Language selection

Search

2020-2021 – Departmental Plan

Survey

Complete a survey on your experience using this Departmental Plan

PDF (856 kb)

ISSN: 2371-7386

On this page

From the Minister

Minister of Health

As the Minister of Health, I am pleased to present the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) 2020–21 Departmental Plan.

This plan outlines for Canadians the important initiatives the Agency is delivering and how it is planning to fulfill its mandate to safeguard food safety, protect the health of plants and animals in Canada, and support market access both now and in the future.

Canada continues to be recognized internationally for its high standards in food safety and plan and animal protection. However, the world in which the Canadian agri-food sector operates has changed significantly in recent years and is becoming increasingly complex. Demographic shifts, changing consumer preferences, global trade, and developments in science and technology have created new opportunities on the international stage. These changes also bring new challenges and risks to food safety and plant and animal health at home. Climate change is also introducing a whole new set of threats, pressures and emerging issues such as foreign animal disease, plant pest and disease vector incursions, invasive species, arboviruses, food safety issues. The CFIA will continue to stay abreast of these challenges and others in 2020-21 as it works to modernize the way in which it delivers on its business priorities.

CFIA is continuously striving to evolve and modernize its regulatory toolkit. Canada's Safe Food for Canadians Regulations have now been in force for one year. In 2020-21, the food system will become even stronger with new food safety requirements being phased in for the fresh fruits and vegetables and manufactured food sectors over the course of the year. CFIA will continue to work on broad regulatory renewal across other parts of CFIA business, with an ambitious regulatory reform agenda for plants and animals that moves away from the traditional prescriptive regulations of the past towards a more nimble, preventive, modern regulatory approach that can anticipate and adapt to the dynamic environment in which we operate.

Another key priority is a focus on integrated risk management, which represents an opportunity for the Agency to make use of risk-based data to target resources where they are most needed to protect the health and safety of Canadians. Over the last number of years, the Agency has become increasingly sophisticated in its application of risk intelligence to better inform inspection priorities and target areas of high risks. In 2020-21, CFIA will continue to explore other tools to improve its risk analysis.

Continued investment in CFIA inspection staff is paramount – this is the core of CFIA's work as a regulator. To this end, CFIA will continue to focus on delivering consistent and efficient inspections, enabled by the rollout of digital tools and mobile services. An increased focus on the use of technology will also allow the Agency to focus inspection resources on inspection, rather than paper-based administrative duties.

Building on the successful launch of its My CFIA portal for industry to conduct business transactions, such as licence application online, CFIA continues on its path to greater digital service delivery, creating significant efficiencies for the Agency and industry. In addition, Budget 2019 announced $27 million over five years for the continued digitization of CFIA services. In 2020–21, CFIA will build on the electronic services provided through My CFIA to include export certificates so Canadian businesses can move their products to other markets faster.

On the international stage, CFIA continues to lead Canadian efforts in many international fora across the food, plant and animal business lines to promote the development of science-based international standards. These are key avenues for Canada to advance its trade agenda and influence acceptable terms of trade in agricultural commodities and food.

The Government of Canada has committed to increase exports in the agriculture and agri-food sector to $75 billion by 2025. CFIA will continue to support economic growth of this sector by building on its reputation as a global leader and providing the technical expertise necessary to facilitate market access.

Finally, CFIA plays an ongoing and crucial role in protecting Canadians from food safety risks, and Canadian plant and animal resources from new risks that can have a devastating effect on our economy and environment. In 2020-21, for example, CFIA will work with domestic and international partners to prevent African Swine Fever - a contagious and fatal disease for pigs that has now aggressively spread through Asia, Africa and parts of Europe - from entering Canada.

In support of a healthier and more sustainable food system for Canadians, the Government of Canada introduced the Food Policy for Canada, including $24.4 million in funding over five years ($5.2 million ongoing), announced in Budget 2019 to enhance the vital work of the Agency. This funding will combat the global problem of food fraud, protect consumers from deception, and help companies in their fight against unfair competition.

CFIA continues to collaborate with Health Canada to move forward on food labeling modernization—an initiative that supports industry innovation, protects consumers and enables Canadians to make more informed choices about the food they buy.

Important work continues in close collaboration with trusted partners across governments, industry, academia and other partners to implement the Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada. This is a national vision to protect animal, plant and human health by addressing new and emerging risks to plant and animal health. The Agency also continues its collaborative efforts with trusted partners to prevent the spread of invasive species, which can have a devastating effect on economies.

