A Guide to Identifying Food Products Affected by the Proposed Imported Food Sector Product Regulations
Step B: Analysis by Food Commodity

Fish/Seafood/Aquatic Products

Marine plant matter and products containing marine plant matter (in the absence of fish, shellfish, crustaceans or marine mammals) are Imported Food Sector (IFS) products.

Products containing any amount of fish, shellfish, crustaceans or marine mammals are under the Fish Inspection Act and are not IFS products.

Decision Tree 2: Fish, Seafood and Aquatic ProductsFootnote 1

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Description-Decision Tree 2. Description follows.

Description for Decision Tree 2: Fish, Seafood and Aquatic Products
  • This diagram is a decision tree that consists of two yes/no questions to help you determine if a product is an Imported Food Sector product under the proposed Imported Food Sector Product Regulations.

Start (Continued from Decision Tree 1)

  • Question 1. Is the product a preparation of marine plants, without any fish? If no, proceed to Question 2. If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 2. Does the product contain any amount of fish? The Fish Inspection Act defines "fish" as any fish, including shellfish and crustaceans, and marine animals, any parts, products or by-products thereof. If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.

End

Animal and Meat Products

The following animal and meat products are Imported Food Sector (IFS) products:

  • Any product containing reptiles, amphibians and/or land invertebrates, such as alligators, frogs, land snails, turtles and snakes.
  • Products containing 2 per cent or less meatFootnote 2, unless they are a processed egg or cheese that contains meat (and therefore fall under the Processed Egg Regulations or the Dairy Products Regulations).
  • Products containing only highly processed meat products, including gelatin, bone meal, collagen casing, hydrolysed animal protein, derivatives/components of animal fats/oils (i.e. monoglycerides, diglycerides or fatty acids). These are all exempt from the Meat Inspection Act, except for shortening from animals, edible tallow, lard and suet when used for human consumption.

Note: A letter of exemption from the Meat Inspection Act and Regulations is required for products that contain 2 per cent or less meat.

Decision Tree 3: Animal and Meat ProductsFootnote 3

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Description-Decision Tree 3. Description follows.

Description for Decision Tree 3: Animal and Meat Products
  • This diagram is a decision tree that consists of three yes/no questions to help you determine if a product is an Imported Food Sector product under the proposed Imported Food Sector Product Regulations.

Start (Continued from Decision Tree 1)

  • Question 1. Is the product derived from reptiles, amphibians and/or land invertebrates? This includes alligators, crocodiles, frog legs, land snails, turtles/tortoises and/or snakes. If no, proceed to Question 2. If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 2. Is the product derived from highly-processed or rendered inedible meat products, such as gelatin, bone meal, collagen casing, hydrolysed animal protein, monoglycerides, diglycerides, and fatty acids? If no, proceed to Question 3. If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product. There is an exception. When used for human consumption, shortening from animals, edible tallow, lard and suet are not Imported Food Sector products.
  • Question 3. Does the product contain less than two per cent meat? If no, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product. There is an exception. If the product contains less than two per cent meat and is mixed with cheese or egg, it is not an Imported Food Sector product.

End

Egg and Egg Products

The following eggs and egg products are Imported Food Sector (IFS) products:

  • Whole eggs not produced by the domestic hen (Gallus domesticus), for example turkey eggs, quail eggs, salted duck eggs, preserved 100-year-old duck eggs, Cornish hen eggs
  • Processed egg products containing eggs produced by domestic hens or turkeys that are less than 50 per cent processed egg by weight (frozen eggs, frozen egg mixes, liquid egg mixes, dried eggs and dried egg mixes)
  • Processed egg products produced from any type of bird other than a domestic hen or turkey, regardless of the percentage of processed egg
  • Cooked eggs and/or products made from cooked eggs that do not contain fish and/or more than 2 per cent meat

Decision Tree 4: Eggs and Egg ProductsFootnote 4

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Description-Decision Tree 4. Description follows.

Description for Decision Tree 4: Egg and Egg Products
  • This diagram is a decision tree that consists of six yes/no questions to help you determine if a product is an Imported Food Sector product under the proposed Imported Food Sector Product Regulations.

