Developing Your Biosecurity Plan: The National Voluntary Farm-Level Biosecurity Standard for the Fruit and Tree Nut Industries
2.0 The Creation of a Biosecurity Plan and the Implementation of Biosecurity Measures

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This standard provides a framework for the development of individual farm biosecurity plans or to enhance but not supersede existing farm level programs, such as CanadaGAP™ and other regional or provincial programs. Figure 1 shows how the documents and tools referenced in this standard support the development of farm specific biosecurity plans.

Figure 1: Flow chart of how the documents and tools referenced in this standard work together to help you develop your biosecurity plan.

Flow chart of how the documents and tools referenced in this standard work together to help you develop your biosecurity plan. Description follows.
Description for Flow chart of how the documents and tools referenced in this standard work together to help you develop your biosecurity plan

Development of your biosecurity plan for your farm should start with the general biosecurity principles of the National Voluntary Farm-Level Biosecurity Standard for the Fruit and Tree Nut Industries. Then commodity specific guidance from the Biosecurity Producer Guide for the Fruit and Tree Nut Industries and provincial and trade association production Guides, manuals and farm-level certification programs that are specific to the biosecurity concerns of your operation should be considered. This will help you address and include the specific biosecurity needs of your operation in your farm specific biosecurity plan.

The development and implementation of your biosecurity plan can be seen as a cycle of activities:

  1. Assess pest risks and reassess on a regular basis to ensure preparedness;
  2. Plan to address biosecurity gaps:
  3. Implement measures and procedures; and
  4. Monitor and gather pest information.

Figure 2 provides a visual representation of the cycle of biosecurity activities, where the need to assess and reassess can be seen as both the starting point of the cycle as well as the activity that continues the cycle. Your biosecurity plan is created to prevent and manage the pest risk within your farm operation. By assessing and re-assessing pest risk on a regular basis, preparedness can be achieved and activities which were once reactive become measured and predictable.

Figure 2: An illustration of the activities to follow to develop and maintain your biosecurity plan

An illustration of the activities to follow to develop and maintain your biosecurity plan. Description follows.
Description for An illustration of the activities to follow to develop and maintain your biosecurity plan

Figure 2 is an illustration of the cycle of activities that should be completed to develop and implement a biosecurity plan. The cycle of biosecurity activities has four items in the centre with arrows pointing between them in clockwise direction. The first item at the top of the cycle is Assess. Moving clockwise, the second item is Plan, the third item is Implement and the fourth item is Monitor. There is a text box by each of these items in the cycle (four in total). Above the word Assess there is a box with the following text: The risks posed by pests that threaten your plants are identified and evaluated on an on-going basis. To the right of the word Plan there is a box with the following text inside: A written plan forms the basis of the biosecurity training program, allows for regular review, updates, and provides a framework for preparedness. Below the word Implement is a text box with the following text inside: Put the plan into action. To the left of the word Monitor is a text box with the following text: A monitoring program and information gathering framework is developed and implemented that provides information to adjust the biosecurity plan.

  • Assess: Identify and evaluate the risks of pest introduction, and analyze their transmission pathways. This will allow for current biosecurity gaps within your farm operation to be identified and addressed. Production practices should also be reviewed frequently (re-assess) to ensure that implemented measures are effective in relation to pest prevention and control.
  • Plan: A written biosecurity plan is highly recommended. A written plan allows for regular review and update, facilitates preparedness within the farm operation and forms the base for training. Note: The self- assessment tool (Appendix 1) provides a framework or starting point for the development of your biosecurity plan.
  • Implement: Put the plan into action. Education, training and communication are key to effective implementation of your biosecurity plan.
  • Monitor: Create an information gathering system that identifies emerging pest risks to your farm operation. This system should include the implementation of a monitoring program that will identify pests that may be introduced to your farm operation. It is important that the design, effectiveness and implementation of a biosecurity plan be assessed not only on a routine basis but also when changes in farm practices or biosecurity threats occur.
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