D-00-07: Import and domestic phytosanitary requirements to prevent the introduction and spread of apple maggot (Rhagoletis pomonella spp. (Walsh)).

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Effective Date: November 4, 2013
(7th Revision)

Subject

This directive provides the requirements for the entry of hosts of apple maggot into British Columbia (B.C.) from Mexico and the continental United States (U.S.). This directive also incorporates domestic movement requirements in relation to apple maggot. These requirements are in addition to other restrictions such as those for Oriental Fruit Moth (OFM), designated virus diseases of fruit trees, and prohibitions such as soil from Mexico.

This revision is being made to include the Fraser-Fort George Regional District to the apple maggot regulated area in B.C.

Table of Contents

Review

This directive will be reviewed every 5 years or unless otherwise required. For further information or clarification, contact the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

Endorsement

Approved by:

Chief Plant Health Officer

Amendment Record

Amendments to this directive will be dated and distributed as outlined in the distribution below.

Distribution

  1. Directive mail list (Regions, PHRA, USDA)
  2. Provincial Government, Industry (determined by Author)
  3. National Industry Organizations (determined by Author)
  4. Internet

Introduction

Apple maggot is a serious pest of apples. The maggots tunnel within the fruit and the affected fruit rapidly rots due to infection caused by secondary organisms. The insect also attacks crab apples and the fruit of hawthorns over most of its range. Studies show it can also be found in Aronia spp., Amelanchier spp., Cotoneaster spp., Rosa spp., Pyracantha spp., common pears, Asian pears, plums and other fruits in the vicinity of its normal hosts. An apple maggot race which attacks cherries occurs in Utah and Wisconsin. Soil in association with, or in the vicinity of the hosts can be a pathway for apple maggot.

The apple maggot was detected in British Columbia during the annual detection survey of 2006. This is the first detection of apple maggot for British Columbia. The geographic areas in which apple maggot was detected are separated from the main apple-growing areas of British Columbia by mountain ranges, therefore apple maggot cannot infest the main areas by natural spread. This directive includes the movement requirements for host fruit, used bins and nursery stock from areas where apple maggot has been detected in British Columbia (regulated areas) to other areas of British Columbia. See Appendix 2 for a map of British Columbia identifying the regulated areas.

For biological information, please refer to the Pest Fact Sheet - Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) - Apple Maggot.

Introduction of the insect into British Columbia's main apple-growing areas could result in reduced marketability of the fruit, possible market losses and increased costs related to control, survey, storage and inspection.

Note: Fruit tree propagative plant material including Malus spp. and Prunus spp. is only admissible into Canada from certain Unites States states. It is not admissible from Mexico. Please refer to D-94-35 for more details.

Scope

This directive is intended for the use of the CFIA inspection staff, Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), importers, shippers and brokers in order to outline the necessary requirements and inspection procedures for the entry and movement of host material of apple maggot from Mexico, the continental States of the Unites States, and the regulated areas of Canada and British Columbia to non-regulated areas of British Columbia. It is also intended as a guide for producers located in regulated areas.

References

  • D-94-02, Certification of apples for export for the presence of apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh).
  • D-94-35, List of sources approved to export fruit tree and grape propagative material to Canada.
  • D-95-26, Phytosanitary requirements for soil & related matter, alone or in association with plants.
  • ISPM No. 5: Glossary of Phytosanitary terms: FAO, Rome (updated annually).

This directive supercedes D-00-07, 5th revision.

Definitions, Abbreviations and Acronyms

Definitions for terms used in the present document can be found in the Plant Health Glossary of Terms.

1.0 General Requirements

1.1 Legislative Authority

The Plant Protection Act, S.C. 1990, c. 22
The Plant Protection Regulations, SOR/95-212
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Fees Notice, Canada Gazette: Part I (as amended from time to time)

1.2 Fees

The CFIA is charging fees in accordance with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Fees Notice. For information regarding fees associated with imported product, please contact the Import Service Centre (ISC). Anyone requiring other information regarding fees may contact any local CFIA office or visit our Fees Notice Web Site.

1.3 Regulated pests

The apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella spp. (Walsh) (Diptera: Tephritidae)

1.4 Regulated Commodities

Plants

Rooted plants of all species, hybrids and horticultural varieties of Malus spp., Crataegus spp., Prunus avium and P. cerasus spp.

Note: Prunus spp. and Malus spp. plant material is additionally regulated or prohibited for other pests. Please refer to D-94-35 for further details.

Fresh Fruit

Fresh fruit of Malus spp., Crataegus spp. and depending on the origin, Prunus avium and P. cerasus, whether intended for consumption or processing.

Note: Prunus spp. and Malus spp. fresh fruit is additionally regulated or prohibited for other pests. Please refer to D-95-08 for further details.

Containers (Used)

Pallet boxes, crates or other containers previously employed to transport fresh fruit listed under "Fresh Fruit" above.

