Annex E: Equine Information Document

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Table of Contents

E.1 Introduction

It is mandatory for all operators of Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) inspected facilities in Canada engaged in equine slaughter for edible purposes to have complete identity and medical records for all animals (domestic and imported) presented for slaughter. These records are referred to as equine information documents.

A completed individual animal information document is referred to as an Equine Information Document (EID) and contains a standardized description of the animal, as well as a comprehensive record of the equine's medical treatment for at least the preceding six months. The various options for identification, including visual and written descriptions, are listed in section E.2. The information provided in section E.2 shall be used by equine owners as an aid to provide the required information for individual equine animals to the operator. The completed EID shall accompany the equine, at the time of ownership transfer, to the buyer of the animal. The EID requires a signed declaration by the owner of the equine as to the accuracy of the information recorded in the EID. A web link providing access to an interactive PDF individual animal EID template which may be used by equine owners is provided in section E.2 of this annex.

Provisions have been included in the EID (see section E.2) for a declaration by a transient agent (a person who maintains responsibility for the care of equine from time of purchase for slaughter until arrival to a meat processing establishment in Canada) to ensure that equine are presented for slaughter with a continuous medical history. The transient agent declaration may not be used in lieu of an ownership declaration. In the case of more than one transient agent caring for the animal(s) at different times, the transient agent declaration may be repeated on the EID as many times as necessary to cover the time period prior to slaughter.

An owner of a group or groups of equine animals assembled with the intention of utilizing the animals for human consumption may be eligible to present the animals to slaughter via a group declaration in lieu of an individual animal EID declaration. For details refer to section E.4 of this annex. Group identification of equine animals intended to be presented for slaughter for human consumption must be pre-approved by the CFIA.

E.2 Equine Information Document

The information provided below represents the core elements of written and pictorial identification for the Equine Information Document (EID), as well as a record of medical history and declaration(s) for equine (horses, donkeys, zebras and their crosses) presented for slaughter in Canada and is intended to be adapted for use by the equine industry.

A interactive user friendly individual animal Equine Information Document (CFIA/ACIA 5624) developed for use by equine owners may be found at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency website.

The EID must contain both written and visual identification as well as medical history and a signed declaration by the owner of the equine. The owner declaration under part 3 of the EID must bear the original signature of the owner. Alternate options to filling out the written description and picture identification below are given at the end of Part 1.

Part 1 Written and Visual Identification

a) Written Information

Primary location of the animal
space
(Land location or legal address or Premise Identification Number)
Primary use(s) of the animal. Circle one or more of the following: recreation/companion animal/ pleasure riding, breeding, ranch/farm work, public work, private industry work, performance/sport/show, racing, rodeo, urine production, food production, if other please specify
space
Sex - Mare/Filly, Gelding, Stallion/Colt (Circle one)
Month and year of birth space (if known)
Country of Birth space (if known)
Height in hands (1 hand = 4 inches) space
Refer to the Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures, Chapter 17, Annex E, Section E.3 for terms to be used for the following equine colour and marking identification section.
Body Colour space
Markings: Head space
Body space
Limbs: Right Front space Right Hind space
Left Front space

The following supplemental identification items may be completed if applicable.

List visible acquired marks (brands, tattoos, scars, etc.) and location
space/space
Pedigree registry and registration number space
Microchip number and location space
Passport ID number space
Unique Equine Life Number space
Or other unique identifier space
In the case of an Equine Information Document completed by the previous owner, name of previous owner: space

b) Picture Identification

Attach one or more pages containing colour pictures of the animal showing the details contained in each of the views of the silhouettes below. The pictures shall be clear and large enough to see the detail required. If applicable, take close ups of any visible acquired marks such as tattoos and attach. Owners should ensure that the written description and pictures agree.

Silhouette
For information on how to complete the silhouette, refer to Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures, Chapter 17, Annex E, section E.3.

This diagram shows five views of a horse: the right side, the left side, the front of the head, the forelegs and the hind legs - rear view.

Alternatives to Written and Picture Identification

The following are acceptable alternative means of providing written and/or visual identification information. Note that the primary location of the animal and the primary use of the animal as indicated in part 1a) Written Identification is also required information.

  1. As a substitute for pictures, the above silhouette is completed, preferably by a licensed Veterinarian or an authorized person Footnote 1. Ensure that the written description (part 1a) and the completed silhouette agree.
  2. Official pedigree registration papers with written description and visual identification. A copy of the registration papers shall be attached to the EID.
  3. An official passport. The passport shall be attached to the EID.
  4. A complete Equine Information Document (EID) (including part 1) provided by a previous owner(s). The previous complete EID shall be attached to the current EID. The name of the previous owner must appear in part 1a) of the current EID.

Part 2 Medical History

I, space (name of owner) of space/ space/ space/ space/ space- space- space (state your full contact address, [street number or post office box number/city/province or state/postal code or zip code, phone number] am the ownerFootnote 2 of the animal identified on this document and have had uninterrupted possession, care or control of the animal identified below from space (indicate date care or control started) to space (indicate end date).

  1. Have any drugs or vaccines been administered to or consumed by the animal during the shorter of the following 2 periods: in the last 180 days, or during the time you owned the animal? Circle Yes or No. If yes, write the name the drug(s) or vaccine(s), Drug Identification Number (DIN) if indicated on the label, last date of use, withdrawal period(s) Footnote 3 and for drugs, the amount used (dose) per treatment if the label does not indicate a dose or if drug is used at a dosage different than the label indicates.
    space
  2. Has the animal identified on this document shown signs of any illness or deviation from normal behaviour or appearance during the shortest of the following 2 periods: in the last 180 days, or during the time you owned the animal? Are there any additional items that may impact food safety that should be declared such as broken needles? Circle Yes or No. If yes, provide details.
    space
  3. Has the animal identified on this document to your knowledge been treated with a substance listed under the table named substances not permitted for use in food producing equine found in the Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures, Chapter 17, Annex E, section E.5 during the shortest of the following 2 periods: in the last 180 days, or during the time you owned the animal? Circle Yes or No.

Part 3 Declarations

Owner Declaration

As the owner of the animal identified on this document, I hereby certify that the information stated in this Equine Information Document is accurate and complete.

I understand that at least six continuous months of documented acceptable history covering the time period before slaughter is required for an equine presented for processing in an establishment inspected by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. As such, I have the option of attaching to this document, completed Equine Information Document(s) from previous owner(s) in order to cover the required six continuous months of documented history.

space (Signature of owner)

space /space/ space (Date DD/MM/YY)

Transient Agent Declaration(s)

A Transient Agent is a person who maintains responsibility for the care of equine from the time of purchase for slaughter until their arrival at a meat processing establishment in Canada.

A transient agent declaration is applicable for an animal destined for slaughter shortly (the time needed to assemble, schedule, and move to slaughter) and may not be used in lieu of an ownership declaration. The transient agent declaration may be repeated on the EID as many times as necessary to cover the time period prior to slaughter.

Name of Agent space
Phone Number (space) space-space
Address space

The animal identified on this document has been under my care and control from space (date) to space (date). During this time period:

  • has this animal shown signs of any illness or deviation from normal behaviour or appearance?
    Yes or No. If yes, provide details. space
  • have any drugs or vaccines been administered to or consumed by the animal? Yes or No. If yes, provide details.
Any drugs or vaccines administered to or consumed by the animal
Drug or vaccine Drug Identification Number (DIN) Last date of use Withdrawal period Amount used (dose) per treatment
         
         

Signature of Agent space.

