Guidance for landscaping and grounds maintenance workers, operating in the Japanese beetle regulated area in Vancouver, British Columbia

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The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has established a regulated area to control the spread of Japanese beetle in the Vancouver area. The CFIA is working with the City of Vancouver, Province of BC, British Columbia Invasive Species Council, BC Landscape and Nursery Association and other industry associations to control the movement of material that could contribute to the spread of Japanese beetle.

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Japanese beetle

Description of map – Figure 1: Japanese Beetle regulated area of Vancouver, British Columbia with location of the temporary transfer station – West 1st Avenue and Wylie Street.

This map shows the boundaries of the Japanese beetle regulated area in the City of Vancouver in British Columbia. The boundaries include the waterfront of Coal Harbour and Burrard Inlet from Burrard Street to Clark Drive and extend to south to 12th Avenue. The temporary transfer station is located at West 1st Avenue and Wylie Street.

Anyone growing or working with plants, soil or plant waste in the regulated area should be aware of the full requirements described below.

If you have a situation that is not covered on the CFIA's website or in this document, or you require a Movement Certificate, please contact the Canadian Food Inspection Agency at 604-292-5742 or by email at: BCPF.Japanese.Beetle@inspection.gc.ca. You may also report a Japanese beetle sighting using the aforementioned phone number and email address.

Japanese beetle on a leaf

Photo Credit: Katja Schulz, Creative Commons 2.0

Introduction

This document provides guidance for the movement of regulated material typical of landscaping and grounds maintenance work to reduce the spread of Japanese beetle. Municipal bylaws and Provincial laws must still be followed. Guidance for plant retailers, homeowners and building construction workers is also available.

Please use available municipally sanctioned green/compost waste disposal programs, where possible. If you have green waste that cannot go into the green waste program, please take it to the temporary transfer station located at 301 West 1st Avenue (Wylie Street and West 1st Avenue) at the South end of the Cambie Street Bridge (see Figure 1 for map with location of temporary transfer station). For more information please visit the City of Vancouver's website.

Commercial operations working within the regulated area, as well as the public, can drop-off green horticultural waste (for example, grass clippings, leaves, weeds, pruning waste and spent flowers), plants with soil and small amounts of soil at the temporary transfer station. Only material from the regulated area will be accepted. Whenever possible, regulated articles should remain within the regulated area.

Exempted Articles

The following are considered exempted articles, as they are unlikely to carry live Japanese beetle. These articles can move freely out of the regulated area and do not require a CFIA Movement Certificate:

  • green horticultural waste that has been chipped or ground using a brush chipper or a horizontal grinder
  • branches, trunks, sticks and wood with no leaves attached that are free from soil
  • outside the Japanese beetle flight period (January 1 to June 14 and October 16 to December 31), all plants and plant parts (including grass clippings) free from soil
  • articles transiting the regulated area
  • dormant bulbs, tubers, corms, rhizomes that are free from soil
  • potted plants, including ornamental grasses and nursery stock that enter the regulated area after October 15 and leave the regulated area before June 15, the following year
  • potted plants, including nursery stock and ornamental grasses that are kept exclusively in an indoor area or a screened area within the regulated area between June 15 and October 15 (Japanese beetle flight period)
  • potted houseplants (non-commercial) which have been grown indoors within the regulated area and not set outdoors as patio plants
  • potted houseplants, cut flowers and decorative branches (commercially produced outside the regulated area and sold in florist shops, etc. within the regulated area)
  • fallen leaves packed into paper bags and disposed of in accordance with the municipal curbside Fall leaf collection program
  • fresh fruits and vegetables for consumption
  • soil from outside the regulated area that has been commercially prepared and packaged (sealed) outside of the regulated area

Regulated Articles

The following are regulated articles, as they are things that are infested or likely to be infested with Japanese beetle and may require a CFIA Movement Certificate to move out of the regulated area:

  • soil
  • plants with soil attached
  • plants and plant parts

Note: "Soil" means the loose surface of the earth in which plants grow, in most cases consisting of disintegrated rock with an admixture of organic matter, including related matter such as clay, silt, sand, soil minerals, humus, compost, earthworm castings, muck, plant litter and debris, either individually or in combination.

Soil – regulated year-round

Movement of soil from one location to another should be avoided as much as possible. Should you need to dispose of soil, the temporary transfer station accepts small amounts, such as a wheelbarrow load.

If soil cannot be disposed of at the temporary transfer station, all forms of soil require a CFIA issued Movement Certificate to move outside of the regulated area. Top 30 cm of undisturbed soil must be treated or disposed of in accordance with CFIA specifications (for example, heat-treatment or deep burial). Soil that is 30 cm or deeper or soil that is beneath an impermeable surface (for example, asphalt, cement or similar plant barrier), does not require specific treatment or deep burial.

Plants with soil attached – regulated year-round

For example:

  • turfgrass
  • sod
  • ornamental grasses
  • annuals
  • perennials
  • bulbs
  • shrubs
  • bedding plants and potted houseplants
  • patio plants grown outdoors

Plants with soil (growing media) from the regulated area that are not destined for disposal, must meet CFIA requirements to be moved outside of the regulated area. Such movements will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

As much as possible, green horticultural waste with soil should be mulched in place or composted within the regulated area. Horticultural waste may be disposed of through a municipal green/compost waste program in accordance with program requirements. If you have horticultural waste that cannot go into the green waste program, please take it to the temporary transfer station for disposal.

If the material cannot be disposed of at the temporary transfer station, a CFIA Movement Certificate is required before moving it outside of the regulated area for disposal. These articles must be treated or disposed of in accordance with CFIA specifications (for example heat-treatment or deep burial).

Plants and plant parts –only regulated between June 15 and October 15

This includes all outdoor plants and plant parts, other than leaf-free woody material. As much as possible, these materials should be mulched in place or composted within the regulated area.

Green horticultural waste may be disposed of through a municipal green/compost waste program in accordance with program requirements. During the regulated period, these articles may also be taken to the temporary transfer station, within the regulated area, for disposal.

Green horticultural waste (including grass clippings) cannot leave the regulated area without a CFIA Movement Certificate, between June 15 and October 15, which is the Japanese beetle flight period.

Additional measures

Sort your load before going to the temporary transfer station

Remove root balls from plants and separate them from all soil-free green horticultural waste when loading your truck. Root balls and green horticultural waste mixed with soil will be disposed of in a soil bin.

Leave behind as much soil as you can at your worksite, and segregate green horticultural waste from soil to save on dumping fees.

Help prevent the spread of Japanese beetle from the regulated area

Shake plants to remove any Japanese beetle prior to taking to temporary transfer station for disposal.

Clean soil from equipment/tools and boots on-site and when leaving disposal/transfer sites. Be especially diligent when cleaning aerating and power raking equipment, as this equipment could present a significant risk for carrying various Japanese beetle life stages. Please avoid using this equipment as much as possible.

Sweep out tarps/grass catchers and vehicles, and check for adult Japanese beetle hitchhikers on clothing as well as inside and outside vehicles and equipment.

If you are working inside and outside the regulated area in the same day/period, do not bring regulated articles (plant material and soil) along with you to work sites outside the regulated area. Do not store regulated articles outside the regulated area.

Non-compliance

When issues of non-compliance are observed, the CFIA will follow the Agency's Compliance and Enforcement Operational Policy.

One of the enforcement options is to issue an Administrative Monetary Penalty which is a Notice of Violation with a warning or it can include a penalty. Penalties for individuals can range from $500 to $1,300 and $1,300 to $10,000 for violations committed during the course of business.

Learn more about the Japanese beetle and get updates on this response effort.

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