Start (Continued from Decision Tree 1)

  • Question 1. Is the product a cooked egg or made from cooked eggs? If no, proceed to Question 2. If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 2. Is the product an egg from a domestic chicken, or does the product contain egg from a domestic chicken? (The Latin name for chicken is: Gallus domesticus.) If yes, proceed to Question 3. If no, proceed to Question 5.
  • Question 3. Is the product a raw shell egg? If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, proceed to Question 4.
  • Question 4. Is the product a processed egg or egg product that contains 50 per cent or more egg by weight? According to the Processed Egg Regulations, processed eggs include frozen egg, frozen egg mix, liquid egg, liquid egg mix, dried egg, dried egg mix and egg product. If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 5. Is the product an egg from a turkey, or does the product contain egg from a turkey? (The Latin name for turkey is Meleagris gallapavo.) If yes, proceed to Question 6. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 6. Is the product a raw shell egg? If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product. If no, proceed to Question 4.

End

Dairy Products

The Dairy Products Regulations define dairy products as "milk or a product thereof, whether alone or combined with another agricultural product that contains no oil or fat other than that of milk." It is important to note that, in this context, 'milk' refers to the "normal lacteal secretions of the mammary gland of an animal" and, therefore, includes milk from any animal (except human beings). As such, it follows that the milk fat can also be derived from the milk of any animal (except human beings). Examples of dairy products include cheese, milk, chocolate milk, cream, sour cream, ice cream, yogourt and whey.

Given this definition, the following dairy products are Imported Food Sector (IFS) products:

  • Products that contain fat or oil other than milk fat, including:
    • Non-dairy liquid or powdered coffee whiteners
    • Margarine
  • Products that contain a high proportion of dairy ingredients but are not commonly recognized as a milk or milk product, including:
    • Frozen novelties
    • Cheesecake
    • Cheese muffins
    • Breaded cheese sticks
    • Pudding (both powdered mix and pudding cups)

Small amounts of omega-3 fatty acids added to milk products are often an exception to the "no fat other than milk fat" rule. Dairy products that contain small amounts of omega-3 fatty acids for the purpose of making a "source of omega-3 fatty acids" claim on the label fall under the Dairy Products Regulations.

Decision Tree 5: Dairy ProductsFootnote 5

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Decision Tree 5. Description follows.

Description for Decision Tree 5: Dairy
  • This diagram is a decision tree that consists of two yes/no questions to help you determine if a product is an Imported Food Sector product under the proposed Imported Food Sector Product Regulations.

Start (Continued from Decision Tree 1)

  • Question 1. Does the product contain fats other than milk fat? Examples of products that contain fats other than milk fat include but are not limited to non-dairy liquid or powdered coffee whiteners, margarine, et cetera. If no, proceed to Question 2. If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 2. Is the product commonly recognized as milk or a milk product? Examples of products that are commonly recognized as milk or a milk product include but are not limited to cheese, milk, chocolate milk, cream, sour cream, ice cream, yogourt, whey, et cetera. Example of products that are not commonly recognized as milk or a milk product include but are not limited to frozen novelties, cheesecake, cheese muffins, breaded cheese sticks, pudding (both powdered mix and pudding cups), et cetera. If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.

End

Honey Products

Honey products that are not composed of 100 per cent honey are Imported Food Sector (IFS) products, such as:

  • Honey in the comb
  • Dried honey products
  • Flavoured honey products
  • Coloured honey products

Maple Products

Maple products that are not made from 100 per cent pure maple sap from the genus Acer are IFS products, including:

  • Maple candy
  • Maple-flavoured syrup
  • Table syrup that contains some maple syrup

Unconcentrated maple products (such as raw sap that has not been boiled, known informally as "maple water"), as well as products made from the sap of trees other than maple trees from the genus Acer (such as birch sap), are all IFS products.

In general, products made solely from concentrated maple sap are not IFS products. This includes maple sugar, maple butter and maple taffy.

Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Products

This section applies to fresh produce, which includes fresh fruit, fresh vegetables, fresh nuts, fresh edible fungi, fresh sprouts, fresh herbs, and any fresh cut fruit and vegetables (ready-to-eat and non-ready-to-eat).

In general, fresh produce falls under the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Regulations and are not Imported Food Sector (IFS) products.