E.3 Equine Written Description Terms

The Equine Information Document (EID) requires an accurate standardized written description and visual identification that may include a completed equine outline instead of picture identification. The following terms shall be used to complete the written description portion of the EID. In addition to brands or tattoos that the horse may bear, look for and identify unique distinguishing marks such as scars. Descriptive nomenclature for colouring and markings of equine as well as instructions for filling out the equine diagram has been standardized by the International Equestrian Federation and has been adapted for use.

Height

The height of a horse is normally recorded in "hands", measured at the top of the withers. One "hand" equals four inches.

Colour

Black:

Black pigment is general throughout the coat, limbs, mane and tail, with no pattern factor present other than white markings.

Brown:

There is a mixture of black and brown pigment in the coat, with black limbs, mane and tail.

Bay-brown:

The predominate colour is brown, with muzzle bay, black limbs, mane and tail.

Bay:

Bay varies considerably in shade from dull red approaching brown, to a yellowish colour approaching chestnut, but it can be distinguished from the chestnut by the fact that the bay has a black mane and tail and almost invariably has black on the limbs and tips of the ears.

Chestnut:

A Chestnut may be any shade of red with no black points like the bay. Think of the different colours of a penny from brand new to very old and tarnished; chestnuts can come in all these colours. Also chestnuts may be described as follows if applicable:

  • Liver Chestnut is very dark red like a very old tarnished penny.
  • Dark Chestnut is mahogany red.
  • Light Chestnut is light red to yellow.
  • Sorrel is yellowish to reddish to a brownish shade body coat. The mane and tail are usually the same or darker than the body.
  • Chestnut or sorrel with a flaxen mane and tail is a chestnut/sorrel colour body coat with a light coloured to almost white mane and tail.

Grey:

The body coat is a varying mosaic of black and white hair, with black skin. With advancing age, the coat grows lighter in colour. The flea-bitten grey may contain three colours or the two basic colours and should be so described. A pure white is exceptional.

Roan:

Mixture of white hairs with one or two other hair colours in the coat. May be described as Red Roan (white and chestnut hair), Blue Roan (white and black hair) as applicable.

Strawberry:

The coat is chestnut with a mixture of white hairs.

Piebald:

The body coat consists of large irregular patches of black and white. The line of demarcation between the two colours is generally well defined.

Skewbald:

The body consists of large irregular patches of white and of any definite colour except black. The line of demarcation between the colours is generally well-defined.

Dun:

The body coat is cream colour with black mane and tail.

Cream:

The body coat is of a cream colour, with nonpigmented skin. The iris is deficient in pigment and is often devoid of it, giving the eye a pinkish or bluish appearance.

Palomino:

The body coat is a newly-minted gold coin colour (lighter or darker shades are permissible) with a white mane and tail.

Appaloosa:

Body colour is grey, covered with a mosaic of black or brown spots.

Unique Coat Marking Additional Identifying Terms

Grey-ticked:

White hairs are sparsely distributed through the coat or any specified part of the body.

Flecked:

Small collections of white hairs occur distributed irregularly in any part of the body. May be further qualified as Lightly Flecked or Heavily Flecked depending on the amount of white hair.

Black Marks or Dark Marks:

Small areas of black or dark hairs occur together with the basic (usually lighter coloured) body colour hairs.

Spots:

Small, more or less circular, collections of hairs differring from the general body colour occur, distributed in various parts of the body. The position and colour of the spots must be stated.

Leopard:

The term Leopard may be added when the horse has many more or less circular collections of hairs differring from the general body colour.

Patch:

This term should be used to describe any larger well-defined irregular area (not covered by previous definitions) of hairs differring from the general body colour. The colour, shape, position and extent shall be described.

Zebra Marks:

Dark or black striping on the limbs, neck or quarters. The affected part of the animal must be stated.

Withers Stripe:

Zebra band across the withers.

List:

A dorsal band of black hair which extends from the withers backwards to the base of the tail.

White Marks

The characteristics of all white marks must be described.

A white mark can be regular or irregular. It can be mixed with the hair of the coat, completely or in part, or at the edge. It can be bordered, a band of black skin shows under the white hair at the edge of the mark (the area appears bluish).

Head

The description should begin at the forehead, followed by the nasal bone, the muzzle, lips and chin.

Star:

Any white mark on the forehead. Size, shape, intensity, position and coloured markings (if any) on the white to be specified. Should the markings in the region of the centre of the forehead consist of a few white hairs only, it shall be so described and not referred to as a star.

Stripe:

The narrow white marking down the face not wider than the flat anterior surface of the nasal bones. In many cases, the star and stripe are continuous and should be described as star and stripe connected. When the stripe is separate and distinct from the star it shall be described as interrupted stripe. When no star is present the point of origin of the stripe shall be indicated. The termination of the stripe and any variation in breadth, direction and any markings on the white shall be so stated, e.g. broad stripe, narrow stripe, inclined to left, etc. Any markings in the white area shall be stated.

Blaze:

A white marking covering almost the whole of the forehead between the eyes and extending beyond the width of the nasal bones and usually to the muzzle. Any variations in direction, termination and any markings on the white shall be stated.

White Face:

When the white covers the forehead and front of the face, extending laterally towards the mouth. The extension may be unilateral or bilateral, in which case it shall be described accordingly.

Snip:

An isolated white marking, independent of those already named, and situated between or in the region of the nostrils. Its size, position and intensity shall be specified. When a snip is connected with a stripe it shall be recorded as such, e.g. star, stripe connected snip.

Flesh Mark:

Lack of pigmentation. A flesh mark is described as such and not as a white mark. Black spots within the flesh mark are to be indicated. All lip markings, whether flesh marks or white marks, shall be accurately described.

White Muzzle:

When the white embraces both lips and extends to the region of the nostrils.

Limbs

All white markings on the limbs must be accurately defined and the upper limit precisely stated with reference to points of the anatomy, e.g. white to mid-pastern, white to upper third of cannon. The use of such terms as "sock" or "stocking" are not acceptable. The exact location must be specified, examples are listed below:

  • White coronet, white pastern, white fetlock, white to knee, white to hock, white to hind quarter;
  • White patch on coronet (anterior, lateral, medial, posterior);
  • White ring around limb: does not extend down to the coronet.

The presence of coloured spots in white marks shall be recorded. Black spots in a white coronet are referred to as Ermine marks.

Hoofs:

Any variation in the hoof pigment shall be noted.

Whorls - Cowlicks

Whorls or cowlicks are changes in the hair pattern, and may take various forms simple, tufted, feathered or sinuous. Their position must be clearly specified with an "X" at their location on the horse.

Illustrations of White Markings

Equine Face Markings

This image shows the face markings of equines: star, snip, stripe, star with stripe, white face, interrupted stripe, blaze and star with stripe and snip.

Equine Legs Markings

This image shows the leg markings of equines: coronet, half pastern, pastern, mid cannon and white to knee.

The Diagram

As described in section E.2 of this annex, a silhouette (diagram) properly filled may be used in lieu of picture identification.

General

  • The diagram must be filled in using both a red ballpoint pen and a black ballpoint pen.
  • Blue ink must never be used because it is difficult to photocopy.
  • Inks which run must be avoided (e.g. felt pens, ink pans).
  • Coloured pencils which can be erased must not be used.
  • The ballpoint pen used must have a broad point.

Procedure

  • The narrative should be completed first using a black ballpoint pen, followed by the diagram indicating all the distinctive marks.
  • Ensure that the diagram and the narrative agree.

