 1000 400
Vitamin D µg 5 10
Vitamin E mg 10 3
Vitamin C mg 60 20
Thiamin, Thiamine or Vitamin B1 mg 1.3 0.45
Riboflavin or Vitamin B2 mg 1.6 0.55
Niacin NE 23 8
Vitamin B6 mg 1.8 0.7
Folacin or Folate µg 220 65
Vitamin B12 µg 2 0.3
Pantothenic Acid or Pantothenate mg 7 2
Vitamin K µg 80 30
Biotin µg 30 8
Calcium mg 1100 500
Phosphorus mg 1100 500
Magnesium mg 250 55
Iron mg 14 7
Zinc mg 9 4
Iodide µg 160 55
Selenium µg 50 15
Copper mg 2 0.5
Manganese mg 2 1.2
Chromium µg 120 12
Molybdenum µg 75 15
Chloride mg 3400 1000

RE = retinol equivalents
µg = micrograms
mg = milligrams
NE = niacin equivalents

Weighted Recommended Nutrient Intake

Weighted Recommended Nutrient Intakes (WRNI) became part of the Food and Drug Regulations in 1996. They are considered to represent the nutritional needs of the total population because they are weighted according to the age and sex distribution of the Canadian population.

The Weighted Recommended Nutrient intake is used to determine whether a food provides a sufficient amount of a nutrient to qualify for a health claim pertaining to:

  • sodium, potassium and hypertension [item 1 (b) in column 2 of the table following B.01.603, FDR], and
  • saturated fat, trans fat, and heart disease [item 3 (b) in column 2 of the table following B.01.603, FDR]
Weighted Recommended Nutrient Intake for Vitamins
[D.01.013, D.02.006, FDR)]
Item Column I
Vitamin
Column II
Units
Column III
Amount
1. Biotin µg 90
2. Folacin µg 195
3. Niacin NE 16
4. Pantothenic Acid mg 5.0
5. Riboflavin mg 1.2
6. Thiamine mg 1.0
7. Vitamin A RE 870
8. Vitamin B6 mg 1.0
9. Vitamin B12 µg 1.0
10. Vitamin C mg 34
11. Vitamin D µg 3.0
12. Vitamin E mg 7.0
Weighted Recommended Nutrient Intake for Mineral Nutrients
[D.01.013, D.02.006, FDR]
Item Column I
Mineral Nutrient
Column II
Units
Column III
Amount
1. Calcium mg 780
2. Iodide µg 155
3. Iron mg 10
4. Phosphorus mg 885
5. Magnesium mg 210
6. Zinc mg 10

µg = micrograms
NE = niacin equivalents
mg = milligrams
RE = retinol equivalents

Reference Standards

Reference Standards pertain to the amount of specific nutrients (other than vitamins and mineral nutrients), set out in the table to B.01.001.1(2) of the Food and Drug Regulations.

In the Nutrition Facts table, the term "Daily Value" is synonymous with "Reference Standard" for these nutrients.

The Reference Standards form one of the two reference points upon which the % Daily Value is based. (The other reference point is the Recommended Daily Intake which pertains to vitamins and mineral nutrients.)

The Reference Standards are reproduced in the table Reference Standards below.

Reference Standards
[B.01.001.1(2), FDR]
Column 1
Nutrient
Column 2
Amount
1. Fat 65 g
2. The sum of saturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids 20 g
3. Cholesterol 300 mg
4. Carbohydrate 300 g
5. Fibre 25 g
6. Sodium 2400 mg
7. Potassium 3500 mg

Daily Value and % Daily Value

The Daily Value (DV) is the reference point upon which the % Daily Value is based. The Daily Value is equivalent to either the Recommended Daily Intake (for vitamins and minerals) or the Reference Standard (for other nutrients) [B.01.001, FDR].

The % Daily Value is a relative amount of the nutrient in a serving compared to an amount expected to be consumed in the daily diet. (100% Daily Value is based on a 2000 Calorie daily diet). For example, 10% DV Vitamin A means: 1 serving of this food provides 10% of the Vitamin A a person should consume in one day.

The % Daily Value of the nutrient in one serving, rounded as indicated in the Table: Core Nutrition Information and Table: Additional Nutrition Information, is declared in the Nutrition Facts table. It is calculated as:

% Daily Value = Amount of nutrient per serving ÷ Daily value of nutrient X 100

For nutrients present in a food in quantities greater than 100 percent of the Daily Value, the true percentage must be declared (e.g., 110% DV), taking into account the rounding rules.

The following example indicates how to calculate the % Daily Value of vitamins, fat and the sum of saturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids using the Recommended Daily Intake for the vitamins and the Reference Amounts for the remaining nutrients.

