Video - SFCR Overview Webinar

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) came into force on January 15, 2019. The SFCR improves and strengthens Canada's food safety system, enables industry to innovate, and creates greater market access opportunities for Canadian food products exported abroad.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) held webinars for food businesses and industry associations on the regulations. A 30-minute webinar was pre-recorded in December 2018 to provide an overview of the SFCR and My CFIA.

SFCR Overview Webinar – Transcript

[Text on screen: Safe Food for Canadians Regulations: Getting Started]

Sarah Mitchell: Good afternoon. Thank you for joining us today for the session on Safe Food for Canadians Regulations, also known as SFCR. My name is Sarah Mitchell, and I work in the Communications and Public Affairs Branch; I will be the moderator.

Today's session will provide a general overview of the SFCR and My CFIA. This session is not intended to address technical aspects of the SFCR, such as commodity-specific guidelines.

We will be hearing from Tammy Switucha from Food Safety and Consumer Protection in Policy and Programs. Now, let's turn it over to Tammy. Tammy?

Tammy Switucha: Thanks, so much. Today, I will be talking to you about the following three key elements of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations, namely: licensing, preventative controls, and traceability.

[Text on screen: This presentation provides an overview of

  • Key elements of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR)
    1. Licensing
    2. Preventive controls
    3. Traceability
    4. Importing
    5. Exporting
  • Timelines for coming into force
  • Information resources available
  • My CFIA]

I'll also be giving you an overview of the requirements in the SFCR related to importing and exporting food.

And finally, I will talk about the timelines for coming into force of the SFCR and the information resources that are available on the CFIA website and the importance of My CFIA.

[Text on screen: Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR)

June 13, 2018 – Published in Canada Gazette, Part II

January 15, 2019 – Begin coming into force

  • Some requirements will have to be met immediately
  • Other requirements will be phased in over a period of 12-30 months based on food commodity, type of activity and business size.

Take time to review the regulations and guidance and get ready to meet the new requirements in advance.]

After 5 years of consultation and engagement on the development of the regulations, the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations were published in Canada Gazette, Part II on June 13, 2018. The regulations will come into force on January 15, 2019.

The six month transition period was added to give food businesses more time to review the regulations, the supporting guidance and to get ready. Some requirements will have to be met immediately upon coming into force, while other requirements will be phased in over a period of 12-30 months based on the food, type of activity and business size.

We encourage you to take the time to review the regulations and the guidance on the CFIA website and get ready to meet the new requirements.

[Text on screen: Safe Food for Canadians Regulations

Scope

  • Food for human consumption
    (including ingredients) that is imported, exported, or inter-provincially traded.
  • Food animals from which meat products to be exported or inter-provincially traded may be derived.
  • Some of the traceability, labelling and advertising provisions apply to intra-provincially traded foods.

Key Features

  • One (1) regulation for all food
  • Outcome-based, allows for flexibility and innovation
  • Broader in scope
    • More food/activities subject to the SFCR, for example Non-Federally Registered Sector, import]

The SFCR applies to food, including ingredients for human consumption that are imported, exported, or traded interprovincially; and food animals from which meat products to be exported or interprovincially traded may be derived. Some of the traceability, labelling and advertising requirements also apply to food that is intra-provincially traded.

Food businesses that were not previously registered with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency will also need to meet new requirements under the new regulations. This includes businesses conducting activities related to confectionary, snack foods, beverages, oils, dried herbs and spices, nuts and seeds, coffee and tea, processed grain-based foods such as baked goods, cereals and pasta, among others.

Some key features of the Regulations are that the SFCR is one set of consistent regulation for all food, thereby eliminating administrative burden and duplication that you may now face. The requirements, where applicable, have been written in an outcome-based manner to allow for flexibility and innovation in achieving food safety outcomes

[Text on screen: Key SFCR Requirements

Licensing and Structure 1 2 3

Identifies an 1 Person (or food business) who conducts an:

  • 2 Activity (or activities) on a food or food animal
    • Manufacture, process, treat, preserve, grade, package or label a food for interprovincial trade or export
    • Import a food
    • Export a food that requires an export certificate or other export permission
    • Slaughter a food animal where the meat product is destined for interprovincial trade or export
    • Store and handle a meat product in its imported condition for inspection by the CFIA

at a

  • 3 Location (or locations) (e.g. establishment, including a field or facility).