A careful check must be made to ensure that all reference to left and right agree and no ambiguity exists.

Red Ballpoint Pen

Everything which appears in white on the horse must be shown in red on the diagram.

  1. White Marks

    White marks must be clearly outlined, with irregularities indicated, and without shading but lightly hatched-in if desired.

  2. Bordered Marks

    A white bordered mark has a definite outline, which is bluish and corresponds to the black skin under the white hairs. Bordered markings are indicated by a double line.

  3. Mixed Marks

    Mixed hairs are indicated by cross-hatching.

  4. Few White Hairs

    Few white hairs or grey-ticked areas are indicated by single short lines.

  5. Unpigmented Areas

    Unpigmented areas such as flesh marks, wall-eyes, or stripes on the hoofs are entirely coloured in red.

  6. White Patches

    Large white patches on piebald or skewbald horses should be cross hatched-in or line-shaded to differentiate them from other patches.

  7. Various
    • The presence of white hairs in the mane and tail should be indicated with red lines.
    • Permanent white marks in the coat acquired through trauma, freeze branding, surgery, etc. should be indicated in the diagram as for other white marks and by an arrow pointing at their location.

Black-ballpoint Pen

Identifying markings which are not white on the horse must be shown in black on the diagram.

  1. Whorls

    Whorls are indicated by an "x", if the whorl is elongated, it is shown by a continuous line from the "x". The exact location of the whorls is very important.

  2. Black Spots and Marks

    Black spots or marks on the coat or within a white mark or flesh mark must be outlined in black and left unshaded.

  3. Scars

    Scars due to surgery, treatment or accidents are indicated by arrows pointing at their location.

  4. Brand Marks

    Brand marks should be drawn in black; if the shape is not visible the brand is to be considered as a scar and indicated by an arrow.

  5. Zebra Marks, Wither Stripes and Lists

    Zebra Marks, wither stripes and lists are indicated by thick black lines following the mark(s).

E.4 Equine Lot Program

An owner of a group or groups of equine animals intended for human consumption may be eligible to present the animals to slaughter via a group declaration in lieu of individual declarations for each animal on the Equine Information Document (EID).

There are a number of advantages to the Lot Program:

  • Equine held in a lot established under an Equine Lot Program will not be required to be identified by a full narrative description and pictures on an individual EID when presented for slaughter.
  • The review of records prior to slaughter and the amount of paperwork to be retained on file is greatly decreased.
  • The CFIA's risk-based inspection approach recognizes factors that may impact food safety risk. Equine enrolled in the Equine Lot Program are subjected to greater veterinary oversight and are deemed a lesser food safety risk.

General Requirements for Establishing a Group (Lot) of Equine Intended for Slaughter

Lot owner responsibilities

The owner of any proposed lot of equine intended for slaughter shall ensure that:

  • a lot identification method(s) is accepted by the CFIA;
  • a letter of commitment is provided to the operator of the slaughter establishment as described in the Lot Identification Approval section;
  • a lot control program is established that associates history information to identified lots;
  • a drug and vaccine use program including drug withdrawal period information is developed and health information is recorded;
  • arrangements are made with a licensed veterinarian to verify the lot program and perform onsite verification activities;
  • the Initial Equine Information Document (IEID) and Sub Lot Equine Information Document (SLEID) (or the CFIA approved equivalent documents) be submitted, as required by this policy, to the establishment operator;
  • any changes made to the method(s) of lot identification shall be submitted to the CFIA for acceptance prior to implementation;
  • verification assessment findings are corrected in a timely manner; and
  • records are kept and maintained in a timely and auditable manner.

Equine presented for slaughter but not enrolled in a CFIA accepted Lot Program must be presented with an acceptable individual EID.

Establishment Operator Responsibilities

Establishment operators are to work with potential lot owners and the CFIA to ensure that a system of animal identification and in plant procedures enable the operator to maintain traceability throughout the slaughter process. Procedures and methods of identification from live animal receiving to processing shall be established to ensure that meat products may be traced back to an implicated lot.

Establishment operators are to perform ante-mortem examination as per Chapter 17, which includes a review of EIDs for acceptability. The establishment operator shall adjust his or her HACCP plan(s) as needed.

CFIA Responsibilities

The CFIA is to review a potential lot owner's lot identification requests to ensure the method is unique and potentially effective to maintain traceability. The initial request from the lot owner is reviewed by the Veterinarian in Charge (VIC) with the operator of the slaughter establishment. When the identification request is found acceptable to the operator and VIC, the submitted identification method and a recommendation of acceptance of the method is sent to the Area Program Specialist and National Specialist Red Meat Non-Ruminant Species responsible for equine slaughter for acceptance evaluation.

Equine Lot Program Elements

Unique Lot Identification Method

The lot owner may apply for an identification method that identifies a selected group or lot of equine animals intended for slaughter. At the time that a group of equine animals is established as a pre-slaughter lot, a unique lot identifier must be applied to each member of the lot.

Unique Individual Animal Lot Identification Method

The lot owner may apply for a unique individual animal identification method for each equine intended to be presented as a lot at slaughter.

Lot Identification Approval

Owners of equine intended for slaughter wishing to take advantage of group or individual lot identification must receive approval from the CFIA.

The prospective lot owner must submit written details of the proposed method of lot identification for review and approval by the CFIA prior to use. The approval process involves an initial review and recommendation of acceptance by the plant operator and the CFIA VIC of the establishment(s) to which the animals will be shipped, and final acceptance from the Area Program Specialist and National Specialist Red Meat Non-Ruminant Species prior to use. The potential lot owner shall state in writing the method(s) of lot identification they wish to use that will ensure uniqueness and traceability.

A letter of commitment from the potential lot owner to the operator of the slaughter facility and the VIC shall also be submitted. In the letter of commitment, the lot owner shall give assurances that he or she understands the requirements outlined in Annex E of Chapter 17 of the Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures. The letter of commitment must also include a statement that the lot owner is aware of, and accepts that the lot program, animals and premise are subject to audit activities co-ordinated by the CFIA.

The lot identifier must be capable of being maintained for the time period the lot is expected to be held prior to slaughter. Any animals added to a lot must have the lot identifier applied upon entry into the lot.

Owners may elect to seek approval to identify groups of equine animals under either of the two options above or both options when more than one lot is owned. In the case of equine animal identified by both a unique lot identifier and a unique animal identifier, the unique animal identification method procedures and requirements apply.

Lot Control Program and Record

A documented lot control program shall be established by the owner of a lot of equine animals. The lot control program shall ensure that medical records correlate to the animals specified within a declared lot. The lot owner shall ensure that animals are not inadvertently added to any specific lot without ensuring the added animals have a medical history compatible with the lot they enter and are identified according to other members of the lot they enter. Records of animals contained within each lot intended for slaughter shall be established upon creation of the lot and brought up to date/verified as animals are removed from the lot, added to the lot, determined to be missing from the lot, and shipped for slaughter. Lot control records shall also include the date of creation of the lot, the date the lot would be eligible to be slaughtered considering the requirement for at least a 180 day recorded history prior to slaughter for all members within the lot, the unique lot identifier or animal identification information, and entries that indicate the date or dates animals from the lot were shipped for slaughter and the number of animals in each shipment.

Animals may be added to an established lot only if they are accompanied by completed and acceptable EID(s) (i.e. compliant non permitted drug use history, withdrawal periods have been met or will be met prior to slaughter, identity is confirmed) that are compatible with the start date established for the lot they enter. These EID(s) must be filed by the lot owner and made available for inspection/verification with other information applicable for the established lot they enter.

For any animal removed from an established lot but not sent for immediate slaughter, the lot owner has the following three options:

  • An individual EID is created by the lot owner. or
  • The animal is moved to a new lot created with a new projected slaughter date that adheres to at least 180 days of recorded compliant drug use history prior to slaughter and the lot identifier for the new lot is applied to the animal upon entry into the new lot. or
  • The owner has an accepted unique individual animal identification method, identifies the animal individually and enrols the animal into an individual animal lot program.

Each record event entry in lot control records shall be accompanied by the initials or identification of the person making the entry and date/time of the entry.

Lot control records and supplemental information associated with the animals in the lot such as previous EIDs shall be accurate and kept up to date in a timely manner as well as maintained on file by the lot owner for verification and oversight purposes from the time the lot is established until two years after all members of the lot have been fully shipped for slaughter.

Drug and Vaccine Program and Lot Record

The lot owner must prepare a Drug and Vaccine Program which lists the drugs and vaccines authorised to be given or fed to equine enrolled in a lot program. The Drug and Vaccine Program shall provide the brand name of the drug and/or vaccine authorized for use, the predetermined prior to slaughter withdrawal period associated with the use of the specified drug or vaccine, and the source of the withdrawal period information for each drug or vaccine listed.

Records of drug and/or vaccine use shall be established upon creation of a lot and maintained in a timely manner. Individual animal drug and vaccine use records are required for each animal identified via the individual animal method. In the case of unique lot identification, a record of drug and vaccine use for the lot is to be maintained. All medication used for individual animals remaining within an established lot under the unique lot method will need to be declared for the entire lot.

The record of drug and vaccine use shall contain:

  • the date of lot creation (for unique lot method only);
  • the first date the lot animal(s) may be shipped for slaughter considering the requirement for at least a 180 day recorded history prior to slaughter;
  • the unique identifier; and
  • record entries that indicate the name of drug or vaccine used on any animal remaining in the lot, the date of use of any drug or vaccine on any animal remaining in the lot, the number of animals treated, the dose (amount of drug/vaccine) used, the withdrawal period for the medication used, and the source of the withdrawal period information.

Each record event entry shall be accompanied by the initials of the person making the entry and date/time of the entry.

Drug and vaccine lot records shall be kept current and maintained on file by the lot owner for verification and oversight purposes from the time the lot is established until two years after the lot is fully shipped for slaughter.

Lot Health Record

The owner of a lot of equine intended for slaughter must create and maintain a record of any illness for any animal member/members contained within each established lot. Individual animal health records are required for each animal identified via the unique individual animal method. In the case of unique lot identification, a single health record for the lot is to be maintained. Any illness detected in a lot member remaining within an established lot under the unique lot method will need to be declared for the entire lot.

Health records shall contain the date the lot was established (if using the unique lot method), the first date the animal(s) may be shipped for slaughter considering the requirement for at least a 180 day recorded history prior to slaughter, the unique identifier, as well as record entries that indicate the date the illness was noticed, the details of the illness, the number of animals affected and date the illness was resolved. Each record event entry shall be accompanied by the initials of the person making the entry and date/time of the entry.

Health records shall be kept up-to-date in a timely manner and maintained on file by the lot owner for verification and oversight purposes from the time the lot is established until two years after the lot is fully shipped for slaughter.

Verification Review Procedure

The lot owner must make arrangements for a licensed veterinarian to evaluate the general health status, medication use, identification and supporting documents/records pertaining to equine involved in a lot program. This evaluation is referred to as a veterinary verification. The lot owner must have sufficient proof of a valid veterinary/client/patient relationship. The veterinary verification must occur at least once every six months. Any costs associated with the lot program are the responsibility of the lot owner.

The licensed veterinarian shall assess if the lot control and the drug and vaccine program are effective and/or being implemented as written. The licensed veterinarian shall assess if the lot control records, drug and vaccine records, and health records are being established as required and are complete, up-to-date and accurate. A review of supporting information such as previous owner EIDs is also conducted.

The licensed veterinarian shall compare a sufficient number of IEIDs and SLEIDs to drug and vaccine use records as well as health records on file to ensure that the lot owner or designate is accurately transferring the on file information to the IEIDs and SLEIDs.

The licensed veterinarian shall assess if the unique identifier is being applied as required, is functional/legible, and is being retained on lot animals. If animals have been added to a lot, identity and lot requirements for these animals are confirmed through identity verification (comparing the previous owner EID to the animal and then ensuring the unique identification method has been applied) and file maintenance verification (the correct records are being kept) of a sufficient number of these animals to provide confidence that there are no non-compliances. The licensed veterinarian will also assess the lot premise to identify potential food safety issues.

The licensed veterinarian performing the verification shall officially document each assessment and findings including his or her name, signature and assessment date. Any deficiencies found shall be noted by the verifier. The lot owner or designate shall then ensure deficiencies are corrected in a timely manner, noted on the appropriate record as completed and signed off after completion including applicable initials/time/date of the record entry. The licensed veterinarian performing the verification will assess the effectiveness of any required corrections on the next verification or visit. The lot owner shall retain a copy of the veterinary assessment on file for oversight purposes. A template checklist for this verification may be obtained from the CFIA Area Equine Program Specialist.

The licensed veterinarian performing the verification shall notify the slaughter plant operator and the CFIA VIC in the case of deficiencies that may impact the acceptability of a lot that has been or will be slaughtered.

CFIA Oversight

It is expected that the CFIA will perform an audit of the Equine Lot Program at least once per calendar year. The CFIA will perform the duties outlined under the Verification Procedure and Record section as well as audit the frequency and effectiveness of the assessments performed by the licensed veterinarian. A record of the CFIA oversight shall be created and a copy kept on file by the lot owner. A template checklist for this verification may be obtained from the CFIA Area Equine Program Specialist.

Any deficiencies shall be identified in writing to the lot owner and veterinary verifier for correction by the lot owner as indicated in the verification section above. The veterinary verifier shall assess the correction on the next veterinary verification.

Document Submission Prior to Slaughter for Equine Identified by the Lot Methods

The following procedures are meant to minimize the likelihood and potential complications involved with receiving multiple animals at a slaughter plant with unsatisfactory documentation or pre-slaughter history.

The lot owner or designate shall ensure that drug and vaccine lot records are current and complete, that all withdrawal periods have been met, that no unauthorized drugs have been used and that the minimum slaughter date has been reached for any members of a lot of equine shipped for slaughter on the day of shipment.

At least three working days prior to the expected date of slaughter of the first member of a lot, the owner or designate must review and transcribe all relevant drug and vaccine use details as well as the health history applicable to the lot on file at the premise to the Initial Equine Information Document (IEID) as required. The lot owner or designate shall then (at least three days prior to the expected slaughter date) fax or electronically submit signed copies of the IEID to the operator of the registered establishment.

The operator of the registered establishment and the CFIA veterinarian shall review the IEID as indicated in the ante-mortem section of Chapter 17 to evaluate the acceptability of the animals it represents for slaughter.

A Sub Lot Equine Information Document (SLEID) carrying contact information, an original signature of the owner or designate and signature date shall be provided to the slaughter plant operator upon arrival of each truck/trailer carrying equine corresponding to the IEID previously sent to the slaughter plant.

Each individual animal identifier must be listed on the IEID and corresponding SLEIDs when animals are identified with unique individual animal identifiers.

