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2018-2019 Departmental Results Report

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2018-2019 Departmental Results Report

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Organization: Canadian Food Inspection Agency

ISBN: 2561-0775

The original version was signed by

The Honourable Patty Hajdu, PC, MP, Minister of Health

For the period ending March 31, 2019

Minister's message

Minister of Health

As the Minister of Health, I am pleased to present the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) 2018–19 Departmental Results Report.

CFIA is a valued partner of Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, as well as many other government and industry organizations. Working collaboratively is one of CFIA's greatest strengths.

CFIA continues to protect the health of Canadians by further strengthening our already world-class food safety system. We introduced additional safeguards through the coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations on January 15, 2019. These regulations make our food safety system even safer by enabling the faster removal of unsafe food from the marketplace. They also support an agile regulatory system that promotes greater market access opportunities for Canadian food products abroad.

CFIA continues its focus on a preventive, risk-based approach to all programs and initiatives. Taking this modern approach, CFIA is enhancing and improving the client experience with digital tools and services such as "My CFIA," a portal that provides clients access to secure business resources online.

CFIA remains active in the important areas of plant and animal health, and this work directly supports market access – an important priority for this government.

Plant health is essential to both human and animal health, as well as to our environment and economy. CFIA works proactively with partners to prevent the introduction and spread of plant pests in Canada and globally. CFIA is leading the Government of Canada's efforts to raise awareness about plant health alongside other federal departments and international partners in 2020, which the United Nations has proclaimed as International Year of Plant Health.

The Agency is also advancing the development of the new Sidney Centre for Plant Health, a world-class plant health research facility that will provide CFIA scientists and partners with state-of-the-art facilities to advance plant science and safeguard plants.

On the animal health front, CFIA has worked diligently with domestic and international partners to keep African swine fever from entering Canada, and prepare for it in the event it does cross our borders. In addition, Health Canada has made regulatory and policy changes related to the responsible use of antimicrobials in animals, essential to protecting the health and safety of people, our food, animals and plants here in Canada and around the world. CFIA programs and its veterinarians provide front-line support of responsible use of medically important antimicrobials in animals.

I look forward to continuing to advance priorities through collaboration and evidence-based decision-making to maintain and improve the health and safety of all Canadians.

These are just a few of CFIA's many achievements that lay the foundation for more opportunities to come. I invite you to read the 2018–19 Departmental Results Report to see how CFIA continues to innovate and deliver on behalf of all Canadians.

The Honourable Patty Hajdu, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Results at a glance

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is a science-based regulatory agency mandate involves safeguarding food, animals and plants, in an effort to enhance the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment and economy. As such, CFIA is continuously improving its program design and delivery in order to minimize and manage risks. Through our work the environment is better protected, Canadians can be assured their food is safe, and Canadian businesses have access to competitive opportunities around the world.

In 2018 to 2019, CFIA focused its efforts on the implementation of its strategic framework – Responding to Today, Building for the Future, which will guide CFIA's efforts in the coming years to help better manage emerging risks, respond to consumer demands and support industry as they compete in the global market place. CFIA's programs and internal services work in parallel to advance the Agency's strategic direction.

Modern regulatory toolkit

CFIA continued to deliver on its modern, outcome-based, regulatory toolkit with new and innovative compliance promotion tools to protect Canada's food safety system and its plant and animal resource-base. The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations were published in Canada Gazette, Part II, on June 13, 2018 and came into force on January 15, 2019. The new regulations specify the outcome that industry must meet, rather than describing the way it must be achieved which enables industry to innovate and respond to emerging risks and developments and to introduce new technologies, processes and procedures, while strengthening Canada's food safety system. Amendments were also made to the humane transportation requirements of the Health of Animal Regulations and are expected to come into force in February 2020. In regards to food labelling modernization, CFIA continued drafting new labelling provisions. These amendments were published in the Canada Gazette, Part I on June 21, 2019. This would modernize best before dates, food company information, origin labelling by introducing outcome-based requirements that apply equally to all food. These amendments would also reduce industry burden by repealing unnecessary or duplicative food commodity-specific requirements. Fertilizers Regulations were published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on December 8, 2018, and following a comment period and subsequent analysis, is anticipated to be published as final in the Canada Gazette, Part II, in winter 2020.

Integrated risk management

Through the development and implementation of new risk management tools, analytics and surveillance, CFIA continued to adopt integrated risk management approaches to determine enforcement priorities and resource allocations, targeting resources to where they are most needed, through the development and implementation of new risk management tools, analytics and surveillance. These included adopting the Establishment-based Risk Assessment model (for food establishments, hatcheries, and feed facilities), and implementing CFIA's Risk Intelligence Framework to enhance decision-making. Development of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network advanced and is on target to be implemented by March 2020, supported by a Steering Committee with representation from every Province and Territory.

Consistent and efficient inspections

CFIA continued to deliver consistent and efficient inspections by implementing a single inspection procedure for dairy, fish, processed products, honey, maple syrup and eggs. This approach is focused on regulatory outcomes and is increasingly supported by mobile tools and guidance which will lead to greater efficiency and agility of the response to emerging risks. The phase one launch of the Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program in Hog (MSIP-Hog) pilot project concluded in two pilot facilities in August 2018.

Digital First Tools and Services

CFIA's digital-first tools and digital services approach aims to provide clients a full range of services and information they need to comply with regulations. MyCFIA remains a convenient and secure way to do business online with CFIA, serving as a preferred method of requesting and receiving services, such as for a permit, certificate, or license. CFIA inspectors are capturing the results of their inspection activities in the Digital Services Delivery Platform. The next step of the platform development is to make services available to our plant and animal business lines. CFIA is also advancing other digital export certification activities, which will be available in early 2019-20. This includes: the Certificate of Free Sale, the Dairy Standard certificate, and a pilot for live cattle to the USA which has been planned with two phases. CFIA is continuing to advance work to automate fish and plant health certificates through My CFIA in 2020-21. Through the use of technology, CFIA strives to free inspectors from administrative tasks and instead to focus their work on verifying compliance and ensuring that only safe food, and healthy plants and animals, make it to market.

Global Leader

In its efforts to serve as a global leader, CFIA continues to pursue improved international standards, fairness in trade practices, enhanced use of technology and regulatory cooperation. It also supports international efforts and consensus to better safeguard food, plant and animal health while promoting increased market access. In response to serious global concern about the risk of emerging viral agents, CFIA led the formation of the Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Disease Laboratories Network. This network has successfully delivered training workshops to meet the needs of high and maximum containment laboratory for network members (scientists and technical personnel from five partner countries: Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Australia). CFIA hosted the African Swine Fever (ASF) Forum in Ottawa on April 30 and May 1, 2019. CFIA worked with the United States Government, industry leaders, decision makers and international experts to discuss the threat of African swine fever (ASF) to the Americas, to learn from experiences from recent outbreaks in Europe and Asia, and to develop a roadmap for working with government and industry partners and international organizations to prevent and respond to the threat of ASF.

For more information on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's plans, priorities and results achieved, see the "Results: what we achieved" section of this report.

Results: what we achieved

Core responsibility: safe food and healthy plants and animals

Description

Protecting Canadians by safeguarding Canada's food system and the plant and animal resources on which we depend, and supporting the Canadian economy through the trade of Canadian goods.

Strategic outcome

CFIA is continuously evolving to meet the challenges of a complex and ever changing environment that is influenced by factors such as globalization, technological and climate change, and new and emerging diseases or pests.

In 2018 to 2019, CFIA's food, plant and animal programs planned and delivered on their associated day-to-day prevention and safety activities using innovative approaches. The programs advanced priorities that improve how we deliver our business in the following areas:

CFIA played a key role internationally by supporting:

Details on each of the above items are available below in the Departmental Result 1, 2 and 3 sections.

Results
Departmental results Departmental result indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018–19 actual results 2017–18 actual results 2016–17 actual results
N1 Percentage of food businesses that comply with federal rules 95% Not applicable 98.01% 93.86% 94.24%
N2 Percentage of Public Warnings for high risk food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 95% Not applicable 96.9% 93.9% 96.9%
N3 Number harmful foreign plant pests that have entered and established themselves in Canada 0 Not applicable 0 0 1
N4 Percentage of domestic seed, fertilizer, and new or modified plant varieties and products that comply with Canadian regulations and international agreements 95% Not applicable 92.20% 90.70% 93.20%
N5 Percentage of inspected loads of live animals that comply with federal humane transportation requirements 95% Not applicable 99% 98.90% 98.53%
N6 Number of cases of animal diseases that affect human and/or animal health that have entered into Canada 0 Not applicable 0 0 0
N7 Number of Shipments of Canadian goods that are rejected at foreign borders for not meeting import requirements TBD Not applicable 2198 Not applicable Not applicable

This indicator is a roll up of several plant programs, all programs met the target individually with the exception of fertilizer where product compliance was reported at 82%. This lowered the overall result.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 main estimates 2018–19 planned spending 2018–19 total authorities available for use 2018–19 actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19 difference
(actual spending minus planned spending)
571,740,385 571,740,385 668,574 666 645,785,932 74,045,547

The increase in authorities over planned spending reflects additional in-year funding received for Treasury Board approved initiatives via the implementation vote and the supplementary estimates, statutory payment reimbursement, and other in-year adjustments. These adjustments totaled $96.8 million, mainly consisting of: the renewal of sunsetting initiatives such as Canadian Food Safety Information Network; funds transferred from the previous fiscal year; and in-year funding received related to the settlement of collective agreements.

CFIA spent $22.8 million less than total authorities available for use. Unspent authorities were mainly related to: funds being transferred to the next fiscal year to support various Treasury Board approved initiatives, and funds reserved for the remaining anticipated collective bargaining settlement costs; and lapses required to fund specific Government-wide initiatives. Lapsing funds will be brought forward to 2019-20.

CFIA spent $74.0 million more than planned. The increase is mainly attributable to: the renewal of sunsetting initiatives, and the ratification of the majority of its collective agreements resulting in significant one-time retroactive salary settlement payments and ongoing cost increases.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 difference
(actual full-time equivalents minus planned full-time equivalents)
5,043 5,187 144

The increase of 144 full-time equivalents over planned mainly relates to in-year funding received for the renewal of sunsetting funding for various food safety initiatives.

Financial, human resources and performance information for CFIA's Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Departmental result 1: food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians

Canadians want to know that the food they eat is safe and that industry understands and follows the required rules to produce or import food that is safe and accurately labelled. Through the delivery of its programs, CFIA mitigates risks to public health associated with potential hazards in the food supply system and manages food safety emergencies and incidents by collaborating with federal and provincial food safety partners and industry. CFIA achieves its objectives through: risk management; implementing and enforcing regulations; new tools and processes; embracing innovation and technology; adopting science-based international standards; and cooperating with partners as appropriate.

To achieve its food safety goals, CFIA advanced key initiatives, including, further implementing analytical risk tools such as the Establishment-based Risk Assessment Model, and releasing a growing number of online services for industry through MyCFIA. CFIA tested new inspection procedures in two hog slaughter establishments in Alberta and rolled out the first wave of new digital devices for employees across the country, which help them do their work more efficiently and effectively. These efforts constitute a foundation on which CFIA will continue to build.

CFIA's achievements in support of safe food included:

Modern regulatory toolkit

Implementation of Safe Food for Canadians Regulations

Did you know

Prescriptive versus outcome-based requirements: Previously, prescriptive regulations might have specified that equipment used in food production must be raised at least one meter above the ground.

Under the SFCR, an outcome-based approach might say that such equipment is to be installed in a manner that does not pose a risk of contamination.

The Safe Food for Canadians Act and Regulations is a pillar for modernizing the Canadian food safety system. This Act consolidates 13 food commodity-based regulations plus the food-related provisions from the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Regulations into a single regulation under the Safe Food for Canadians Act. Doing so provides one suite of authorities with simplified language that aligns inspection and enforcement powers, making them consistent across all food commodities, enabling inspectors to be more efficient and fostering even higher rates of compliance for industry. This new approach will increase focus on prevention, allow faster removal of unsafe food from the marketplace, reduce burden on industry, enhance innovation and facilitate market access for Canada's agri-food and agricultural sector. By specifying the outcome that a business must meet, rather than describing the way it must be met, the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations empower businesses to modernize their technologies, processes and procedures.

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations are consistent with internationally recognized requirements for all food commodities that are imported, exported or traded inter-provincially. They support market access for Canadian exporters by keeping pace with food safety modernization efforts in other countries and by strengthening Canada's reputation for having a world-class food safety controls system.

Did you know

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) were published on June 13, 2018 in the Canada Gazette, Part II. Many requirements came into force on January 15, 2019 and others will be phased in through July 2021, depending on the food commodity, type of activity and business size.

In the period leading up to the publication of the regulations in Canada Gazette, Part II on June 13, 2018, CFIA implemented a multi-channel engagement and outreach strategy to raise awareness of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations among industry. The general public and media were informed of the Canada Gazette, Part II publication via a news release accompanied by backgrounders as well as a ministerial event in Ottawa, social media and proactive media outreach. Web and social media metrics indicated high engagement with the information, tools and resources available on CFIA's website. CFIA participated in 309 engagement activities, such as presentations, conferences, booths, and meetings, to help industry understand the new requirements and to raise awareness. Public opinion research, conducted in October-November 2018 and again in February-March 2019, showed increased awareness of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations over 2017-18 results, as well as strong awareness of the three key requirements under the new regulations (licensing, traceability and preventive controls).

An increased level of awareness of new food safety requirements among food business contributes to strengthening Canada's food safety system. CFIA has reviewed, updated, and published all existing guidance documents pertaining to the requirements of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations to promote compliance in all sectors. CFIA's food web page contains a wide range of resources, including a toolkit for businesses, the guidance finder searcher tool and a feedback button.

To prepare for the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations to come into force (between January 15, 2019 and July 2021), CFIA has ensured mechanisms are in place for fast track decision making to minimize disruption to trade, and has continued to engage with industry associations, regulated parties, other government departments, and international trading partners. Additionally, during the implementation phase, CFIA has put in place a graduated enforcement approach that emphasizes working with businesses to help them understand and comply with the new requirements.

Food Labelling Modernization

Food Labelling Modernization is another initiative aimed at strengthening Canada's food safety system. It seeks to improve legibility of food labels and provide more useful information on date marking, ingredients, company contact information and origin of imported foods. This initiative will also include tools for building consumer awareness and help consumers to make informed choices in the marketplace. The tools will also promote compliance by better specifying roles and responsibilities for truthful and not misleading food labelling, and clarifying industry accountabilities as well as CFIA oversight.

CFIA and Health Canada have been working closely to integrate their labelling modernization activities and to align and coordinate engagement activities, proposals, consultations, and coming-into-force dates for additional regulatory changes. To that end, CFIA continued to develop new labelling drafting instructions in 2018 to 2019, in collaboration with Health Canada. These new requirements emanate from amendments to the labelling section of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations and the Food and Drug Regulations. The proposed amendments are expected to be pre-published in the Canada Gazette, Part I in spring 2019. Canada Gazette, Part II is planned for 2020.

Modernized labelling will support innovation in the food industry and enable Canadians to make enhanced informed purchasing decisions and protect them better.

Integrated risk management

Establishment-based Risk Assessment model

To strengthen the Canadian food safety system, that CFIA has been modernizing its approach to inspection. The Establishment-based Risk Assessment (ERA) model assesses the food safety risks of food establishments under CFIA jurisdiction. It takes into consideration mitigation strategies implemented by the industry to control their food safety risks, establishment compliance information, and food safety risks associated with a specific food commodity, operation or manufacturing process.