Key Components

  • Preventive controls
    • prevent food safety hazards and reduce the likelihood of contaminated food entering the market, whether the food is prepared within or outside of Canada
  • Preventive Control Plan (PCP)
    • Written preventive control plan (PCP) to address both
      • food safety hazards, controls measures and associated evidence of their effectiveness (consistent with HACCP); and
      • consumer protection and market fairness requirements (labelling, compositional standards, grades)
  • Traceability
    • Trace the food one step forward/one step back along the supply chain]

Licensing, preventative controls, preventative control plans, also referred to as PCPs, and traceability are the key transformational components of the regulations. Licensing assigns demonstrated accountability for food safety up and down the food supply chain. It is an activity-based regime that is determined by what you do and not by what you produce. This is a key principle to consider as you learn and decide whether you need to get a licence.

The CFIA will no longer be registering establishments, but will be issuing licences to persons and businesses to allow them to carry out activities at one or more locations.

The activities listed here would require a licence, though there are some exceptions for specific foods and activities. You can find definitions for each of these activities and further explanations of them in guidance materials on our website.

You can determine whether you will require a licence under the SFCR by using our online, interactive decision tool called "Licensing Interactive Tool" that takes you through a series of questions and indicates whether the business would require a licence.

[Text on screen: Licensing

Does not apply to:

  • activities conducted on food to be sold and consumed within a province
  • moving food from one province to another (conveying or transporting)
  • growing and harvesting fresh fruits or vegetables
  • handling fish on a vessel
  • activities conducted at the retail grocery store (e.g. packaging/labelling food at the retail grocery store for sale to consumers)]

Licensing does not apply in all situations. While this not an exhaustive list, here are some examples where a SFCR licence is not required. The preparation of food that is to be sold and consumed within the same province. The transportation of food from one province to another. Growing and harvesting of fresh fruits or vegetables. Handling of fish on a vessel; and activity conducted at a retail grocery store where the food is sold onsite.

[Text on screen: Licensing – What's New?

Not all activities taking place in an establishment may be subject to SFCR (e.g. food manufactured for intra-provincial trade)

No longer a requirement to:

  • post a licence certificate in the facility
  • have the licence number on the label (other than inspection legend)
  • submit PCP at time of licence application (but must have one in place and meet all requirements)

The ability to search a listing of valid licence holders will be available on the CFIA's website]

So what's new for food businesses that are currently registered or licensed with CFIA? Well, since the CFIA will no longer be registering establishments, but issuing licences to persons or businesses to carry out specific activities, not all the activities taking place in an establishment may be subject to licensing, for example, food manufactured for intra-provincial trade only.

The following requirements found in regulations under the Canada Agricultural Products Act, the Fish Inspection Act and the Meat Inspection Act, were not maintained.

Posting a licence or registration certificate in the facility. Having a licence or registration number applied on the label of a food, other than the inspection legend for meat, processed egg, and fish. Submitting a preventative control plan at the time of licence application.

Please note that even though you may not be required to submit your PCP at the time of licensing, the PCP must be in place to meet all regulatory requirements, and must be presented to the inspector during an inspection.

Another new feature is that on the CFIA's website, you will have the ability to search a listing of valid licence holders.

[Text on left of screen: Preventive Controls

  • Include hazard analysis and control measures for the hazards associated with food
  • Include requirements related to treatment and processes, establishment conditions, sanitation, pest control, competency, investigation, complaints
  • Outcome-based where possible to allow for flexibility and innovation
  • Include investigation, complaints, recalls]

[Graphic on right of screen: Key Preventive Food Safety Controls]

Another key component of the SFCR is Preventative Controls. Preventative controls are steps that you must take to prevent, reduce or eliminate food safety hazards.

Part 4 of the regulation contains the majority of these requirements that are based on internationally recognized principles of food hygiene, including Good Manufacturing Practices, Good Agricultural Practices and the principles of HACCP.

The preventative controls cover requirements such as hazard analysis and control measures, treatment and processes, establishment conditions, sanitation, pest control, competency, investigation, complaints and recalls. The preventative controls in the SFCR were written to be outcome based, where possible, to allow for flexibility and innovation.