Note: Used containers may also be regulated for Oriental fruit moth (OFM) if the containers are interchanged with, or stored adjacent to, OFM hosts. Contact any local CFIA office.

Soil

Alone or in association with host plants listed under "Plants" above.

Note: Soil movement into Canada is also regulated or prohibited for other pests. Please refer to D-95-26 for further details.

1.5 Commodities exempt from requirements specific to apple maggot

Unrooted and in vitro cuttings of the regulated species, hybrids and varieties, if free of soil and fruit.

Seeds of the regulated species, hybrids and varieties.

Note: Other requirements for unrooted cuttings and seeds of Malus spp., Crataegus spp., Prunus avium and P. cerasus. still apply and may be found in other directives. Refer to the list of directives.

Herbarium specimens of the regulated commodities.

Processed fruit of the regulated species (canned, frozen).

1.6 Regulated Areas

United States: All continental states

Note: Appendix 1 lists counties in the Unites States which are free of apple maggot on the basis of official annual surveys. Only the counties listed in Appendix 1 are eligible for the various certification options in this directive regarding county freedom.

Mexico: All states

Canada: All provinces and territories. For British Columbia, the following areas:

  • Vancouver Island and the regional districts of:
  • Mount Waddington, Comox Strathcona, Powell River, Sunshine Coast, Greater Vancouver, Fraser Valley (except the electoral district of Fraser Valley A) and Fraser-Fort George.

Note: See Appendix 2 for map of regulated areas in British Columbia.

2.0 Specific Requirements

2.1 Prohibitions

  • Malus spp. and Prunus spp. plants from Mexico (prohibited entry to all of Canada due to other pests as specified in other directives). Please refer to D-94-35 for further details.
  • Fresh fruit of Prunus avium and P. cerasus, as well as containers used for these fresh fruits, from Utah and Wisconsin.

2.2 Import and Domestic Requirements for movement of material into and within British Columbia

The regulated commodities described under Section 1.4 shall not be imported, transported or otherwise moved

  1. into British Columbia
  2. within British Columbia into non-regulated areas from any of the areas listed under Section 1.6 of this directive, except in accordance with the following provisions:

2.2.1 Rooted Plants

Malus spp., Crataegus spp., Prunus avium, and P. cerasus from the Unites States and regulated areas of Canada as well as Crataegus spp. from Mexico.

2.2.1.1 Permit to Import (Unites States and Mexico)

A permit to import is required.

2.2.1.2 Phytosanitary Certificate (Unites States and Mexico) or Movement Certificate (Canada)

Rooted plants require a Phytosanitary Certificate (Unites States and Mexico) or a Movement Certificate (Canada) if entering a non-regulated area of British Columbia. With the exception of Prunus avium from the continental United States, (see requirements for P. avium from the continental Unites States below), the certificate must include one of the following declarations:

"The plants in the consignment are free of fruit and washed free of soil."

or

"The plants in the consignment were grown in a county in the continental United States (or a municipality/county in Canada) in which, on the basis of annual surveys, the apple maggot does not occur."

For Prunus avium from the continental Unites States, the certificate must include one of the following declarations:

"The plants in the consignment are free of fruit and washed free of soil."

or

"The plants in the consignment are one year old or younger Footnote 1 and non-fruit bearing."

or

"The plants in the consignment were grown in a county in the continental United States in which, on the basis of annual surveys, the apple maggot does not occur."

Note: Unites States counties free of apple maggot are listed in Appendix 1. Canadian regulated and protected areas are shown in Appendix 2.

2.2.2 Fresh fruit

All fresh fruit, either for consumption or processing must enter the province of British Columbia in new containers.

2.2.2.1 Fresh fruit of Malus spp. and Crataegus spp.
2.2.2.1.1 Permit to Import (Unites States and Mexico)

A permit to import is not required.

2.2.2.1.2 Phytosanitary Certificate (Unites States and Mexico) or Movement Certificate (Canada)

Fresh fruit requires a Phytosanitary Certificate identifying the county of origin if originating from the Unites States, or requires a Movement Certificate if originating from Canada.

The shipment must conform to one of the following two options:

Option 1: Cold storage treatment

The certificate must contain one of the following two additional declarations:

"The fruit was inspected at time of shipment and is apparently free of apple maggot and has been continuously maintained at a maximum temperature of 0.6°C (33°F) for a minimum of 42 days."

or

"The fruit was inspected at time of shipment and is apparently free of apple maggot and has been continuously maintained at a maximum temperature of 3.3°C (38°F) for a minimum of 90 days."