In 2018 to 2019, the planning phase of the automation of the Establishment-based Risk Assessment Model was completed and CFIA obtained the following achievements:

The Establishment-based Risk Assessment model provides industry with feedback on their risks, helping them improve and strengthen their food safety practices, and consequently increasing confidence in Canada's food system. The results are used with other factors such as trade requirements to determine the approach and appropriate level of oversight required to manage the risk of an establishment.

The Establishment-based Risk Assessment model also helps ensure that CFIA resources are focused on areas of higher risk.

In this phase of the project, CFIA's Information Technology team finalized the design for the automated collection of additional establishment information. Beginning in March 2019, establishments can voluntarily provide information related to their operational activities as well as mitigation strategies online through MyCFIA. Compliance information is gathered from CFIA inspection and enforcement data. The results generated are the final level of risk of an establishment

Comparative Risk Model and risk-based planning

The Comparative Risk Model is an analytical tool that uses data from external and internal sources to compare risks across CFIA activities. CFIA has continued to advance its Comparative Risk Model for use in identifying and assessing risks across and within its three business lines (animal, plant and food). CFIA conducted a number of pilot studies which leveraged risk-informed analytics, data, and intelligence to support data-driven decision-making. The pilot results are being reviewed and refined by technical experts.

The model uses a combination of data from multiple sources and Agency experts to assess the impact of CFIA's controls on diverse risks and how they might be allocated differently to more closely align with its risk management goals and for more cost effective risk reduction. The model supports risk informed decision-making at different levels in CFIA. This ability to look and compare horizontally across CFIA activities allows it to plan to shift resources to the higher risk areas.

In the food program, the Comparative Risk Model results are an input to risk-based program design and planning using the Program Management Framework process. In 2018 to 2019, this process was used to identify changes to CFIA's activities to more effectively use our resources to manage the risk of pathogens in eggs. These changes were included in the business decisions in strategic and tactical planning for 2019 to 2020 and beyond.

Canadian food safety information network

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN) is a CFIA-led initiative designed to strengthen the ability of food safety authorities across Canada to better anticipate, detect and respond to food safety incidents and emergencies. Through a secure online platform, the network will link food safety authorities and food testing laboratories across the country, allowing for the sharing of data, expertise, analysis and scientific techniques.

CFIA has been incorporating more technology into the management of the food safety system through the CFSIN platform. CFIA's focus has been on onboarding, supporting, and developing the network with food safety partners. A Pan-Canadian approach to federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) food surveillance activities will also build synergies among FPT partners. Moving forward, CFIA looks to eventually engage with the food industry and academia to grow the network.

CFSIN is currently in its implementation phase and is on target to be fully implemented by March 2020. In 2018 to 2019, in collaboration with its federal, provincial and territorial partners, CFIA developed the CFSIN food and hazard classification systems, and is on schedule to deliver a tool to facilitate a collaborative and systematic approach to environmental scanning in June 2019.

CFSIN will enable CFIA to respond more quickly and effectively to food safety events and minimize their impact on Canadians while demonstrating the effectiveness of Canada's food safety system to trading partners.

Consistent and efficient inspections

Single inspection model

pig

The Standard Inspection Procedure (SIP) reflects a fundamental shift in CFIA's inspection approach with less emphasis on prescriptive-based requirements and more focus on safety outcomes. The result is a stronger food safety system which enables industry to innovate and respond to emerging risks and developments.

The revised version of the SIP was posted on CFIA's website in January 2019, and was applied to inspections of dairy, fish, processed products, honey, maple syrup and eggs.

The SIP implantation in the fresh fruit and vegetable establishments was delayed due to the progressive enforcement of some of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations that will apply to the fresh fruit and vegetable establishments only starting in January 2020.

The Modernization of the Slaughter Inspection Program in federal slaughter establishments is a standard inspection program for all species that adheres to the following principles:

Phase one of the Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program in Hog (MSIP-Hog) pilot project concluded in two pilot facilities in August 2018. Overall, the results of the performance metrics show that food safety and quality under the MSIP-Hog has been found to be equal or in some metrics enhanced over the existing inspection system. In order to gather additional scientific evidence and continue to validate the MSIP-Hog system, CFIA will launch a second phase by expanding pilot implementation in new facilities. The modernization of CFIA's inspection system contributes to the continuous improvements CFIA makes to ensure that the food Canadians eat is safe.

Digital First Tools and Services

hands typing on keyboard

MyCFIA

In-line with the Government of Canada's shift towards a digital-first approach to offering services to the public and Canadian business sectors, CFIA is providing access to a range of services and information through its online service platform, MyCFIA, and making better use of the data it gathers. MyCFIA allows businesses to register and request services such as licences and permissions to import and export food, animal and plant products.

MyCFIA is a digital platform that allows registered establishments holding a licence under the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations convenient and secure access to online services. CFIA continues to evolve and develop this platform to increase functionality within the plant and animal business lines.

Global Leader

Foreign Verification Office

The Foreign Verification Office conducts food safety verifications and offers technical assistance to foreign food facilities that export food products to Canada, thus identifying and seeking to prevent offshore food safety issues at the point of production before they reach Canadian consumers.

In 2018 to 2019, CFIA continued building on its offshore preventative activities program and delivered 17 food safety offshore missions/activities in collaboration with foreign competent authorities and industry stakeholders.

The offshore activities conducted in 2018 to 2019 were planned and informed by various products developed by CFIA's Risk Intelligence community, incorporating compliance history data, emergent risks, and trade volume. Offshore activities have allowed CFIA to:

In addition, CFIA has further developed the capacity of its offshore activities by:

Departmental result 2: plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests and are safe for Canadians and the environment

herd of bison

Canadians expect the health and welfare of its animals, plants and forests to be safeguarded. To effectively and efficiently prevent and contain diseases and pests that affect plant and animal resource bases, CFIA must keep pace with a changing climate, the rapid rate of technological advancements and scientific breakthroughs, while maintaining reliable and relevant services. CFIA is moving toward an outcome-based regulatory system to support the well-being of all plants and animals.

CFIA aims to make a difference for Canadians by:

These activities prevent or minimize risks to the food supply, human, animal or plant health, and to the environment. They also instill confidence in Canadian trading partners about the safety of its food system and the health of its plants and animals.

CFIA's achievements in 2018 to 2019 in support of healthy animals and plants are detailed below:

Modern regulatory toolkit

CFIA continued to work with key stakeholders to modernize its regulatory system for animal and plant resource bases to make it more agile, transparent and responsive. Modernizing the animal and plant health regulatory system is expected to contribute to minimizing animal and plant health risks for Canadians and instill more confidence in Canadian products, resulting in access to markets.

Hatchery

chickens

CFIA embarked on modernizing the Hatchery Regulations, Hatchery Exclusion Regulations and part of the Health of Animals Regulations to develop a more outcome-based regulatory framework to keep pace with advances in science and technology, and enable improved monitoring for pathogenic organisms of concern.

Once they come into force, the Hatchery Regulations are expected to contribute to the control of disease in poultry hatcheries and supply flocks in Canada, and keep pace with scientific knowledge and industry best practices. The amended regulations would incorporate by reference standards for the production, management and testing of eggs and chicks sourced by hatcheries from supply flocks and in the hatcheries themselves. Additionally, combing two or three different sets of regulations into one will make it easier for industry to comply, and will help manage Salmonella Enteritidis better in hatcheries thereby minimizing human health issues. While some stakeholders feel that industry and provincial program requirements for Salmonella Enteritidis testing are adequate, CFIA, in an effort to further mitigate the risk of poultry disease and improve the safety of Canadians, has introduced Testing Standards for zoonotic and emerging pathogens to ensure that testing is consistent among provinces and operators.

Traceability

cow

Animal traceability is the ability to follow an animal or group of animals through all stages of its life, with the objective of mitigating the impact from a disease outbreak or food safety issue.

CFIA continued work on amendments to the Health of Animals Regulations to include strengthening requirements related to the identification, movement, slaughter and disposal of domestic cattle, bison, sheep, pigs, goats, and cervids. CFIA conducted consultations with the provinces and industry on developing communication and compliance tools, and with the Department of Justice on the draft regulations.

The proposed amendments would strengthen existing livestock identification traceability requirements in Canada and improve effectiveness and timeliness of disease control investigations, with the incidental effect of improving CFIA's ability to maintain market access and the confidence of Canadian consumers. They are expected to be ready to be published in the Canada Gazette, Part I in winter 2020. A Regulatory Implementation Committee (an industry-government working group) has been established to support industry compliance with the proposed regulatory requirements.

Humane transport

Humane transportation of animals is important to Canadians. On February 20, 2019, amendments to Part XII of the Health of Animals Regulations that governs the transportation of animals were published in Canada Gazette, Part II. This important achievement is the culmination of a rigorous process that involved over 10 years of consultation with Canadians and industry, and a thorough review of the latest scientific research.

The regulatory amendments have better aligned Canada's animal transportation requirements with international partners (for example the United States, Australia and the European Union), as well as the World Organisation for Animal Health's animal welfare standards for animals transported by land, air and sea.

The updated regulations will lead to better outcomes for animals and better reflect current science, societal expectations, industry practices, and international standards.

Feeds regulations

field of crops

Safe feeds contribute to the production of healthy livestock and safe foods of animal origin.

The Feeds Act and Regulations require that all regulated feeds and supplement products must be safe for humans, plants, animals, and the environment. CFIA continued work on proposed amendments to the Feeds Regulations that aim to minimize the risks associated with livestock feeds manufactured in or imported into Canada. CFIA held several consultations (including online) on technical standards and prepared a comprehensive draft of regulatory amendment text with the Department of Justice.

The proposed regulations would introduce a more transparent feed ingredient assessment and authorization process to support a safe and competitive feed supply chain. They would also allow for the consideration and adoption of ingredient authorization processes and decisions of other jurisdictions to reduce burden and promote market access.

Fertilizers regulations

Fertilizers and supplements are intended to improve the physical condition of soils or aid plant growth or crop yields. The Fertilizers Act and Regulations require that all regulated fertilizer and supplement products must be safe for humans, plants, animals, and the environment. They must also be properly labelled to ensure safe and appropriate use.

Amended regulations were pre-published in Canada Gazette, Part I on December 8, 2018, and were followed by a 75-day comment period. CFIA has analyzed comments received and plans to adjust the regulatory text to address key concerns identified by industry. The current target date for Canada Gazette, Part II is winter 2020.

Improvements in the proposed regulations would include: minimization of contamination risks; a flexible list of materials that can be updated periodically; risk based regulations; an extended registration period; and flexible labelling requirements which would lessen the burden on regulated parties while delivering safe products to Canadians. These amendments are expected to facilitate market access for safe and innovative fertilizers and supplements.

Integrated risk management

Plant and animal health strategy – implementation

Agriculture is an important driver in today's economy and has been identified as one of Canada's key growth sectors. In fact, federal, provincial and territorial ministers of agriculture worked with industry and academia, to develop the Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada, using innovative and prevention-based approaches to safeguarding plant and animal health. This strategy aims to safeguard the food supply, the health of Canada's people and environment, and economic growth and prosperity by protecting the health of plants and animals.

In 2018, a multi-partner task team collaborated to develop the terms of reference for the plant health implementation body outlined in the Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada. This collaboration, endorsed by federal, provincial, and territorial Ministers of Agriculture in 2018 resulted in the creation of the Canadian Plant Health Council, launched on October 5, 2018. The Council is near finalizing its two-year implementation work plan of coordinated, prevention-based activities to protect forests, agriculture and other plants from pests and emerging risks. The National Farmed Animal Health and Welfare Council agreed to lead the implementation of the Animal Health Strategy. This included leading the Animal Health Canada initiative which is examining a governance structure including scope, membership, terms of reference, and roles of the coordinating bodies.

Protecting the health of plants and animals helps safeguard the food supply, the health of Canadians and the environment and contributes to economic growth and prosperity. The Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada provides a mechanism for CFIA to work with partners in achieving this goal. By taking a collaborative approach, the partners will continue to protect plant and animal resources from current risks and will be even more successful at protecting the resources from new and emerging risks, which will unleash the potential for growth in Canada's agriculture sector.

Federal Geospatial Platform

Did you know

Forests are a major source of wealth for Canadians, providing a wide range of economic, social, and environmental benefits.

In 2017, the forest industry contributed $24.6 billion to Canada's gross domestic product and directly employed 209,940 people.

The Federal Geospatial Platform is an online platform for federal geospatial data – location-based information that is collected and used by federal organizations to collectively enhance the responsiveness, efficiency, and sustainability of the federal geomatics (a branch of science that deals with the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data relating to the earth's surface) and earth observations infrastructure.

In 2018 to 2019, CFIA contributed to the operational development of the platform, and became a member of the platform's board of directors. The Agency reviewed datasets for publication, and published new/updated datasets related to plant pest regulated areas (such as emerald ash borer) on the platform.

The platform allows for the integration of economic, social, and environmental geospatial data from multiple departments and agencies to better support location-based decision making on a range of complex issues. The platform plays an important role in supporting Open Government by ensuring geospatial data and applications are made available coherently to Open Maps on the Open Government Portal.

Surveillance of plant pests

One of CFIA's top goals is to prevent the entry into or spread of regulated plant pests in Canada, and manage the risk associated with an introduction should it occur. These pests, if left uncontrolled, could cause significant damage to Canada's forestry, plants and environment.

In 2018 to 2019, emerald ash borer, a highly destructive invasive beetle, was found in Atlantic Canada for the first time – in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. CFIA worked with provincial partners and other stakeholders to regulate this pest at the county level by restricting the movement of all ash material (such as logs, branches, and woodchips), and all species of firewood from the county of Halifax. In 2018, CFIA also managed the regulated area for hemlock woolly adelgid, an aphid-like insect that attacks and kills hemlock trees, in Nova Scotia.

By using numerous methods, including pest surveys and consulting with stakeholders, CFIA continues to stay on top of plant pest detections in Canada. With early confirmation of the pests' presence, CFIA was able to create regulated areas in a timely manner which greatly helps to minimize their spread. By being made aware of the pests' indicators and what the regulated areas are, Canadians are able to do their part in protecting plant health in Canada by knowing what to look for and by following the restrictions of said areas. Restrictions and what to do differ depending on the pest, which is why CFIA's thorough updates and information on each specific pest is so crucial to Canada's plant health.

Emerging animal diseases

To better address prevention and preparedness for emerging diseases, CFIA's Foreign Animal Disease Emergency Support plan with British Columbia was updated in 2018 to 2019. The plan acknowledges the importance of working with industry stakeholders and their potential roles/responsibilities in the case of a disease outbreak. This will increase the awareness and implementation of biosecurity measures within smaller poultry and livestock productions.

Did you know

African swine fever (ASF) is a highly contagious viral disease of domestic and wild pigs. There is no treatment or vaccine. An outbreak in Canada would have a significant economic impact on the country and the Canadian pork industry. To date, there have been no occurrences in Canada. CFIA is working hard with federal industry and international partners to keep ASF out of the country.

Preventing the introduction of swine diseases of concern, including African swine fever (ASF) into Canada has been a major concern of the swine industry and federal, provincial and territorial partners during this fiscal year. To that end, the following initiatives were put in place in 2018 to 2019:

Protecting Canada's plant and animal resources is a shared responsibility and depends on the ability of governments, industry, academia, and others to anticipate and prepare for future challenges and opportunities facing Canada. With increasingly complex and continuously changing risks, a strategic approach is needed so that Canada can continue to safeguard plant and animal health. When all parties work together, they can become more adept at disease prevention.

Surveillance of animal diseases

two fish

CFIA collaborated with provinces and industry to expand sector-based networks for data sharing on animal health surveillance and intelligence. The accomplishments in enhancing partnerships in both the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System and Community for Emerging Zoonotic Disease initiatives support the implementation of the Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada and recognize the importance of federal, provincial, industry and academia collaboration.

The Community for Emerging Zoonotic Diseases revised and released their Sustainability Plan, completed and released new early warning intelligence reports (supporting federal, provincial, and territorial, and industry disease prevention activities such as against African swine fever), and aquatic diseases were included within their workplan. Poultry abattoir condemnation data is now posted to the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System website, and development of a database for equine notifiable disease was started. Furthermore, stakeholder maps were prepared for equine, dairy, antimicrobial use / antimicrobial resistance and poultry networks.

The improved ability to share data and information will lead to more effective, responsive, and integrated animal health surveillance, allowing for a more rapid response to potential animal disease outbreaks.

Chronic wasting disease program change

Chronic wasting disease is a progressive, fatal disease of the nervous system known to naturally infect cervids (including white-tailed deer, mule deer, moose, red deer, elk and reindeer).

This year, CFIA finalized the first phase of an updated national Chronic Wasting Disease Program. This program will encourage industry to adopt strong risk management practices by enrolling in a Voluntary Herd Certification Program. CFIA updated the functional direction and any implicated operational guidance, and held information sessions for CFIA inspectors on final program changes. Furthermore, CFIA worked with provinces, territories, and industry to raise awareness of the extensive measures required to prevent the disease.

The changes made to this program promote preventive measures on cervid farms by providing compensation only for affected herds that have enrolled in the Chronic Wasting Disease Voluntary Herd Certification Program. This will help promote biosecurity actions that help minimize the incidence of animal disease on farms.

Antimicrobial resistance and usage initiative

petri dish

Antimicrobial resistance is a complex and evolving public health issue, involving many stakeholders in Canada and internationally. The responsible use of antimicrobials is essential to protecting the health and safety of people, food, animals and plants, here in Canada and around the world.

As part of the development of the Pan-Canadian Action Plan for Responsible Antimicrobial Use, the Government of Canada undertook comprehensive engagement and consultations with major stakeholders. CFIA and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada engaged with agriculture and the animal health sector to gather information on current and future initiatives, plans or ideas to reduce antimicrobial resistance and encourage the judicious use of antibiotics for each sector. During engagement meetings, CFIA identified specific areas stakeholders consider critical to their sector and the associated challenges. The results of these consultations were shared with all partners working on developing the action plan through a summary report and various presentations.

CFIA has been a key collaborator with the Public Health Agency of Canada in supporting the abattoir component of the Canadian Integrated Program on Antimicrobial Surveillance – a surveillance system that monitors trends in antimicrobial use and antimicrobial resistance. To implement regulatory and policy changes related to the use of antimicrobials in animal production, CFIA, in collaboration with Health Canada, has made several changes to the feed program. These changes include the updating of the Compendium of Medicating Ingredients to that include all prescription drugs approved for use in livestock feed and, for those medicating ingredients that are medically important antimicrobials, remove any growth promotion claims and require a prudent use statement to be included on labels. CFIA also collaborated with Health Canada to design a shared compliance and enforcement approach to help address Health Canada's requirement for commercial feed mills to now sell some medicated feeds with a prescription. CFIA feed inspectors continue to verify compliance with these changes and document observations for Health Canada. CFIA, in collaboration with other federal partners, participated in several international fora on combating the spread of antimicrobial resistance and contributed to the development of key documents (e.g. those from Codex Alimentarius, OIE) or high level resolutions (G7, G20, FAO, etc.) that guide international efforts to control antimicrobial resistance. CFIA will remain engaged as international collaborations continue to ensure harmonized actions globally in efforts to reduce the spread of antimicrobial resistance and increase the judicious use of antimicrobials.

Digital First Tools and Services

MyCFIA

hands typing on keyboard

CFIA is committed to equipping industry with a full range of electronic services and information to support compliance with regulations, and employees with the necessary tools to carry out their work effectively and efficiently.

MyCFIA is a convenient and secure online portal to do business with CFIA. CFIA has continued to add services online to support businesses and international trade. Businesses can request licences, permits, export certificates, registrations and authorizations and manage and track service requests online.

In 2018 to 2019, MyCFIA launched the inspection component of the digital platform, and adopted business numbers as a standard identifier of businesses for online transactions. Plant and animal businesses can now set up accounts on MyCFIA. Further, CFIA began development of an electronic submission process for the pre-market assessment of agricultural input commodities. This will reduce regulatory burden, and allow for automated case tracking. Through this technology, CFIA continues to free inspectors from administrative tasks and find ways to become more efficient and effective.

Single-tier labelling rule for veterinary biologics

For better alignment of rules with US counterparts, and to aid Canadian industry as a means of further facilitating trade, CFIA adopted the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Single-Tier Labelling rule for veterinary vaccines. The Single-Tier Labelling rule is a simplified single label statement that refers users to product safety and efficacy data summaries that are posted on the USDA and CFIA websites.

Under US regulations, American manufacturers must comply with the single-tier product label requirements within the four-year prescribed time frame (by October 2020). As well, newly licensed American products will be required to have single-tier labels in the USA. To avoid disruption in availability of approximately 500 veterinary vaccines, Canada must accommodate the new rule for vaccines imported from the United States, and ensure that all essential information, including safety and efficacy data, is available to Canadians in both official languages.

Global Leader

Sidney laboratory

The Sidney Laboratory, Canada's Centre for Plant Health in British Columbia plays an important role in supporting Canada's $114B agriculture and agri-food system through research and testing services that include small fruit trees (such as berries), fruit trees and grapevines as the demand by growers and industry is continually increasing. Scientists at the Centre continued to work collaboratively with Genome BC, Summerland Varieties Corporation, PhytoDiagnostics, the British Columbia Cherry Association, and Vineland Research and Innovations Centre on cutting edge research to develop genomics applications which can allow faster and cheaper detections of viruses in imported and exported horticultural crops. The results of these pilot studies are promising and the technology is now being taken through validation. Ultimately the outcomes of this work will help improve the timelines of the importation of new grape, small fruit and tree fruit varieties into Canada.

New collaborative research partnerships such as these are also being realized in conjunction with the development of a new Centre for Plant Health announced in Budget 2017,which will continue to allow Canada to lead in this area. In 2018 to 2019, CFIA formalized further partnerships through Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) with academic partners including Brock University, the University of British Columbia, and the University of Victoria, as well as Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada for scientific cooperation as part of ongoing work to create the new Centre for Plant Health. The established partnerships extend regionally and nationally to the broader Canadian plant health community. It brings a new opportunity for federal plant health science to help accelerate and improve access to domestic and world markets for clean, safe plant products through supporting innovation in diagnostic testing and technology transfer. This will support Canada's agriculture and agri-food sector while facilitating trade and economic growth that benefits all Canadians.

Biosafety level 4 zoonotic - laboratory network

syringe and test tubes

The Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Laboratory Network (BSL4ZNet) is an international network of government-mandated organizations with federal level responsibility for protecting animal and human health. Network partners work together to enhance knowledge, competency, and capacity to meet current and future high containment needs.

At least 65 individuals from 15 partner organizations are actively involved with the Network. The BSL4ZNet successfully delivered training workshops to meet high and maximum containment laboratory needs for Network members. In 2018, as the secretariat of the network, CFIA hosted an online scientific symposium on fluorescent tracking of the foot and mouth disease virus and hemorrhagic fever viruses, with over 40 participants from nine organizations across five countries. In addition, in February 2019, CFIA led the International BSL4ZNet Live Animal Handling Workshop at the Australian Animal Health Laboratory in Geelong, Australia, which brought together representatives to share best practices and exchange knowledge for handling live animals in Level 4 laboratories.

The BSL4ZNet network contributes to the safety and security of Canadians by building capacity in laboratory personnel through collaborative training to handle live animals safely in order to prevent transmission of deadly viral pathogens from the laboratory setting to the outside environment.

Departmental result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally

CFIA supports government trade priorities and makes a difference for Canadians and Canadian businesses by helping to open or maintain access to markets, enabling international trade, and supporting the economy.

International standard setting

CFIA actively participates in developing international trade rules and international standards for food safety, fair practices in the food trade, and animal and plant health. CFIA also participates in the negotiation of free-trade agreements in a manner that strategically advances Canada's sanitary and phytosanitary interests. This contributes to meeting Canada's requirements for food safety, and animal and plant health, while striving to minimize the use of unjustified barriers to trade by trading partners.

In 2018 to 2019, achievements included the following:

CFIA represented Canada at the Codex Committee on Food Import and Export Inspection and Certification Systems, where standards are being developed on the equivalence of national food systems, electronic certification and voluntary third-party assurance schemes. CFIA also represented Canada at the Codex Committee on Fats and Oils, co-leading work on the olive oil standard and providing technical expertise on oils such as flaxseed oil.

In order to promote the development of science-based international standards, consistent with Canada's regulatory framework and Government of Canada objectives, CFIA led Canada's participation at the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) and at the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE).

CFIA was again active in 2018 to 2019 at all IPPC levels, including representing North America on IPPC's Bureau to the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures. Among specific activities, Canada chaired the second meeting of the Sea Container Task Force to engage world experts in sea container usage and movement, including industry and international organizations, to develop actions to reduce pest risks in the international movement of sea containers and avoid impediments to trade. CFIA participated, as the North American representative and Vice-Chair, in the Implementation and Capacity Development Committee which aims to increase the capacity while facilitating safe trade between countries. CFIA also represented the North American region on the IPPC Standards Committee which plays a key role in overseeing the standard setting activities.

In support of the Government of Canada's trade diversification agenda, and to promote Canadian agricultural interests in trade negotiations, CFIA actively contributes to the Government's free trade agenda. CFIA co-lead the negotiation of the Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measure Chapter in the Free Trade Agreement negotiations with Mercosur (Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay) and the Pacific Alliance (Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru), as well as the modernization of the North American Free Trade Agreement (Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement: CUSMA). CFIA provided advice and input into exploratory discussions to potentially launch the negotiation of a free trade agreement with the countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). CFIA provided expert trade policy advice for the negotiations of the Chapters on Technical Barriers to Trade and Good Regulatory Practices for the free trade agreement negotiations with Mercosur, Pacific Alliance and CUSMA on obligations relating to CFIA's mandate.

Market access support

CFIA supports Canadian exporters by facilitating access to international markets. To do this, CFIA engages in several activities, including negotiating export conditions with international trading partners for animal, plant and food products, and verifying that foreign country import requirements are being met prior to export. For example, CFIA negotiated in 2018 to 2019 new export conditions for exporting breeding swine and porcine semen to Argentina, live cattle to Zimbabwe, and British Columbian fresh cherries to Japan.

In 2018 to 2019, CFIA hosted a number of incoming audits providing foreign government counterparts an opportunity to verify Canada's food safety and animal and plant health systems:

In 2018 to 2019, CFIA resolved 57 market access issues, including maintaining access and a shared commitment to continue engagement for Canadian wheat to Peru.

Under the Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures Second Joint Management Committee of the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement, CFIA agreed with the European Union upon a work program established to advance a variety of issues related to animal health, plant health and food safety. This allows for the resolution of trade irritants related to sanitary and phytosanitary issues.

When the genetically modified (GM) wheat – not approved for use in any country – was found in February 2018, it had the potential to: endanger $6.5 billion in annual Canadian wheat exports; affect the livelihoods of thousands of Canadians jobs and communities that rely on wheat production; reduce confidence in Canada's food and feed safety regimes; and affect NAFTA modernization negotiations that were taking place. In response to this finding, CFIA, AAFC and Global Affairs Canada (GAC) worked collaboratively to discern and communicate complete, accurate and credible science-based information about this discovery. Being transparent about this discovery not only minimized trade disruptions, but protected Canada's reputation as having a world-class food safety system. Canadian trade in wheat continued due to strong preparation, proper positioning and comprehensive, science-based information. Only two markets temporarily suspended Canadian wheat exports: Japan suspended exports for five weeks.

In 2018 to 2019, market access was gained for bovine semen to the Philippines and maintained for live pigs to Taiwan.

Under the chilled pilot project between China and Canada, 17 Canadian federally registered meat establishments became eligible in April 2018 to export chilled pork and chilled beef derived from cattle under thirty months of age to China. Market access to China was also maintained for cherries and blueberries.

In 2018 to 2019 CFIA continued to work closely with industry to implement streamlined and modernized phytosanitary export testing of grain. This testing is required to confirm that export shipments comply with foreign import requirements.

Included in the list of accomplishments were:

International regulatory cooperation and collaboration

CFIA supports a strong and predictable trade environment by mitigating risks to Canada and providing strategic direction for CFIA's international relations and engagement activities with foreign regulators.

In 2018 to 2019, advances were made and work continues between CFIA and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) on a harmonized approach to allow the exchange of electronic certificates for exports. Under the Canada-U.S. Food Safety Systems Recognition Arrangement, CFIA and the Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) agree that the Safe Food for Canadians Licence Registry will be used to demonstrate that a Canadian company is in good regulatory standing. This reduces the regulatory burden for U.S. companies importing Canadian goods under the U.S. Foreign Supplier Verification Program to facilitate trade while maintaining food safety controls. CFIA has reviewed the stakeholder submissions through the Canada Gazette and U.S. Federal Register process to identify future areas for cooperation with the United States.

CFIA continues to engage with international partners and organizations and public-private partnerships, exchanging technical expertise and increasing foreign capacity to contribute to a safe supply of food, animals and plants imported into Canada. To that end, in 2018 to 2019 CFIA:

Internal services

Description

Internal services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of Programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are:

Results

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 main estimates 2018–19 planned spending 2018–19 total authorities available for use 2018–19 actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19 difference
(actual spending minus Planned spending)
127,384,141 127,384,141 163,337,198 146,521,359 19,137,218

The increase in authorities over planned spending reflects additional in-year funding received for Treasury Board approved initiatives via the implementation vote and the supplementary estimates and other in-year adjustments. These adjustments totaled $35.9 million, mainly related to: the renewal of sunsetting funding for various food safety initiatives including Canadian Food Safety Information Network; funds transferred from previous fiscal year; and in-year funding received to support the anticipated operating pressures related to the settlement of collective agreements.

The Agency spent $16.8 million less than total authorities available for use. Unspent authorities were mainly related to: funds being transferred to the next fiscal year to support various Treasury Board approved initiatives, and funds reserved for the remaining anticipated collective bargaining settlement costs; and lapses required to fund specific Government-wide initiatives. Lapsing funds will be brought forward to 2019 to 2020.

The Agency spent $19.1 million more than planned. The increase is mainly attributable to: the renewal of sunsetting initiatives, and the Agency ratified the majority of its collective agreements resulting in significant one-time retroactive salary settlement payments and ongoing cost increases, and incremental Agency investments to support the implementation of Government of Canada and Agency initiatives such as Phoenix and Agency Workplace Optimization.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 difference
(actual full-time equivalents minus planned full-time equivalents)
901 974 73

The increase over planned of 73 full-time equivalents is largely related to: the renewal of sunsetting funding for various food safety initiatives; and additional internal services resources to support the implementation of Government of Canada and Agency initiatives and projects.

Financial, human resources and performance information for CFIA's Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

CFIA's achievements in 2018 to 2019

Human resources

The Clerk of the Privy Council outlined three challenges facing the public service in his 24th annual report to the Prime Minister: mental health and well-being; improving the capability of the public service, and attracting, retaining and developing top talent. CFIA pursued the following initiatives in 2018 to 2019 to help address these challenges:

The adoption of the PSPM App has provided enhanced capability in reporting on the overall performance program at the Agency.

CFIA continued to put emphasis on student recruitment. Since January 1st, 2018 CFIA has attended approximately 35 recruitment fairs across the country and employed 175 students in 2018 to 2019. CFIA also focused on creating a welcoming atmosphere for students by sharing information related to Mental Health and Wellness and Diversity programs (including the Indigenous Summer Student Program). CFIA has continued to partner the University of Guelph and have a partnership with McMaster University. This past year the recruitment team developed a Quick response code (QR code) where interested parties can access an external website with a mobile device.

Service delivery

As part of CFIA's Service Management Strategy, it continued to mature its service management strategy and refine its approach to service delivery. The multi-year plan to develop and implement the Digital Service Delivery Platform (DSDP) drove many of the changes this fiscal year. The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations came into force in January 2019 and provided the opportunity to leverage the newly built MyCFIA portal to provide online licensing.

Furthering CFIA's digital service offerings, Certificates of Free Sale supporting the export of certain food products became available online via the MyCFIA portal.

Internally, CFIA built on its efforts to improve the management of its services through the launch of the Human Resources Request Portal. This portal provided managers and staff with a better user experience when seeking to submit any HR-related service request. The Agency is working to bring more internal and external services into a digital, self-serve format.

An enquiries management strategy was deployed to respond to the increasing number of enquiries, and feedback relating to the implementation of The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. This strategy ensured timely, meaningful responses were made available to its clients and employees.

Looking to the future, CFIA established clear accountabilities for service design and delivery. The newly created Innovation, Business and Service Delivery Branch (IBSDB) has matured to support innovation and to drive innovation and business improvements at the Agency, including service delivery. Working with both internal and external clients, the branch is responsible for developing and improving processes and tools used by staff and its clients. From a Government of Canada perspective, the Agency is partnering with multiple departments to ensure that CFIA is aligned with a one government approach to client service. Specifically, this has included onboarding to the Single Window Initiative – Integrated Import Declaration system wherein only one import declaration need be made for multiple government organizations which have been listed in the Open Government Portal.

Enhancing project management

CFIA's project management competency development program pilot continues to increase the project management competencies.

CFIA created several program portfolio scenarios to facilitate consultations with senior management prior to adjusting and implementing new tools to outline the principles, risks, benefits, and challenges in establishing a program/portfolio approach. Adjustments to the current project management framework are planned over the next two fiscal years.

CFIA governance members and project sponsors were provided executive project management training, in order to:

An automated dashboard reporting solution for monthly project reporting process was fully implemented in order to introduce efficiencies in routing, reviewing and approving project health dashboards and summaries. This has created the ability to leverage project data on an aggregate level and centralize data.

Enhancing open and transparent government

The Government of Canada has strongly committed to ensuring that government science is fully available to the public and that this science informs policies and decision-making. Increasing the accessibility of government science:

From the time its transparency agenda was first initiated in 2011, openness and transparency have been key considerations underpinning CFIA's values. In 2018 to 2019, as part of maintaining trust in Canada's regulatory system for food, plants, and animals, CFIA built on its past experience and developed the next phase of its transparency agenda.

CFIA completed consultations with Canadians and stakeholders on how and where it should increase openness and transparency, and received their feedback on two key documents that would guide the Agency's future approach: the Open and Transparent Framework and Policy.

Comments received from stakeholders and CFIA employees were analyzed and used to improve these documents. Feedback provided to the Agency was summarized in a What We Learned report posted to CFIA's website in February 2019, followed by the final framework and policy in early April.

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

The tables presented in this section reflect CFIA's historical spending levels from 2016-17 to 2018 to 2019 and planned spending for the next three fiscal years (2019 to 2020 to 2021 to 2022). Planned spending excludes funding extensions that the Agency plans to pursue. Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding.

The Agency will assess initiatives that are sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in the Agency's budgetary authorities. Agency-level information can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph below.

Departmental spending trend graph

Departmental spending trend graph. Description follows.
Description for image - Departmental spending trend graph
Departmental spending trend graph
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22
Statutory 162 101 160 140 139 138
Voted 624 639 632 536 530 524
Total 786 739 792 676 669 662
Budgetary performance summary for core responsibilities and internal services
(dollars)
Core responsibilities and internal services 2018–19
main estimates
2018–19
planned spending
2019–20
planned spending
2020–21
planned spending
2018–19
total authorities available for use
2018–19 actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 actual spending (authorities used) 2016–17 actual spending (authorities used)
Safe food and healthy plants and animals 571,740,385 571,740,385 537,142,804 531,134,043 668,574,666 645,785,932 600,782,338 652,479,905
Subtotal 571,740,385 571,740,385 537,142,804 531,134,043 668,574,666 645,785,932 600,782,338 652,479,905
Internal Services 127,384,141 127,384,141 138,638,594 138,236,751 163,337,198 146,521,359 138,235,246 133,431,955
Total 699,124,526 699,124,526 675,781,398 669,370,794 831,911,864 792,307,291 739,017,584 785,911,860

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for core responsibilities and internal services (full-time equivalents)
Core responsibilities and internal services 2016–17 actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 actual full-time equivalents 2018–19
planned full-time equivalents
2018–19 actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 planned full-time equivalents 2020–21 planned full-time equivalents
Safe food and healthy plants and animals 5,185 5,291 5,043 5,187 4,702 4,702
Subtotal 5,185 5,291 5,043 5,187 4,702 4,702
Internal Services 916 980 901 974 940 940
Total 6,101 6,271 5,944 6,161 5,642 5,642

CFIA saw increased spending in 2018 to 2019, primarily relating to salary cost increase as the Agency ratified the majority of its collective agreements. This resulted in significant one-time retroactive salary settlement payments and ongoing cost increases. Given that 80% of CFIA's annual operating expenditures support personnel costs, limited flexibility existed to realign non-personnel authorities. As a result, the Agency saw a slight decline in its full-time equivalents (FTE) complement in 2018-19.

In 2019 to 2020, 2020 to 2021and 2021 to 2022, planned spending and FTEs decrease compared to prior years mainly due to the sunsetting of funding for various initiatives such as BSE and Daily Shift Inspection Presence and projects, and the exclusion of anticipated in-year allocations from planned spending (such as annual reimbursements of personnel related payments made on behalf of the Government of Canada).

However, the Agency will assess initiatives that are sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. When including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, Agency spending and FTEs utilization is forecasted to be more stable.

Expenditures by vote

For information on CFIA's organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2018–2019.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of CFIA's spending with the Government of Canada's spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

CFIA's financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statements highlights

The financial statements highlights presented within the Departmental Result Report are intended to serve as a general overview of CFIA's financial position and operations.

Financial statements are prepared in accordance with accrual accounting principles, Treasury Board accounting policies, and year-end instructions issued by the Office of the Comptroller General which are based on Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector, as required under Section 31 of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act. However, the financial information previously presented in the earlier portion of this Department Results Report was drawn from the Public Accounts of Canada which were prepared using an expenditure basis of accounting, also known as modified cash accounting.

Condensed statement of operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2018–19
planned results
2018–19
actual results
2017–18
actual results
Difference (2018–19 actual results minus
2018–19 planned results)
Difference (2018–19 actual results minus
2017–18 actual results)
Total expenses 813,335,000 835,244,000 822,103,000 21,909,000 13,141,000
Total revenues 52,201,000 56,671,000 56,449,000 4,470,000 222,000
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 761,134,000 778,573,000 765,654,000 17,439,000 12,919,000
Note

For more information about the planned results, please visit the 2018-19 Future-Oriented Statement of Operations.

CFIA's expenses for the fiscal year 2018 to 2019 were $835.2 million, an increase in expenses of $13 million compared to 2017-18. This increase was comprised mainly of salaries and employee benefits of $11.5 million, amortization of $6.5 million due to the commencement of depreciation for the Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP). These increases were mainly offset by a decrease in rentals of $2.8 million due to reduction in software licencing costs, and transfer payments of $2.5 million due to less compensation payments for animal diseases. The total revenues amounted to $56.7 million for 2018 to 2019, similar to last year's $56.4 million.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2018–19 2017–18 Difference
(2018–19 minus 2017–18)
Total net liabilities 178,747,000 198,169,000 (19,422,000)
Total net financial assets 109,013,000 100,353,000 8,660,000
Agency net debt 69,734,000 97,816,000 (28,082,000)
Total non-financial assets 200,030,000 200,579,000 (549,000)
Agency net financial position 130,296,000 102,763,000 27,533,000

The total liabilities at the end of 2018 to 2019 were $178.7 million, a decrease of $19.4 million over the previous year. The decrease is mostly the result of the reduction of accounts payable and accrued liabilities of $14.8 million mainly due to the reduction of the expired collective bargaining liability. There was also a decrease in the allowance for employee severance benefits of $4 million due to a decrease of the remaining obligation for employees who did not withdraw benefits calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits for the Government as a whole. The total financial assets for the fiscal year 2018-19 were $109 million; an increase of $8.7 million can be mainly attributed to the increase in the account receivable for GST/HST of $6.1 million and an increase in account receivable for recoverable salary overpayment of $3.1 million due to the timing of recovery.

The total non-financial assets amounted to $200 million for 2018 to 2019, similar to last year's $200.5 million.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Ginette C. Petitpas Taylor, PC, MP

Institutional head: Siddika Mithani

Ministerial portfolio: Health

Enabling instruments

CFIA wide
Food safety
Plant and animal health
Plant
Animal health

Year of incorporation/commencement: 1997

Reporting framework

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018 to 2019 are shown below:

Reporting framework table. Description follows.
Description for image: Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory

At the top of image, there is a table with four columns in a row.

The first column spans from the top to the bottom of the table with text rotated ninety degrees counter clockwise. The first column says:

  • Departmental Results Framework

The second column has multiple rows of boxes

The first box in the second column says:

  • Core Responsibility: Safe Food and healthy plants and animal

The second box in the second column says:

  • Departmental Result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians

The third box in the second column says:

  • Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment

The fourth box in the second column says:

  • Departmental Result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally

The third column has multiple rows that are aligned to the second box, third box, and the fourth box in the third column.

The first box in the third column is blank.

The second box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians" and it says:

  • Percentage of food businesses that comply with federal rules

The third box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians" and it says:

  • Percentage of Public Warnings for high risk food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision

The fourth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Number of harmful foreign pests that have entered and established themselves in Canada

The fifth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Percentage of domestic seed, fertilizer, and new or modified plant varieties and products that comply with Canadian regulations and international agreements

The sixth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Percentage of inspected loads of live animals that comply with federal humane transportation requirements

The seventh box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Number of cases of animal diseases that affect human and/or animal health that have entered into Canada

The eighth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally" and it says:

  • Number of shipments of Canadian goods that are rejected at foreign borders because they do not meet their import requirements

There is a blank row separating the first and second table.

The second table has two columns in a row.

The first column spans from the top to the bottom of the table with text rotated ninety degrees counter clockwise. The first column says:

  • Program Inventory

The second column has several rows.

The first row in the second column says:

  • Setting Rules for Food Safety and Consumer

The second row in the second column says:

  • Food Safety and Consumer Protection Compliance Promotion

The third row in the second column says:

  • Monitoring and Enforcement for Food Safety and Consumer Protection

The fourth row in the second column says:

  • Permissions for Food Products

The fifth row in the second column says:

  • Setting Rules for Plant Health

The sixth row in the second column says:

  • Plant Health Compliance Promotion

The seventh row in the second column says:

  • Monitoring and Enforcement for Plant Health

The eighth row in the second column says:

  • Permissions for Plant Products

The ninth row in the second column says:

  • Setting Rules for Animal Health

The tenth row in the second column says:

  • Animal Health Compliance Promotion

The eleventh row in the second column says:

  • Monitoring and Enforcement for Animal Health

The twelfth row in the second column says:

  • Permissions for Animal Products

The thirteenth row in the second column says:

  • International Standard Setting

The fourteenth row in the second column says:

  • International Regulatory Cooperation and Science Collaboration

The fifteenth row in the second column says:

  • International Market Access Support

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspections Agency (CFIA) is a science-based regulatory agency that employs 7200 dedicated and highly trained professionals working across 18 regions and 160 field offices within Canada.

CFIA strives to regulate and maintain best industry practice to ensure that food is represented accurately to Canadians; to safeguard Canada's plant and animal resources from disease and pests; to monitor the safety of the Canadian food supply and environment; and to sustain the international reputation of Canada's food, animals and plants, as well as their associated products, in order to retain the confidence of Canada's global trade partners.

Mandate and role

In fulfilling its role as a science-based regulatory agency, CFIA serves Canadians by developing policies and strategies, conducting specialized laboratory tests, and monitoring industry practice and compliance with legislation, in order to:

Currently, CFIA works in concert with a variety of departments across all three levels of government, collaborates with stakeholders, and remains receptive to the values of interests groups. Together, all parties play a unique role in managing food, animal, and plant safety and risks, incidents and emergencies, and the implementation of appropriate measures and interventions where necessary.

Annually, CFIA performs over 900,000 scientific tests with the help of private, independent contractors, oversees more than 350 food recalls, and in 2018 carried out over 1500 inspections in the poultry, diary, and fish and seafood industry.

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

CFIA is responsible for safeguarding food safety, animal health and plant health, as it relates to the health and well-being of Canadians, the environment and our economy. The Agency shares these responsibilities with various levels of government, industry and other stakeholders with whom it implements safety measures, manages risks, incidents and emergencies.

External influences

CFIA considers external factors in its daily operations. External factors that influence CFIA's operating environment include:

Internal influences

Internally, CFIA's operating environment is shaped by the Agency's strategic priorities as outlined in its Responding to Today, Building for the Future framework. The vision includes fundamental changes on how we manage risk, support industry's ability to compete globally, and embrace technology to provide more efficient and responsive services.
Our strategic priorities include:

Key risks

As outlined in the operating context section, risks impacting CFIA are influenced by external and internal influences.
CFIA integrates risk management practices enterprise-wide by systematically identifying, assessing, addressing and communicating risks across all aspects of its mandate and in a manner that informs strategic priority setting, optimizes resource allocation and contributes to improved Agency performance.

Managing the following risks supports the delivery of our Core Responsibility – safe food and healthy plants and animals.

Climate change

Over the next several decades, climate change will likely accelerate, impacting Canada's economy, productivity and health across all sectors, including resource-based sectors like agriculture, fisheries and forestry, unless significant action is taken. These impacts will also affect the health of Canadians, for example through decreased food safety and security and increased risk of transmitted diseases. Together, these environmental changes are challenging CFIA's ability to deliver its mandate. In order to better adapt, CFIA may need to factor in climate change in its policies, programs and operations.

Globalization

Global supply chains have changed the way products are produced, processed, packaged, distributed and sold. Consumer preferences are changing the volume and variety of products entering and leaving Canada. CFIA has been enhancing its data systems to enable it to better meet the challenges stemming from the changes in the global food, plant, and animal contexts, and support stakeholders needs in opening and maintaining access to markets.

Innovation and science

New and emerging technologies are being developed worldwide on a continuous basis. In addition, there is growing international consensus on the need for common technology and scientific approaches to support industry oversight and global agri-food trade. There is a risk that the Agency is unable to foresee and to keep pace with new developments in the world of innovation and science, thereby risking its ability to keep regulations, policies and programs and services current and effective. To keep pace with these emerging technologies, CFIA has been investing in innovation and science, while ensuring that the right tools are in place to partner and share the results of the Agency's work.

Risk Risk response strategy and effectiveness Link to department's core responsibilities Link to mandate letter commitments and any government-wide or departmental priorities (as applicable)
Climate change
  • Risk the Agency is unable to to keep pace with the impacts of climate change..
  • This is an existing risk
CFIA has been implementing the following initiatives to mitigate emissions of greenhouse gases and adapt to climate change:
  • Participation toward three of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) goals: Low Carbon Government, Sustainably Managed Lands and Forests, and Sustainable Food
  • Environmental performance reported through a CFIA Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) to support the implementation of the 2016-19 FSDS. A new DSDS will be tabled every third year.
  • Preliminary assessment of risks and identification of knowledge gaps on how climate change may impact the ability of CFIA in fulfilling its mandate.
  • Designation of a focal point for climate change within CFIA to inform and sensitize policy-makers and program managers on the impacts of climate change on CFIA mandated activities, and in coordinating CFIA's effort with other government departments and under government-industry initiatives to respond better to climate change.
  • Partner with other federal departments/agencies to align key ecosystem monitoring and tracking activities.
Safe food and healthy plants and animals
  • Link to Minister of Agriculture mandate letter:
    • Support the Ministers of Natural Resources and the Environment and Climate Change in making investments that will make our resource sectors world leaders in the use and development of clean and sustainable technology and processes.
  • Departmental priorities:
    • Alignment with Responding to Today Building for the Future
      • Modern regulatory toolkit
      • Integrated risk management
      • Global leader
  • Government-wide priorities:
    • Environment and Climate Change
Impacts of globalization
  • There is a risk that the Agency is unable to keep pace with external expectations influenced by globalization.
  • This is an existing risk
CFIA has been implementing the following initiatives to mitigate and/or address the impacts of globalization:
  • Continued to work closely with other government departments and international bodies as international standards become a greater priority.
  • Continued to work with Canada Border Services Agency, as its support offerings to the Agency evolves.
  • Plant pest surveillance - One of CFIA's top goals is to prevent the entry into or spread of regulated plant pests in Canada, and manage the risk associated with an introduction, should it occur. Through numerous methods, such as pest surveys, and consulting with stakeholders, CFIA continued to stay on top of plant pest detections in Canada.
  • Foreign verification office - CFIA continued building on its offshore preventative activities program. The offshore activities conducted in 2018-19 were planned and informed by various products developed by CFIA Risk Intelligence community, incorporating compliance history data, emergent risks, and trade volume.
  • Standard Inspection Procedure - reflects a fundamental shift in CFIA's inspection approach with less emphasis on prescriptive-based requirements and more focus on safety outcomes. The result is a stronger food safety system which enables industry to innovate and respond to emerging risks and developments.
Safe food and healthy plants and animals
  • Departmental priorities:
    • Alignment with Responding to Today Building for the Future
      • Modern regulatory toolkit
      • Global leader
      • Consistent and efficient inspections
  • Government-wide priorities:
    • Canada in the World
    • Barton Report (increase exports by 2025)
Innovation and science
  • There is a risk that the Agency is unable to foresee and to keep pace with new developments in the world of innovation and science, thereby risking its ability to keep regulations, policies and programs and services current and effective.
  • This is an existing risk
  • CFIA has been implementing the following initiatives to mitigate and/or address innovation and science risks:
    • Innovation Strategy (Budget 2017) – Strengthened laboratory infrastructure to ensure better access to specialized expertise and knowledge in science.
    • Government of Canada Vision for Science (Federal S&T Infrastructure Strategy) – Developed an integrated, enterprise-wide approach to Canada's federal intramural S&T to strengthen partnerships and collaboration, increase effectiveness and attract industry's leading talent.
    • Canada Food Safety Inspection Network (CFSIN) – being implemented to strengthen the ability of food safety authorities across Canada to better anticipate, detect and respond to food safety incidents and emergencies. CFIA will foster collaboration among federal/provincial/territorial food safety authorities and food testing laboratories.
    • CFIA Transparency Policy - CFIA built on its past experience and developed the next phase of its transparency agenda and will advance implementation related to sharing of scientific data.
Safe food and healthy plants and animals
  • Departmental priorities:
    • Alignment with Responding to Today Building for the Future
      • Modern regulatory toolkit
      • Integrated risk management
      • Global Leader
  • Government-wide priorities:
    • Investment in Science Infrastructure
    • Transparency

Supporting information on the program inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Context for the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2016-2019 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS):

In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, CFIA supports reporting on the implementation of the FSDS and its Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS), or equivalent document, through the activities described in this supplementary information table.

2. Sustainable development in CFIA

CFIA's Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy for 2017 to 2020 describes the Department's actions in support of achieving sustainable food and a low-carbon government. This supplementary information table presents available results for the departmental action[s] pertinent to these goals. Last year's supplementary information table is posted on CFIA's website.

3. Departmental performance by FSDS goal

The following tables provide performance information on departmental actions in support of the FSDS goals listed in section 2.

FSDS goal: sustainable food
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved
Ensure safe and accessible food supply by mitigating risks to animal and plant resources from pests, diseases and other health hazards and prevent risks to health of Canadians Work with partners to address invasive alien species
  • Participate in international fora such as the International Plant Protection Convention, and the North American Plant Protection Organization.
  • Contribute to the development of international phytosanitary standards.
  • Foster partnerships with provincial invasive species councils and agricultural, forestry, and horticultural stakeholders.
  • Work with the United States to collect data on the inspection of vessels for Asian gypsy moth conducted by other countries at origin and upon arrival in North America to determine compliance rates.
  • Starting point:
    • Not applicable
  • Target(s)/performance indicator(s):
    • Percentage of North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO), International Plant Protection Convention and Quadrilateral Groups projects with CFIA plant health experts
    • Number of new and revised regional and international standards for plant health
    • Number of new partnership initiatives (consultation, outreach, research, info sharing, alternative service delivery, etc.)
  • 55% of North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO), International Plant Protection Convention and Quadrilateral Groups projects with CFIA plant health experts.
  • 25 new and revised regional and international standards for plant health
  • 15 new partnership initiatives
FSDS goal: low-carbon government
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (UN SDG) target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved
Reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025 Modernize our fleet
  • Report annually on GHG emissions from fleet sources.
  • Develop and leverage a long term Fleet Management Strategy, which will include ways to reduce GHG through reduction in idling and purchasing of green vehicles where and when feasible among other activities.
  • Starting point:
    • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): = 6.43 ktCO2e
  • Target(s)/performance indicator(s):
    • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2029-30 = 3.86 ktCO2e
    • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleet from fiscal year 2005-06 to fiscal year 2029–30 = 40%
  • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2017-18 = 3.86 ktCO2e
  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleet from fiscal year 2005-06 to fiscal year 2018-2019 = 40%
  • Reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025
Reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025 Support the transition to a low-carbon economy through green procurement
  • Include environmental considerations in procurement instruments.
  • Fulfill the requirements of the Policy on Green Procurement related to training, employee performance evaluations, procurement management processes and controls and using common use procurement instruments.
  • CFIA will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into procurement, in accordance with the Federal Policy on Green Procurement.
  • CFIA will continue to ensure that 100% of procurement and material management specialists complete the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course.
  • CFIA will continue to ensure that 100% of identified managers and functional heads of procurement and material have performance evaluations that clearly include support and contribution toward green procurement.
  • CFIA awarded 96 contracts with a total value of $3, 513, 687 to purchase environmentally friendly products from certified green suppliers.
  • 100% of CFIA procurement and material management specialists have completed the CSPS Green Procurement Course.
  • 100% of CFIA managers and functional heads of procurement have performance evaluations supporting green procurement
  • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2017-18 = 3.82 ktCO2e
  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleet from fiscal year 2005-06 to fiscal year 2017-2018 = 41%
Sustainably Managed Lands and Forests: Lands and forests support biodiversity and provide a variety of ecosystem services for generations to come
Sustainably Managed Lands and Forests
FSDS target(s)
FSDS Contributing Action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s) where available, and your choice of performance indicators for departmental actions Results Achieved
By 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective are-based conservation measures Use legislation and regulations to manage the spread of invasive alien species
  • Perform activities to promote and verify compliance with import and domestic phytosanitary requirements including cargo and facility inspections and audits of alternative service delivery programs.
  • Develop and implement regulatory options for new invasive plants, plant pests, and pathways.
  • Consult Canadians on regulatory options for new invasive plants, plant pests, and pathways.
CFIA minimizes the spread and introduction of invasive alien species by promoting compliance and carrying out enforcement activities. CFIA is working to design, develop, and implement initiatives to limit the introduction and spread of invasive alien plants and pests to Canada's environmental resources, such as forests and agricultural lands.
  • Starting point:
    • Not applicable
  • Target(s)/performance indicator(s):
    • Number of new plant pests and invasive plants introduced in Canada
Performance Indicator(s): 0
4. Report on integrating sustainable development

CFIA will continue to ensure that its decision-making includes consideration of FSDS goals and targets through its Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) process. A SEA for policy, plan, or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the given proposal on the environment, including on FSDS goals and targets.

Public statements on the results of CFIA's assessments are made public when an initiative that has undergone a detailed SEA is announced. The purpose of the public statement is to demonstrate that the environmental effects of the approved policy plan or program, including the impacts on achieving the FSDS goals and targets, have been considered during proposal development and decision making.

Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

CFIA had no transfer payments over $5 million.

Gender-based analysis plus

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) and CFIA

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is committed to ensuring gender impacts are meaningfully incorporated in its decision-making. As part of this commitment, CFIA applies GBA+ to all Cabinet documents and tracks the overall quality of the analysis. With a new CFIA GBA+ template this year for all Cabinet, regulatory and policy proposals, a "complete" GBA+ is assured for every initiative. To promote improved GBA+ at the outset of program, policy and regulatory design/development, CFIA has created basic and advanced practitioner guides which include case studies and lessons learned to further GBA+ awareness and application. In the spirit of experimentation, CFIA prepared GBA+ snapshots on Farm Operators and Human Resources for in-depth, exploration of intersectional data from both an internal and external diversity perspective.

To better apply GBA+, raise awareness and build capacity, CFIA began an internal GBA+ roadshow to engage all Branch executives and managers in enabling further GBA+. Having all managers underscore the importance of GBA+ is essential, prior to implementing the multi-year, phased roll-out of Introduction to GBA+ online training to all key analysts, officers and management in all Branches. To promote the widespread application of GBA+, CFIA introduced all new content on its internal GBA+ website that includes new and revised guidance, tools and further resources.

CFIA continues to benefit greatly from ongoing, close collaboration and strong working relationships with both the Health and Agriculture portfolios, and the Department of Women and Gender Equality. This past year, CFIA participated in many gender and diversity learning events such as the GBA+ National Forum, the Health Portfolio's Sex and Gender Symposium, and the week-long, GBA+ Premium course from the Canada School of Public Service. CFIA and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada co-hosted GBA+ Awareness Week activities which galvanized a greater understanding of GBA+, gender diversity and inclusion, as well as the implications of new GBA+ government priorities and requirements.

General information
Governance structures

CFIA's GBA+ implementation and strategic action plan ensures a sustainable and systematic foundational framework for Agency activities and proposals, including raising awareness and building capacity for applying GBA+ in CFIA's day-to-day work.

This includes: the Health Portfolio Sex and Gender-Based Analysis policy, CFIA's new GBA+ Template, tools, guidance and website resources to ensure GBA+ was integrated into departmental decision-making processes during the 2018 to 2019 fiscal year; tailored accountability mechanisms and processes for Cabinet and regulatory initiatives, budget and policy proposals to ensure GBA+ was integrated into departmental decision-making processes; tracking, monitoring and reporting mechanisms which assess and describe the extent to which GBA+ was applied and included in decision-making; a GBA+ Responsibility Centre, currently performed by CFIA's GBA+ gender focal point; and, additions to the implementation plan to support new Government of Canada priorities such as the gender results framework, gender budgeting and the new policy direction from TBS on Building Gender Inclusive Services.

Human resources

The total number of actual full-time equivalents (FTEs) that were dedicated to GBA+ implementation in the department in 2018 to 2019, includes:

  • 0 FTEs that were part of a GBA+ Responsibility Centre
  • 1 FTE for the Departmental GBA+ Focal Point(s) and GBA+ Responsibility Centre
  • 0 FTEs on GBA+ advisory committees and other governance bodies
Major initiatives: results achieved

The title of the initiative is: Funding for project activities for the Centre of Plant Health in Sidney, BC. This falls under the Plant Health Program inventory. The new Centre for Plant Health in Sidney, British Columbia, will be a world-class research facility to replace the existing facility and provide federal scientists and partners with state-of-the-art amenities to advance plant science, to collaborate on new opportunities, and to protect Canada's plant resources while growing its agriculture and agri-food sector.

Federal Science and Technology Infrastructure Initiative governance, through the Deputy Minister Science Committee, will monitor the Centre for Plant Health rebuild project to ensure appropriate action should any impact on gender or diversity arise, and that PSPC and CFIA meet their duty to consult and accommodate Indigenous communities and to meet their commitments associated with this submission in a manner that ensures age, sex, gender, ethnicity, education or other diversity outcomes are met. The GBA+ for this initiative was quite comprehensive, incorporating gender and diversity considerations related to disability, sex, gender, race/ ethnicity, age, income, indigeneity, geography, education and language factors into project management, contracting, mitigation and monitoring strategies, as well as research / analysis for informed options and decision-making. During the length of the project, impacts will be monitored and overseen by CFIA governance, the Finance, Integration and Project Oversight Committee, the Corporate Management Committee and a Senior Project Oversight Committee at the VP level. Officials will integrate key decision points, progress updates, and track a range of existing data and new datasets to derive lessons learned that will be tried, tested and adopted in each phase to allow for course corrections, where necessary and ensure that the net impact of the initiative is positive as it pertains to gender equality.

Reporting capacity and data

To best support CFIA's core responsibility, safe food and healthy plants and animals, CFIA undertakes gender-based analysis for Cabinet, regulatory and program development initiatives. For programs related to Food Safety and Consumer Protection (Compliance Promotion / Monitoring and Enforcement), though CFIA does not collect gender disaggregated microdata in any of its forms at this time, the Agency does use Health and census information from Statistics Canada studies like the Census of Agriculture to consider such socio-economic factors as age, gender (woman-owned businesses), income (small – medium-sized businesses), race and geography.

For its international programs, which include standard setting and market access support, CFIA uses data from Global Affairs Canada and the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service to understand the realities of female-owned, small- and medium-sized exporters, to help prioritize expanded exports, greater trade liberalization and supporting international trade and standard-setting.

CFIA intends to review the availability of data and develop a plan with both the Health and Agriculture Portfolios to augment the Agency's Data Asset Inventory for improved GBA+ in rule-setting, compliance promotion, monitoring and enforcement. This will reinforce CFIA's strong data foundation, which includes a logic model and CFIA-specific GBA+ performance indicators, and position the Agency to align well with expanded priorities and policies such as TBS Policy Direction on Building Inclusive Services.

Horizontal initiatives

General information
Name of horizontal initiative Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) renewal
Lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Federal partner organization(s) Health Canada; Public Health Agency of Canada
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15 Renewal Core BSE program (program regularly renewed since inception in 2003)
End date of the horizontal initiative 2018 to 2019
Description of the horizontal initiative

To protect human and animal health, the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) program conducts surveillance, research and risk assessments on BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) to minimize the risk of exposure to infected materials, maintain consumer confidence through assessment of the effectiveness of the risk mitigation measures and having measures in place to control any potential outbreaks. The BSE program supports market access for cattle, beef and related products by promoting and explaining Canada's BSE program to domestic and international stakeholders.

Health Canada conducts research and risk assessments on human exposure to BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) carries out surveillance of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) and targeted supporting research in this area. CFIA enforces the removal of specified risk material from the animal feed and the human food chains, monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country, monitors for the prevalence of BSE in the cattle population (through surveillance), verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place and explains Canada's BSE control measures to domestic and international stakeholders (for example, through the veterinarians abroad program) in order to maintain confidence in Canada's BSE program.

Governance structures

The CFIA is the federal lead for BSE Program delivery. A summative evaluation of CFIA's BSE program conducted in 2008 recommended the governance of the program be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication regarding BSE -related activities, both internally and with partner organizations. Based on that recommendation and consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives, CFIA has since 2010 maintained committees in line with the Agency's overall governance structure, which evolved to address business needs in 2015. The governance structure enhances whole-of-Agency information sharing and integration and ensures a more efficient and streamlined senior-level committee structure. It is intended to foster a whole-of-Agency approach to decision making and support day-to-day operations across the Agency. To ensure that business line perspectives are integrated into decision-making process, three senior executive-level committees on Animal Health, Plant and Food Safety are supported.

Total federal funding allocated (2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 203,229,461
Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2019 (dollars) 203,229,461
Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2019 (dollars) 188,102,229
Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative 2014-15
Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal, and source of funding (dollars) $203,229,461 (Budget 2014)
Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars) Not applicable
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners

To contribute to the protection of human and animal health, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian cattle, beef and beef products.

ER 1: specified risk material (SRM) Removal from the Human Food Chain:

Performance indicator(s) PI 1: Industry compliance rate for removal of specified risk material.
Target(s) T 1: 100% compliance.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Internal files/ documents/databases; quarterly monitoring; annual reporting.
Results

AR 1: A compliance rate of 99.50 % was achieved in tasks delivered in federally registered establishments.

The CFIA conducts on-site inspection of SRM removal in federally registered slaughter and boning establishments. The CFIA also reviews records to verify compliance and the effectiveness of the SRM control program. In 2018-19, 92.40% (6015/6510) of the planned programming specific to the enforcement and verification of SRM removal and controls was delivered nationally.

In addition, CFIA continued to conduct annual inspections of non-federally licensed cattle slaughter establishments and audits of provincial inspection systems. Records are reviewed to ensure the removal, segregation and disposal of SRM from food are properly carried out and to determine the adequacy of provincial oversight for plant controls.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable.
Name of theme Not applicable.
Theme outcomes

ER 2: Import Controls:

Outcome: Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards.

Theme performance indicator(s)

PI 2.1: Percentage of import policies verified and updated as required.

PI 2.2: BSE Import Policy is verified and updated as required.

Theme target(s)

T 2.1: 25% per year.

T 2.2: Annually, when the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) updates the BSE risk status country lists.

Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Internal files/documents/ databases; annual monitoring and reporting.
Theme results

AR 2.1: 100% of Animal Products and by Products Import Policies have been reviewed and updated in one single Import Framework Policy including the BSE-related import conditions by commodity.

AR 2.2: In 2019, the BSE Import Policy was updated to reflect the requirements indicated with respect to the slaughter of bovine animals under the authority of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR).

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable.
Name of theme Not applicable.
Theme outcomes

ER 3: BSE Surveillance:

Outcome: Safe animals and food and market access

Theme performance indicator(s) PI 3: Temporal trend in exposure to the BSE agent in the cattle population.
Theme target(s) T 3: Testing 30,000 samples from the high-risk category of cattle is the minimum national target.
Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Internal files/documents/databases; monthly monitoring and quarterly reporting.
Theme results

AR 3: In the 2018-19 fiscal year, the total number of BSE samples tested by the national transmissible spongiform encephalopathy network laboratories was 31,747 (21,206 CFIA and 10,541 provincial). Sampling for BSE surveillance is conducted primarily on-farm or at dead stock facilities.

In Eastern Canada, sampling at dead stock is consistent, since contracts are signed with the facilities to hold a specified number of eligible carcasses for testing.

Sampling in Western Canada is done mostly on-farm by private practitioners. The surveillance program relies on producers or practitioners voluntarily submitting eligible diseased, down, dead or dying animals for sampling. If producers and practitioners do not send in samples, the numbers fall. Since BSE can mimic many other common disease conditions of cattle, it would be neither practical nor feasible to try to enforce mandatory surveillance.

However, CFIA has collaborated with provinces and industry representatives (CanSurvBSE) to encourage continued commitment to the BSE surveillance program. The CFIA continues to work with our industry and provincial partners to maintain a high level of awareness of the importance of sample submission for BSE

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable.
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 4: Cattle Identification:

Outcome:

  • Governments and other entities make informed decisions to manage animal and related human health issues
  • Risk to Canadian livestock resource base are mitigated
  • Canadian livestock sector is compliant with regulations
Performance indicator(s)

PI 4.1: Number and development status of inspection tools in place

PI 4.2: Number of inspectors trained

PI 4.3: Ratio of non-compliances versus number of Compliance Verification System (CVS) tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage

PI 4.4: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards

Target(s)

T 4.1: Training, tools and materials are relevant and up-to-date

T 4.2: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained

T 4.3: 95% compliance

T 4.4: 100%

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

DSF 4.1: Manual for Policy and Programs Branch, annually

DSF 4.2: Manual for Operations Branch, annually

DSF 4.3: Manual for Operations Branch, annually

DSF 4.4: Manual for Operations Branch, annually

Results

AR 4.1: Inspection tools (e.g. manual of procedures) and materials (e.g. guidance, list of approved indicators) are relevant and up-to-date. Inspectors' training courses (e-courses and classroom delivery) are available and up-to-date; to be revised with proposed regulatory amendment in 2019.

AR 4.2: All inspectors verifying compliance have completed the required training courses.

AR 4.3: 95% in 2018-19

AR 4.4: Few responses to disease and epidemiological investigations are completed within service standards due to program design issues, aimed to be resolved through regulatory amendment due in 2020.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable.
Name of theme Not applicable.
Theme outcomes

ER 5: Export Certification:

Outcome: Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

Theme performance indicator(s) PI 5: Percentage of exports meeting the standards of the importing country as required.
Theme target(s) T 5: 100%
Internal files/documents/databases; quarterly monitoring and annual reporting.
Theme results CFIA is informed of non-compliances related to BSE specified risk material (SRM) in meat and meat products picked up by third countries upon arrival. The Agency data shows that most of the Canadian exports are meeting the standards of the importing countries. Only 0.54% of the total port-of-entry violations notified by the importing countries from 2014 to 2018 pertain to BSE SRM.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable.
Name of theme Not applicable.
Theme outcomes

ER 6: Technical Market Access Support:

Outcome: Maintain or improve confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets.

Theme performance indicator(s) PI 6: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.
Theme target(s) T 6: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.
Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Internal files/documents/ databases; annual monitoring and reporting.

Data source: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) International Affairs Branch (IAB) – Market Access Secretariat (MAS), Global Analysis team

Frequency/monitoring: A customized report: "Canadian meat & beef trends 2019" was produced to obtain this information.

Note: For online access to this report and/or other market analysis reports, visit AAFC's International agri-food market intelligence website and select Market intelligence reports.

Theme results

AR 6: Target met for 2018-19.

The Canadian meat sector, based on retail sales values (including beef, chicken, lamb, pork, packaged or fresh turkey and other meat categories), is expected to grow from US$22.1 billion (C$28.2 billion) in 2018 to US$29.7 billion (C$33.9 billion) in 2023.

Between 2014 and 2018, Canadian retail sales in the meat sector for beef increased by 2.2%, going from US$8.3 billion to US$9.1 billion. Fresh beef from over the retail counter is the largest category, with US$5 billion in off-trade sales in 2018, while frozen processed or whole cuts of beef is expected to remain the fastest growing category, with an anticipated growth rate of 5% between 2019 and 2022.

Per capita expenditure of meat in Canada stood at US$594 in 2018, which was higher when compared to both global (US$180) and North American regional (US$558) averages.

Canada follows closely with global survey results, where females are more likely than men to limit their intake or replace meat with plant-based alternatives, as the consumption of meat in Canada is slightly higher among males by 51.6% and 48.4% women. Also, survey results indicate that older consumers (55+ years) consumed the most meat, with a 35.4% volume share in 2016 – yet respondents were most likely to stick to familiar brands (45+ years).

Popular consumer trends include convenient packaging and timesaving products, and clean labeling (claims that consist of all natural, trusted, and traceable) meat products, along with the introduction of innovative functional protein 'ready-to-eat or on-the-go' meat snacks that go beyond the meat aisles.

In fiscal year 2018 to 2019, BSE media coverage in Canada was very light. Two articles focused on Budget 2019 renewal funding and the success of CFIA's surveillance and testing, referencing the upcoming OIE application. Other articles (13) focused on BSE and similar diseases in other countries.

CFIA also received 3 media calls relating to BSE: from industry media (Western Producer), regional US media (Mountain West News Bureau, serving the US Rocky Mountain States) and one film producer (Hodgee Films).

Note: Growth rates were determined using Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR).

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable.
Name of theme Not applicable.
Theme outcomes

ER 7: Health Products Risk Assessment and Targeted Research

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE / TSE science, risks and product surveillance

Theme performance indicator(s)

PI 7.1: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on BSE / TSE topics.

PI 7.2: Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. biologics).

PI 7.3: Number of products / product lots assessed for TSE (or TSE / BSE risks).

Theme target(s)

T 7.1: 2

T 7.2: 0 (as needed)

T 7.3: 400 lots per year

Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Annual monitoring and reporting of data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, risk assessments, incident reports, certificates, internal records.
Theme results

AR 7.1: Health Canada attended 1 international conference and 1 international meeting.

AR 7.2: Not applicable

AR 7.3: 514 lots were assessed (477 lots of human/animal plasma derived products and 37 lots of human derived excipients products). Additionally, Health Canada completed the review of 49 submissions (22 Clinical Trial Applications/ Clinical Trial Applications Amendments; 23 Post-market Changes; and 4 New Drugs Submissions) which included the verification of the acceptability of source material related to BSE. Staff also participated in two applicable international conference/meeting and gained knowledge and expertise

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable.
Name of theme Not applicable.
Theme outcomes

ER 8: Food Safety and Nutrition: Risk Assessment

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE / TSE science, risks and product surveillance

Intermediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making

Theme performance indicator(s)

PI 8.1: Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on BSE / TSE topics.

PI 8.2: Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. food products).

PI 8.3: Number of knowledge transfer activities related to BSE / TSE.

Theme target(s)

T 8.1: 1 conference

T 8.2: TBD (to be determined) since it will depend on the number of BSE suspicion by product line

T 8.3: 1

Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Annual monitoring and reporting of data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, risk assessments, incident reports, certificates, internal records.
Theme results

AR 8.1: Health Canada officials strengthened their scientific and regulatory capacity to complete TSE work by attending the special plenary session on chronic wasting disease of the 5th International One Health Congress in Saskatoon (June 22-25, 2018). It also gave them the opportunity to network with key international BSE/TSE experts.

AR 8.2: Health Canada continued to provide food safety risk assessment and policy advice to Federal and Provincial regulatory authorities on BSE/TSE-related risks (e.g., chronic wasting disease in cervids) and conducted environmental scanning activities to identify new and emerging threats from BSE/TSE in the food supply.

AR 8.3: Succession planning took place to ensure that there is continuity in the Health Canada relationships with key stakeholders in the area of BSE/TSE.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable.
Name of theme Not applicable.
Theme outcomes

ER 9: Prion Diseases Program

Outcome: Risks of human TSE in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled.

Theme performance indicator(s) PI 9.1: Alignment of Public Health Agency of Canada data from human TSE surveillance with international benchmarks; number of research presentations and publications; use of policy advice in decision-making.
Theme target(s)

T 9.1: Maintenance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) surveillance sensitivity at a level where observed mortality from all human TSE in Canada is consistent with that observed internationally i.e. 1-2 per million population.

T 9.2: Technological development to ensure Canadian diagnostic analyses remain consistent with those performed internationally.

T 9.3: At least two research presentations, publications or reports per year.

Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

DSF 9.1: Continuous monitoring and reporting of surveillance statistics and database

DSF 9.2: Annual monitoring and reporting of laboratory reports and databases (internal records), National Microbiological Laboratory Quality System (internal records)

DSF 9.3: Annual monitoring and reporting of scientific publication records of researchers and CJD surveillance system, Electronic databases (publications; citations; impact factors)

Theme results

AR 9.1: For the previous reporting period (2017-18), a trend was noted toward increased numbers of cases of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), such as CJD (CJD), identified in Canada. This trend, which has continued in 2018-19, corresponds to an increased level of effort on the part of the PHAC portion of the BSE program, "Surveillance and research for human TSEs".

This effort is reflected in the number of case investigations opened in 2018-19 (130), a significant increase over the previous annual average of approximately 100. Now-complete data from calendar year 2017 yielded 81 definite and probable cases of CJD, compared with an annual average of 56.8 cases annually over the 5-year period 2012 to 2016 inclusive. This count of 81 cases corresponds to a national CJD mortality rate of over 2 cases per million per year, which exceeds the upper boundary of the target range (1-2 cases per million per year) included in this indicator.

Data for calendar year 2018, current as of May 31 2019, show a total of 70 definite and probable CJD cases, with the final total expected to be slightly higher.

The epidemiologic data of the PHAC CJD Surveillance System continue to be used to assess the human health risk from zoonotic TSEs in Canada. The strong evidence bases for the negative findings of this national surveillance program for human TSEs directly support the success of the BSE Horizontal Initiative.

AR 9.2: QuIC (test exploits the natural ability of the disease-associated, misfolded isoform, PrPd, to induce conversion of the normal cellular form of the prion protein, PrPc, into a misfolded form. The resulting insoluble PrP aggregates generated by this molecular templating process can be measured with standard laboratory equipment.) testing has been incorporated into the panel of tests performed on cerebrospinal fluid samples submitted to the NML for CJD testing. As a result, enhanced diagnostic support is accessible to physicians and other health care providers in Canada dealing with suspected cases of CJD. In comparison to previous CJD assays, this test more directly identifies the presence of the pathogenic form of the prion protein in cerebrospinal fluid. With this development, Canada is consistent with International standards.

AR 9.3:

Refereed publications (names of PHAC contributors underlined):

1. D'Arcy CE, Bitnun A, Coulthart MB, D'Amour R, Friedman JN, Knox JD, Rapoport A, Snead OC, Widjaja E, Hazrati L-N, Jansen GH. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a young girl with unusually long survival. Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology 2019; 78(4):373-8.

2. Mercer RCC, Daude N, Dorosh L, Fu Z-L, Mays CE, Gapeshina H, Wohlgemuth SL, Acevedo-Morantes CY, Yang J, Cashman NR, Coulthart MB, Pearson DM, Joseph JT, Wille H, Safar JG, Jansen GH, Stepanova M, Sykes BD, Westaway D. A novel Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease mutation defines a precursor for amyloidogenic 8 kDa PrP fragments and reveals N-terminal structural changes shared by other GSS alleles. PloS Pathogens 2018; 14(1): e1006826.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable.
Name of theme Not applicable.
Performance highlights

Canada continues to qualify annually as a country assigned a controlled risk status by the World Health Organisation (OIE). The CFIA has presence and oversight of SRM removal at federally registered establishments, which account for the majority (95%) of livestock processing in Canada. At the same time, CFIA acknowledges that there have been some challenges with meeting inspection targets for non-federally registered abattoirs in some provinces.

In 2017/18, CFIA has continued to meet BSE sampling targets for high-risk cattle, however regional variation in the numbers of samples submitted for BSE sampling has been noted. The CFIA continues to work with industry and provincial partners to encourage horizontal consistency in BSE sample submissions across Canada.

Canada's BSE programming continues to mitigate introduction risks via a strong import program. In addition, CFIA continues to update import policies, manuals and training to ensure that Canada's BSE program is continuously updated to reflect the latest science of BSE.

Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Aline Dimitri
Executive Director
Animal Health Directorate
Policy & Programs Branch
613-773-7472

Public Health Agency of Canada

Steven Sternthal
Director General
Centre for Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch
613-948-6883

Health Canada

Etienne Ouimette
Director General
Resource Management & Operations Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
613-957-6690

Performance summary
Federal department Link to the department's program inventory Horizontal initiative activities Total federal allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2018–19 planned spending (dollars) 2018–19 actual spending (dollars) 2018–19 expected results 2018–19 performance indicators 2018–19 targets Date to achieve target 2018–19 actual results
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Specified risk material removal from the human food chain 45,946,160 9,189,232 7,946,329 ER 1 PI 1 T 1 March 31, 2019 AR 1
Import controls 3,347,815 669,563 669,563 ER 2 PI 2.1
PI 2.2
T 2.1
T 2.2
March 31, 2019 AR 2.1
AR 2.2
BSE surveillance 80,912,125 16,182,425 16,229,176 ER 3 PI 3 T3 March 31, 2019 AR 3
Cattle identification 10,672,140 2,134,428 1,977,322 ER 4 PI 4.1
PI 4.2
PI 4.3
PI 4.4
T 4.1
T 4.2
T 4.3
T 4.4
March 31, 2019 AR 4.1
AR 4.2
AR 4.3
AR 4.4
Export certification 29,822,860 5,964,572 5,362,018 ER 5 PI 5 T 5 March 31, 2019 AR 5
Technical market access support 22,794,635 4,558,927 4,558,927 ER 6 PI 6 T 6 March 31, 2019 AR 6
Health Canada Biologics and Radiopharmaceutical Drugs Risk assessment 1,538,882 306,881 308,660 ER 7 PI 7.1
PI 7.2
PI 7.3
T 7.1
T 7.2
T 7.3
March 31, 2019 AR 7.1
AR 7.2
AR 7.3
Food Safety and Nutrition Risk assessment and standard setting 4,194,844 930,014 895,727 ER 8 PI 8.1
PI 8.2
PI 8.3
T 8.1
T 8.2
T 8.3
March 31, 2019 AR 8.1
AR 8.2
AR 8.3
AR 8.4
Public Health Agency of Canada Foodborne and Zoonotic Diseases / Laboratory Science Leadership and Services Prion diseases program 4,000,000 800,000 791,795 ER 9 PI 9 T 9.1
T 9.2
T 9.3
March 31, 2019 AR 9.1
AR 9.2
AR 9.3
Total for all federal organizations Not applicable Not applicable 203,229,461 40,736,042 38,739,517 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

Horizontal initiative – close-out reports

Food Safety Oversight Close-Out Report

Name of the horizontal initiative: Food Safety Oversight

Start date: 2014-15

End date: Ongoing

Lead department: CFIA number of times renewed: 0

Partner departments: Health Canada

Other non-federal partners: nil

Expenditures (millions)

Total federal funding from start to end date (Authorities and Actual): $15.8 ($12.4 actual) for 2014-15, $24.6 ($21.8 actual) for 2015-16, $40.3 ($32.9 actual) for 2016-17, $35.6 ($31.6 actual) for 2017-18, $35.6 ($30.8 actual) for 2018 to 2019, and $35.6 ongoing.

Themes and internal services
Theme and internal services Authorities Actual spending Variance(s)
FSM - Preventative food safety program management $11,786,965 $9,788,821 $1,998,144
FSM - Enhanced inspection activities $90,809,418 $75,018,284 $15,791,134
FSM - Increased sampling, testing, and analysis $22,283,451 $22,025,374 $258,077
FSM - Foreign country assessments $6,293,373 $5,117,353 $1,176,020
HC - Standard Setting $14,246,254 $11,963,755 $2,282,499
HC - Health Risk Assessments $6,580,170 $5,612,581 $967,589
Totals $151,999,631 $129,526,168 $22,473,463

Results

(ER 10) Enhanced preventative food safety program management
Performance indicators Trend data
(PI-10) Strengthened design and management of preventative food safety programming

(PI-10) The publication and coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) is a major step forward in further safeguarding Canada's food supply and enhancing the health and well-being of consumers. The SFCR, which are now in force, simplifies and strengthens rules for food in Canada, whether produced here or imported into the country.

(PI-10) Updates to program design for fish, fresh fruits and vegetables (FFV) and imported manufactured food products (IMFP) have improved CFIA's ability to monitor, inspect and proactively manage risks, thus improving consumer protection.

(PI-10) CFIA reviewed, updated and published all existing guidance documents pertaining to the food safety requirements of the SFCR to promote compliance of the fish, FFV and IMFP sectors.

(PI-10) Additionally, CFIA increased the number of engagements such as webinars, presentations, conferences, articles to FFV, IMFP and fish stakeholders.

(PI-10) The new regulations require imported food to be prepared with the same level of food safety controls as food prepared in Canada. As a result, Canadians can have more confidence that food imported into Canada is safe to eat.

(PI-10) CFIA continued specific actions for risk management of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. CFIA's enhanced program design and guidance, as well as participation in collaborative efforts to improve controls across the production, harvest, processing and consumption continuum following the 2015 outbreak, has resulted in additional tools for industry and communication channels to maintain relationships with stakeholders. The CFIA completed a review of the recommendations made in the Inter-Sectoral Working Group Report, and posted a summary of the responses to all of the recommendations implicating CFIA on our web site in December 2018.

(ER 11) Enhanced inspection activities
Performance indicators Trend data
(PI-11) Increase in inspection activities to the non-meat food areas (PI-11) Over the 5 years, CFIA allocated inspection resources to deliver key food safety priorities in the Fish, IMFP and FFV programs. These inspections activities included establishment inspections, importer audits, non-registered manufactured food inspections, sampling, label verifications, complaints and investigations, recall effectiveness checks and monitoring. This was accomplished with expert elicitation and collaboration to create recommended changes to these programs, including development of frequencies for non-meat food establishment inspection.
(ER 12) Enhanced sampling, testing, and analysis
Performance indicators Trend data
(PI-12) Increase in sampling, testing, and analysis

(PI-12) Additional samples, testing reports, results and analysis completed in the non-meat food areas:

(PI-12) Between fiscal years 2014-15 and 2018 to 2019, CFIA Food Microbiology and Food Chemistry laboratories received over 18,000 additional samples of high risk non-meat food commodities within the Imported and Manufactured Food Products (IMFP), Fish and Seafood, and Fresh Fruit and Vegetables (FFV) sectors in support of the Food Safety Oversight (FSO) initiative. Sample testing reports, results and analysis for these samples, representing approximately 50,000 microbial and chemical tests and analyses, were generated.

(PI-12) FSO funding permitted enhanced surveillance of high risk food safety issues in microbiology, including bacterial pathogens and parasites in leafy greens and pre-packaged salads, viruses in frozen fruit and bacterial pathogens and viruses in oysters. This increased sampling, testing and analysis capacity under FSO also enabled CFIA to more effectively respond to microbial contamination events, including Salmonella in sprouts, verotoxigenic E. coli in flour and romaine lettuce, and viruses in frozen berries and seafood, while maintaining lab capacity for all routine and planned laboratory testing. High risk food safety issues in chemistry included undeclared allergens in manufactured foods, sulfites in imported fresh fruit and continued monitoring of fish and seafood and fresh fruit and vegetable sectors for metals, pesticides and veterinary drug residues.

(PI-12) Validated methods developed and implemented to support increased testing in the non-meat food areas

(PI-12) Under FSO, CFIA Food Microbiology and Food Chemistry laboratories undertook a number of projects to expand and improve testing methods in support of the increased testing in the non-meat food areas. These included the development of a more sensitive assay for the detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in shellfish, improvements to the detection methodology for viruses in fruits and vegetables, the development of a multi-class veterinary drug residues method, carbapenems method and multi-residue pesticides method for fish and seafood as well as a consolidated mercury and heavy metals method.

(ER 13) Improved safety in imported food
Performance indicators Trend data
(PI-13) Increase in foreign country assessments of priority areas

AR 13.1 CFIA continued to build its capacity to conduct foreign systems assessments. In this regard, CFIA updated its tools and templates to align them with the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. It also provided mentoring and training to its staff.

AR 13.2 CFIA delivered three on-site assessments, one for fresh fruits and vegetables (Chile) and two for fish and seafood (USA and Indonesia) in fiscal 2018 to 2019.

AR 13.3 CFIA continued to engage with foreign competent authorities (e.g. South Korea) for delivery of shellfish sanitation program audit.

AR 13.4 CFIA continues to publish the final assessment reports on its external website.

AR 13.5 Prior to the coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations, CFIA continued to add fish products or foreign processors to the Enhanced Inspection List when there was information that the product may be potentially unsafe or unwholesome or the processors may potentially be producing unsafe products. With the coming into force of the SFCR on January 15, 2019, importers are required to demonstrate that they have preventive controls in place.

(ER 14) Standard setting support
Performance indicators Trend data
(PI-14a) Development of new and/or updated standards is initiated in 100% of cases where there is an identified need to do so in order to address food safety risks (PI-14a) The development of three new/or updated standards has been initiated; chemicals include cyanide in apricot kernels, lead in infant formula, and inorganic arsenic in rice.
(PI-14b) Number and type of involvement activities associated with standard setting initiatives

(PI-14b) Involvement activities associated with standard setting initiatives include:

One Notice of Proposal was published for a contaminant maximum level for cyanide in apricot kernels to be added to the List of Contaminants and Other Adulterating Substances in Food.

One Notice of Proposal was developed for a contaminant maximum level for lead in infant formula to be added to the List of Contaminants and Other Adulterating Substances in Food.

One regulatory proposal was developed for contaminant maximum levels for inorganic arsenic in rice to be added to the List of Contaminants and Other Adulterating Substances in Food.

Two consultations are being prepared for transferring and/or updating contaminant standards for marine biotoxins and PAHs in olive-pomace oils.

Three technical guidance documents were made publically available through web posting regarding the impact of gluten and other proteins for individuals with celiac disease and/or gluten-related disorders.

(PI-14c) Number of risk assessments developed in support of standard setting initiatives (PI-14b) Nine risk assessments in support of standard setting initiatives were completed; chemicals include furan, cyanide, lead, inorganic arsenic, melamine, patulin, glycoalkaloids, cadmium and diarrheic shellfish poisoning toxins.
(PI-14d) Number of detection methods developed and enhanced in support of standard setting initiatives (PI-14d) Six analytical detection methods were developed and/or enhanced in support of standard setting initiatives; the chemicals involved include halogenated and aromatic volatile organic compounds, mycotoxins, perfluorinated compounds, emerging flame retardants, plant alkaloids, and the phycotoxin PSP. One in vitro high-throughput method was developed for screening chemicals for potential neurotoxic effects. Two methods are under development to screen chemicals for potential hypersensitivity and cross-reactivity with priority allergens.
(ER 15) Enhanced food safety risk assessments
Performance indicators Trend data
(PI-15) Timely response to emerging food and nutrition safety incidents including foodborne illness outbreaks (PI-15) Health Canada completed 100% of the 93 health risk assessment requests from CFIA, which covered 188 products and resulted in 259 health risk classifications within agreed service standards and continues to fully meet performance targets for these types of Health Risk Assessments.

Brief explanation of performance

Enhancing the Agency's ability to identify and prevent food safety issues offshore increases the safety of food imported to Canada. As part of its efforts to verify the safety of food imported to Canada, CFIA assesses foreign food systems, and provides technical assistance to specific countries to strengthen their systems.

In the last five years, CFIA developed and maintained its capacity to conduct foreign assessments. This included building a team of assessors and developing new tools and templates to conduct assessments.

CFIA conducted several foreign systems assessments in fresh fruit and vegetables, fish and seafood. This work allowed us to verify whether food safety controls are in place for the production of safe food for export to Canada. The foreign assessments also increased awareness of Canadian requirements and strengthened our relationships with our foreign counterparts. Information from these assessments was shared with other federal government departments and within CFIA to inform risk evaluation, risk mitigation and resource allocation. Final reports of these assessments are published on CFIA's external website.

Programs receiving ongoing funding

A. Internal audits
Program Ongoing funding Purpose
Health Canada $4,621,097 Not applicable
CFIA $30,985,280 Not applicable
Total $35,606,377

Plans (including timelines) for evaluation and/or audit

Organizational contact information
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

1400 Merivale Road,
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9
Canada
Telephone: 1-800-442-2342/1-613-773-2342
Internet: www.inspection.gc.ca

Contact information
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Lyzette Lamondin
Executive Director
Food Safety and Consumer Protection Directorate
Policy and Programs Branch
Telephone: 613-773-6189

Dr. Aline Dimitri
Executive Director
Food Safety Science Directorate
Science Branch
Telephone: 613-773-5542

Jag Dhanda
Senior Director
National Inspection Division
Operations Branch
Telephone: 613-773-6536

Health Canada

Karen McIntyre
Director General
Food Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
Telephone: 613-957-1821

Canadian food safety information network horizontal initiative close-out report

Name of horizontal initiative: Canadian Food Safety Information Network

Start date: April 1, 2014

End date: March 31, 2019

Lead department: CFIA number of times renewed: 0

Partner departments: Health Canada

Other non-federal partners: nil

Expenditures (millions)

Total federal funding from start to end date (Authorities and Actual): $1.0 ($0.6 actual) for 2014-15, $2.8 ($2.6 actual) for 2015 to 2016, $2.7 ($2.6 actual) for 2016 to 2017, $2.8 ($2.7 actual) for 2017 to 2018, $2.9 ($1.6 actual) for 2018 to 2019.

Themes and internal services
Themes and internal services Authorities
(as per the TB submission)
Actual spending Variance(s)
FSM - Data Support, Coordination and Outreach $9,330,455 $7,856,778 $1,473,677
FSM - Environmental Scanning $990,306 $782,078 $208,228
IS - Data support, coordination and outreach $571,532 $478,614 $92,918
IS – Environmental Scanning $70,059 $52,706 $17,353
HC – Food Safety and Nutrition – Data Support Coordination and Outreach $1,170,797 $924,173 $246,624
Totals $12,133,149 $10,094,349 $2,038,800
Result

Build and maintain collaborative relationships among federal, provincial and territorial food safety partners, establishing a network for information on food safety through data support, coordination and outreach activities.

Have an environmental scanning tool within the Canadian Food Safety Information Network to better understand incidents, technological trends and emerging issues impacting the food supply.
Have improved ability of government food safety authorities to anticipate, prepare and respond to food safety issues and emergencies through data support, coordination and outreach with authorities on food safety.

Performance indicator(s) and trend data for shared outcome(s)
Performance indicators Trend data
Data Support, Coordination and Outreach
Data sharing arrangements signed between CFIA and federal, provincial and territorial partners to formalize their participation in the network.
CFIA signed two data and information sharing Memoranda of Understanding. Discussions are ongoing with five other provinces. A letter of intent was signed with one province to share data for undertaking data sharing pilots. At a federal level, a trilateral data and information sharing Memorandum of Understanding is under development among CFIA, Public Health Agency of Canada, and Health Canada.
A report containing the business requirements for federal, provincial, territorial partners gathered and listed by functionality and priority level. Through outreach activities with the federal, provincial and territorial food safety authorities, the Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN) has finalized a report that includes complete and validated business requirements by functionality and priority. The document containing business requirements has been endorsed by the federal, provincial and territorial steering committee for CFSIN. The functionalities of the technical solution supporting CFSIN are under development based on these business requirements.
An approved data dictionary by the federal, provincial and territorial steering committee for CFSIN, in addition to the identification of a system for food and hazard classification. A data dictionary was developed and was approved by the federal, provincial and territorial steering committee for CFSIN. The European Food Safety Agency's food classification was leveraged and adapted to meet CFSIN's food classification requirements. Food and hazard classification systems were developed and approved by the steering committee.
The number of multi-jurisdictional planning meetings that occur. Canadian Food Inspection Agency engaged in outreach activities with provinces and territories and established a federal, provincial, territorial steering committee to advance CFSIN. The steering committee had monthly teleconferences and had face-to-face meetings on a semi-annual or annual basis. The steering committee met once a year in fiscal 2014 and 2015; and twice each year from 2016 to 2018.
The number of members that have participated in pilots and additional working groups

Federal, provincial and territorial working groups of technical experts were created to advance specific activities. The federal, provincial, territorial steering committee members identified experts from their respective jurisdictions. For example, the Data Dictionary working group included representatives from five provinces and three federal partners. This group met on a monthly basis for a period of 18 months from January 2016 to June 2017, to finalize the Data Dictionary. The Nomenclature working group included representatives from three provinces and three federal partners.