125 g of condensed tomato soup contains:

  • 72 RE vitamin A
  • 70 mg vitamin C
  • 0.09 mg thiamine
  • 15 µg folate
  • 1.5 g total fat
  • 0.7 g saturated fat + trans fat (consisting of 0.4 g saturated fat and 0.3 g transfat)

To express these quantities as a percentage of the Daily Value, divide each nutrient by the Recommended Daily Intake or by the Reference Standard, as applicable for that nutrient and multiply by 100. Note that the figures are rounded as specified in the Table: Core Nutrition Information and Table: Additional Nutrition Information. The percent Daily Values below are calculated using the amounts after rounding. (Note: since this example is not a food intended solely for children less than two years of age, it uses the RDI in the column "Persons 2 years of age or older"):

  • For Vitamin A: 72 / 1000 X 100 = 7.2%
    Rounded to 8% as per the rounding rules in item 13 in the table: Core Nutrition Information.
  • For Vitamin C: 70 / 60 X 100 = 116.7%
    Rounded to 120% as per the rounding rules in item 13 in the table: Core Nutrition Information.
  • For Thiamine: 0.09 / 1.3 X 100 = 6.9%
    Rounded to 6% as per the rounding rules in item 14 in the table: Additional Nutrition Information.
  • For Folate: 15 / 220 X 100 = 6.8%
    Rounded to 6% as per the rounding rules in item 14 in the table: Additional Nutrition Information.
  • For Total Fat: 1.5 / 65 X 100 = 2.3%
    Rounded to 2% as per the rounding rules in item 3 in the table: Additional Nutrition Information.
  • For Saturated Fat + Trans Fat: 0.7 / 20 X 100 = 3.5%
    Rounded to 4% as per the rounding rules in item 3 in the table: Additional Nutrition Information.

It is the manufacturer's responsibility to ensure that the declared nutrient value accurately reflects the nutrient content of the product. The manufacturer may calculate the % DV based on rounded values or absolute values of each nutrient. When deciding whether to use the unrounded or rounded values, the manufacturer should consider the % DV that will fall within the acceptable tolerances (as stated in the Nutrition Labelling Compliance Test), provide the greatest consistency on the food label, and prevent any unnecessary consumer confusion.

Additional Information (Q&A)

Single Serving Products

How does one determine a serving for pie crust if the reference amount is not given in grams or millilitres, only a fraction of a pie crust? Item 20 of Schedule M of the FDR for pie crust is ⅙ of a 20 cm crust or ⅛ of a 23 cm crust.

B.01.002A 2(b) or (c) of the FDR require reference amounts in grams or millilitres to calculate single servings. As this does not apply in this case, B.01.002A(2)(a) must be used in this situation : the quantity of food that can reasonably be consumed by one person at a single eating occasion. This is determined based on presentation and amount, i.e. a tart shell with an area smaller than the reference amount (< 52 cm2) would be considered a single serving as would a shell presented as the basis of a single meal, e.g. lunch-sized quiche shell.

Would a granola bar with a net weight of 75 grams be considered a single serving, even though the reference amount for this type of product is 30 grams?

Section B.01.002A of the Food and Drug Regulations state that a serving of stated size shall be the quantity of the food in the package if the quantity of the food can reasonably be consumed by one person at a single sitting. In this case, the granola bar meets this condition so the serving size must be the entire content of the package, i.e. 75 grams.

Can the serving size for a (drained) canned meat product be declared as "Per ½ can drained (46g)" when the reference amount is 50g and the suggested serving size is 50g to 100g? Is there any flexibility in the serving size range or should this be treated as a single serving container and declared as "Per 1 can drained (92g)"?

The manufacturer has some flexibility in determining serving sizes. This serving size is based on the edible portion of the food as sold, and is the amount of food that one adult would reasonably eat at one eating occasion. However, while companies may have some flexibility in choosing their serving sizes, B.01.002A(2)(b) of the Food and Drug Regulations (FDR) states that "a serving of stated size shall be the net quantity of the food in the package if […] the reference amount of the food is less than 100 g or 100 mL and the package contains less than 200% of that reference amount[…]"

Since the reference amount of canned meat is 55 g, which is under 100 g, and since the package (1 can) contains less than 200% (200% x 55 g = 110 g) of the reference amount, the serving size must be the net quantity of the product, as per regulations.

Serving Size Declaration

When stating serving size (as gram weight) for meat with bones (e.g., chicken wings or drumsticks), should it be specified that the serving size represents only the edible portion and not the bones?

The nutrient information presented in the Nutrition Facts table is based on a specific amount of food (edible portion). The words "edible portion" should be included to clarify that the weight of the serving includes only the portion of the food that is consumed, i.e. the chicken and not the bones of the chicken.

For example: "Serving Size 1 Drumstick (100g edible portion)"

"Pour" or "par" for the Nutrition Facts table serving size

When are "par" and "pour" used for the serving size in a French Nutrition Facts table?

"Par" and "pour" are synonyms and can usually be switched. "Pour" tends to be more widely used when there is a specific number of something, for example; "per 3 pieces" would be "pour 3 morceaux". If the serving size is ½ cup, one would be more likely to use "par ½ tasse". If one wanted to use "pour" for a serving size of a ½ cup, the appropriate phrase would be "pour une ½ tasse".

"Per approximately" or "per about" in the serving size

Can "about" or "approximately" be used in the consumer friendly measure for serving size?

"Per about 5 pieces (xx g)" , "per approximately 1 fillet (xx g) " or other similar declarations are allowed when there is variability in the consumer friendly part of the measure. It is not permitted for uniformly sized products, e.g. stacked potato chips, most cookies, crackers, etc.

Example: a box of 4 fish fillets, the net weight of the product is 500 g and each fillet is roughly 125 g. However, due to natural variation they are not completely uniform, one could be 115 g, another 135 g. In cases like this it is acceptable to use "per approximately 1 fillet (125 g)" which is meant to indicate to the consumer that 125 g is roughly the size of each individual fillet. The metric measure must be a precise number and the nutrient values must meet the compliance test for that metric value.

Ranges in the serving size

Is it acceptable to declare serving size in the following manner – "per 5-6 onion rings", "per 6-8 scallops"?

No. "About" or "approximately" (see above) sufficiently indicates to the consumer that the weight corresponds to roughly that number, allowing for variations in size of irregular pieces. A range in the serving size would increase the room for varied interpretations by the consumer (e.g. "are those 4-6 big onion rings or 4-6 small ones?"). It is the manufacturer's responsibility to make as accurate a representation as possible.

Use of "per 100 g" exclusively as the serving size

When can "per 100 g" be used on its own as the serving size declaration in the Nutrition Facts table, without a consumer friendly measure?

"Per 100 g" can be used on multi-serving meats (e.g. roast beef), poultry (e.g. whole chicken), fish fillets, or catch weight meat, poultry or fish products that cannot divided up into pieces or slices of similar size. It can also be used on deli meats sold in chubs or industrial formats or on single serving containers when 100 g is the net quantity of the container. These situations are covered under the Serving Size section. Examples of products that may use "per 100 g" alone as the serving size declaration are:

  • whole roast beef
  • whole chickens
  • whole turkeys
  • chub/industrial format of salami or other deli meats
  • steaks, pork chops, when multi-serving variable size
  • side of salmon
  • whole hams
  • whole fish
  • fish fillets (with the exception of uniform preportioned ones)
  • mixed trays of drumsticks, thighs, chicken breasts

When "per 100 g" cannot be used exclusively as the serving size

When can "per 100 g" (or other metric weight) on its own not be used as the serving size declaration in the Nutrition Facts Table, i.e. a consumer friendly (visual) measure must be provided?

Anything other than the above Q & A. Examples of products that must include a consumer friendly measure as part of the serving size declaration, with examples, are:

  • ground meat and poultry (e.g. per ½ cup (xx g))
  • bacon (e.g. per 2 slices (xx g))
  • beef jerky (e.g. serving about 1 piece (xx g))
  • hamburger patties (e.g. per 1 patty (xx g))
  • stewing meat (e.g. per 1 cup (xx g))
  • prepackaged sliced deli meats (e.g. per about 2 slices (55 g))
  • non-uniform chocolate Easter bunnies (e.g. per ¼ package (xx g))

Note: "about" or "approximately" may be used in the consumer friendly measure when the products vary in size and may not be exactly the weight indicated.

U.S. versus Canadian household measures

Can the U.S. common household measure be used in the serving size declaration in the Nutrition Facts table e.g. 1 cup (240 ml)?

Since Canadian measuring devices are used in Canadian homes, the common household measure declaration must be Canadian. Most measuring cups and spoons sold in Canada reflect the metric equivalents of the household measures, e.g. 250 mL for a cup and 15 mL for a tablespoon.

Basis of Information – Foods in Liquid

What is the basis of nutrition information for foods sold in liquids such as oil, brine, syrup?

Nutrition information is based on the edible portion of the food as sold. For foods sold in a liquid, the serving size should be based on the typical consumption of the product.

Examples:

  • The liquids of pickles, artichokes, olives, etc. are packed is not normally consumed, therefore the nutrient information should be based on the drained product per pickle (xx g).
  • The syrup in which canned fruit is packed is typically consumed with the fruit per ½ cup (xx ml).
  • The oil in sardines or tuna is not typically consumed, therefore the nutrient information should be based on the drained product: per xx sardines (xx g) or for tuna in oil: per 1 can (xx g).
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