To certify that cold treatment requirements have been met:

  1. At the time that the apples are put into cold or controlled atmosphere storage, the inspector shall verify that the apples have been packed and labelled in such a manner that they can be identified as to orchard of origin. The starting date of the storage period is to be indicated on the label or packaging material.
  2. During the time that apples are undergoing cold or controlled atmosphere storage, an inspector shall inspect the storage facilities approximately once every 20 days to verify that all conditions are as prescribed.

or

Option 2: Pest Freedom

Certification for freedom from apple maggot is based on the results of official annual surveys, isolation from sources of infestation and systematic sampling and inspections of the fruit prior to export.

The shipment is exempted from cold storage treatment if certified free from apple maggot by listing one of the following three additional declarations on the certificate:

For states or provinces free from apple maggot:

"The fruit in this shipment originates in a state of the continental Unites States, or province of Canada in which, on the basis of the official annual surveys, the apple maggot does not occur."

or

For counties within the continental Unites States which are free from apple maggot:

"Fruit was grown in a county which has been surveyed annually in a manner which clearly establishes that the apple maggot does not occur and in addition this fruit was harvested a minimum of one mile from any neighbouring county infestations."

Note: Unites States counties free from apple maggot are listed in Appendix 1.

or

For commercial orchards free from apple maggot located within infested counties in the continental Unites States:

"The fruit of this consignment was harvested from a commercial orchard in the designated apple maggot free zone space (identification name or number) in the county of space."

Note: Producers wishing to qualify for such an exemption for their commercial orchard must file a request for exemption with their state certification authority. The state of origin must then make representation to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) in Washington, D.C. Details concerning the name of grower(s), location of orchard(s), isolation factors including proximity to nearest known apple maggot infestation, survey methods and results would be required and should be included in such a representation.

2.2.2.2 Fresh fruit of Prunus avium and P. cerasus

For sources other than Utah and Wisconsin, a Permit to Import, Phytosanitary Certificate or Movement Certificate are not required. Fresh fruit of Prunus avium and P. cerasus from Utah and Wisconsin is prohibited (as stated in Section 2.1).

2.2.3 Containers (Used)

2.2.3.1 Containers used for fresh fruit of Malus spp. and Crataegus spp.

Note: See 1.4 for information on interchanging with, or storing containers near OFM hosts.

2.2.3.1.1 Permit to Import

A permit to import is not required.

2.2.3.1.2 Phytosanitary Certificate (Unites States and Mexico) or Movement Certificate (Canada)

Used empty containers require a Phytosanitary Certificate, or a Movement Certificate if moved from regulated provinces to British Columbia or from regulated areas of British Columbia to non-regulated areas of British Columbia. The certificate must state that the containers are free of apple maggot, soil and plant debris as a result of a decontamination treatment using a steam or high pressure water wash or other specified treatment as approved by the CFIA. The treatment details must be specified in the treatment section of the Phytosanitary Certificate.

2.2.3.2 Containers used for fresh fruit of Prunus avium and P. cerasus

For sources other than Utah and Wisconsin, a Permit to Import, Phytosanitary Certificate or Movement Certificate are not required. Containers used for fresh fruit of Prunus avium and P. cerasus spp. are prohibited from Utah and Wisconsin (as stated in Section 2.1).

2.2.4 Other Requirements

Articles listed under Section 1.4 - Regulated Commodities may enter for certain uses if authorized by the Director under the authority of Section 43 of the Plant Protection Regulations (conditions of entry shall be specified on the Permit to Import).

2.3 Transit Requirements

In addition to meeting CBSA's reporting requirements, regulated commodities entering regulated areas within Canada in transit to other destinations within Canada or the Unites States must either be shipped by a bonded carrier or meet the entry requirements of the province through which they are transiting. Please visit the CBSA's web site for more information about reporting requirements.

2.4 Non-Compliance

Shipments which do not meet requirements, or are found to be infested with any quarantine pests may be refused entry, returned to origin, or disposed of at the importer's expense. If determined feasible by the inspector, such shipments may be rerouted to other destinations, provided such a course of action does not cause unwarranted pest risk.

Notifications of non-compliance will be issued in accordance with D-01-06: Canadian Phytosanitary Policy for the Notification of Non-compliance and Emergency Action.

3.0 Appendices

Appendix 1 - Counties in the Continental United States which are Considered Free of Apple Maggot

Counties in the Continental United States which are Considered Free of Apple Maggot on the Basis of Official Annual Surveys

Appendix 2 - Regulated Areas for Apple Maggot in British Columbia

Map of Regulated Areas for Apple Maggot in British Columbia - 2013
Map - Apple Maggot Regulated Area within British Columbia. Description follows.
Description for map - Regulated Areas for Apple Maggot in British Columbia - 2013

Vancouver Island

Regional Districts of:

  • Mount Waddington
  • Comox Strathcona
  • Powell River
  • Sunshine Coast
  • Greater Vancouver
  • Fraser Valley (Except the Electoral District Fraser Valley A)
  • Fraser-Fort George
Date modified: