Nursery Sector Biosecurity Guide
6.0 Glossary

Advanced biosecurity measure:

For the purpose of this Guide, an advanced biosecurity measure is considered essential to achieve a higher level of biosecurity in a nursery, which may help to increase the mitigation of pest introduction and spread.

Biological control:

Often referred to as "biocontrols". Biological pest control is the method of controlling pests (including insects, mites, weeds and plant diseases) using other living organisms. It relies on predation, parasitism, herbivory or other natural mechanisms, but typically also involves an active human management role. It is often an important component of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs.

Biosecurity:

A set of practices used to minimize the transmission of pests including their introduction (bioexclusion), spread (biomanagement), and release (biocontainment).

Controlled Access Zone (CAZ):

An area(s) within a nursery where access is restricted or otherwise controlled to prevent pest movement into or out of the area.

Formal monitoring:

A planned systematic process to detect and quantify pests that is conducted by a trained scout.

High-risk area:

An area that requires additional biosecurity measures to prevent pest spread either into or out of it.

Infest:

A plant is considered infested when a pest is detected on it. Please note this Guide defines a pest as any living organism injurious to plants, plant products or by-products, including insects, mites, diseases, vermin, animals and weeds.

Informal monitoring:

Regular monitoring that is performed by any trained nursery employee to detect pests.

Input:

The resources that are used in greenhouse, nursery or floriculture production, such as chemicals, equipment, fertilizer, seed and plant material.

Integrated Pest Management (IPM):

IPM is a process for planning and managing sites to prevent pest problems and for making decisions about when and how to intervene when pest problems occur. It is a sustainable approach, combining biological, cultural, physical and chemical tools to manage pests so that the benefits of pest control are maximized and the health and environmental risks are minimized.

Maintenance:

Involves unscheduled and routinely scheduled activities to fix any area of the nursery, device or equipment should it become out of order or broken.

Non-regulated pest:

For the purpose of this Guide, a non-regulated pest includes any new pest or pest of concern that is not regulated.

Output:

Includes waste, garbage and finished product.

Pest:Footnote 16

Any living organism injurious to plants, plant products or by-products, including insects, mites, diseases, vermin, animals and weeds.

Restricted Access Zone (RAZ):

An area, generally located inside the controlled access zone, where access by people or equipment is further restricted, providing an extra level of protection.

Routine biosecurity measure:

For the purpose of this Guide, a routine biosecurity measure is considered essential to achieve a minimum or basic level of biosecurity.

Sanitation:

Activities to maintain clean equipment and machinery, including the irrigation system.

Segregation area:

An area used to separate and store plants, which pose a concern of spreading a pest, from other plants in production as a precautionary measure.

Vector:

A biological, physical or environmental agent that disperses a crop pest.

Vermin:

Wild and usually small animals such as rodents, which are harmful to crops or farm animals or which carry disease.

Visitor:

Includes service providers, shippers, consultants, federal and provincial inspectors, delivery personnel, utility providers such as electricians and plumbers, IPM specialists, extension specialists and others entering the nursery that are not considered an employee.

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