[Text on screen: Preventive Control Plans

  • Required for most businesses, including importers
    • Exception: $100K or less in gross annual food sales for some foods
  • PCP must address both
    • food safety hazards, controls measures and associated evidence of their effectiveness (consistent with HACCP); and
    • consumer protection and market fairness requirements (labelling, compositional standards, grades)
  • If you have a HACCP-based system in place, you are well positioned to show compliance with the PCP requirements
  • Review your system to make sure all PCP requirements are included and that consumer protection and market fairness are also covered]

A PCP is a written document that demonstrates how risks to food and food animals are identified and controlled. The controls are based on internationally recognized Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) principles.

The PCP also includes a description of measures taken to show compliance with consumer protection and market fairness requirements, such as packaging, labelling, grades and standards of identity.

If you already have HACCP system in place, such as FSEP or a private certification scheme plan, you are well positioned to show compliance with the PCP requirements. However, there are some PCP exceptions, for example, businesses who make food for export who do not need an export certificate, other than meat products or fish. Businesses who handle fish on a vessel, and businesses who prepare fresh fruits or vegetables, honey, maple products or other foods such as baked goods and their gross annual food sales is less than $100,000.

It is important to note that even though you may be exempt from a written PCP, the preventative controls or food safety requirements still need to be met.

[Text on screen: Evidence (Validation)

  • Don't need to re-validate control measures that were acceptable before SFCR
  • Re-validation is required when:
    • changes are made to a control measure
    • repeated failures or deviations
  • Proportional to the level of risk
  • Industry Guidance is available "Proven by evidence to be effective"]

Validation is an important activity to ensure your preventative controls meet the outcomes identified in the regulations. The definition of validation is based on the Codex definition, which is, the process of obtaining evidence that a control measure or combination of control measures, if properly implemented, is capable of controlling the hazard to a specified outcome.

If your food business has in place controls measures that were validated and found to be acceptable before the SFCR came into force, you do not need to revalidate them.

However, revalidation is required if you have made changes to the control measure or if you have found repeated failures or deviations.

The validation you conduct on the control measures should be proportional to the level of risk. This means that evidence could be very simple, for example, for good hygiene practices or prerequisite programs. More detailed for "known" Critical Control Points,
to full validation studies for new or alternative control measures.

There is industry guidance on the CFIA website that explains validation and what is meant by 'Proven to be effective".

Outcome based-regulations do not lower food safety standards or allow companies to cut corners. While the Canadian Food Inspection Agency will be open to innovation, it will be vigilant in verifying high standards of food safety.

[Text on screen: Traceability

  • Trace food one step forward and one step back through the supply chain in order to protect Canadians during a food safety incident
  • Helps ensure a timely response if a food safety issue is detected:
    • reduce the time it takes businesses to remove unsafe food from the market, safeguarding the public
    • minimize the scope of recalls and reduce the cost of recalls for businesses
  • Align with international standards (e.g. Codex)
  • Apply to a broader scope of food businesses than the licensing and PCP requirements:
    • all food (no exemptions like licensing and preventive controls)
    • retail grocery stores that sell food to consumers – trace one step back only (corporate as well as franchise)
    • distributors and wholesalers who trade inter-provincially
  • Does not apply to food service operations]

The last transformational requirement in the SFCR is traceability. The traceability requirements align with international standards, such Codex and aim to trace the food one step forward and one step back through the supply chain.

Traceability records are crucial during a food safety incident because they reduce the time it takes to remove unsafe food from the market; and they minimize the scope of recalls therefore reducing the cost for businesses.

The traceability requirements apply to an even broader scope of food and businesses than licensing and preventative controls. For example, traceability applies to grains, alcoholic beverages, food additives, wholesalers and distributors and retail grocery stores. However, the traceability requirements do not apply to restaurants, cafeterias and caterers.

[Text on screen: Importing

  • Importers need to:
    • have a licence to import
    • have a preventive control plan (some exemptions apply)
    • ensure that their foreign supplier is manufacturing, preparing, storing, packaging and labelling the food under the same conditions as food prepared in Canada
    • maintain procedures and processes for handling and investigating complaints and recalls
    • keep clear and complete traceability records that show where food came from (the supplier) and to whom it was sold (buyer)
  • Non-resident importers permitted under certain conditions
  • Border processes with CBSA will not change – updates to requirements will be uploaded into Automated Import Reference System]

Now, let's move on to the SFCR requirements related to the import of food.

The new regulations will apply to all imported food to ensure that they meet the same food safety outcomes and have been prepared with the same level of food safety controls as food made in Canada. Under the new requirements, importers will need a licence.