The CFIA and the operator of the registered establishment will review the SLEID as indicated in the ante-mortem section of Chapter 17 to evaluate the acceptability of the animals for slaughter.

The owner or designate of the lot shall make copies of, and keep on file at the premise, all IEIDs and SLEIDs sent to operators of slaughter facilities. These IEIDs and SLEIDs are subject to review during veterinary verification and CFIA oversight procedures.

Alternate or Equivalent Document to IEID and SLEID

The operator may apply to the CFIA for an exemption to the submission of IEIDs and SLEIDs from a specified lot owner as above, instead submitting one customized CFIA approved form covering animals sent to slaughter on a specific day.

The operator must submit the customized group EID template to the CFIA and obtain CFIA approval prior to use. The operator shall provide the CFIA with a signed and dated letter stating that they are willing to accept the proposal from the designated premises to forego the submission of IEIDs and SLEIDs and that the operator understands that the review and acceptance procedures pertaining to a single lot EID may increase the possibility of holding or rejection of groups of equine animals prior to slaughter.

The proposed single lot EID must include all the information contained in both the IEID and SLEID. Single lot EIDs must be sent to a specified slaughter establishment from a specified Equine Lot Program premises.

In the case of multiple truck loads arriving at the slaughter establishment during a 24 hour period from a specified premise, the first truck load must carry and present the customized group EID to the operator and the CFIA for review and acceptance prior to slaughter as per ante-mortem procedures.

E.5 List of Veterinary Drugs Not Permitted For Use in Equine Slaughtered for Food with Canadian Brand Name Examples (10 March, 2010)

Non Permitted Drug Name Examples of Brand or Common Names Species Indicated on the Label
5-Nitroimidazoles including dimetridazole, metronidazole, and ronidazole Banned by regulations Table Note 4 for sale in food producing animals in Canada.
Not approved for veterinary use in Canada.
Not applicable
N/A
Antibiotics used for growth promotion purposes such as olaquindox, carbadox, and tylosin Carbadox Not currently marketed in Canada (stop sale order in effect) N/A
Antibiotics used for growth promotion purposes such as olaquindox, carbadox, and tylosin Olaquindox Not approved for veterinary use in Canada N/A
Antibiotics used for growth promotion purposes such as olaquindox, carbadox, and tylosin There are no antimicrobials approved for use as growth promotants for equine in Canada. Equine animals treated with antibiotics for growth promotion reasons are not eligible for slaughter in Canada. Several antimicrobials (e.g., bacitracin, bambermycin, chlortetracycline, lincomycin, procaine penicillin, tylosin, virginiamycin etc.) have label claims for growth promotion/feed efficiency in other food producing animals (e.g., cattle, swine, poultry).
Aristolochia species and preparations thereof Not approved for veterinary use in Canada. N/A
Arsanilic acid 3-Nitro-20 Chicken, Turkey, Swine
Arsanilic acid Histostat 50 Turkey
Arsanilic acid Pro-Gen 20% Chicken, Turkey
Arsanilic acid Pro-Gen 100% Chicken, Turkey
Beta-agonists used for growth promotion purposes, including clenbuterol and ractopamine Clenbuterol
Banned by regulations Table Note 4 for sale in food producing animals in Canada.
N/A
Beta-agonists used for growth promotion purposes, including clenbuterol and ractopamine Ractopamine
Optaflexx 100 Premix
Cattle
Beta-agonists used for growth promotion purposes, including clenbuterol and ractopamine Paylean 20 Swine
Beta-agonists used for growth promotion purposes, including clenbuterol and ractopamine Ventipulmin Solution Horses not intended for food
Beta-agonists used for growth promotion purposes, including clenbuterol and ractopamine Ventipulmin Syrup Horses not intended for food
Beta-agonists used for growth promotion purposes, including clenbuterol and ractopamine Zilpaterol hydrochloride
Zilmax Medicated Premix
Cattle
Boldenone Equipoise Injectable
Equipoise
Horses not intended for food
Chloramphenicol Banned by regulations Table Note 4for sale in food producing animals in Canada.
Chlor-500
Chlor-1000
Chloramphenicol 1% Ointment
ChlorPalm 250
Dog, Cat
Chloroform Approved as a veterinary drug in Canada, however currently not manufactured N/A
Chlorpromazine Not approved for veterinary use in Canada. N/A
Colchicine Not approved for veterinary use in Canada. N/A
Dapsone Not approved for veterinary use in Canada. N/A
Methandriol Not approved for veterinary use in Canada. N/A
Nitrofurans including Furaltadone, Furazolidone, nitrofurantoin, nitrofurazone Banned by regulations Table Note 4 for sale in food producing animals in Canada.
Furazolidone Not approved for veterinary use in Canada.
Furox Aerosol Powder, Topazone Aerosol Powder, Furall registered for veterinary use in the USA.
N/A
Nitrofurans including Furaltadone, Furazolidone, nitrofurantoin, nitrofurazone Furaltadone Not approved for veterinary use in Canada N/A
Nitrofurans including Furazolidone, Furaltadone, nitrofurantoin, nitrofurazone Nitro Ointment Horses not intended for food
Nitrofurans including Furazolidone, Furaltadone, nitrofurantoin, nitrofurazone Nitrofur Solution Horses not intended for food
Nitrofurans including Furazolidone, Furaltadone, nitrofurantoin, nitrofurazone Nitrofurantoin
Equifur
Horses not intended for food, Dog, Cat
Nitrofurans including Furazolidone, Furaltadone, nitrofurantoin, nitrofurazone Nitrofurazone
Niderm Ointment
Horses not intended for food
Nitrofurans including Furazolidone, Furaltadone, nitrofurantoin, nitrofurazone Nitrofurazone Ointment General use
Nitrofurans including Furazolidone, Furaltadone, nitrofurantoin, nitrofurazone Pinkaway Powder Dog, Cat
Estradiol (for estradiol containing implants, see steroidal hormones below) Estradiol Cypionate in Oil Horses not intended for food, Cattle, Dog, Cat
Estradiol (for estradiol containing implants, see steroidal hormones below) Estrus Cattle
Estradiol (for estradiol containing implants, see steroidal hormones below) Uni-Bol Horses not intended for food
Testosterone Uni-Test (Uni–Vet)
Testosterone Propionate Injection (Dominion)
Horses not intended for food
Phenylbutazone Butazone 400
Butazone 1000
Butazone Concentrate
Butequine
Buzone Concentrate
Phenylbutazone
Phenylbutazone Injection
Phenylbutazone Powder
Phenylbutazone Tablets
Phenylbutazone Tabs
Note: All of the products listed carry an indication for use in equine (but not equine intended to be slaughtered for food)
Resorcylic acid lactones including zeranol Zeranol
Ralgro
Beef
Note that this product carries only a cattle indication
Stanozolol No active products for veterinary use in Canada. N/A
Steroidal hormonal implants used for growth promotion purposes Equine animals treated with steroid containing hormone implants used to promote growth are not eligible for slaughter in Canada. Note that these products carry only a cattle indication. Hormonal implants containing estradiol or melengestrol acetate singly, or the combinations of estradiol and progesterone; estradiol and testosterone; estradiol and trenbolone acetate etc. sold under different brand names for use in cattle.
Stilbenes, stilbene derivatives, and their salts and esters including diethylstilbestrol Banned by regulations Table Note 4 for sale in food producing animals in Canada.
Diethylstilbestrol
Stilbestrol
Dog, Cat
Stilbenes, stilbene derivatives, and their salts and esters including diethylstilbestrol Stilbestrol Tablets Dog, Cat
Thyrostats, antithyroid agents administered under any circumstances for the purpose of growth promotion Approved for use in humans. Use in animals would be under veterinary control, but animals treated with these substances would not be eligible for slaughter. N/A

N/A: Not applicable as these active ingredients are not approved for veterinary use in Canada.

Table Notes

Table note 4

As per Section C.01.610.1 of the Food and Drug Regulations:

No person shall sell a drug for administration to animals that produce food or that are intended for consumption as food if that drug contains

(a) chloramphenicol or its salts or derivatives;
(b) a 5-nitrofuran compound;
(c) clenbuterol or its salts or derivatives;
(d) a 5-nitroimidazole compound; or
(e) diethylstilbestrol or other stilbene compounds

As per Section B.01.048 of the Food and Drug Regulations

(1) No person shall sell

(a) any animal intended for consumption as food if any product containing any drug listed in subsection (2) has been administered to the animal;
(b) any meat, meat by-products, eggs or milk intended for consumption as food and derived from an animal if any product containing any drug listed in subsection (2) has been administered to that animal; or
(c) any meat, meat by-products, eggs or milk that contains any residue of any drug listed in subsection (2).

(2) The drugs referred to in subsection (1) are

(a) chloramphenicol and its salts and derivatives;
(b) a 5-nitrofuran compound;
(c) clenbuterol and its salts and derivatives;
(d) a 5-nitroimidazole compound; and
(e) diethylstilbestrol and other stilbene compounds.

Return to table note 4  referrer

E.6 List of "Essential" Veterinary Drugs Permitted in Equine With a 6 Month Withdrawal Period With Canadian Brand Name Examples

Drug Use Drug Canadian Brand Name Examples
Sedation and premedication (and antagonism) Acepromazine Ace
Acevet 10 Tablets
Acevet 25 Tablets
Acevet Injection
Atravet 10 mg Injectable
Atravet Soluble Granules
Sedation and premedication (and antagonism) Atipamezole Antisedan
Sedation and premedication (and antagonism) Diazepam No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Sedation and premedication (and antagonism) Midazolam No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Sedation and premedication (and antagonism) Naloxone No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Sedation and premedication (and antagonism) Propofol PropoFlo
Rapinovet
Sedation and premedication (and antagonism) Sarmazenil No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Sedation and premedication (and antagonism) Tiletamine No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Sedation and premedication (and antagonism) Zolazepam No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Hypotension or respiratory stimulation during anaesthesia Dobutamine No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Hypotension or respiratory stimulation during anaesthesia Dopamine No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Hypotension or respiratory stimulation during anaesthesia Ephedrine Antihistamine
Antihistamine Powder
Antihist Solution
Pyrahist-10
Hypotension or respiratory stimulation during anaesthesia Glycopyrrolate No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Hypotension or respiratory stimulation during anaesthesia Noradrenaline No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Analgesia Buprenorphine No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Analgesia Fentanyl No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Analgesia Morphine No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Analgesia Pethidine No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Muscle relaxants and associated substances Atracurium No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Muscle relaxants and associated substances Edrophonium No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Muscle relaxants and associated substances Guaifenesin No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada for the use indicated
Inhalation anaesthetics Sevoflurane No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Local anaesthetics Bupivacaine No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Local anaesthetics Oxybuprocaine No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Local anaesthetics Prilocaine No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Cardiovascular Digoxin No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Cardiovascular Quinidine sulfate and quinidine gluconate No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Cardiovascular Procainamide No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Cardiovascular Propanolol No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Convulsions Phenytoin No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Convulsions Primidone No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Gastrointestinal Bethanechol No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Gastrointestinal Dioctyl Sodium Sulfosuccinate No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Gastrointestinal Metoclopramide No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Gastrointestinal Propantheline bromide No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Rhabdomyolysis Dantrolene sodium No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Antimicrobials Ticarcillin No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Antimicrobials Azithromycin No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Antimicrobials Rifampicin No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Antimicrobials Amikacin Amiglyde-V
Respiratory Ambroxol No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Respiratory Ipratropium bromide No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Respiratory Oxymetazoline No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Antiprotozoal Isometamidium No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Antiprotozoal Pyrimethamine Quinnoxine-S
Sulfaquinoxaline-S
Ophthalmic Acyclovir No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Ophthalmic Idoxuridine No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Ophthalmic Phenylephrine No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Ophthalmic Tropicamide No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Ophthalmic Dorzolamide No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Ophthalmic Latanoprost No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Ophthalmic Timolol maleate No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Ophthalmic Cyclosporin A Optimmune
Ophthalmic Ketorolac No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Ophthalmic Ofloxacin No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Ophthalmic Fluoresceine No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Ophthalmic Rose Bengal No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Ophthalmic Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Hyperlipaemia Insulin Caninsulin
Fungal infection Griseofulvin No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Fungal infection Ketoconazole No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Fungal infection Miconazole Conofite Cream 2%
Dermazole Shampoo
Surolan Drops
Fungal infection Nystatin Canaural Ear Drops
Panalog Cream
Panalog Ointment
Miscellaneous Chondroitin Sulfate Chotin
Miscellaneous Domperidone No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Miscellaneous Hydroxyethyl starch No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Miscellaneous Imipramine No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Miscellaneous Thyrotropin releasing hormone No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Miscellaneous Barium sulphate No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Miscellaneous Iohexol No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada
Miscellaneous Iopamidol No known manufacture for veterinary use in Canada

E.7 List of Veterinary Drugs Safe For Use in Equine Intended For Food Production For Which Withdrawal Periods Have Been Determined With Canadian Brand Name Examples

Health Canada recommends the following provisional withdrawal periods (WP) for veterinary drugs in equine intended for food production. The following Table will be updated periodically with the inclusion of new drugs or revised withdrawal periods, when additional information (e.g., new data from the drug sponsor) becomes available. When the label recommended WPs are not specific to equine, Health Canada recommends using the provisional WPs listed in the following table.

List of Veterinary Drugs Safe For Use in Equine Intended For Food Production For Which Withdrawal Periods Have Been Determined With Canadian Brand Name Examples

