D-14-03: Phytosanitary import requirements for fresh and dried branches, cut flowers and other plant parts for ornamental purposes.

This page is part of the Guidance Document Repository (GDR).

Looking for related documents?
Search for related documents in the Guidance Document Repository

Effective Date: March 3, 2016
(Original)

Subject

This directive provides the phytosanitary import requirements for all fresh and dried branches, roots, cones, foliage, flowers, lichens and mosses for ornamental purposes.

Table of Contents

Review

This directive will be updated as required. For further information or clarification, please contact the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

Endorsement

Approved by:

space
Chief Plant Health Officer

Introduction

A large volume of fresh and dried branches, cut flowers and other plant parts are imported into Canada from a variety of origins. A wide range of serious plant pests, which can pose a high pest risk to Canada's agriculture, forests and environment, can be transported in or on this material. Wood-boring insects, for example, are of particular concern and can be present in woody material. Pests can move from non-propagative material to the environment, for example: when material is disposed of by composting; when ornamental arrangements are placed outdoors; or when ornamental material is stored in close proximity to propagative material.

Purpose

This directive is intended for the use of CFIA staff, Canada Border Services Agency staff, National Plant Protection Organizations (NPPOs) of exporting countries exporting countries as well as importers and exporters.

References

D-01-06: Canadian phytosanitary policy for the notification of non-compliance and emergency action. CFIA, Ottawa.

D-02-12: Import requirements for non-processed wood and other non-propagative wood products, except solid wood packaging material, from all areas other than the continental United States. CFIA, Ottawa.

D-03-08: Phytosanitary Requirements to Prevent the Introduction Into and Spread Within Canada of the Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire). CFIA, Ottawa.

D-07-03: Phytosanitary Import Requirements to Prevent the Entry of Epiphyas postvittana (light brown apple moth). CFIA, Ottawa.

D-08-04: Plant protection import requirements for plants and plant parts for planting. CFIA, Ottawa.

D-11-01: Phytosanitary Requirements for Plants for Planting and Fresh Branches to Prevent the Entry and Spread of Anoplophora spp. CFIA, Ottawa

D-12-01: Phytosanitary Requirements to Prevent the Introduction of Plants Regulated as Pests in Canada. CFIA, Ottawa.

D-94-35: List of Sources Approved to Export Fruit Tree and Grape Propagative Material to Canada. CFIA, Ottawa.

D-99-07: Policy for Importation from the United States and Domestic Movement of Plum Pox Virus (PPV) susceptible Prunus Propagative Plant Material. CFIA, Ottawa.

Definitions, abbreviations and acronyms

Definitions for terms used in the present document can be found in the Plant Health Glossary of Terms.

1.0 Scope

1.1 Legislative authority

Plant Protection Act, S.C. 1990, c.22
Plant Protection Regulations, SOR/95-212
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Fees Notice, Canada Gazette, Part I (as amended from time to time)

1.2 Fees

The CFIA charges fees in accordance with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Fees Notice. For information regarding fees associated with imported product, please contact the CFIA's National Import Service Centre (NISC). Anyone requiring other information regarding fees may contact any local CFIA office or visit our Fees Notice website.

1.3 Regulated pests

Please see the list of Pests Regulated by Canada.

Please note that the CFIA may take action on material that is found to be infested with pests of potential quarantine concern even if those pests are not yet included on this list.

1.4 Regulated commodities

All commodities imported under the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System (HS) codes in Table 1.

HS codes are part of an internationally standardized system of names and numbers for classifying traded products. The codes are developed and maintained by the World Customs Organization.

Table 1: Cut flowers, branches and other plant parts for ornamental purposes
HS code Description
06.03 Cut flowers and flower buds of a kind suitable for bouquets or for ornamental purposes, fresh, dried, dyed, bleached, impregnated or otherwise prepared
06.04 Table Note 1 Foliage, branches and other parts of plants, without flowers or flower buds, and grasses, mosses and lichens, being goods of a kind suitable for bouquets or for ornamental purposes, fresh, dried, dyed, bleached, impregnated or otherwise prepared.

Table Note

Table Note 1

Except fresh Christmas trees, HS Code 0604200143, which are regulated under directive D-02-12: Import requirements for non-processed wood and other non-propagative wood products, except solid wood packaging material, from all areas other than the continental United States

Return to table note 1  referrer

1.5 Commodities not in the scope of this directive

  • Bark in isolation (no longer attached to branches). See directive D-02-12 for the import requirements for bark in isolation imported from areas other than the continental United States. For the continental United States, see the directives listed in Appendix 1.
  • Christmas trees. See directive D-02-12 for the import requirements for Christmas trees.
  • Material intended for propagation. See directive D-08-04 for the import requirements for plant material intended for propagation.
  • Material intended for human consumption, animal and livestock feed, and further processing. These requirements are presented in various Plant Health directives.