As part of their licensing requirements, importers will need a preventative control plan which identifies the food safety risks associated with the food they want to import and ensure there are control measures in place for them. And shows the conditions under which the food is manufactured, prepared, stored, packaged or labelled before it is imported to Canada.

While an importer can hire a broker to help facilitate the import process, the importer will need to hold the licence and maintain procedures for handling and investigating complaints and recalls for food they import. The new requirements also apply to food that is imported for the purpose of exporting at a later date.

A non-resident importer may obtain a licence under the SFCR as long as their fixed place of business is located in a country recognized by the CFIA as having at least the same level of protection as that of Canada for the commodity being imported. Foods imported by the non-resident importer will also need to be sent directly to Canada from the recognized state where the non-resident importer resides.

Border processes with Canada Border Services Agency, or CBSA, will not change and the Automated Import Reference System, or AIRS, is being updated to reflect SFCR requirements.

[Text on screen: Exporting

Exporters need to:

  • ensure that their food is manufactured, processed, treated, preserved, graded, packaged or labelled by a licence holder
  • meet Canadian requirements as well as foreign requirements
  • for food that does not meet Canadian requirements, have written documents that substantiate the foreign requirements have been met and clearly labelled for export
  • keep clear and complete traceability records

Registry of Licensed Food Businesses: businesses in good regulatory standing

If you need a CFIA export permission, you must have a licence and a written preventive control plan – even if the food you are exporting is exempt from these requirements]

New food safety requirements under the SFCR will require that foods exported generally meet Canadian requirements, as well as those of the importing country, prior to exporting. When there are no requirements in the foreign country, businesses will still need to comply with applicable Canadian law.

If you export food, make sure that the food was manufactured, processed, treated, preserved, graded, packaged, labelled by a licence holder, and if the food is a meat product, the slaughtering of the food animal was conducted by a licence holder.

Generally speaking, you are permitted to export a food that does not meet Canadian requirements, as long as the following requirements are met, namely, traceability, preventative controls and preventative control plans, animal welfare, humane treatment of animals, and work shift agreements.

If the food does not meet Canadian requirements, you must have written documents that prove that the foreign requirements have been met and that the food is clearly labelled for export. If you need an export certificate from the CFIA, you will need to have a licence and a written preventative control plan. This includes food that were previously regulated solely under the Food and Drug Regulations and if the domestic timeline allows for later implementation dates.

The CFIA will no longer be issuing the Manufacturer's Declaration Form for manufactured foods, and instead will be issuing the Certificate of Free Sale to licensed food businesses. This will be provided through My CFIA for manufactured foods to those with a licence and written PCP.

Existing registered businesses currently getting export certificates from the CFIA will need to follow existing export certificate application processes.

An exporter can choose to hire someone to help facilitate their export process, such as a customs broker, but it is the exporter who needs the licence under the SFCR. In the event of an issue or a recall, the CFIA will deal with the licence holder directly.

The CFIA has also created a registry of licensed food businesses. It will provide a listing of businesses that meet the requirements for licensing, preventative controls and traceability and are in good regulatory standing. You would still be in "good standing" with the CFIA if there were non-compliances identified and are being corrected.

A key driver for this Registry is the Foreign Supplier Verification requirements for U.S. Importers which came into effect May 2017 under the US Food Safety Modernization Act. This list will provide U.S. importers a means to demonstrate they meet the US FDA Foreign Supplier Verification modified requirements for Canadian manufactured foods.

[Text on left of screen: Regulatory Compliance

How will an inspector evaluate compliance?

  • Verifies that information on the licence is accurate (locations, activities, food)
  • Verifies preventive controls are in place
  • Verifies that control measures are in place and that there is evidence that they are effective
  • Reviews Preventive Control Plan

Note:
An inspector can at any time request product samples/testing, review traceability plans to confirm compliance and/or if suspicion of a food safety risk exists]

[Graphic on right of screen: What to Expect When Inspected.]

The CFIA is aware that businesses have to meet a number of new requirements under the SFCR. To facilitate the coming into force and to further help businesses transition to the new regulations, the CFIA will take a graduated approach to enforcement based on the seriousness of the non-compliance, considering factors such as the potential or actual harm, the compliance history and the intent of the regulated party.

In cases where there are no immediate food safety concerns and the business has demonstrated their intent to comply with the regulations, but may not understand the requirements, the CFIA may, for example, issue letters of non-compliance or Corrective Action Requests, or where no licence has been issued, direct the business to the CFIA website to get their licence and, if applicable, to further develop or improve their preventative control plan. A follow-up inspection may be conducted to verify that requirements are being met.

Where there is a risk to food safety or an apparent disregard for the new regulations, such as failing to get a licence or implement a preventative control plan after being advised to do so, standard enforcement measures would be applied.

[Text on screen: Changes to Service Fees as a Result of SFCR

1 – Addition of the SFCR Licence Fee

  • For all food commodities, add a $250 licence fee, payable every 2 years
  • Convert existing annual registration fee to an annual inspection fee where applicable; current annual inspection fees remain

2 - Updates to authorities

  • Replace references to existing Acts and Regulations with references to the SFCA/SFCR where applicable
  • Remove fees where authorities no longer exist in the SFCA/SFCR (e.g. review of labels and recipes)

3 - Updates to language

  • Replace wording reflective of language used in existing Acts and Regulations with wording found in the SFCA/SFCR]

Amendments have been made to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Fees Notice as a consequence of the coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Act and the Regulations. The changes, which will be in place once SFCR comes into force in January, will support the introduction of the new licensing regime in the food program. The Fees Notice updates the service descriptions in order to align with the new regulatory authorities.

The changes include the introduction of a $250 fee for a 2-year licence. Existing annual registration fees will be converted to annual inspection fees similar to the approach currently taken for some sectors, such as meat and eggs. The inspection fees would be in addition to the $250 licence fee and would be charged on the first inspection each year. All other existing fee amounts remain the same.

We will repeal certain fees for services which the Agency no longer conducts, such as the verification of labels. This alignment is not part of the proposed restructuring of the CFIA cost recovery regime that was consulted on in 2017. We continue to examine our cost recovery structure and will consult stakeholders again before any further restructuring takes place.

[Text on screen: When do the new requirements apply to my business?

  • While the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations begin to come into effect on January 15, 2019, certain requirements for some foods or businesses may apply at a later date
  • Consult detailed information on the SFCR Timelines landing page. It covers:
    • timetables (by sector) for licensing, preventive controls, preventive control plans and traceability requirements
    • organic aquaculture products
    • inspection legends]

Now that we talked about some of the key components of the SFCR, the next question is, when do you need to comply? The timelines for complying with licensing, preventative controls, preventative control plans and traceability requirements vary by food, activity and size of your food business.

[Text on screen: Summary of timeline

Dairy products; Eggs; Fish; Honey; Maple products; Meat products; Processed egg products and Processed fruit or vegetable products

  • SFCR requirement: Licence January 15, 2019
  • SFCR requirement: Traceability January 15, 2019
  • SFCR requirement: Preventive Controls January 15, 2019
  • SFCR requirement: Written PCP January 15, 2019 (not required for maple products and honey if annual food sales are $100K or less)

Fresh fruits or vegetables

  • SFCR requirement: Licence January 15, 2019 (N/A for growing and harvesting)
  • SFCR requirement: Traceability January 15, 2019 (except growing and harvesting); January 15, 2020 (growing and harvesting)
  • SFCR requirement: Preventive Controls January 15, 2020
  • SFCR requirement: Written PCP January 15, 2020 (not required if annual food sales are $100K or less)

All Other Foods 
More than $100K in gross annual food sales and more than 4 employees

  • SFCR requirement: Licence July 15, 2020
  • SFCR requirement: Traceability July 15, 2020
  • SFCR requirement: Preventive Controls July 15, 2020
  • SFCR requirement: Written PCP July 15, 2020

More than $100K in gross annual food sales and 4 employees or less

  • SFCR requirement: Licence July 15, 2020
  • SFCR requirement: Traceability July 15, 2020
  • SFCR requirement: Preventive Controls July 16, 2021
  • SFCR requirement: Written PCP July 16, 2021

$100K or less in gross annual food sales Or 4 employees or less

  • SFCR requirement: Licence July 15, 2020
  • SFCR requirement: Traceability July 15, 2020
  • SFCR requirement: Preventive Controls July 16, 2021
  • SFCR requirement: not required if $100K or less (regardless of no. of employees)]

This is a summary table of the timelines for licensing, traceability, preventative controls and written preventative control plans. Given that not all food business have the same level of readiness, these requirements will be phased in. This will give those food businesses who are not currently subject to registration or licensing under existing regulations as well as small businesses, extra time to get ready.

The exemption from a written preventative control plan for businesses with gross annual food sales less than $100,000 only applies to "all other foods", as seen in this table, as well as honey, maple products, and fresh fruits and vegetables.

[Text on screen: Industry guidance on the CFIA website]

[Graphic: Safe Food for Canadians Regulations web page]

On the SFCR landing page you will find these ten portals to information and guidance. We encourage you to explore these links to learn more and get ready.

[Text on screen: Five Reasons You Should Be Using My CFIA

  • Convenient and secure access to online services
  • Request licences, permits, registrations, export certificates
  • Manage and track your service requests
  • Pay for CFIA services online, at any time of the day
  • Cut back on paperwork

Sign up for My CFIA today inspection.gc.ca/mycfia]

Now, let's move on to CFIA's online services.

[Text on screen: My CFIA

Modernizing tools and services

  • Digital service will be the primary and preferred method of requesting and receiving services
  • The Agency is starting to:
    • Provide online access to a full range of services and information to comply with regulations through My CFIA
    • Make available more information and guidance online and enhance its search ability
    • Enhance ability to manage enquiries in a seamless and timely way in order to provide consistent, clear responses to questions, triaged based on complexity
    • Transition to the Single Window portal for all Import declarations
    • Update resource tools like AIRs with SFCR requirements

My CFIA – access to services online

  • My CFIA represents the Agency's move into digitally enabled service delivery
  • My CFIA allows you to request, pay for and track the status of services online through a secure account that can be tailored to suit your business model
  • Services are being added gradually
    • Today you can enroll and create a business profile
    • Request import permits for most plant and animal products, as well as requests to register establishments involved in the preparation of food commodities currently governed by CFIA regulation
    • Businesses are encouraged to enrol now in My CFIA and prepare to apply for their licence when licensing becomes available online. Those who submit SFCR licence applications by email or fax will be redirected to apply using the My CFIA portal

In 2018, we are gradually beginning to offer Export Certificates online]

The CFIA is moving to provide services online and improving its ability to manage enquiries by making information more accessible on our website. It's a convenient and secure way to do business with the CFIA 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Through My CFIA, businesses will be able to apply and pay for their Safe Food for Canadians licence, track its progress, and receive it in their My CFIA account at any time of day or night. It will also provide you with an opportunity to sign up and receive the latest information on CFIA matters that interest you. You may also be able to see your inspection reports in your account. Other services include requests for import permits and export certificates.

You are encouraged to enrol in My CFIA and apply for your licence, which is now available online. Those who submit licence applications by email or fax will be redirected to apply using the My CFIA portal.

[Text on screen: Getting an SFC licence – My CFIA

If you already have a CFIA registration or licence

  • follow the normal process to renew (if it expires before January 15, 2019). Your renewed permission will be valid once the SFCR come into force
  • You will fully transition to an SFC licence at a later time

If you do not have a CFIA registration or licence, and require one by January 15, 2019, act now to enroll – visit My CFIA

  • Payment and issuance will occur on January 15, 2019]

If you currently have a registration or licence issued by the CFIA that is expiring before January 15, 2019, you will need to follow the normal process to renew. The renewed permission will continue to be valid until its expiry date.

If you currently have a registration or licence issued by the CFIA that is expiring after January 15, 2019, and if it contains a statement indicating that it will continue to be a licence under the SFCR, you will be able to keep it until it expires, after which you will need to apply for a new licence for your activities.

If you do not currently have a registration or licence issued by the CFIA, and you require one for January 15, enrol in My CFIA to apply for a licence. Payment and issuance will occur on January 15 when the law and regulations come into force.

[Text on screen: SFC Licence Checklist

Determine Scope

  • What activities/food commodities and locations will form the basis (or structure) of the licence

Enrol via my CFIA

  • Determine profile model
  • Determine accountabilities
  • Get supporting documents ready
  • Complete enrolment process

Apply for a SFCR licence

  • Begin the service request]

Here's a checklist to help you prepare your application for a licence or multiple licences. I'll go into more details in upcoming slides.

[Text on screen: SFC Licence Checklist, Determine Scope

What activities/food commodities and locations will form the basis of the licence?