Antimicrobials
Drug Approved Canadian Products Route WP
Amikacin Amiglyde-V (Wyeth) Intrauterine 6 months
Ceftiofur Excenel Sterile Powder for injection (Pfizer) Intramuscular (IM) 5 days
Gentamicin Gentocin (Intervet) Intrauterine 45 days
Neomycin Neomycin (± astringents ± electrolytes ± anticholinergic):
  • Biosol Liquid (Pfizer)
  • NeoMed 325 (Bio Agri Mix)
  • Neomix Soluble powder (Pfizer)
  • Neomycin 325 (Vetoquinol)
  • Scour Solution CO-OP (IPCO)
  • Scour Solution (Vetoquinol)
Oral 30 days
Neomycin and sulphonamide combinations Neomycin and sulfonamides (± astringents ± electrolytes ± anticholinergic):
  • Calf Scour Bolus (PVL)
  • Neorease (Bimeda-MTC)
  • NeoSulfalyte Bolus (Pfizer)
  • Scour-Plug (Can-Vet)
  • Scour Treat (Citadel)
  • Super Scour Calf Bolus (Dominion)
Oral 30 days
Procaine penicillin Co-op Penicillin G procaine Inj (IPCO)
Depocillin (Intervet)
Hi-Pencin 300 (Remedy Animal Health/Equivet)
Pen Aqueous (Wyeth)
Pen G Injection (Citadel)
Penicillin G procaine (Vetoquinol)
Penicillin G procaine (Novopharm)
Penmed (Medprodex)
Penpro (Vetoquinol)
Pen Vet 300 (Alfasan/Rafter 8)
Procaine Penicillin G (Dominion)
Procillin (Bimeda-MTC)
IM 28 days
Benzathine penicillin
(in combination with procaine penicillin)
Benzapro Liquid (Medprodex)
Duplocillin LA (Intervet)
Longisil (Vetoquinol)
Procillin LA (Bimeda-MTC)
IM 60 days
SulfonamidesTable Note 5 Sulfonamides (± astringents ± electrolytes ± anticholinergic):
  • Sodium Sulfamethazine Liq 25% (Citadel)
  • Sulfa 25% Solution (Bimeda-MTC)
  • Sulfamethazine Bolus 15 g (Dominion)
  • Sulfamethazine Bolus 15 g (PVL)
  • Triple Sulfa Bolus (PVL)
  • Triple Sulfa Bolus (Dominion)
Oral 12 days
Potentiated sulfonamides Sulfonamide-trimethoprim (Oral):
  • Uniprim Oral Powder (Macleod)
  • Uniprim Oral Granules (Macleod)
Oral 7 days
Potentiated sulfonamides Sulfonamidetrimethoprim (Injectable):
  • Tribrissen 48% (Intervet/Schering)
Intravenous (IV) or IM 12 days
Tetracycline Tetra 4000 (Jaapharm)
Tetrabol (Vetoquinol)
Intrauterine 18 days

Table Notes

Table Note 5

For sulfonamide and neomycin combinations, see neomycin and sulfonamide combinations above

Return to table note 5  referrer

Paraciticides
Drug Approved Canadian Products Route WP
Fenbendazole Panacur Paste 10% (Intervet)
Safe-Guard Paste 10% (Intervet)
Panacur Suspension 10% (Intervet)
Safe-Guard Suspension 10% (Intervet)
Panacur Granules 22.2% (Intervet)
Oral 13 days
Ivermectin Bimectin Oral Paste (Bimeda-MTC)
Equell Oral Paste (Vibrac/ Pfizer)
Eqvalan Paste (Merial)
Eqvalan Liquid (Merial)
Panomec Oral Paste (Merial)
Zimecterin Paste (Merial)
Oral 28 days
Ivermectin and Praziquantel Equimax Oral Paste (Vibrac/ Bimeda-MTC/ Pfizer/ Vetoquinol)
Eqvalan Gold Paste (Merial)
Oral 28 days
Moxidectin Quest Gel (Wyeth) Oral 36 days
Moxidectin and praziquantel Quest Plus Gel (Wyeth) Oral 36 days
Piperazine Powder/pellet formulations:
  • Alfalfa Pellet Horse Wormer 50% (Farnam)
  • Co-op Wormer 52% (IPCO)
  • Piperazine 100 Oral Powder (Medprodex)
  • Piperazine 52 (Vetoquinol)
  • Piperazine Dihydrochloride 53% (Dominion)
  • Piperazine Dihydrochloride 53% (PVL)
  • Wonder Wormer for Horses 100% (Farnam)

Liquid formulations:

  • Piperazine 34 (Vetoquinol)
  • Piperazine 34 Liq (PVL)
  • Super Pipzine 34% (Dominion)
Oral 21 days
Pyrantel Exodus Paste 23.6 g (Bimeda-MTC)
Exodus Paste 47.2 g (Bimeda-MTC)
Strongid P (Pfizer)
Strongid T (Pfizer)
Oral 7 days
Tranquilizers/Sedatives/Anaesthetics
Drug Approved Canadian Products Route WP
Acepromazine Oral formulations:
  • Ace Powder (Jaapharm)
  • Atravet Soluble Granules (Wyeth)
Oral
IM, IV
6 months
Acepromazine Injectable formulations:
  • Acepro-25 (Bimeda-MTC)
  • Acepromazine Inj (Univet)
  • Acevet (Vetoquinol)
  • Atravet Inj (Wyeth)
IM, IV 6 months
Butorphanol Torbugesic (Wyeth) IV 7 days
Detomidine Dormosedan (Orion/Pfizer) IM, IV 7 days
Lidocaine Lidocaine Neat (Wyeth)
Lurocaine (Vetoquinol)
Subcutaneous (SC), IM 7 days
Lidocaine and epinephrine Lido-2 (Rafter 8; lidocaine HCl - 20 mg/mL, epinephrine HCl - 0.01 mg/mL)
Lidocaine 2% Sterile Injectable (Vetoquinol, Lidocaine HCl - 20 mg/mL, epinephrine 0.01 mg/mL)
Lidocaine HCl 2% (Wyeth; lidocaine HCl 20 mg/mL, epinephrine HCl - 0.01 mg/mL)
Lidocaine HCl 2% with Epinephrine (Bimeda-MTC)
Lidocaine HCl 2% with Epinephrine 1:100,000 (P.V.L)
Lidocaine HCl 2% with Epinephrine 1:100,000 (Dominion)
SC, IM 7 days
Romifidine Sedivet (Boehringer) IV 14 days
Thiopental Thiotal 1 G (Vetoquinol)
Thiotal 5 G (Vetoquinol)
IV 7 days
Xylazine Anased Inj 100 mg/mL (Vet-A-Mix)
NvAnased Injectable 100 mg/mL (Novopharm)
Rompun Injectable 100 mg/mL (Bayer)
Xylamax Injection 100 (Bimeda-MTC)
IM, IV 35 days
Glucocorticoids
Drug Approved Canadian Products Route WP
Dexamethasone Dexamethasone
Dexacort 5 (Rafter 8)
Dexamethasone 2 (Vetoquinol)
Dexamethasone 5 (Vetoquinol)
Dexamethasone 21 Phosphate Injection (Dominion)
Dexamethasone Injectable 2 mg/mL (Dominion)
Dexamethasone Injectable 2 mg/mL (P.V.L)
Dexamethasone Pwr (Dominion)
Dexamethasone Powder (Vetoquinol)
Dexone (Jaapharm)
Rafter Dex (Alfasan/Rafter 8)
UniDex (Univet)
Oral, IV, IM 21 days
Dexamethasone and trichlormethiazide Naquasone (Schering) IM 21 days
Prednisolone Prednisolone:
  • Depo-Medrol (Pfizer)
  • Depo-Medrol Sterile Aqueous Suspension (Pfizer)
  • Methylprednisolone acetate (PVL)
  • Prednisolone Acetate Inj (Dominion)
  • Prednisolone Acetate Sus (PVL)
  • Prednisolone Injection (Vetoquinol)
  • Prednisolone Sod Succinate (Univet)
  • Solu-Delta-Cortef (Pfizer)
  • Solu-Delta-Cortef Sterile Solution (Pfizer)
  • Uni-Med (Univet)
  • Uni Pred 50 (Univet)
  • Vetacortyl (Vetoquinol)
IM, IV, Intra articular 28 days
Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory
Drug Approved Canadian Products Route WP
Flunixin Banamine solution (Schering)
Cronyxin Inj (Cross Vetpharm/Bioniche)
Flunazine (Bimeda-MTC)
Flunixin Injection (Norbrook/Wyeth)
Influx-50 (Vetoquinol)
Suppressor (Norbrook/Kane)
IM, IV IV: 10 days
IM: 30 days
Ketoprofen Anafen Injection 100 mg/mL (Merial) IM, IV 7 days
Vedaprofen Quadrisol 100 (Intervet) Oral 21 days
Vedaprofen Quadrisol i.v. 50 Inj (Intervet) IV 21 days
Steroids
Drug Approved Canadian Products Route WP
Altrenogest Regu-mate solution 0.22% (Intervet) Oral 42 days
Progesterone Table Note 6 Progesterone 5% (Vetoquinol) IM 14 days

Table Notes

Table Note 6

Withdrawal period applies only for therapeutic use.

