Plant pest cards

The plant pest cards have been produced to enhance the awareness and recognition of plant pests by any interested stakeholders. The cards are available below in portable document format (PDF).

Report plant pest sightings

Apple maggot
(Rhagoletis pomonella) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Apple maggot. Description follows. PDF (916 kb)

Text version

The adult is about 5 to 6 mm long and has four irregular or zig-zag black bands on the wings. The legless larvae are usually 6.5 to 8 mm long and 1.5 to 2 mm wide, cream-coloured, and consist of 11 apparent segments.

Signs of apple maggot activity in fruit include dimpling and maggot tunneling.

Help prevent the spread of Apple maggot! Please do not move fruit containers, fresh fruit, soil or apple trees into tree fruit production areas including, Okanagan, Similkameen, and Creston Valleys.

Report all sightings in British Columbia interior. Call 250-470-4884 and ask to speak to plant health staff.

© 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: CFIA, Blair Stirling, (H.J. Larsen, J. Berger: Bugwood.org).

Asian gypsy moth
(Lymantria dispar) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Asian gypsy moth. Description follows.PDF (1,186 kb)

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Asian gypsy moth egg masses are 2 to 4 cm long. They are gold to dark brown in colour, with fine hairs covering the eggs.

The female Asian gypsy moth is large in size. They range from white to light grey in colour, with black markings on the wings.

Find, remove and destroy Asian gypsy moth egg mass.

Inspect and report all sightings in Canada on vessels, cargo, and containers.

© 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: CFIA.

Asian longhorn beetle
(Anoplophora glabripennis) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Asian longhorn beetle. Description follows.PDF (1,603 kb)

Text version

Adults are large shiny black beetles measuring 20 to 35 mm in length and 7 to 12 mm wide. There are up to 20 irregular white spots on each elytron. There is one prominent spine on each side of the black thorax. The antennae are longer than the body and consist of 11 black segments with a white or whitish blue base. The legs are black and have a bluish tinge.

Signs of Asian longhorned beetle include exits holes (6 to 12 mm wide), egg laying sites (about 10 mm wide), and frass (sawdust and wood shavings occurs in piles around the base of the tree or in branch forks).

© 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: B.Gill, T. Poiré. Report all sightings.

Blueberry Maggot
(Rhagoletis mendax) Thumbnail image for plant pest card: Blueberry Maggot. Description follows.PDF (997 kb)

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The adult fly is approximately 4.5 millimetres in length with a wingspan of about 8 millimetres. The wings display a brown banding pattern while the black abdomen is marked with white cross bands. The legless, whitish-coloured larvae are up to 8 millimetres in length.

The primary host of the blueberry maggot is blueberry, both high and low bush. Other suitable hosts include Hillside blueberry, Deerberry and Huckleberry.

Infested fields will have an abundance of fruit on the ground. Puncture holes will be visible on the skin of berries. Collapsed berries will also be common.

©2019 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Photo credits: Joseph Moisan-De Serres (MAPAQ), Pierre Lemoyne (AAFC), Jerry A. Payne (USDA-ARS). Use without permission is prohibited. Report ALL sightings.

Box Tree Moth
(Cydalima perspectalis) Thumbnail image for plant pest card: Box Tree Moth. Description follows.PDF (974 kb)

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Adults are described as medium-sized moths with a wing span of about 4 cm. The more common variant has white coloured wings with thick dark brown border trimmings. Eggs, which are laid in clusters, are greenish yellow in colour when first laid. Black dots start to show as the larval head capsule is forming.

Cydalima perspectalis is primarily a pest of Buxus plant species (Family Buxaceae)

Damage to boxwood plants is caused by the larvae feeding primarily on leaves and sometimes on the bark. Infested plants are disfigured by the loss of leaves and by the webbing spun by the larvae. Younger larvae feed by eating the lower surfaces of the leaves only, leaving the upper epidermis intact. Older larvae feed inside the webbing and skeletonize the leaves, leaving only the midribs, and occasionally the outer margin intact.

© 2019 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Photo credits: D. Beadle, V. Voe, C. Manci, K. Yukich, J. Llewellyn - OMAFRA. Use without permission is prohibited. Report ALL sightings.

Brown spruce longhorn beetle
(Tetropium fuscum) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Brown spruce longhorn beetle. Description follows.PDF (1,434 kb)

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The brown spruce longhorn beetle attacks spruce trees.

Adult beetles have a flattened body, 10 to 15 mm long. The head is black or dark brown, with a deep longitudinal groove between the antennae. The head is also covered with long, light-coloured hairs. Their eyes are completely divided. The slender antennae are half the length of the body and are reddish brown. The pronotum bulges laterally. The elytra are tan, brown, or reddish-brown with 2 or 3 longitudinal grooves. The legs are dark brown or reddish-brown.

Signs include exits holes (4 to 6 mm in diameter), excessive white resin on tree trunk, and larval galleries.

© 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: R. Neville (CFIA), J. Sweeney, S. Sopow, K. Harrison (CFS). Please report suspect specimens.

Emerald ash borer
(Agrilus planipennis) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Emerald ash borer. Description follows.PDF (1,340 kb)

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Adult beetles are metallic blue-green, narrow, hairless, elongate, 8.5 to 14.0 mm long and 3.1 to 3.4 mm wide.

Signs of emerald ash borer include D-shaped exit holes (3.5 by 4.1 mm in size), S-shaped larval galleries that are filled with a fine brownish frass, and ash decline.

© 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: T. Kimoto, B. Lyons. Report new sightings.

European cherry fruit fly
(Rhagoletis cerasi) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: European cherry fruit fly. Description follows.PDF (962 kb)

Text version

The adult is 3.5 to 4 mm long and predominantly black in colour. The wings are transparent, with characteristic dark crossbands. The scutellum of the thorax is yellow. Hosts include cherry and honeysuckle.

Signs of European cherry fruit fly include maggots in fruit, brown, rotting fruit, and maggot exit holes in cherries.

© 2017 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited.

Photo credits: R. Coutin (OPIE), C. Daniel (FiBL), www.entomart.be, J. Grunder (ZHAW). Please report suspect specimens.

European oak leafroller
(Tortrix viridana) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: European oak leafroller Description follows.PDF (1,073 kb)

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Adult description: green body and wings, and wings without markings. The front wings are pale-green or yellow-green; rear wings are brownish-gray to grayish; both wings have a white, frayed outer edge. The wingspan is approximately 18 to 23 mm. The head is yellowish and adults have a grayish, 8 mm long abdomen.

Not known to occur in Canada.

Hosts: oak (main), maple, birch, beech, poplar, and blue-beech.

Larvae feed in rolled leaf shelters.

© 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: G. Csoka, M. Talbot, T. Gilligan (Bugwood.org). Please report suspect specimens.

Gypsy moth
(Lymantria dispar) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Gypsy moth. Description follows.PDF (1,329 kb)

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Adult males are brown with dark, crescent-shaped mark on the forewing. The wing span is 35 to 40 mm. Adult females are mainly white with dark, crescent-shaped mark on the forewing. The wing span is 55 to 70 mm. Caterpillars normally have 5 pairs of blue tubercles followed by 6 pairs of red. Pupae may be found attached by silken thread to branches, tree trunks, rocks, forest debris, buildings or fences. Egg masses are approximately 30 to 60 mm long and 20 to 30 mm wide and are covered with tan coloured hairs.

Green insect traps placed on trees should not be disturbed.

Dear Home Owner,
We have placed an insect trap in your area to detect Gypsy Moth, a non-native, serious tree pest.Please help us keep this unwanted pest from invading your neighbourhood by not disturbing the trap.If you have questions regarding this trap and our survey we would be happy to help you.

© 2014 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: CFIA, Pennsylvania D.C. & N.R. – Bugwood.org.

Hemlock woolly adelgid
(Adelges tsugae) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Hemlock woolly adelgid. Description follows.PDF (1,345 kb)

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Hemlock woolly adelgid is an aphid-like insect that attacks and kills hemlock trees. Its egg sacs, which look like small cotton balls or hailstones, can be found at the base of needles.

© 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: J. Van Driesche, L. Graney & C. Evans, (Bugwood.org), E. Appleton. Report all sightings

Japanese Beetle
(Popillia Japonica) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Japanese Beetle. Description follows.PDF (1,452 kb)

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Adult: Oval outline from above, almost 10 mm long and 6 mm wide, abdomen, thorax and head metallic green with metallic copper-brown wing coverings and contrasting 12 white tufts of hair along the sides and rear of the abdomen.

Larva: a typical C-shaped creamy white grub with a yellowish-brown head (20 mm).

Signs of Japanese beetle include skeletonized foliage and dead grass caused by larval feeding.

© 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: J. Baker, D. Cappaert, S. Katovich (Bugwood.org), CFIA. Please report suspect specimens.

Khapra beetle
(Trogoderma granarium) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Khapra beetle. Description follows.PDF (1,086 kb)

Text version

An adult khapra beetle is brown or black, approximately 1.6 to 3 mm long by 0.9 to 1.7 mm wide, and is covered with hair. Larvae are approximately 1.6 to 1.88 mm long, yellowish white with brown hairs covering the head and body.

Pest of stored products: grains, seeds, other dried product.

Not know to occur in Canada.

© 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: J. Young, N. Wright, Ministry of Agriculture & Regional Development Archive, (Bugwood.org), J. Holmes. Please report suspect specimens.

Kudzu
(Pueraria montana) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Kudzu Description follows.PDF (1,656 kb)

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Kudzu is a perennial, climbing vine with hairy twining stems that can grow 10 to 30 m in length. Its lobed leaves are composed of 3 leaflets (each 7 to 20 cm long). Kudzu flowers are clustered, fragrant, reddish-purple, and pea-like in appearance (flowers: mid to late summer).

Where to look: abandoned fields, pastures, tree plantations, roadsides, riverbanks, urban areas.

© 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: L. Mehrhoff (U. of Connecticut), M. Oldham (OMNR), R. Wallace (U. of Georgia), K. Castro (CFIA). Report all sightings.

Oak Wilt
(Bretziella fagacearum) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Oak Wilt. Description follows.PDF (1,616 kb)

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Leaves turn dull green, brown or yellow. Discoloration progresses from leaf margin to midrib. Premature leaf fall may occur.

Bark cracks caused by pressure pads. Pressure pads form under bark and emit a fruity smell.

© 2018 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: Iowa State University, Julie Holmes (CFIA), Minnesota DNR, Steven Katovich (USDA-FS). Please report suspect specimens.

Pink gypsy moth
(Lymantria mathura) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Pink gypsy moth. Description follows.PDF (1,048 kb)

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Pink gypsy moths are moderately-sized, hairy and heavy-bodied. The females bear a thick anal tuft of scale hairs and the last three abdominal segments are extended. The hind wings of the female are pink, those of the male are yellow; female wing-span is about 80 mm, that of male about 45 mm. The larvae are stout-bodied with prominent bristles. The larvae are peculiar in having one pair of anterior and two pairs of posterior hair pencils (long hair tufts). Pupae are medium brown with white hairs on the first abdominal segment.

Hosts: birch, oak, apple, sumac, pear, chestnut, flowering cherry.

Not known to occur in Canada.

© 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: D. Mohn (Bugwood.org), D. Holden. Please report suspect specimens.

Plum pox virus Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Plum Pox Virus. Description follows.PDF (993 kb)

Text version

Hosts: peach, apricot, plum, nectarine.

Signs of plum pox virus include mottled yellow rings, patches and lines on fruit, yellow spots or rings on leaves.

Report sightings outside of regulated area.

© 2014 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: CFIA.

Red-necked longhorned beetle
(Aromia bungii) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Red-necked longhorned beetle. Description follows.PDF (1,179 kb)

Text version

Adult beetles are 22 to 38 mm in length and completely glossy black in colour except for the red thorax, which bears a stout, spine-like process on each side. Like other longhorned beetles, the antennae are as long as (females) or longer (males) than the body.

Hosts: cherry, plum, peach, apricot, poplar.

Not known to occur in Canada.

Larval galleries are 17 to 22 cm long under the bark of the trunk or along branches. Large coarse fibrous debris (frass) may be pushed out and can occur around the base of the tree.

© 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: D. Benchi, B. Espinosa, R. Griffo. Please report suspect specimens.

Spotted lanternfly
(Lycorma delicatula) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Spotted lanternfly. Description follows.PDF (1,070 kb)

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Adults are approximately 20 to 26 mm long and 12 mm wide. They have uniquely-coloured wings: the front wings are light brown/grey with black spots at the front and dark speckled bands near the back. The rear wings are red in colour and have black spots near the front and white and black bands at the back. The abdomen is yellow with horizontal black stripes. Early stage nymphs are black and white, while later stage nymphs are black, white and red.

Hosts: grape, tree-of-heaven, willow, apple, pine, stone fruit.

Signs include grey or black weeping wounds on host plants and yellowish-white mold patches occurring at the base of the tree. Newly laid egg masses are brown in colour and covered in a grey, waxy coating.

© 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: L. Barringer & H. Raguza (Bugwood.org), E. Wachmann, Itchydogimages. Report all sightings.

Tomato leaf miner
(Tuta absoluta) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Tomato leaf miner. Description follows.PDF (1,078 kb)

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Adult: 10 mm long, filiform antennae, silverish-grey scales, black spots on anterior wings.

Signs include leaf, tomato, and stem mines.

Have you seen these signs of damage on tomato?

© 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: M. van der Straten, A. Minuto, J.M. Cobos Suarez (EPPO). Please report suspect specimens.

Verticillium wilt on canola
(Verticillium longisporum) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Verticillium wilt on canola. Description follows.PDF (1,082 kb)

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Symptoms include stem necrosis, yellowing of leaves and lateral branches, early senescence, drying out of stems and leaves.

On mature plants, microsclerotia (black pepper-like spots) can be seen under the stem surface.

© 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo Credits: S. Brière, C. Hutter, MAFRD, A. V. Tiedemann. Please report suspect specimens.

Yellow starthistle
(Centaurea solstitialis) Thumbnail image for plant pest credit card: Yellow starthistle. Description follows.PDF (1,109 kb)

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The flowers are bright yellow and are ringed with long, sharp spines. It has lobed lower leaves (5 to 15 cm long). The plants are grayish-green with many stiff stems (up to 2 m tall) and are covered with fine white hairs. It has narrow upper leaves and winged steams.

Flowers: early summer to late fall.

Where to look: grasslands, rangelands, pastures, fields, croplands, dry, sunny, open sites, roadsides and disturbed areas.

© 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Aussi disponible en français. Use without permission is prohibited. Photo credits: S. Dewey (Utah State University), M. Harte (Bugwood.org), P. Greb, C. Turner (USDA ARS). Report all sightings.

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