Chapter 4 - Inspection Criteria for a Sugar Bush Establishment
4.5 Equipment and Utensils

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4.5.1 Design, Construction and Installation

Principal

The equipment and utensils are designed, built, installed and handled so as to ensure a quality product that is hygienically prepared to avoid contamination.

Assessment Criteria

Design, construction and installation

  • meets the process requirements
  • accessible for cleaning, sanitation, maintenance and inspection tasks
  • prevents product contamination during operations
  • adequate drainage when necessary, directly connected to drains
  • ability to withstand repeated cleanings and sanitations
  • effective elimination of foreign materials where there are automatic cleaning systems for containers (when used)
  • clear identification to avoid cross-contamination when they are used for handling contaminated materials, including allergenic ingredients (when used in the establishment)

Surfaces, seams and joints in contact with food

  • smooth, free of holes, cracks, crevices and peeling paint
  • non-absorbent, non-corrosive and non-toxic
  • free of lead

Note: the equipment that is most likely to cause lead contamination are those:

  • built before 1994 with galvanized steel
  • welded before 1995
  • where the connections were made of bronze or brass
  • built with "terne plate", a tin/lead alloy
  • that are homemade

Note: where there is equipment containing lead that comes into contact with food, the inspector should ensure that there is a follow-up sampling and that a suitable action plan is in place according to the directives in force. If needed, specific situations should be evaluated in consultation with the supervisor and the program specialist.

Rating I - Examples

  • N/A

Rating II - Examples

  • The following equipment or any unit thereof built and/or welded with a material containing lead where the surface is in contact with the food:
    • boilers for sap collection
    • tanks for storing the sap and maple syrup
    • evaporator and syrup filter tank
  • Poorly installed equipment, constantly contaminating the product, for example difficult disassembly with the accumulation of putrid, dirty, moldy or filthy residues.
  • Equipment poorly installed, causing a risk of chemical contamination of the product, for example, drops of lubricant escape from the bearings, gears, motors and equipment high up; a propane hoist in a production area.
  • Equipment built using a material that is not suitable for food use.
  • Catwalk installed above a food tank.

Rating III - Examples

  • Equipment other than those in the first example in Rating II, built and/or welded with a material containing lead, where the surface is in contact with food.
  • Equipment installed too close to a wall or ceiling that does not allow adequate cleaning.
  • Uneven, discontinuous and rough welded joints in contact with food.
  • Porous surface or surface with holes or fissures, in contact with food.
  • Inadequately identified utensil used for handling contaminated materials.
  • Rusted utensil holder
  • Cracked, split or dented wooden utensil used in processing areas.

References

  • MPR, subsections 3.2 (1), 7 (5), 10 (7)

4.5.2 Preventive Maintenance and Calibration

Principal

The equipment is maintained and calibrated to ensure a quality product that is hygienically prepared to avoid contamination.

Assessment Criteria

Preventive maintenance and equipment calibration

  • by personnel trained for this purpose
  • regular inspection to check its condition, according to:
    • the usage conditions
    • the recommendations of the manufacturer or an equivalent manual
  • parts adjusted and replaced
  • calibration according to manufacturer directives

Note: for the maintenance and adjustment of equipment to close containers, refer to task 4.11.1 Closer of Containers (Including the Drums).

Rating I - Examples

  • N/A

Rating II - Examples

  • Inadequately-maintained equipment causing a risk of contamination by dangerous foreign materials, for example, sharp metal fragments, shards of glass, etc.

Rating III - Examples

  • Poorly-calibrated refractometer resulting in incorrect grading
  • Inadequately-maintained equipment with the risk of contamination by rust, excess grease or peeling paint.

References

  • MPR, subsections 3.2 (1), 6.1 (1) a) and b), 7 (5)
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