Activity (or activities) on a food or food animal

  • Manufacture, process, treat, preserve, grade, store, package or label a food for interprovincial trade or export
  • Import a food
  • Export a food that requires an export certificate or other export permission
  • Slaughter a food animal where the meat product is destined for interprovincial trade or export
  • Store and handle a meat product in its imported condition for inspection by the CFIA

Location (or locations)

  • (e.g. establishment, including a field or facility)

Structure of licence considerations

  • Single or multiple licences
  • Licence fees ($250/2-year licence)

Considerations:

  • For export, many foreign countries require that each establishment/location be assigned a unique identification number. Therefore, only one licence should be associated for each establishment
  • CFIA conducts inspections on each licence you hold
  • You have to prepare, keep, maintain and implement preventive control plans (PCPs) for each licence you hold (if a PCP is required)
  • CFIA enforcement action, such as suspension or cancellation, is taken on a licence and impacts all activities and food covered by that licence

Note: Enforcement action on one licence could result in inspection of activities conducted under other licences.]

I don't want to dive into too much detail on this slide, but I want to highlight the considerations to defining the licence scope that are relevant to creating a My CFIA profile. A proposed fee of $250 will be charged per licence, as I mentioned previously.

For businesses considering "exporting" or "preparing food for export", on their licence application, a single licence per physical location for all activities carried out at that location is recommended to minimize disruption to trade. This is similar to previous establishment registrations.

CFIA will also conduct inspections on each licence you hold, and you have to prepare, keep, maintain and implement preventative control plans for each licence that you hold.

CFIA enforcement action, such as suspension or cancellation, is taken on a licence and will impact all activities and food covered by that licence. And finally, an enforcement action on one licence could result in inspection of activities conducted under other licences

[Text on screen: SFC Licence Checklist, Enrol via My CFIA

  • Enrolment is the process of setting up your food business account profile in My CFIA.
  • To enrol, food businesses have to identify a person to be accountable for activities on the account, ("Profile Authority") and someone ("Profile Manager") who will manage the setup and ongoing changes, and request services. These can, but do not have to be the same person.
  • Enrolling in My CFIA takes on average between 30 and 60 minutes, depending on the complexity of your food business.
  • Once complete, the CFIA verifies completeness and validates the account. This includes verifying basic identify information such as legal name, location, business authorities. CFIA uses the Government of Canada Business Number (GC BN) as one means of doing this.
  • Once your account information has been validated, you are ready to request services through My CFIA]

Once you have figured out the scope of your licence, or licences, then it's time to determine how you want to structure your business profile within My CFIA.

What is enrolment? It's the process of setting up a business profile in My CFIA, but it's more than just providing your business name, address and phone number. Creating a My CFIA profile also requires a business to identify who has authority to request service and/or manage information within the profile. This is very important as we move to online services.

Enrolling takes about 30 to 60 minutes depending on the complexity of your business operations. Once complete, the CFIA's National Service Centre verifies the information allowing you to begin requesting services.

[Text on screen: SFC Licence Checklist Enrol | Determine your Business Model

Establishment Model

  • This model allows a food business to create multiple party profiles (accounts). Businesses can choose to have multiple facilities, organizational units or business divisions to interact with My CFIA independently using their own authorized party profile.
  • A business can choose to authorize a single Profile Authority to oversee all of their party profiles and assign a different Profile Manager for each.
  • Each party profile is created using a unique profile name, but all party profiles would be identified by a common legal name, associating them with a single business entity.
  • While each location would manage their own profile, service requests and have access to their own inspection reports, they would not have access to Party Profiles of other locations that have the same Legal Business name (i.e. parent company).

Corporate Model

  • This model allows a business to manage all of its service requests, payments and CFIA-issued permissions or export certificates from a single party profile.
  • When a business enrols using this model, it can assign a single Profile Manager to have access to the party profile.
  • In this model, locations can still submit and manage their own service requests, but they would not have access to their own Inspection Reports.
  • The Profile Authority (the parent company) could view and manage service requests for all of its locations and view all of its inspection reports.

The Business Model relates to the Profile structure within My CFIA, not necessarily how you operate or view your business. You can always change your Business/Profile Model but it's not a trivial exercise, so it's good to understand and select the model most suited to your needs.]

There are two types of business models that companies can choose from. The Establishment model is very similar to how many companies we currently deal with today operate, with very little interaction from Corporate head office. The Corporate model means that Corporate head office is choosing to manage their business at the corporate level for all of their locations.

Individuals within each establishment can still be provided access to the system but one important factor is all establishments can see each other's information and transactions as it rolls up to the Corporate level.

