D- 96-05: Phytosanitary requirements for the importation and domestic movement of non-propagative potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) and related potato articles, including associated soil

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Effective Date:
November 25, 2013
(11th Revision)

Subject

This directive governs both the importation and the domestic movement of potatoes and related potato articles (potato parts, potato by-products, and any associated soil and conveyances) that are not intended for propagative purposes and originate from the continental United States (U.S.) and/or from regulated areas in Canada. This directive supersedes all previous references to this subject in any other policy document (Appendix 1). Import requirements for seed potatoes, true seed, and potato plant parts for propagation are outlined in Directive D-98-01: Import Requirements for seed potatoes and other potato propagative material.

The specific import requirements provided in this directive can also be accessed for quick reference through the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Automated Import Reference System (AIRS).

This revision was a result of Canada's deregulation of Heterodera glycines - Soybean Cyst Nematode. Section 1.3 (Regulated pests) and Appendices 2 and 3 have been updated to reflect this change. This revision also introduces additional options to certify for vehicle cleanliness (Section 2.7) and removes the expiry date for compliance agreements (Section 2.9.2). Minor editorial changes have also been made to improve clarity.

Table of contents

Review

This directive will be updated as required. For further information or clarification, please contact the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

Endorsement

Approved by:

Chief Plant Health Officer

Amendment record

Amendments of this directive will be dated and distributed as outlined in the distribution below.

Distribution

  1. Regions, CFIA Staff, Plant Health Risk Assessment Unit, Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
  2. Provincial governments and associations.
  3. National industry organizations (Canadian Produce Marketing Association, Canadian Horticultural Council, Canadian Council of Food Processors, Food and Consumer Products of Canada, Food Processors of Canada)
  4. Internet

Introduction

The CFIA regulates the importation and the domestic movement of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) and related potato articles, including any associated soil and conveyances, for purposes other than propagation under the Plant Protection Act - Plant Protection Regulations and the Canada Agricultural Products Act - Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Regulations. This includes but is not limited to potatoes for human or animal consumption and potatoes for processing, repacking or industrial uses. Under the authority of the Plant Protection Act, this directive details the regulatory requirements for the importation and domestic movement of non-propagative potato articles, any associated soil and conveyances, and outlines phytosanitary risk mitigation approaches necessary to protect the Canadian plant resource base.

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Regulations define health and safety, packaging, labelling, and grade standard requirements, including soil tolerances. In cases where a consignment of imported potatoes falls under the authority of the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Regulations, plant protection import policy may rely on fresh fruit and vegetable grade standards or inspection documentation to establish the phytosanitary status of the consignment. For example, the grade standard for potatoes for consumption ensures that the presence of soil on imported potatoes is minimized. Similarly, inspection documentation issued to meet requirements under the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Regulations may be used to establish the origin of a consignment of potatoes.

Scope

This directive provides detailed information to the CFIA, Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), Canadian importers, foreign exporters, international trade specialists, National Plant Protection Organizations (NPPOs), potato industry stakeholders in Canada and the general public, on the Canadian import and domestic movement requirements for potatoes and associated articles.

This directive supersedes D-96-05 (10th Revision) dated November 23, 2011 and all references listed in Appendix 1.

References

  • ISPM 32: Categorization of commodities according to their pest risk, FAO, Rome, 2009.
  • NAPPO, 2011. Regional Standards for Phytosanitary Measures No. 3. Movement of Potatoes into a NAPPO Member Country.
  • QSM-09: Quality Management System requirements for facilities receiving and handling regulated non-propagative potatoes and related potato articles, including associated soil
  • D-95-26: Phytosanitary requirements for soil and related matter, and for items contaminated with soil and related matter, CFIA, Ottawa

Definitions, abbreviations and acronyms

Definitions for terms used in the present document can be found in the Plant Health Glossary of Terms.