1.6 Regulated areas

All countries.

2.0 General requirements

The following requirements apply to all products covered under this directive. Requirements for material from a particular origin also apply when the material is re-exported via a third country.

Material must be free from soil, soil-related matter, growing media and quarantine pests.

Cut flowers, foliage and branches must be free from roots.

Growing on, planting or propagation of any of the material covered under this directive is prohibited. Material intended for planting or propagation is subject to additional requirements presented in other directives (e.g. directive D-08-04).

Section 3.0 presents only the requirements not captured elsewhere in other Plant Health directives and is not exhaustive. Other requirements may also apply, including prohibitions. In particular, Appendix 1 provides a list of Plant Health directives that contain requirements specific to certain pests, taxa and origins. For more information, please see the list of all Plant Health directives, consult the CFIA's Automated Import Reference System or contact your local CFIA office.

3.0 Specific requirements

Note: Appendix 1 provides a list of Plant Health directives that contain requirements specific to certain pests, taxa and origins. Please also consult the CFIA's Automated Import Reference System or contact your local CFIA office.

3.1 Non-woody material

This product category refers to non-woody material (e.g. cut flowers, non-woody foliage, mosses, and lichens).

3.1.1 Dried non-woody material

No specific requirements under this directive.

3.1.2 Fresh non-woody material

Fresh mosses and lichens
  1. From the continental United States:
    A Permit to Import is not required. A Phytosanitary Certificate is not required.
  2. From areas other than the continental United States:
    A Permit to Import and a Phytosanitary Certificate are required.
All other products
Origin Requirements
New Zealand See Section 2.1 of directive D-07-03 on Epiphyas postvittana (light brown apple moth).
South Africa A Permit to Import is not required.
A Phytosanitary Certificate is required.
No treatments or additional declarations are required.
United States Fraxinus spp.: See directive D-03-08 on Agrilus planipennis (emerald ash borer).
United States -
California and Hawaii
Taxa listed in Appendix 1 of directive D-07-03 on Epiphyas postvittana (light brown apple moth):
See Section 2.2 of directive D-07-03.
All other origins No specific requirements under this directive.

3.2 Woody material

This product category includes all woody material (e.g. branches, cones, woody roots, woody foliage), including wreaths and similar items.

3.2.1 Dried woody material

  • Note: Dried woody material may be subject to additional requirements specified in other Plant Health directives. For example, dried branch genera that are hosts of Anoplophora spp. are subject to the documentation requirements outlined in section 1.5.1 of Plant Health directive D-11-01.
3.2.1.1 Originating from the continental United States

No specific requirements under this directive.

3.2.1.2 Originating from areas other than the continental United States
  1. For products that are dried (less than 8% moisture content), free from bark and no greater than 1.5 cm in thickness, including dry cones that are entirely coated with a permanent layer of lacquer, paint or other sealant:
    • Neither a Phytosanitary Certificate nor a Permit to Import is required.
  2. For other products, including:
    • Dry cones that are not coated in a sealant.
    • Products that are dried, not free from bark and/or greater than 1.5 cm in thickness.
  • A Permit to Import is not required.
  • One of the following options must be met:
    • Material must be fumigated with methyl bromide as per Appendix 2.
    • Material must be heat-treated to a minimum temperature of 56°C throughout its profile (including at its core) for a minimum of 30 minutes
  • A Phytosanitary Certificate showing the treatment details is required. A fumigation certificate in lieu of this will not be accepted.
  • Note: For products originating from outside the continental United States that are re-exported from the United States to Canada, the following is required:
    • A Phytosanitary Certificate for re-export; or
    • A copy of the original Phytosanitary Certificate with treatment details stamped with a USDA-APHIS stamp and signed by the authorizing Office.
  • If these requirements are not met then the products will have to be treated or re- treated in the United States, and the following is required:
    • A Phytosanitary Certificate with the treatment details; or
    • A heat treatment certificate or treatment document endorsed by the American Lumber Standards Committee (ALSC) accredited Grading Agency; or
    • A fumigation Certificate, in lieu of a Phytosanitary Certificate from fumigation facilities recognized by the USDA-APHIS. Here is a listing of the fumigation inspection companies PDF (792 kb).