Fresh produce is an IFS product when it is:

  • Mixed with other components (such as croutons or dressing packets in bagged salad)
  • Stored in juice or sweetening agents

Whole fruit or vegetables that are infused with flavouring agents are not IFS products.

The definition of 'fresh cut' includes fruit and vegetables that have been trimmed, chopped, peeled, shredded, or treated with approved food additives as listed in the Food and Drug Regulations.

Decision Tree 6: Fresh Fruit and Vegetable ProductsFootnote 6

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Decision Tree 6. Description follows.

Description for Decision Tree 6: Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Products

This diagram is a decision tree that consists of one yes/no question to help you determine if a product is an Imported Food Sector product under the proposed Imported Food Sector Product Regulations.

Start (Continued from Decision Tree 1)

  • Question 1. Does the product contain ingredients and/or components other than coatings, wax, and/or food additives? Examples include but are not limited to dressing packets, croutons, juice or sweetening agents. If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is not an Imported Food Sector product.

End

Processed Fruit and Vegetable Products

This section applies to fruit and vegetables that have been processed (frozen, dehydrated, hermetically sealed or cooked). In general, the following processed fruits and vegetables are Imported Food Sector (IFS) products:

  • Any products that are not covered by a grade, standard of identity or by standard container sizes within the Processed Products Regulations
  • Processed products containing 2 per cent or less meat (with exceptions, for example vegetable soup, beans with pork)
  • Processed products with a shelf-life of less than 90 days
  • Processed products that contain oilseeds, grains or nuts and their products (for example, tofu and products that contain coconut or pasta - with the exception of canned spaghetti in tomato sauce)
  • Nuts that have been dehydrated, roasted, blanched, salted, spiced, cured or otherwise prepared
  • Fried vegetables (potato chips, refried beans)
  • Spiced or battered french fried potatoes, potato patties
  • Fruit and vegetables that have been dehydrated, roasted or salted
  • Fruit and vegetables packed in alcohol, as well as the alcohol itself
  • Fruit and vegetable products packed in a non-hermetically sealed container that must be kept refrigerated (for example, unpasteurised apple juice).

The processing method determines if a processed fruit and vegetable product is an IFS product. If more than one processing method is used to make the product, consider only the last method used during the process.

a) Hermetic Sealing

Most hermetically sealed fruit and vegetables are covered by standards and requirements in the Processed Products Regulations.

Hermetically Sealed Vegetables

In general, the following hermetically sealed vegetables are IFS products:

  • All vegetable pastes and pasta saucesFootnote 7 that are not tomato-based
  • All condiments except for tomato ketchup, relish, and chutneys
  • Vegetable-based jams, jellies, broths and spreads (for example, based on tomatoes, peppers, beets, carrots), purées (except tomato purée)
  • Hermetically-sealed vegetables packed in more than 15 per cent oil
  • Hermetically-sealed infant foods containing more than just vegetables, with the exception of infant foods containing any amount of fish or more than 2 per cent meat
  • Salsa (vegetable)
  • Veggie burgers, patties/sausages
  • Re-fried beans or fried beans
  • Pimento sauce/pepper sauce
  • Tomato sauce

Hermetically Sealed Fruit

In general, the following hermetically sealed fruit are IFS products:

  • Fruit purées and pulps except for those made from pumpkin and apples
  • Fruit spreads, butters and snacks, fruit salsas and fruit ketchups
  • Certain jams, jellies and marmalades, for example those made from coconut, figs or with wine
  • Pie fillings that do not contain fruit, or that are re-constituted from powders
  • Hermetically-sealed infant foods containing more than just fruit, with the exception of infant foods containing any amount of fish or more than 2 per cent meat

Hermetically Sealed Juices

In general, the following hermetically sealed juices are IFS products:

  • Ready-to-serve hermetically sealed drinks, cocktails and beverages that contain less than 100 per cent juice
  • Carbonated juices (except apple and grape)
  • Blends of carbonated juices
  • Concentrated juices (except apple and grape)
  • Juices from concentrate (except apple and grape)
  • Blends of concentrated juices
  • Fruit nectars other than those made from peaches, pears, prunes and apricots
  • Nectar blends

Note that any juice intended for consumption by infants falls under the Processed Products Regulations and therefore are not IFS products. Juices intended for infants could:

  • Have an image of a baby on the label
  • Be labelled as "baby juice"
  • Specify the age group the product is intended for on the label (infants are under one year of age)

b) Freezing

Most frozen fruit and vegetables fall under the Processed Products Regulations. The following sections on frozen vegetables, fruit and juices indicate which products are IFS products.

Frozen Vegetables

  • Frozen soups and frozen vegetables with nuts, sauces or pasta
  • Frozen infant foods
  • Frozen purées, pulps and jams
  • Most frozen fried vegetables (except french fried potatoesFootnote 8)
  • Frozen battered vegetables (for example, onion rings)

Frozen Fruit

  • Frozen infant foods
  • Frozen purées, pulps and jams

Frozen Juices

  • All frozen concentrated juices, except for orange, sweetened orange, and apple juice
  • All frozen nectars and vegetable juices
  • All frozen vegetable juices

c) Dehydration

The following products are IFS products:

  • Dehydrated fruit and vegetables
  • Dehydrated edible fungi
  • Re-hydrated vegetables and edible fungi, including those in powder form.

Decision Tree 7 (Part 1): Processed Fruit and Vegetable ProductsFootnote 9

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Decision Tree 7 - Part 1. Description follows.

Description for Decision Tree 7 (Part 1): Processed Fruit and Vegetable Products

This diagram is a decision tree that consists of four yes/no questions to help you determine if a product is an Imported Food Sector product under the proposed Imported Food Sector Product Regulations. It is Part 1 of the three-part decision tree.

To ensure accuracy, Decision Tree 1 must be followed prior to using this decision tree to ensure that you arrive at the correct determination.

Start (Continued from Decision Tree 1)

  • Question 1. Does the product have a shelf life of less than 90 days? If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product. If no, proceed to Question 2.
  • Question 2. The next few questions ask about the last method used to process the product. Is the product dehydrated? If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product. If no, proceed to Question 3.
  • Question 3. Is the product hermetically sealed? If yes, proceed to Decision Tree 7, Part 2. If no, proceed to Question 4.
  • Question 4. Is the product frozen? If yes, proceed to Decision Tree 7, Part 3. If no, please return to Decision Tree 1 to check whether you have arrived at the correct food commodity-specific decision tree, or contact the CFIA.

End

Decision Tree 7 (Part 2): Processed Fruit and Vegetable Products

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Decision Tree 7 (Part 2). Description follows.

Description for Decision Tree 7 (Part 2): Processed Fruit and Vegetable Products

This diagram is a decision tree that consists of 31 yes/no questions to help you determine if a product is an Imported Food Sector product under the proposed Imported Food Sector Product Regulations. It is Part 2 of the three-part decision tree.

Start (Continued from Decision Tree 7, Part 1)

  • Question 1. Is the hermetically-sealed product a vegetable, a fruit, or a juice? If the product is a vegetable, proceed to Question 2. If it is a fruit, proceed to Question 13. If it is a juice, proceed to Question 23.
  • Question 2. Is the hermetically-sealed vegetable product one of the following?
    • A powder
    • A jam, jelly or spread
    • Tofu
    • Packed in alcohol
    • A broth
    • Containing nuts
    • Packed in more than 15 per cent oil
    • Fried

    If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product. If no, proceed to Question 3.

  • Question 3. Is the product a paste, purée, infant food, condiment, pasta sauce or is the product pickled? If yes, proceed to Question 4. If no, it is not an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 4. Is the product a paste or purée? If yes, proceed to Question 5. If no, proceed to Question 6.
  • Question 5. Is the product a tomato paste or purée? If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 6. Is the product an infant food? If yes, proceed to question 7. If no, proceed to Question 8.
  • Question 7. Does the infant food contain only vegetables? If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 8. Is the product a condiment? If yes, proceed to Question 9. If no, proceed to Question 10.
  • Question 9. Is the condiment a relish, tomato ketchup, or a chutney? If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 10. Is the product a pasta sauce? If yes, proceed to Question 11. If no, proceed to Question 12.
  • Question 11. Is the product a tomato-based sauce with spaghetti? If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 12. Is the product pickled? If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, return to Decision Tree 1 to check whether you have arrived at the correct food commodity-specific decision tree or contact the CFIA.
  • Question 13. Is the hermetically-sealed fruit product one of the following?
    • A powder
    • An alcoholic beverage
    • Packed in alcohol
    • A spread or a snack
    • Salsa
    • A fruit ketchup (other than tomato)
    • A fruit butter
    • A fruit product containing nuts
    • Fried

    If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product. If no, proceed to Question 14.

  • Question 14. Is the product a purée, pulp, pie filling, jam, jelly, marmalade or infant food? If yes, proceed to Question 15. If no, it is not an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 15. Is the product a purée or a pulp? If yes, proceed to Question 16. If no, proceed to Question 17.
  • Question 16. Is the purée or pulp made of apple or pumpkin? If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is not an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 17. Is the product a pie filling? If yes, proceed to Question 18. If no, proceed to Question 19.
  • Question 18. Is the pie filling made of fruit? If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 19. Is the product a jam, a jelly or marmalade? If yes, proceed to Question 20. If no, proceed to Question 21.
  • Question 20. Is the jam, jelly or marmalade made from traditional ingredients (for example, no added spice, flavour, et cetera)? If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 21. Is the product an infant food? If yes, proceed to Question 22. If no, please return to Decision Tree 1 to check whether you have arrived at the correct food commodity-specific decision tree, or contact the CFIA.
  • Question 22. Does the infant food contain only fruit? If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 23. Is the hermetically-sealed juice product one of the following?
    • A beverage
    • A drink
    • A cocktail
    • A powder

    If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product. If no, proceed to Question 24.

  • Question 24. Is the juice a fruit concentrate, from concentrated fruit, a nectar, carbonated or for infants? If yes, proceed to Question 25. If no, it is not an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 25. Is the juice concentrated or made from concentrate? If yes, proceed to Question 26. If no, proceed to Question 27.
  • Question 26. Is the juice apple or grape, or is it made from apple or grape concentrate? If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 27. Is the juice a nectar? If yes, proceed to Question 28. If no, proceed to Question 29.
  • Question 28. Is the juice a nectar made from peach, pear, prune or apricot? If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 29. Is the juice carbonated? If yes, proceed to Question 30. If no, proceed to Question 31.
  • Question 30. Is the carbonated juice made from either apple or grape? If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 31. Is the juice intended for consumption by infants? If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, please return to Decision Tree 1 to check whether you have arrived at the correct food commodity-specific decision tree, or contact the CFIA.

End

Decision Tree 7 (Part 3): Processed Fruit and Vegetable Products

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Decision Tree 7 (Part 3). Description follows.

Description for Decision Tree 7 (Part 3): Processed Fruit and Vegetable Products

This diagram is a decision tree that consists of nine yes/no questions to help you determine if a product is an Imported Food Sector product under the proposed Imported Food Sector Product Regulations. It is Part 3 of the three-part decision tree.

Start (Continued from Decision Tree 7, Part 1)

  • Question 1. Is the frozen product a vegetable, a fruit, or a juice? If the product is a vegetable, proceed to Question 2. If it is a fruit, proceed to Question 7. If it is a juice, proceed to Question 8.
  • Question 2. Is the frozen vegetable product one of the following?
    • Tofu
    • A product containing nuts
    • Soup
    • Rehydrated vegetables
    • Infant food
    • Vegetables with sauce, spices and/or pasta

    If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product. If no, proceed to question 3.

  • Question 3. Is the the frozen vegetable product fried? If yes, proceed to Question 4. If no, it is not an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 4. Is the product a french fried potato? If yes, proceed to Question 5. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.
  • Question 5. Is the french fried potato battered or spiced? If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product. If no, proceed to Question 6.
  • Question 6. Is the cut or shape of the french fried potato one of the following?
    • Straight or regular cut
    • Shoestring or julienne cut
    • Crinkle cut
    • Crinkle cut shoestring
    • Crinkle cut julienne

    If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.

  • Question 7. Is the frozen fruit product one of the following?
    • Infant food
    • A purée or pulp
    • A jam

    If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is not an Imported Food Sector product.

  • Question 8. Is the juice a nectar or vegetable juice? If yes, it is an Imported Food Sector product. If no, proceed to Question 9.
  • Question 9. Is the frozen juice made from one of the following concentrates?
    • Orange
    • Sweetened Orange
    • Apple

    If yes, it is not an Imported Food Sector product. If no, it is an Imported Food Sector product.

End

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