1.0 General requirements

1.1 Legislative authority

  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency Fees Notice, Canada Gazette, Part I
  • Eggplants and Tomatoes Production (Central Saanich) Restriction Regulations, SOR/82-448
  • Golden Nematode Order, SOR/80-260
  • Plant Protection Act, S.C. 1990, c.22
  • Plant Protection Regulations, SOR/95-212
  • Potato Production and Sale (Central Saanich) Restriction Regulations, SOR/82-186

1.2 Fees

The CFIA charges fees in accordance with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Fees Notice. For information regarding fees associated with imported product, please contact the Import Service Centre (ISC). Anyone requiring other information regarding fees may contact any local CFIA office.

1.3 Regulated pests

There are a number of regulated pests and potential quarantine pests that can be spread via the movement of potatoes, related potato articles and associated soil. The requirements in this directive have been developed to help prevent the introduction and spread of identified regulated potato and/or soil-borne pests known to occur in the U.S. (Appendix 2) and/or in Canada (Appendix 3). In this context, specific risk mitigation measures are required for the movement of potatoes, related potato articles, and any associated soil and conveyances, originating from areas within Canada or the continental U.S. where any of the following pests are known to occur:

  • Meloidogyne chitwoodi - Columbia Root Knot Nematode (CRKN)
  • Ditylenchus destructor - Potato Rot Nematode (PRN)
  • Globodera pallida - Pale Cyst Nematode Footnote *
  • Globodera rostochiensis - Golden Nematode Footnote *
  • Synchitrium endobioticum - Potato Wart (PW)

Note: For a list of Pests Regulated by Canada, consult the CFIA website.

1.4 Regulated articles

  • Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) produced in a regulated area, not intended for propagation, including packaged and bulk potato tubers for human or animal consumption, processing, packing, repacking, or any other non-propagative use.
  • Related potato articles, such as potato parts (culls, peels, etc.) and by-products (wash water, flume water and other effluents, solid waste, etc.), typically generated through the potato handling (transporting, receiving, repacking, processing, etc.) and the associated cleaning and disposal procedures.
  • Potatoes or potato articles that have come in contact with potatoes or regulated potato articles produced in a regulated area.
  • Any conveyances involved in the transport of potatoes or potato related articles produced in a regulated area (trailers, conveyor belts, storing and packaging material such as paper bags, jute bags, jumbo polypropylene totes, etc.)
  • Soil from a regulated area associated with potatoes, the related potato articles or the conveyances.

1.5 Exempt articles

In accordance with the principles of the International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures (ISPM) 32 Categorization of Commodities according to Their Pest Risk, certain products are exempt from the regulatory requirements of this directive. The exemptions include, but are not limited to:

  • Processed potatoes and potato products such as canned potatoes, potato chips, potato flakes, potato starch, etc.
  • Frozen potatoes and potato products such as French fries, hash browns, etc.

The importation of 4.5 kg (10 lb) or less per conveyance of packaged potatoes for human consumption is also permitted when commercially packaged, in a closed and intact package labelled U.S. No. 1 grade. The certification of state of origin is not required and no other import requirements apply.

1.6 Regulated areas

For the purpose of this directive, the regulated areas are the areas associated with at least one of the regulated pests listed in Section 1.3. The following regulated areas are subject to specific phytosanitary measures for the movement of regulated articles:

2.0 Regulatory requirements

This section provides an overview of the various documents, treatments or other conditions that may be required. Section 3.0 details which of these requirements apply in specific situations.

2.1 Commercially packaged potatoes

For the purpose of this directive, "commercially packaged" potatoes are considered those which meet Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program import requirements for commercially packaged potatoes. Commercially packaged potatoes must meet Canada or U.S. No. 1 grade standards for cleanliness and therefore this can be a means of mitigating phytosanitary risks associated with certain soil-borne pests.

2.2 Bulk Potatoes and Repacking

For the purposes of this directive, any repacking will be regulated in the same way as bulk potatoes. Repackers increase the risk of pest introductions to agricultural land by concentrating cull potatoes and disposing of them. The regulation of potatoes for repacking ensures that the risk of a pest introduction to agricultural land is minimized. "Bulk" refers to potatoes held in containers with a capacity of 22.7 kg (50 lb) or more that are intended for processing, packing or repacking. Bulk potatoes may or may not be reasonably free from soil, they are subject to the removal of potatoes potentially infested with a quarantine pest, and therefore subject to specific requirements outlined in this directive.