3.2.2 Fresh woody material

  • Note: Fresh woody material may be subject to additional requirements specified in other Plant Health directives. For example, fresh branch genera that are hosts of Anoplophora spp. are subject to the phytosanitary requirements outlined in Plant Health directive D-11-01.
3.2.2.1 Originating from the continental United States
Scientific name Common name Requirements
Chaenomeles spp. flowering quince The conditions for plant material intended for propagation apply. See directives D-94-35 (fruit trees and grapevines) and D-97-07 (plum pox virus).
Cydonia spp. quince The conditions for plant material intended for propagation apply. See directives D-94-35 (fruit trees and grapevines) and D-97-07 (plum pox virus).
Malus spp. apple, crabapple The conditions for plant material intended for propagation apply. See directives D-94-35 (fruit trees and grapevines) and D-97-07 (plum pox virus).
Prunus spp. stone fruit The conditions for plant material intended for propagation apply. See directives D-94-35 (fruit trees and grapevines) and D-97-07 (plum pox virus).
Pyrus spp. pear The conditions for plant material intended for propagation apply. See directives D-94-35 (fruit trees and grapevines) and D-97-07 (plum pox virus).
Vitis spp. grapevine The conditions for plant material intended for propagation apply. See directives D-94-35 (fruit trees and grapevines) and D-97-07 (plum pox virus).
Taxa listed in Appendix 1 of directive D-07-03 Taxa listed in Appendix 1 of directive D-07-03 From California only: See Section 2.2 of directive D-07-03 on Epiphyas postvittana (light brown apple moth).
All other taxa All other taxa No specific requirements under this directive. However, see the directives listed in Appendix 1 for other requirements that may apply.
3.2.2.2 Originating from areas other than the continental United States

Taxa and origins not listed in either of the following tables are permitted with no specific requirements under this directive. However, see the directives listed in Appendix 1 for other requirements that may apply.

Permitted, with restrictions
Scientific name Origin Requirements
Citrus spp.
Dieffenbachia spp.
All origins
  • A Permit to Import is required.
  • A Phytosanitary Certificate is required.
Dracaeana sanderiana China
  • A Permit to Import is required.
  • A Phytosanitary Certificate is required. It must include an additional declaration stating that the material in the consignment was produced in a facility approved by the Administration for Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of China or by China Inspection and Quarantine offices, and meets the CFIA's requirements for the importation of Dracaena sanderiana.
  • Material must not be in standing water.
Dracaeana sanderiana All other origins
  • A Permit to Import is required.
  • A Phytosanitary Certificate is required.
Salix spp. (Lulav) All origins other than Europe
  • For ceremonial or religious use during the holiday of Sukkot. Lulavs are for personal use only and must accompany the traveler at the time of entry into Canada. Commercial imports are not permitted.
  • A Permit to Import is not required.
  • A Phytosanitary Certificate is not required.
  • The authorized period for import is 3 days prior to the beginning of Sukkot through to 8 days following the end of the holiday.
  • Lulavs must be free from insect and disease pests. If insect pests or diseases are found on any of the items that make up the lulav, the lulav will be prohibited from entering Canada.
  • Travelers must state the origin of the willow (Salix spp.)
  • Willow branches contained in the fresh lulav, including any leaves and buds, must be dry and not be capable of growing.
  • Willow branches for Sukkot are for personal use only and cannot be used for propagation.
Taxa listed in Appendix 1 of directive D-07-03 Hawaii See Section 2.2 of directive D-07-03 on Epiphyas postvittana (light brown apple moth).
All taxa New Zealand See Section 2.1 of directive D-07-03 on Epiphyas postvittana (light brown apple moth).
3.2.2.3 Prohibited

Fresh woody material of the following taxa is prohibited from origins other than the continental United States.

Prohibited taxa
Scientific name Common name
Abies spp. fir
Acer spp. maple
Aesculus spp. horsechestnut
Alnus spp. alder
Betula spp. birch
Carpinus spp. hornbeam
Carya spp. hickory
Castanea spp. chestnut
Castanopsis spp. chinquapin
Celtis spp. hackberry
Chaenomeles spp. flowering quince
Cornus spp. dogwood
Corylus spp. hazelnut
Cydonia spp. quince
Fagus spp. beech
Frangula spp. buckthorn
Fraxinus spp. ash
Juglans spp. walnut
Larix spp. larch
Lithocarpus spp. stone oak
Malus spp. apple, crabapple
Ostrya spp. hophornbeam
Picea spp. spruce
Pinus spp. pine
Platanus spp. sycamore, plane
Populus spp. poplar
Pseudolarix spp. golden larch
Pseudotsuga spp. Douglas fir
Prunus spp. stone fruit
Pyrus spp. pear
Quercus spp. oak
Rhamnus spp. buckthorn
Rhus spp. sumac
Salix spp. Table Note 2 willowTable Note 2
Sorbus spp. mountain ash
Tilia spp. basswood
Tsuga spp. hemlock
Ulmus spp. elm
Vitis spp. grapevine

Table Note

Table note 2

Refer to section 3.2.2.2 for the provision for lulav.