Between 2016 and 2018, CFSIN initiated pilots with eight federal, provincial, territorial partners. The Canadian Food Safety Information Network conducted pilot projects to engage federal, provincial, territorial partners in program design as well as to create awareness, strengthen relationships and foster collaboration. Through these pilots, CFSIN has gained insight into the needs of the partners. This knowledge was used to create alignment among partners, mapping procedures, business rules, and identification of data dictionary essential elements. Some of the other focus areas that were being explored through program pilots included: data exchange, data integration, data trending and visualisation, nomenclature, analytics, and event management. Pilot projects were designed, implemented and analysed in order to help inform business processes in the implementation of CFSIN.

As a result of Canadian Food Inspection Agency's outreach activities, CFSIN federal, provincial and territorial steering committee for CFSIN currently has representation from all 13 provinces and territories.

Environmental Scanning

Engagement with provincial/territorial partners to gather details of how other departments conduct environmental scanning activities for departmental resources, sources of information as well as end products to further aid in developing CFSIN functionality.

Engagement sessions were held with subject matter experts from federal, provincial, territorial partners of CFSIN to determine established practices and sources of information. An inventory of national and international environmental scanning practices was developed. Gaps in the Canadian environmental scanning practices were identified based on the analysis. An environmental scanning tool and its functionalities were identified for CFSIN.
The number of analysts from Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners identified to provide environmental scanning capacity through environmental scanning tools.

The environmental scanning functionality within CFSIN is an automated system enabled by an algorithm that is composed of machine learning models.

All Canadian Food Safety Information Network partner organizations will have access to the environmental scanning tool. Analysts from federal, provincial and territorial partners have been identified to provide environmental scanning capacity through the environmental scanning tools.

Outreach and Training Sessions

Outreach and training sessions held with Health Canada Food Directorate's research and regulatory community.

Nine outreach training sessions were held with Food Directorate Staff within Health Canada.
Food laboratory research results uploaded to the Canadian Laboratory Information Network. The Canadian Laboratory Information Network (CANLINE) underwent major IT development in 2018 to 2019. The upgraded version has enhanced security, improved capacity to contain different types of data, and will better meet users' needs. The development work prevented the uploading of laboratory research results; however, starting in fiscal 2019 to 2020, the revised application will facilitate the uploading of more datasets in the system.
Brief explanation of performance

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network will respond to recommendations from the Report of the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak [Weatherill Report; recommendations 33 and 34]. The initiative will strengthen the ability of Canada's federal, provincial and territorial food safety authorities to share data and information to anticipate, detect and respond to foodborne risks and minimize the impact of food safety events. The Canadian Food Safety Information Network contributes to Innovative Practices and Networking by sharing food safety data and information across federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions. It also aligns with the Government of Canada (GOC) Strategic Plan for IM-IT 2017-2021, that encourages modern technology that supports information sharing and collaboration by providing a web-based solution to support collaborative activities within CFSIN.

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network supports the Government of Canada's approach to evidence-based policy. Aggregated food safety data will increase the reliability of scientific evidence in risk-based decision-making to strengthen Canada's food safety system. Additionally, CFSIN aligns with the Government of Canada's objective to improve relationships with federal, provincial and territorial partners. The initiative represents a pan-Canadian approach to food safety and requires that federal, provincial and territorial partners work collaboratively to achieve its goals.

A federal, provincial, territorial steering committee for CFSIN has been established to provide integrated federal/provincial/territorial leadership, input and guidance for the development and implementation of CFSIN program and associated food safety activities. A secretariat within CFIA supports the steering committee.

The CFIA and Health Canada work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates and meet regularly to discuss food safety issues of mutual concerns.

In fiscal year 2016-17, extensive consultations took place between CFSIN program team, CFIA business experts, and federal, provincial and territorial partners. From these consultations, a detailed list of business requirements was gathered. These requirements informed CFIA's Information Management and Information Technology enhancements, which facilitate the exchange and analysis of food safety data among Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners.

Results for the data support, coordination and outreach

The CFIA continues outreach activities with federal, provincial and territorial partners, including work on formalizing provincial and territorial participation in CFSIN through bilateral data sharing arrangements. Development of data and information sharing Memoranda of Understanding with provincial and territorial partners will continue to ensure partnerships are formalized with all provinces and territories. Additionally, engagement with food testing laboratories took place and included activities associated with quality management and accreditation of laboratories. To develop a detailed list of business requirements, extensive consultations took place among the program team for Canadian Food Safety Information Network, CFIA business experts, and federal, provincial and territorial partners. The CFIA, with its partners, developed a common food safety data dictionary, glossary of terms, and identified the data elements to be shared, and completed the development of a Canadian Food Safety Information Network system for food and hazard classification.

Results for the environmental scanning

In consultation with federal, provincial, territorial partners an environmental scanning tool has been identified. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is leveraging expertise of the National Research Council in developing the environmental scanning capability. The Canadian Food Safety Information Network will leverage the Global Public Health Intelligence Network (GPHIN) for coordinated environmental scanning activities to better understand incidents, technological trends, and emerging issues that could affect the safety of Canada's food supply through the development of a community in support of environmental scanning activities.

Outreach and training sessions

Health Canada provided training on the use of CANLINE and implemented outreach support to expand the use of CANLINE within its food science laboratories. Health Canada also identified activities, deliverables, resource requirements, work plans and detailed business requirements for the data transfer and CANLINE enhancements required in support of the future transfer of data to CFSIN.

The technical solution supporting CFSIN program activities is currently in its implementation phase and will be completed by December 2019. The horizontal program activities that took place between 2014 and 2019 to promote partner engagement led to a more informed transition to the implementation of the technical solution.

Programs receiving ongoing funding

Not applicable

Plans (including timelines) for evaluation and/or audit

Evaluation and/or audits to take place in 2022/2023, following the implementation of the technical solution that will support CFSIN.

Federal tax expenditures

Not applicable

Organizational contact information
Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

1400 Merivale Road,
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9
Canada
Telephone: 1-800-442-2342 / 1-613-773-2342
Teletypewriter: 1-800-465-7735
Internet: www.inspection.gc.ca

General contact information
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Christiane Villemure
Executive Director, Canadian Food Safety Information Network
Telephone: 613-773-5811

Health Canada

Karen McIntyre
Director General, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch
Telephone: 613-957-1821

Response to parliamentary committees and external audits

Response to parliamentary committees

House of Commons Standing Committee on Health's report:

A Study on the Status of Antimicrobial Resistance in Canada and Related Recommendations

HESA (Standing Committee on Health) Committee News Release, May 1, 2018 (report presented in the House of Commons on May 1, 2018):

The Committee's report examines current efforts across Canada and globally to address antimicrobial resistance, drawing on expert testimony from government officials, academics, international organizations and stakeholders in the fields of both human and animal health.

Over the course of six meetings held between June and November 2017, the Committee heard that work is already well underway in the public and private sectors to address antimicrobial resistance both in Canada and abroad. Witnesses explained that in Canada many of these activities are being coordinated through two main strategic plans: Antimicrobial Resistance and Use in Canada: A Federal Framework for Action and Tackling Antimicrobial Resistance and Antimicrobial Use: A Pan-Canadian Framework for Action. However, though progress has been made, witnesses identified the need for improved surveillance and data, stewardship, and more funding for research and innovation. Most of all, they called for greater federal leadership to promote collaboration and co-ordination to address this rising public health threat.

In response to these concerns, the Committee's report recommends that the Public Health Agency of Canada appoint a federal advisor to be a national champion for combatting antimicrobial resistance across Canada. It also calls on the Government of Canada to accelerate the development of its Pan-Canadian Action Plan to support the implementation of the Tackling Antimicrobial Resistance and Antimicrobial Use: A Pan-Canadian Framework for Action.

The Committee believes that these recommendations, coupled with the other critical actions identified in the report, are necessary to ensure that the current momentum to address antimicrobial resistance in Canada and abroad is not lost.

There were no recommendations for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Response to audits conducted by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada (including audits conducted by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

The following responses to audit recommendations by the Office of the Auditor General / Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development are based on CFIA management assertions:

Audit 1

OAG - Managing the Risk of Fraud (Spring 2017 Reports)

Summary of report

Fraud can happen in any organization. Fraud in a federal government organization can cause the loss of public money or property, hurt employee morale, and undermine Canadians' confidence in public services. Therefore, federal organizations must manage their fraud risks.

This audit examined whether the selected organizations had mechanisms in place to appropriately manage the risk of fraud.

The audit also examined whether the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) provided support to federal organizations to manage their risks, including fraud risks, and monitored the implementation of its relevant policies and directives.

The audit concluded that in the areas we examined, the selected federal organizations did not appropriately manage all of their fraud risks. The OAG did, however, see a number of good practices in all the organizations we examined. Overall, the organizations had appropriate governance structures to help them manage their risk of fraud, but some organizations did not use a strong enough approach to assess those risks, and none of the organizations made sure that the specific controls we looked at worked as they should have. For example, the organizations did not make sure that all their employees received mandatory training in values and ethics.

The audit also concluded that the TBS developed guidance for departments and agencies to help them assess and manage overall departmental risks. However, the Secretariat did not provide specific guidance on fraud risk management or monitor how departments and agencies managed their risk of fraud.

OAG recommendations and CFIA response

1.29 Ensure that its current fraud risk assessments are reviewed and updated periodically, following best practices.

CFIA Response: Agreed. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency will review the current formal fraud risk assessment and update it periodically, incorporating best practices. The first review will be completed by December 2017.

Action taken: completed

1.39 Identify operational areas at higher risk for fraud and develop targeted training for employees in these areas, and ensure that employees are taking mandatory training in a timely manner.

CFIA response: Agreed. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is committed to increasing employee awareness through regular reminder communications. The Agency will also conduct a needs assessment by June 2017 to identify the best approach for mitigating areas of higher risk for fraud. This assessment will consider the need for additional training or other products to mitigate fraud risks.

Action taken: completed

1.54 Ensure that logs used to track and manage declarations of conflict of interest and the related mitigation measures have sufficient and complete information to support the timely resolution of employee declarations of conflict of interest.

CFIA response: Agreed. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is currently reviewing the Conflict of Interest Secretariat's tracking and logging system to ensure critical data is captured for enhanced tracking and reporting capabilities. These activities will be completed by April 2017.

Action taken: completed

1.55 Identify operational areas at high risk for conflict of interest and ensure that public servants occupying positions in those areas are regularly required to indicate whether or not they are in a conflict of interest, and follow up on the implementation of mitigating measures for conflicts of interest on a risk basis

CFIA response: Agreed. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency currently requires all its employees to attest to the Conflict of Interest and Post-Employment Policy during their annual performance reviews. In addition, the Agency's Conflict of Interest Secretariat will commence a review to identify areas of high risk for conflict of interest and to consider whether additional mechanisms are required to confirm whether or not there is a conflict of interest. These actions will be completed by March 2018.

Action taken: completed

1.71 Ensure that contract files and contracting data are complete and accurate. They should also conduct data analytics and data mining to evaluate controls and identify signs of potential contract splitting, inappropriate contract amendments, and inappropriate sole-source contracting on a risk basis.

CFIA response: Agreed. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency will continue to perform monthly validations to ensure the accuracy and completeness of its procurement files, data, and reporting. Procurement records, including the accuracy of related financial coding, are now being reviewed and validated on a monthly basis. The Agency is also reviewing how best to increase the use of data analytics to evaluate procurement and contracting controls and identify possible areas of concern. Identified opportunities to increase the data analytics will be implemented by March 2018.

Action taken: completed

1.80 Maintain a comprehensive and complete log that captures and tracks the status of all allegations, where appropriate, including where corrective measures were implemented to prevent fraud.

CFIA response: Agreed. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is currently implementing a centralized function for the coordination, management, and reporting for any instances of fraud activity. A tracking system will be used to capture and monitor the status of suspected fraud cases and their related corrective action plans. These actions will be completed by March 2018.

Audit 2

2018 Spring Reports of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development to the Parliament of Canada

Summary of report

Salmon farming, also referred to as salmon aquaculture, is the farming of salmon for commercial purposes. In Canada, it is carried out primarily along the coasts of British Columbia and the Atlantic provinces. In 2016, the salmon aquaculture industry in Canada was valued at $1 billion.

Canada is the fourth largest producer of farmed salmon after Norway, Chile, and the United Kingdom. The Canadian salmon farming industry is considered to have significant potential for growth due to Canada's long coastline, cold water temperatures, and proximity to the United States market. Salmon aquaculture is a growing industry in Canada that provides an important source of fish, given declining wild fish stocks. Globally, aquaculture now provides half of all fish for human consumption. Raising farmed salmon in net pens in the ocean has potential effects on wild fish that need to be understood and addressed, as appropriate.

This audit focused on whether Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency managed the risks associated with salmon aquaculture in a manner that protected wild fish.

The audit concluded that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency had measures to prevent the introduction and spread of infectious diseases with respect to aquaculture. However, the Department and the Agency had not clarified roles and responsibilities for managing emerging diseases. This lack of clarification created a risk that potential emerging diseases affecting wild salmon would not be adequately addressed.

CESD recommendations and CFIA response

1.46 Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency should clarify their roles and responsibilities for managing emerging disease risks to mitigate the potential impacts of salmon farming on wild fish.

CFIA response: Agreed. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency will work with Fisheries and Oceans Canada to develop and document a formal process to discuss and evaluate emerging diseases of concern to either government entity and decide which entity will assume which role or responsibility with regard to such diseases in order to protect wild fish. Technical staff in the Agency and the Department will engage in the development of such a process during the 2018–19 fiscal year, with implementation by April 2019.

Action taken: in progress
Response to audits conducted by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada (including audits conducted by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

There were no audits in 2018–19 requiring a response.

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

There were no audits in 2018–19 requiring a response.

Status report on projects operating with specific Treasury Board approval

Link to the department's Program Alignment Architecture: Food Safety Program
Project name and project phase Original estimated total cost (dollars) Revised estimated total cost (dollars) Actual total cost (dollars) 2018–19
main estimates (dollars)
2018–19
planned spending (dollars)
2018–19
total authorities (dollars)
2018–19
actual spending (dollars)
Expected date of close-out
Canadian Food Safety Information Network (Stage 4) 23,238,740 25,672,921 14,905,319 - - 11,432,020 5,661,571 March 2020
Note

Dollar amounts exclude both the goods and services tax (GST) and the harmonized sales tax (HST). Total authorities include funding received through Supplementary Estimates and Carry Forward allocations.

Status report on transformational and major Crown projects

In the fiscal year 2018 to 2019 The Canadian Food Inspection Agency had no transformational or Crown Projects.

Up-front multi-year funding

The Agency has no agreements for this directive.

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

1400 Merivale Road,
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9
Canada
Telephone: 1-800-442-2342 / 1-613-773-2342
Teletypewriter: 1-800-465-7735
Online: Contact CFIA online

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
Consists of the department's Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on an appropriated department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
evaluation (évaluation)
In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical approach used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people may experience policies, programs and initiatives. The "plus" in GBA+ acknowledges that the gender-based analysis goes beyond biological (sex) and socio-cultural (gender) differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (structure de gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.
program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d'alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all of the department's programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department's Core Responsibilities and Results.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
strategic outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
Voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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