Questions and Answers - Horticulture Plant List (HPL): Plant taxa with basic phytosanitary import requirements

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The Horticulture Plant List (HPL) is a tool to simplify the application and evaluation process for plant protection import permits for many commonly requested plant groups, or taxa.

This list may be used for import permits from all origins other than the continental United States.

What is the purpose of the Horticulture Plant List (HPL)?

The HPL was compiled by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) as a list of frequently requested plants which have common, basic phytosanitary import requirements. This will allow importers who are applying for an import permit to apply for all plant taxa included on the HPL with a single application, instead of requesting each of the listed taxa individually on their permit application.

Permit applicants often request permission to import many different plant taxa for each country of origin. Currently, each plant taxon must be entered individually on the application form for an import permit. The CFIA understands that this can be time-consuming; the HPL is a way to simplify this process. In addition, the HPL may reduce the time required to review lengthy application forms and to issue the associated permit.

How can I apply for a permit for the plants on the HPL?

In the "Description" portion of the permit application form, choose the "Plants/Plant parts for planting/propagation" option. This will generate the table required for you to do the following:

  1. Select the type (for example, rooted, unrooted).
  2. Enter "Horticulture Plant List" in the "Scientific Name" column.
  3. Choose "Without Soil". (Plants with soil are prohibited from areas other than the continental United States and the HPL will not be used for plants in growing media imported under the Canadian Growing Media Program.)

For more information on how to complete the application for a plant protection permit to import, please refer to Plant Protection Directive D-97-04: Application, procedures, issuance and use of a Permit to Import under the Plant Protection Act.

How do I apply for a plant that is not on the HPL?

The process for applying for a plant protection import permit for other commodities has not changed. For more information on how to apply for an import permit, please refer to Plant Protection Directive D-97-04: Application, procedures, issuance and use of a Permit to Import under the Plant Protection Act.

What if the plant I want to import is a synonym of a plant on the HPL?

As with all shipments, the plant names on the Phytosanitary Certificate issued by the National Plant Protection Organization of the exporting country must match the plant names on the importer's permit (including the plant names on the HPL when it is referenced on the permit).

What Harmonized System (HS) codes should I use when submitting my request to import these plants in the Electronic Data Interchange (EDI)?

You can continue to use the same Harmonized System (HS) codes as before.

Rooted: 06 02 90 0023 90
Unrooted: 06 02 10 0012 99
In-vitro: 06 02 90 0026 90
Bulbs: 06 01 10 0002 99

Where can I find the HPL?

You can find the HPL on the CFIA's website at: www.inspection.gc.ca/plantlist.

How can I ask to have a plant added to the HPL be updated?

Please send your request to the Horticulture Section at horticulture@inspection.gc.ca. Be sure to include the scientific name of the plant at least to the genus level and please indicate whether you have imported the plant in the past. The Horticulture Section will evaluate your request and determine whether the plant can be added to the HPL. Note that some plants may not be appropriate for addition to the HPL.

How often will the HPL be updated?

Phytosanitary import requirements are based on the best scientific and technical information available at the time. For this reason, the CFIA may update the phytosanitary import requirements for plant protection at any time (for example, when new relevant information becomes available). Although the CFIA expects the phytosanitary status of the plants listed on the HPL to be largely stable, changes may periodically be necessary to reduce the risk of introducing plant pests into Canada.

If new import requirements are applied to specific plant taxa, or if the taxa are no longer allowed entry into Canada, they will be removed from the HPL as soon as the requirements go into effect.

It is crucial that you and your supplier verify the HPL before each importation to ensure that all the plant taxa you plan to import are still included on the HPL and the import permit.

How will I be notified when there is a change to the HPL?

The CFIA has established an e-mail notification service specifically for issues related to plant protection import permits, including updates to the HPL. All importers who hold import permits for plants are strongly encouraged to subscribe to this notification service.

You can sign up for these notifications using the CFIA's Email Notification Services for Plant Health. Under the heading "Plant Health policy updates", check the box marked "Centre of Administration - Plant Import Permits" and click the "Submit" button.

Note: It is the importer's responsibility to review the HPL online prior to every shipment to ensure that the plants to be imported are still on the HPL.

How will my current active permit(s) be affected?

Your current permit will not be affected by the implementation of the HPL. Should you wish to add the HPL to your permit(s), a separate application is required for each permit to be amended. Please note that a $10.00 amendment fee will apply.

If you have questions or comments, please contact the Center of Administration – Plant at permitoffice@inspection.gc.ca or 613-773-7361.

Will I still need a separate permit for each country of origin?

Yes. A separate permit will still be required for each country of origin and a separate permit application form will need to be submitted for each country of origin.

What about plants from the continental United States?

A plant protection import permit is not required for most plants from the continental United States, so the HPL is not used for this origin. Plants from this area for which an import permit is required have specific import conditions, instead of the basic conditions applied to the plants on the HPL.

What about plants imported under the Canadian Growing Media Program?

The HPL cannot be used for plants imported under the Canadian Growing Media Program.

Can HPL plants enter the Canadian Greenhouse Certification Program (CGCP)?

To enter plants into the CGCP, the authorized facility must verify that the plant taxa and the country of origin can meet the phytosanitary import requirements of Canada and the United States.

Individual HPL taxa and origin(s) must be verified as being eligible to enter the United States in order to be produced and exported under the CGCP.

Are there any restrictions on the export of HPL plants to the United States?

HPL plants do not automatically meet the phytosanitary import requirements of the United States. Importers who plan to grow and export plants to the United States should verify that U.S. phytosanitary import requirements can be met prior to ordering.

Do HPL plants meet the NAPPRA requirements of Canada and the United States?

NAPPRA means "Not Authorized Pending Pest Risk Analysis". HPL plants are not considered NAPPRA for Canada. If an HPL plant taxon is determined to be NAPPRA for Canada, it will be removed from the HPL.

HPL plants do not automatically meet the NAPPRA requirements of the United States. Importers who plan to grow and export plants to the United States should verify that U.S. phytosanitary import requirements, including NAPPRA, can be met prior to ordering.

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