Return to table note 2 referrer

4.0 Non-compliance

Imported consignments may be inspected by the CFIA and must meet all requirements when they reach first point of arrival in Canada. Products that are found to be infested with pests of quarantine concern or are otherwise non-compliant may be refused entry to Canada, and may be ordered removed from the country or destroyed. Infested shipments may be ordered treated prior to disposal to prevent the spread of pests. The importer is responsible for all costs relating to treatment, disposal or removal of the products, including costs incurred by the CFIA to monitor the action taken. The CFIA will advise the NPPO of the country of origin of any non-compliance with the conditions outlined in this directive as per directive D-01-06: Canadian phytosanitary policy for the notification of non-compliance and emergency action.

5.0 Appendices

Appendix 1: Plant Health directives that include requirements for material covered in directive D-14-03

The directives below can be found in the list of all Plant Health directives.

Note:Requirements may change at any time; this list may not contain the most up-to-date information. Please see the Automated Import Reference System or contact the CFIA for details.

Plant Health directives that include requirements for material covered in directive D-14-03
Directive Pests of concern Regulated taxa Regulated origin
D-94-22 Tomicus piniperda
(pine shoot beetle)
Pinus spp. continental United States
D-95-28 multiple pests;
see directive
Zea mays multiple countries;
see directive
D-96-08 multiple pests;
see directive
Sorghum spp. multiple countries;
see directive
D-97-07 Ophiostoma ulmi and Ophiostoma novo-ulmi
(Dutch elm disease)
Ulmus spp.,
Zelkova spp.
United States
D-97-10 Lachnellula willkommii
(European larch canker)
Larix spp.,
Pseudolarix spp.
multiple countries;
see directive
D-98-09 Lymantria dispar
(North American gypsy moth)
all taxa United States
D-99-01 multiple pests;
see directive
Hordeum spp., Avena spp.,
Secale spp.,
x-Triticosecale,
Triticum spp.
multiple countries;
see directive
D-99-03 Ceratocystis fagacearum
(oak wilt disease)
Castanea spp.,
Castanopsis spp.,
Lithocarpus spp.,
Quercus spp.
continental United States
D-00-08 Phytophthora alni Alnus spp. multiple countries;
see directive
D-01-01 Phytophthora ramorum multiple taxa;
see directive
multiple countries;
see directive
D-03-08 Agrilus planipennis
(emerald ash borer)
Fraxinus spp. continental United States
D-07-03 Epiphyas postvittana
(light brown apple moth)
multiple taxa;
see directive
New Zealand,
United States (including Hawaii)
D-07-05 Adelges tsugae
(hemlock woolly adelgid)
Picea jezoensis,
Picea polita,
Tsuga spp.
United States
D-11-01 Anoplophora spp.
(long-horn beetles)
multiple taxa;
see directive
multiple countries;
see directive
D-11-05 Anoplophora glabripennis
(Asian long-horn beetle)
multiple taxa;
see directive
continental United States

Appendix 2: Methyl bromide fumigation schedule

Canada is a signatory of The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (1992), agreeing to the reduction and eventual phase-out of methyl bromide use. Exporting countries are encouraged to submit data supporting the efficacy of alternatives to methyl bromide fumigation to the CFIA for review.

The minimum temperature must not be less than 10°C and the minimum exposure time must be at least 24 hours. Monitoring of concentrations must be carried out at a minimum of 2, 4 and 24 hours after application of the fumigant.

A Phytosanitary Certificate issued by the certifying National Plant Protection Organization and indicating the fumigation details (average commodity temperature, general rate [g/m3] of methyl bromide used and exposure time) is required.

Regulated products may be fumigated with methyl bromide in the following manner:

Methyl bromide fumigation schedule
Temperature (°C) Dosage (g/m3) Minimum
concentration (g/m3)
at 2 hours
Minimum
concentration (g/m3)
at 4 hours
Minimum
concentration (g/m3)
at 24 hours
21.0 or above 48 36 31 24
16.0 - 20.9 56 42 36 28
10.0 - 15.9 64 48 42 32
Date modified: