Sweeteners
Mandatory Labelling of Sweeteners

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Like all food additives, sweeteners must be declared in the List of Ingredients of the prepackaged foods which they are present in [B.01.008, FDR]. See Order of Ingredients for more information.

In addition, several sweeteners and foods containing sweeteners are subject to the following mandatory labelling requirements:

Aspartame, Sucralose, Acesulfame-potassium and/or Neotame Labelling

The following table outlines what must be declared on the labels of prepackaged products that contain aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame-potassium and/or neotame when present in a food or sold as a table-top sweetener [B.01.014, B.01.015, B.01.016, B.01.017, B.01.019, B.01.020, B.01.022, B.01.023, FDR].

Labelling Requirements for Prepackaged Products that Contain Aspartame, Sucralose Acesulfame-Potassium and Neotame
Labelling Requirements In a Food Table-top Sweetener
A statement on the principal display panel to the effect that the food contains or is sweetened with "aspartame", "sucralose", "acesulfame-potassium", and/or "neotame". Check Check
If aspartame is used in conjunction with other sweeteners, a statement to the effect that the food contains, or is sweetened with "aspartame", and the name(s) of the other sweetener(s).
[e.g. "sweetened with aspartame and xylitol"]
Check
If sucralose, acesulfame-potassium or neotame are used in conjunction with other sweeteners, sweetening agents, or both, a statement to the effect that the food contains, or is sweetened with "sucralose", "acesulfame-potassium" or "neotame", as the case may be, and the name of other sweetener(s), sweetening agent(s) or both.
[e.g. "sweetened with sucralose, fructose and sugar"]
Check
When the three statements above are required, they must be declared in letters that are at least the same size and prominence as the numerical portion of the net quantity declaration. Check Check
A statement declaring the sweetness per serving, expressed in terms of the amount of sugar required to produce an equivalent degree of sweetness, grouped with the list of ingredients [FDR B.01.008(1)]. Check
A statement setting out the "aspartame", "sucralose", "acesulfame-potassium" and/or "neotame" content expressed in milligrams per serving size, grouped with the list of ingredients [FDR B.01.008(1)]. This statement cannot appear in the Nutrition Facts Table. Check Check
In the case of aspartame, a statement, grouped with the list of ingredients [FDR B.01.008(1)], to the effect that aspartame contains phenylalanine. Check Check
A Nutrition Facts Table [B.01.401(4)(d), FDR]. Check Check

Polydextrose Labelling Requirements

Polydextrose is a permitted food additive synthesized from dextrose (glucose). The label of a food containing polydextrose must indicate the amount of polydextrose, expressed in grams per serving of stated size [B.01.018]. The amount of polydextrose must be included in the total amount of carbohydrates declared in the Nutrition Facts Table. See Elements within the Nutrition Facts Table for more information.

For more information on polydextrose, refer to Health Canada's web page on Sugar Alcohols and Polydextrose.

Sugar Alcohols Labelling Requirements

Sugar alcohols (definition) (i.e. polyols) provide energy in the form of carbohydrates similarly to sweetening agents (i.e. white and brown table sugars). They are also known as sugar relatives, and provide fewer calories per gram than typical sweetening agents. The sugar alcohols (i.e. polyols) that are permitted for use as food additives in Canada are: hydrogenated starch hydrolysates, isomalt, lactitol, maltitol, maltitol syrup, mannitol, sorbitol, sorbitol syrup, xylitol and erythritol.

When these sugar alcohols are present in a food, their total content must be declared in the Nutrition Facts Table in grams per stated serving size [FDR B.01.402]. See Elements within the Nutrition Facts Table for more information.

For more information on sugar alcohols, refer to Health Canada's web page on Sugar Alcohols and Polydextrose.

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