[Text on screen: SFC Licence Checklist Enrol | Determine Accountabilities

Determine who is going to be accountable for specific administrative roles within My CFIA

Role: Company Officer
Description: The legal individual who designates the Profile Authority to act on the behalf of the company. This is not a system role – this is the person who signs the "Proof of Profile Authority" (POA). This individual must also appear on the Proof of Business (POB). Example: CEO, CFO, VP, Board of Director Member.
Update Profile Information: Not Applicable. Not a My CFIA administrative role.
View Profile Information: Not Applicable. Not a My CFIA administrative role.
Submit Service Requests: Not Applicable. Not a My CFIA administrative role.
View and Manage Service Requests: Not Applicable. Not a My CFIA administrative role.

Role: Profile Authority
Description: Accountable for all information, records, requests, and users assigned to a party profile. The profile authority may be accountable for more than one party profile (for example, a broker) and may also act as profile manager.
Update Profile Information: Yes
View Profile Information: Yes
Submit Service Requests: Yes
View and Manage Service Requests: Yes

Role: Profile Manager
Description: Authorized by the profile authority to create and manage the profile, invite other users, and to conduct business online with the CFIA on behalf of the business.
Update Profile Information: Yes
View Profile Information: Yes
Submit Service Requests: Yes
View and Manage Service Requests: Yes

Role: Alternate Profile Manager
Description: Same authority and responsibility as the Profile Manager.
Update Profile Information: Yes
View Profile Information: Yes
Submit Service Requests: Yes
View and Manage Service Requests: Yes

Role: Party Contact (Employee or Broker)
Description: Can submit service requests on behalf of the business but cannot edit party profile information. Party contacts can be added at any point in time by the profile authority or profile manager and are not necessary when you sign up.
Update Profile Information: No
View Profile Information: Yes
Submit Service Requests: Yes
View and Manage Service Requests: Yes]

When enrolling, you need to determine who will be accountable for the administrative roles within My CFIA. This slide provides you with definitions of the different roles and responsibilities.

[Text on screen: SFC Licence Checklist Enrol | Get supporting documents ready

Before enrolling in My CFIA, complete or have the following items ready

In addition to determining the structure of the SFCR licence (scope) and profile model and accountabilities, the enrolment process will require a few other documents / items.

These include:

  • Government of Canada Business Number (GC BN)

Food businesses will need a GC BN as part of the Proof of Business step in enrolment. This is a 9-digit number issued by the Canada Revenue Agency for business identification purposes. For more information or to obtain a GC BN, go to http://www.canada.ca/

  • Proof of Authority Form

This form is used to record the food business' authorization for an individual to establish and manage the company's My CFIA account. Individuals will need completed/signed POAs to administer the organization's profile on My CFIA. The form can be downloaded from inspection.gc.ca

  • a GCKEY (for signing into the system securely) or approved sign-in partner service

A GCKEY is needed for secure online communications with government programs (e.g. My CFIA). You can also use an approved sign-in partner service (a number of financial institutions provide this service).

My CFIA: www.inspection.gc.ca/mycfia, includes online resources such as links to GCKey, the Profile Authority Form, FAQs, glossaries and other resources to help you with getting these support documents ready.]

The enrolment process requires that you have several documents ready in hand in advance. The first one is the Government of Canada Business Number. This is a 9 digit number issued by the Canada Revenue Agency for all business transactions with the Government of Canada and is needed for the proof of business step.

The second is your Proof of Authority Form This is your businesses authorization for someone to establish and manage the My CFIA account. The form must be signed and it can be downloaded from our website.

Thirdly, a GC Key or an approved sign-in partner service. This will enable secure online access and communications with government programs.

[Text on screen: SFCR Getting Started | Help

Have questions?

  • If you have a question after consulting the web resources (inspection.gc.ca), call 1-800-442-2342 (My CFIA Support Team), or
  • use the contact us form found on our website

Stay up to date

If you have questions after reviewing the resources on our website please call our 1-800 number, or use the "contact us" form found on our website.

We also encourage you to stay connected by signing up to receive our email notifications; follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook; and subscribe to our chronicle called the CFIA Chronicle, our current quarterly newsletter.

That's the end of my presentation, and I'll had it back over to Sarah to conclude.

Sarah Mitchell: Well, thank you, Tammy. That was very good. We thank everyone who joined us today as well, and we hope you have a lovely day.

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