Identity and Principal Place of Business
How to Declare Changes to Identity and Principal Place of Business

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The identity and principal place of business of the legal entity that is responsible for prepackaged foods may change over time. The following outlines the CFIA approach when these transitions take place.

Note: the scenarios outlined below relate only to the acceptability of the identity and principal place of business declaration. Any violations found on other parts of the label during such a transition may be subject to enforcement action.

When a Company Changes Addresses

In general, there is no objection to a company using up labels with an obsolete address for the time period required to produce new labels, as long as during this time the company has mail-forwarding instructions at the post office.

When a Company is Sold

  • When "company A" is sold to "company B"
    In general, there is no objection to "company B" using up old labels from "company A" if "company B" continues to do business at "company A's" old addresses.

    If "company B" does move to a new address, see "when a company changes addresses" for details.

  • When "company A" is sold to "company B", and as a result becomes a subsidiary of "company B"
    In general, there is no objection to "company A" (the subsidiary of company B) using their original labels if they continue to operate with the same company name and do business at the same location.

When a Brand Name is Sold

When "company A" sells their brand name (not its company name) to "company B", and company B operates at the company B address, new labels will be required right away.

When a Company is Going Out of Business

In general, there is no objection for the company which is going out of business to use existing labels during this transition period.

When a Company has Gone Out of Business

When a company has gone out of business, their product labels are not acceptable for use by any company.

When Products are Already Sold to Distributors or Retailers have Old Labels

In general, there is no objection to the use of old labels that are on products already sold to distributors (definition).

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