Return to table note 6  referrer

Miscellaneous
Drug Approved Canadian Products Route WP
Furosemide Furosemide Injection (Sandoz)
Salix Inj (Intervet)
IM, IV 7 days
Omeprazole Gastrogard (Merial) Oral 3 days
Sodium iodide Sodide (Rafter 8)
Sodium Iodide (Bimeda-MTC)
Sodium Iodide 20% Inj (Univet)
Sodium Iodide Inj 20% (PVL)
Sodium Iodide Inj 20% (Dominion)
IV 0 days
Trichlormethiazide and dexamethasone Naquasone (Schering) IM 21 days

E.8 Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Q1 Why should I fill out an EID?

A1 All equine which may be used for food must be presented with a completed and acceptable Equine Information Document (EID) at the time of slaughter since July 31, 2010. In the event that the animal becomes unwanted, if the owner wants to keep the salvage value and salvage options with respect to human consumption of their animal as high as possible, they will need to accurately fill out an EID for animals they wish to sell.

Q2 Will all equine owners need to fill out an EID?

A2 It is not mandatory that all equine owners fill out Equine Information Documents for equine they own. The requirement applies to equine which may be used for food.

Q3 Why do we have to keep track of medication used since January 31, 2010?

A3 Slaughter facilities handling equine in Canada will need at least a six month history of medication use for equine brought to the facility.

Q4 When do I need to fill out the EID?

A4 The EID can be filled out any time before the sale of your equine, but it is important to keep track of medications used and illness occurrence during the time you own the animal, either on the EID itself or another record used to fill out the EID before you sell your animal.

Q5 How do I include pictures of my horse in the document?

A5 A digital camera is very useful for taking the required pictures. A little computer work can lead to a page containing the required pictures. This page can be printed with a colour printer. Alternatively, the colour pictures can be formatted or printed by many retail outlets which currently offer this service.

Q6 What are non permitted drugs?

A6 Non permitted drugs are drugs that shall not be given or fed to equine which may be used for food. The list of non permitted drugs is available in section E.5 of this annex.

Q7 Is Phenylbutazone is banned?

A7 The use of Phenylbutazone in equine for medical reasons is not currently banned in Canada. However; Phenylbutazone is not permitted to be used in equine animals that may be used for food. (See Question and Answer 6)

Q8 Do we have to keep a record of feed supplements or nutraceuticals administered to equine?

A8 It would depend on the ingredients contained in the feed supplement or nutraceutical. Most feed supplements contain, in addition to feed ingredients, vitamins and minerals which do not have withdrawal periods, so they would not need to be declared on the EID. Similarly, nutraceutical formulations of substances that naturally occur in the body do not have withdrawal periods. If, however, the supplement or nutraceutical did contain a drug ingredient, the supplement/nutraceutical would need to be declared on the EID. When in doubt, consult your veterinarian.

Q9 What is a withdrawal period?

A9 A withdrawal period is the minimum number of days or hours that must expire since the last treatment of a specified medication or vaccine (used as per label directions) before the animal may be slaughtered for food.

Q10 Where do I get the information for drug withdrawal periods or intervals?

A10 The product label should be checked for withdrawal periods established for equine. Also section E.6 of this annex contains a list of drugs for which a 6 month withdrawal period is required. Section E.7 of this annex contains a list of drugs that are safe to be given or fed to equine which may be used for food. Withdrawal intervals for named drugs will be included with this list. With respect to drugs given under a veterinary/client/patient relationship that can be safely given or fed to equine which may be used for food that may not appear on the list, your veterinarian must be consulted before use. Consult with your veterinarian about the possibility of obtaining a valid withdrawal period determination from a credible source before use of the drug.

Q11 What do I do about recording withdrawal periods for drugs my veterinarian tells me are safe for use in other food producing animals, but have no label instructions regarding the use in equine destined for food, or have a label statement that says not for use in equine intended to be slaughtered for food?

A11 See answer A10.

Q12 Are these new rules expected to change?

A12 Yes, these new requirements are only the first step towards strengthening Canada's food safety and traceability system for equine.

Q13 Will imported horses be subject to the same requirements?

A13 Yes, imported horses when presented for slaughter at Canadian slaughter establishments will be required to meet this new Canadian standard for equine meat production in Canada.

Q14 Will these requirements only apply to meat products exported to the European Union?

A14 No, these requirements will apply to all equine presented for slaughter in Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) inspected facilities.

Q15 Who will be responsible for checking the EIDs before slaughter?

A15 The primary responsibility for compliance to requirements in slaughter facilities inspected by the CFIA remains with the operator of the establishment. The establishment operator will be required to ensure that each equine presented for slaughter has a complete and acceptable EID covering at least a six month consecutive time period before slaughter. The CFIA will oversee the effectiveness of the operator's ante-mortem review procedures with respect to the EID.

Q16 Is it possible to include more than one horse on an EID?

A16 The EID represents the minimum information required prior to slaughter in an acceptable format. However, certain conditions may exist that would allow for multiple equine animals to be included on one EID type document such as holding a group of equine for a six month period with a recorded inventory control system. If common medical history, medication history and owner declaration can be made and recorded in an acceptable record format deemed satisfactory to the CFIA, a common EID may be acceptable. The CFIA must give prior approval to this record format and system prior to use. See section E.4 for further details.

Q17 Are non permitted drugs not to be used in an equine presented for slaughter for the life of the animal or just for six months?

A17 The non permitted drugs are listed under section E.5 of this annex. Non permitted drugs are not to be used in equine intended for food production. During a transition period, the EID will be reviewed to determine if equine have or have not been treated with non permitted drugs during the six months prior to their slaughter. A longer "certification period" will eventually be requested.

Q18 If I sell my equine at an auction, does the auction become the owner, that is have care and control of my equine, for a period of time and need to fill out an EID?

A18 No, the buyer of the animal assumes the care and control of the equine after the last date of care or control indicated on the EID filled out by the previous owner (or transient agent); that is the date the animal was delivered to the auction premise. Any medication use on the auction premise is to be declared to the buyer by auction management. Generally this information is given to potential buyers from the auctioneer as the animal is sold.

Q19 Along with the EID I have completed, I am forwarding a previous EID completed by a former owner to the buyer of my equine; am I responsible for the information on that previous EID?

A19 No. Each owner signs for the dates of care or control indicated on their own EID.

Q20 Why were these requirements created; were horse meat products not safe to eat?

A20 Meat products produced at registered facilities in Canada are produced and inspected to verify that they meet current food safety requirements. Procedures are already in place to detect and control potential veterinary drugs and chemical residues in the meat supply. These new requirements for equine will enhance food safety for equine meat products in response to international trading partners' requests and Canada's own objectives.

Q21 Will all horses intended for food production need to be placed into a lot program?

A21 No. The new requirements ask for a documented history for at least six months preceding slaughter. Grouping horses for six months under a lot program is an option, but is not required.

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