RMD-13-04: Consolidated Pest Risk Management Document for pest plants regulated by Canada
Appendix 8B: Risk Management Considerations for Microstegium vimineum (Japanese stiltgrass)

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Values at Risk

Microstegium vimineum prefers wetlands and forested areas. It is difficult to assign a value to the biodiversity of our Canadian landscape

Potential Mitigation Measures for Natural Means of Dispersal

No potential mitigation measures for natural means of dispersal are highlighted herein for Microstegium vimineum. Microstegium vimineum has disturbed many areas of the New England States and is approaching the Canadian border. Regulating the dispersal by surface water runoff and the migration of wild animals is nearly impossible to control.

Potential Mitigation Measures for Intentional Introduction Pathways

No intentional pathways were identified

Potential Mitigation Measures for Non-intentional Introduction Pathways

Field Crops Not Intended for Propagation

Previous imports

Potential risk mitigation measures

Regulate Microstegium vimineum as a quarantine pest under the Plant Protection Act. Add this species to the List of Pests Regulated by Canada (CFIA 2009) in order to:

Regulatory actions under the Plant Protection Act could include one or more of the following:

Trade implications

Cost-effectiveness and Feasibility

Hay and Straw

Previous imports

Potential risk mitigation measures

Regulate Microstegium vimineum under the Plant Protection Act as a quarantine pest by placing it on the List of Pests Regulated by Canada. This will:

Trade implications

Exporting countries will need to devote resources towards inspection of hay and straw commodities and issuance of phytosanitary certificates. Inspectors in exporting countries need to be able to identify seeds of Microstegium vimineum that could be associated with hay and straw. Exporters need to ensure freedom of Microstegium vimineum in hay and straw, otherwise CFIA can refuse import.

Cost-effectiveness and Feasibility

This measure will facilitate trade of hay and straw with the State of Alabama, Connecticut and Massachusetts, where Microstegium vimineum is regulated. This measure is already in place for other pests regulated by Canada. Minor costs will be incurred for training of inspectors

Vehicles and Used Farm Machinery

Previous imports

Potential Risk mitigation measures

Enforcement of Directive 95-26: "Phytosanitary requirements for soil and related matter, alone or in association with plants" (CFIA 2008).

In 2003, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) assumed responsibility for the initial import inspection services in respect to the Acts and Regulations administered by the CFIA to the extent that they are applicable at Canadian border points. The inspection of goods that may be contaminated with soil are among the responsibilities that were transferred to the CBSA in 2003. The Food, Plant and Animals Programs Product of the CBSA is currently finalizing its Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) concerning the "Inspection of Imported Goods Potentially Contaminated with Soil." This SOP provides the CBSA's Border Services Officers with formal procedures for the inspection and disposition of goods that may be contaminated with soil, including used agricultural machinery and vehicles.

Nursery Stock with soil

Previous imports

The total value of imports of nursery stock was $173 million in 2008 (Industry Canada 2009) with approximately 80% of that value originating from the United States (Industry Canada, 2009; based on data using HS 0602 – Other Live Plants (incl. Roots), Cuttings and Slips; Mushroom Spawn). Approximately 40% of the imports from the United States originate from states where Microstegium vimineum is present (e.g., Florida, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, New York, Ohio)

Potential Risk mitigation measures

Trade implications

Cost-effectiveness and Feasibility

Nursery Stock from infested areas where Microstegium vimineum is present may be imported under the condition that the plants are bare root. Alternatively, using soil free growing media may be a condition of entry imposed on these imports. This mitigation measure should be feasible and minor costs will be incurred.

Used Recreational Equipment and Clothing

Previous imports

Risk mitigation measures

Increase public awareness of the regulation and the risk posed by this plant and distribute awareness material at border crossings to the public

Trade implications

There are no trade implications anticipated.

Cost-effectiveness and Feasibility

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