2.3 Phytosanitary Certificate

A Phytosanitary Certificate is an official document issued by the NPPO of the exporting country to the NPPO of the importing country. It certifies that the plants or plant products and other regulated articles covered by the certificate conform to the current phytosanitary regulations of the importing country.

2.4 Permit to Import

Where a Permit to Import is a specified requirement, an Application for Permit to Import Plants and Other Things under the Plant Protection Act (CFIA/ACIA 5256) must be submitted in accordance with the instructions provided with the application.

Note: Import permits are usually valid until December 31st of each year.

2.5 Movement Certificate

A Movement Certificate (CFIA/ACIA 0108) is issued by a CFIA inspector authorized under the Plant Protection Act and the Plant Protection Regulations to allow the movement of regulated articles within Canada.

2.6 Certification of the state of origin

The certification of the state of origin is the responsibility of the USDA and the statement of origin must appear on official USDA documents.

The form most often used for the certification of the state of origin is the USDA-AMS FV-205 Certificate of Inspection for Canadian Destinations (Appendix 4). This form is used to attest that potatoes originating from the continental U.S. meet Canadian import requirements under the authority of the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Regulations.

Other documents which may be used for certification of the state of origin include:

  • USDA-AMS FV-184 Federal-State Inspection Certificate (Appendix 5)
  • USDA-APHIS-PPQ Form 540 Certificate (Appendix 6)
  • A Phytosanitary Certificate issued under the authority of the USDA
  • An official letter on USDA letterhead indicating the state of origin

2.7 Certification of transport vehicle cleanliness

Vehicles can be a pathway for the introduction of quarantine pests due to the presence of soil and plant debris. With regard to imports, the USDA may be required to issue one of the following certificates:

  • USDA-APHIS-PPQ Form 540 - Certificate (Appendix 6)
  • USDA-AMS FV-205 Certificate of Inspection for Canadian Destinations (Appendix 4)

If certification of vehicle cleanliness is required as a condition for import, the following statement must appear on one of the documents listed above:

"This carrier meets Canadian Plant Health cleanliness requirements".

The statement must be based on the absence of soil, dirt and/or plant debris. If soil, dirt, and/or plant debris, is found to be present on the vehicle, high-pressure washing of the entire vehicle assembly, including wheels and undercarriage is required prior to entry into Canada.

This certificate must be issued in the U.S. It cannot be issued upon arrival in Canada.

2.8 Sprout inhibition

Bulk or packaged potatoes may require treatment with a recognized sprout inhibitor for the purpose of mitigating the risk of introducing tuber-borne pests if the potatoes were to be planted in Canadian soil. Depending on the agent used, sprout inhibition may be applied in the field, in storage facilities or during the grading and packaging process. When the treatment is performed in Canada, the sprout inhibitor must be approved by the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA).

New potatoes packed within 30 days of harvest in containers of 22.7 kg (50 lb) or less will be exempt from this treatment. This exemption is based on the premise that the potatoes are being imported for direct consumption as new potatoes. Also, potatoes graded and packed shortly after harvest are not suitable for immediate planting and are not destined for long term storage.

If sprout inhibition or early packaging is required as a condition for import, one of the following declarations must be included on one of the documents listed under Section 2.6:

"The potatoes in this shipment were treated with a sprout inhibitor."; or

"The potatoes in this shipment were packed within 30 days of harvest."

2.9 Compliance agreement

Movement of regulated articles originating from regulated U.S. states and/or regulated areas within Canada may be permitted if the regulated articles are moving directly to a receiving facility which has entered into a compliance agreement (CA) with the CFIA under the authority of the Plant Protection Act. The CA is an audit-based quality management system approach used to mitigate the phytosanitary risks associated with the handling of the regulated articles throughout the activities of the receiving facility.

A CA is approved after completion of the following: (1) a review of the movement of regulated articles within the approved facility, (2) the identification of phytosanitary risks within the facility's organizational and operational structure; (3) the implementation of risk-management measures for each point identified and (4) the completion and approval of a quality management system including a quality manual documenting the processes and associated risk mitigation measures.

A CA's effectiveness at mitigating phytosanitary risks is dependent on the combined impacts of the implemented risk mitigation measures of the facility operating processes. The CA requirements are specific to each individual receiving facility. It is therefore the facility's responsibility to develop and implement its own appropriate control measures to mitigate the risk of introducing and spreading any quarantine pest. The measures proposed by the facility must be reviewed and approved by the CFIA before the facility may begin to receive regulated articles. All facilities approved under a CA are subject to regular CFIA audits.

The CFIA document QSM-09 provides detailed information on the CA process, outlining the procedures for a facility to apply for approval under a CA and for the CFIA to audit the facility. QSM-09 also provides instructions and a template for the development of a facility's quality management system manual (or "quality manual").

Note: The requirement for a CA may be waived for distributors and wholesalers that are importing packaged potatoes that will be consumed in house or sold directly to consumers and will not be processed or repacked for further commercial distribution (see Section 3.3.1.3).

The following sections provide an outline of the CA principles.

2.9.1 CFIA-approved Quality Management System Manual

Facilities that intend to receive regulated articles under a CA must have a CFIA-approved Quality Management System Manual (herein referred to as the Manual) that will serve as a basis for operating procedures and CFIA audit activities. The expected elements of the Manual are described in QSM-09.

2.9.2 CA approval and audit

A facility must be approved under a CA prior to the issuance of a Permit to Import (see Section 2.4) or a Movement Certificate (see Section 2.5) for the purpose of receiving regulated articles. Once a facility has been approved under a CA, the CA does not expire. Facilities are subject to ongoing CFIA evaluations and audits. If an audit of the facility has not been done within the last 90 days or there are outstanding corrective action requests, an evaluation is required prior to any movement of regulated articles to the facility (please consult Section 4.6 of QSM-09 for more information).

The CFIA will conduct regular surveillance audits of the approved facilities, issue corrective action requests, and monitor the implementation of any corrective actions. Based on the facility's conformance status, import permits and/or Movement Certificates may be suspended or revoked and additional regulatory actions and/or penalties may be applied.

2.9.3 Traceability of the regulated articles

It is the approved facility's responsibility to adequately trace and segregate and trace the regulated articles separately from the rest of the material they handle. If the facility cannot maintain proper segregation, all articles handled by the facility will be considered to pose significant phytosanitary risks and will be subject to all regulatory controls applied under the CA. Tracking records must be kept as specified in the approved QM.

2.9.4 Controlling regulated articles

Regulated articles may include effluent, wash and flume water, soil, rejected potatoes (including rejected loads/lots), culls, peels, solid waste, articles contaminated with soil and debris (including packaging, trailers, conveyors belts, machinery, etc.)

Activities with associated phytosanitary risk may include receiving, transporting and moving, storing, grading, processing, (re)packing, shipping, washing and cleaning, disposing, etc. Tracking records must be kept as specified in the approved QM.

2.9.5 Controlling articles leaving the approved facility

All activities related to regulated articles exiting the approved facility must be subject to CFIA approval. This may include the movement of end-products, rejected articles, as well as solid and liquid by-products. Movement Certificates may be required (see Section 2.5).

Any regulated article or associated material as described in Section 2.9.4 shall not be disposed of on agricultural land. These high risk activities may only be permitted if the associated phytosanitary risks have been mitigated to the satisfaction of the CFIA. High risk activities that are prohibited unless pre-approved by CFIA include; disposal methods such as feeding to cattle, spreading on fields, using wash water to irrigate fields, composting, etc.

In the event that regulated articles (such as rerouted products, end products, by-products, rejects, solid waste or effluents) leaving an approved facility are intended to be sent to a second facility, the latter may be required to enter into a CA with the CFIA in order to adequately mitigate all risks associated with the articles. In addition, all regulated articles and by-products leaving an approved facility for disposal must be directed to a site that has been pre-approved by the CFIA. Regulated articles destined for a non-commercial disposal site may require that the operator of the site have an approved CA in place. If a third party service provider is used by the approved facility, the terms of the current agreement or contract may need to be included in the QM to ensure that proper risk mitigation measures are in place. An inspector may request to verify the terms of the current contract between the approved facility and the third party service provider (see Appendix 8 of QSM-09).

2.9.6 Record keeping

Approved facilities must keep all records that pertain to the handling of regulated articles under a CA for a minimum period of ten years.

3.0 Specific requirements for the movement of regulated articles

Movement requirements are based on the origin of the regulated articles, i.e. the area where the potatoes were grown, and not the area through which the shipment transits or is packaged.

Appendix 7 provides a summary of all specific phytosanitary movement requirements.

3.1 Originating from all locations (countries or states) other than the continental U.S. and Canada

A Permit to Import is required (see Section 2.4).

The CFIA may approve the import of regulated articles following the completion of a comprehensive pest risk assessment. If approved, the requirements will be specified on the Permit to Import.

3.2 Originating from states in the continental U.S. that are not known to be infested with any of the pests listed in Section 1.3 OR from non-regulated areas within states in the continental U.S. that are considered infested with Potato Cyst Nematodes (PCN)

The certification of the state of origin is required (see Section 2.6).

3.3 Originating from states in the continental U.S. that are known to be infested with at least one of the pests listed in Section 1.3, with the exclusion of potato cyst nematodes (PCN)

The import of regulated articles is permitted under the following conditions:

3.3.1 Potato tubers destined for direct consumption (not for repacking)

The import is permitted provided one of the following three conditions is met.

Note: Imports are for retail and foodservice, including distributors and wholesalers, importing packaged potatoes which will not be processed or repacked for further commercial distribution.

3.3.1.1 Potato tubers treated with a sprout inhibitor, commercially packaged in containers of 22.7 kg (50 lb) or less, and meeting U.S. #1 grade requirements

The certification of the state of origin is required (see Section 2.6).

The following statement must appear on the document certifying the state of origin:

"The potatoes in this shipment were treated with a sprout inhibitor."

Note: Additional information on sprout inhibition is available in Section 2.8.

3.3.1.2 Potato tubers graded and commercially packaged in containers of 22.7 kg (50 lb) or less within 30 days following harvest, and meeting U.S. #1 grade requirements

The certification of the state of origin is required (see Section 2.6).

The following statement must appear on the document certifying the state of origin:

"The potatoes in this shipment were packed within 30 days of harvest"

3.3.1.3 Potato tubers commercially packaged in containers greater than 22.7 kg (50 lb) and meeting U.S. #1 grade requirements

A Permit to Import is required (see Section 2.4).

The certification of the state of origin is required (see Section 2.6).

One of the following statements must appear on the document certifying the state of origin:

"The potatoes in this shipment were treated with a sprout inhibitor." ; or

"The potatoes in this shipment were packed within 30 days of harvest."

3.3.2 Potato tubers destined for packing/repacking or processing

A Permit to Import is required (see Section 2.4).

A valid Compliance Agreement is required (see Section 2.9).

A Vehicle Cleanliness Certificate is required (see Section 2.7).

The certification of the state of origin is required (see Section 2.6).

For potato tubers imported for packing/repacking and treated with a sprout inhibitor in the U.S., the following statement must appear on the document certifying the state of origin:

"The potatoes in this shipment were treated with a sprout inhibitor."

Note: Potato tubers can also be treated with a sprout inhibitor in Canada. In such cases, the facility has to provide in its QM information about the treatment (agent used, equipment, procedures) (See QSM-09, Appendix 7, Section C7 for more details).

3.3.3 Potato tubers produced in a pest-free area or pest-free place of production

A valid Phytosanitary Certificate is required (see Section 2.3).

The following additional declaration must appear on the Phytosanitary Certificate:

"The potatoes in this shipment were grown in an area free from [insert scientific names of all regulated pests listed in section 1.3 that are present in the state of origin]. This declaration is made based on official soil surveys."

3.4 Originating from potato cyst nematode-regulated areas in the continental U.S.

Note: The importation of potato tubers in packages exceeding 22.7 kg (50 lb) is prohibited.

3.4.1 Potato tubers destined for direct consumption (not for repacking) and commercially packaged in containers of 22.7 kg (50 lb) or less

A valid Phytosanitary Certificate is required (see Section 2.3).

The following additional declarations must appear on the Phytosanitary Certificate:

"The potatoes in this shipment have been washed and commercially packed in a USDA-APHIS- approved facility."; and

"The potatoes in this shipment were treated with a sprout inhibitor."

3.5 Originating from areas in Canada that are known to be infested with at least one of the pests listed in Section 1.3

Note: Additional regulatory control mechanisms may be imposed by the CFIA and/or by provincial authorities.

Note: The local CFIA office must be contacted prior to any movement of regulated articles outside of a regulated area.

3.5.1 Potato tubers intended for direct consumption

A Movement Certificate is required (see Section 2.5).

A valid Compliance Agreement is required (see Section 2.9).

Potato tubers must be washed, treated with a sprout inhibitor and commercially packaged in containers of 22.7 kg (50 lb) or less in a facility under a Compliance Agreement with the CFIA.

Final product must be shipped to retail and foodservice businesses, including distributors and wholesalers. Further potato tuber grading and handling is not permitted.

Note: Each facilities involved in the handling of regulated potatoes must be under a Compliance Agreement with the CFIA.

Note: If the packaged potato tubers are to be exported, they must meet the Foreign Plant Quarantine Import Requirements of the exporting country.

Note: For export to the U.S. from a PCN-regulated area, a Phytosanitary Certificate is required.

3.5.2 Potato tubers intended for processing or repacking

A Movement Certificate is required (see Section 2.5).

A valid Compliance Agreement with the facility processing or repacking the potatoes is required (see Section 2.9).

Note: The export of potato tubers from a PCN-regulated area to a U.S. processing facility is not an option.

3.6 Additional requirements for the movement of regulated articles into the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador

In accordance with the Plant Protection Regulations, potatoes of the blue or purple skin varieties that are susceptible to potato wart (Synchitrium endobioticum), from all origins, including all other Canadian provinces, are prohibited entry into the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

4.0 Appendices

Appendix 1: Documents Superseded by D-96-05

Memorandum: Vehicle Cleanliness Requirements for the Importation of Potatoes for Processing from the U.S. Soybean Cyst Nematode Infested Areas (states of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Virginia and Florida), dated 16/01/90.

D-90-11: "Importation of Bulk Potatoes for Processing from areas of the United states regulated for soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)", dated 11/05/90.

D-93-08: "Import Restrictions related to PVYn for processing potatoes from Florida - amendment", dated 05/05/93.

Information letter: Notice to Importer (L51/95-04-11), Plant Protection Requirements: Importation of Bulk Potatoes for Processing from the U.S. Where soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is Present, dated 11/04/95.

Quarantine Directive D-81-02: "Regulations governing the entry of seed and table stock potatoes and related matter capable of transmitting the Columbia root knot nematode (Meloidogyne chitwoodi)" from areas of the U.S. where this plant pest is known to occur, dated 01/12/81.

Memorandum: "Please replace pages 5 and 6 of Quarantine Directive 81-02 of December 1, 1981 with enclosed amended pages and add appendix A to that same", dated 02/06/83.

D-87-06: Amendments to Quarantine Directive D-81-02, Dec. 1, 1981 and D-82-01, Feb. 1, 1982: "Columbia root knot nematode (Meloidogyne chitwoodi)", dated 13/01/87.

T-93-02: Trade Memorandum Issued by the Plant Protection Division Common/Irish Potato, dated 02/04/93.

Appendix 2: Distribution of Regulated Potato Pests in the Continental United States

Distribution of Regulated Potato Pests in the Continental United States

Appendix 3: Distribution in Canada of Regulated Pests

In Canada, the Plant Protection Act and the Plant Protection Regulations provide the regulatory authority to regulate pests and any associated commodities, infested land and pathways including soil and conveyances. Additional regulatory documents may apply.

Potato cyst nematodes (Globodera pallida and/or Globodera rostochiensis)

  • Alberta: One field located in Spruce Grove, Alberta. Regulated fields are under official control through CFIA notices of restriction.
  • British Columbia: A portion of the Municipality of Central Saanich on Vancouver Island, east of the West Saanich Road. This area is regulated by the following documents: Golden Nematode Order (SOR/80-260), Eggplants and Tomatoes Production (Central Saanich) Restriction Regulations (SOR/82-448), and Potato Production and Sale (Central Saanich) Restriction Regulations (SOR/82-186).
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: Limited distribution, but the entire province is regulated. The regulatory measures are specified in the Plant Protection Regulations.
  • Quebec: The municipality of Saint-Amable and some land in adjacent municipalities are regulated by the Golden Nematode Infested Places Order. Four additional satellite sites are regulated through CFIA notices of restriction.

Potato wart (Synchitrium endobioticum)

  • Newfoundland and Labrador: Limited distribution, but the entire province is regulated. The regulatory measures are specified in the Plant Protection Regulations.
  • Prince Edward Island: A limited number of fields are under notices of restriction issued under the authority of the Plant Protection Act.

Potato rot nematode (Ditylenchus destructor)

  • Prince Edward Island: Detected in a very limited number of fields where potato production is prohibited and soil movement is regulated. Regulatory controls have been in place since 1945 and are applied in collaboration with the provincial government authorities.
  • Ontario: Detected in 2011 in a 2 acre field of garlic in the city of Ottawa, Ontario. Restrictions have been applied to on 4 acres of land to contain the infestation and prevent further spread through the movement of infested planting material, equipment and soil.

Appendix 4: USDA-AMS FV-205 Certificate of Inspection for Canadian Destinations

Click on image for larger view
Description of Certificiate - FV-205. Description follows.

Description for USDA-AMS FV-205 Certificate of Inspection for Canadian Destinations

This form is completed by an inspector designated by the USDA. The form is split up into 3 main sections. The top part of the form is to provide information on the applicant/shipper and receiver, the issuance date of the form, the inspection site, the carrier ID, and the Certificate/worksheet number. The middle part of the form is to describe the product including the number and type of containers, and the origin, size, brand, variety, and grade of the product. The bottom part of the form is for additional remarks, the inspector to detail the fees associated with the issuance of the form (including the estimated total cost) and to sign the form.

Appendix 5: USDA-AMS FV-184 Federal-State Inspection Certificate

Click on image for larger view
Description of Certificiate - FV-184. Description follows.

Description for - USDA-AMS FV-184 Federal State Inspection Certificate

This form is completed by an inspector designated by the USDA. The form is split up into 3 main sections. The top part of the form indicates when the inspection started and was completed and provides the applicant's name and address, and the inspection point. The middle part of the form is for describing the product including the number and size of containers and the origin, size, brand, variety, and grade of the product. The bottom part of the form is for additional remarks, the inspector to detail the fees associated with the issuance of the form (including the estimated total cost) and to sign the form.

Appendix 6: USDA-APHIS-PPQ FORM 540 Certificate (used to establish vehicle cleanliness)

Click on image for larger view
Description of Certificiate - Form 540. Description follows.

Description for USDA-PPQ Form 540 Certificate (used to establish vehicle cleanliness)

This certificate is used to establish vehicle cleanliness. Some of the information found on this certificate is:

  • Date issued
  • Void after (limited to 5 days)
  • Name of consignor
  • Shipping point
  • Name & address of consignee
  • Vehicle license No. & state
  • Description of commodity: quantity, article and remarks
  • Additional statement
  • Signature of issuing inspector

Appendix 7: Summary of Requirements for the Movement of Articles Regulated under D-96-05

PDF (24 kb)

(See section 3.0 for details)

Additional requirements under the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Regulations may apply.

Click on image for larger view
Summary of Requirements for the Movement of Articles Regulated under D-96-05 Description follows.

Description for image - Appendix 7 of D-96-05

This is an image of a table summarizing the requirements for the movement of articles regulated under D-96-05.

The import requirements can be summarized as follows:

  • For all end uses, and from all locations (countries or states) other than the continental U.S. and Canada (Section 3.1), an Import Permit (Section 2.4), is required. See Note 1.
  • For all end uses, and from states in the continental U.S. that are not known to be infested with any of the pests listed in Section 1.3, or from non-regulated areas within states in the continental U.S. that are only infested with potato cyst nematodes (PCN) (Section 3.2), the Certification of the state of origin (Section 2.6), is required.
  • For direct consumption, from states in the continental U.S. that are known to be infested with at least one of the pests listed in Section 1.3, with the exclusion of potato cyst nematodes (PCN) (Section 3.3), 3 options are available:
    • Potato tubers treated with a sprout inhibitor, commercially packaged in containers of 22.7 kg (50 lb) or less, and meeting U.S. #1 grade requirements (Section 3.3.1.1), the Certification of the state of origin (Section 2.6), is required. See Note 2.
    • Potato tubers graded and commercially packaged in containers of 22.7 kg (50 lb) or less, within 30 days following harvest, and meeting U.S. #1 grade requirements (Section 3.3.1.2), the Certification of the state of origin (Section 2.6), is required. See Note 3.
    • Potato tubers commercially packaged in container greater than 22.7 kg (50 lb) and meeting U.S. #1 grade requirements (Section 3.3.1.3), an Import Permit (Section 2.4) and the Certification of the state of origin (Section 2.6), are required. See Note 4.
  • For processing and repacking, from states in the continental U.S. that are known to be infested with at least one of the pests listed in Section 1.3, with the exclusion of potato cyst nematodes (PCN) (Section 3.3), 2 options are available:
    • Potato tubers destined for packing/repacking or processing (Section 3.3.2), an Import Permit (Section 2.4), the Certification of the state of origin (Section 2.6), the vehicle cleanliness (Section 2.7), and a Compliance Agreement (Section 2.9), are required. See Notes 5 and 6.
    • Potato tubers produced in a pest-free area or pest-free place of production (Section 3.3.3), a Phytosanitary Certificate (Section 2.3), is required. See Note 7.
  • For direct consumption only, from potato cyst nematode-regulated areas in the continental U.S. (Section 3.4), and for potato tubers commercially packaged in containers of 22.7 kg (50 lb) or less (Section 3.4.1), a Phytosanitary Certificate (Section 2.3), is required. See Note 8.
  • The importation of potato tubers in packages exceeding 22.7 kg (50 lb) is prohibited.

The domestic requirements can be summarized as follow:

  • For direct consumption, from areas in Canada that are known to be infested with at least one of the pests listed in Section 1.3 (Section 3.5), and for potato tubers washed, treated with a sprout inhibitor and commercially packaged in containers of 22.7 kg (50 lb) or less (Section 3.5.1), a Movement Certificate (Section 2.5) and a Compliance agreement (Section 2.9), are required.
  • For processing and repacking, from areas in Canada that are known to be infested with at least one of the pests listed in Section 1.3 (Section 3.5), and for potato tubers destined for processing or repacking (Section 3.5.2), a Movement Certificate (Section 2.5) and a Compliance agreement (Section 2.9), are required.

(1) The conditions associated with the import permit would be determined by a comprehensive pest risk assessment.

(2) The following statement is required: "The potatoes in this shipment were treated with a sprout inhibitor."

(3) The following statement is required: "The potatoes in this shipment were packed within 30 days of harvest."

(4) One of the following statements is required:

  • "The potatoes in this shipment were packed within 30 days of harvest." or
  • "The potatoes in this shipment were treated with a sprout inhibitor."

(5) For potato tubers treated with a sprout inhibitor in the U.S. and destined for packing/ repacking, the following statement is required: "The potatoes in this shipment were treated with a sprout inhibitor."

(6) The following statement must appear on one of the documents listed in Section 2.7: "This carrier meets Canadian Plant Health cleanliness requirements."

(7) The following additional declaration is required: "The potatoes in this shipment were grown in an area free from [insert scientific names of all regulated pests listed in Section 1.3 that are present in the state of origin]. This declaration is made on the basis of official soil surveys."

(8) The following additional declarations are required:

  • "The potatoes in this shipment have been washed and commercially packed in a USDA-APHIS-approved facility." and
  • "The potatoes in this shipment were treated with a sprout inhibitor."
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