Canada has declared its support for the United Nations' International Year of Plant Health in 2020. The initiative is expected to increase awareness among the public and policy makers of the importance of healthy plants and the necessity to protect them in order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Safeguarding global plant resources is vital to the health and wellbeing of Canadians. CFIA's programs, policies, activities and infrastructure factor in the effects of climate change, the variability it brings to our environment, and the impact it presents to the security of our crops and forests. CFIA is also safeguarding animal health, working with partners to prevent animal diseases such as African swine fever from entering Canada, and to prepare in the event it does cross our borders.

I invite you to read the 2020–21 Departmental Plan to see how CFIA, and its knowledgeable, dedicated employees, will continue its important work and deliver results on behalf of all Canadians.

The Honourable Patty Hajdu, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Plans at a glance

As a science-based regulator, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is responsible for safeguarding the safety of Canada's food supply and protecting Canada's plant and animal resource base, while facilitating trade of agriculture and agri-food products. CFIA strives to ensure that food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians; plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests; and Canadian products can be traded internationally.

CFIA operates within a rapidly changing context as Canada is inextricably linked to a global economy and international influences. Risks to the food system and animal and plant resources have changed considerably in recent years and will continue to evolve rapidly. A growing population and diverse consumer preferences have led to an increasing volume and variety of products on the market. Global commerce has brought new business models and consolidation in the food and agricultural industry. Emerging and disruptive technology require a regulatory system that promotes responsible adoption of such technology for public good without stifling innovation.

CFIA's operating landscape is constantly evolving. Rapid advancements in science and technology also bring new and innovative approaches to industry practices. A growing population and diverse consumer preferences are contributing factors to an increased volume and variety of products on the market. Further, the potential for export growth is reflected in the Government of Canada's commitment to increase export targets for the agricultural sector to $75 billion by 2025.

While these changes provide opportunities for Canadians, they bring operational challenges to CFIA. For instance, risks to food safety and animal health and plant health have increased as a result of expanded international trade, accelerated technological innovation, and increasingly complex and global supply chain of agricultural products. In addition, climate change is introducing potential risks, such as the possibility of pests and diseases becoming established in Canada where they would not have been able in the past.

To keep pace with the many changes in the domestic and global environment, CFIA will continue its efforts with its partners at home and abroad to modernize regulatory frameworks and service delivery models.

Key planning highlights for 2020-21 include:

  1. Regulatory reform
  2. Innovation
  3. Efficiency
  4. Preparedness and Prevention of Emerging Threats

Regulatory reform

CFIA continues to shift from the traditional prescriptive regulations of the past to more preventive and outcome-based regulations that can adapt to the dynamic environment in which it operates. CFIA has made significant progress in the food sector with the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations.

In 2020-21, CFIA will continue to move forward an aggressive regulatory agenda to modernize agricultural inputs (fertilizer, feed, and seed) and livestock traceability, complete a humane transportation framework, improve food labeling and address food safety risks in hatcheries, such as Salmonella. CFIA will also initiate work on full traceability systems (ie. boat-to-plane) in order to ensure consumers have the information they need to make informed choices.

Innovation

CFIA will continue to apply technology to improve service delivery and inform risk-based oversight by harnessing data (e.g., risk intelligence, surveillance and compliance results), equipping inspectors with modern inspection tools and exploring the potential for new technologies such as artificial intelligence. Through Budget 2019, the Government of Canada announced an investment of $27.2 million over five years to fully digitize export certificates. This investment will not only streamline the certification process for CFIA and industry, it will support international trade by allowing CFIA to communicate with other governments through more direct and reliable means.

Efficiency

An increased focus on the use of new inspection tools will allow CFIA to focus inspection resources on inspection, rather than paper-based administrative duties. Investments in risk intelligence will allow inspection resources to be targeted to areas of greatest risk. Building on the successful implementation of CFIA's Standard Inspection Procedures and deployment of digital inspection tools in non-meat food inspections, in 2020-21, CFIA will continue to enhance operational efficiencies in plant and animal inspections, including modernized slaughter inspections for swine and bovine.

Preparedness and Prevention of Emerging Threats

Emerging threats to food safety, plant and/or animal resources, such as African swine fever (ASF), are an ongoing reality. In 2020-21, CFIA will continue to lead national efforts to prevent and prepare for the introduction of diseases to Canada through collaboration and engagement with domestic and international partners.

Beyond2020

All of CFIA's activities embrace the principles of Beyond2020 – the Government of Canada's transformation initiative designed to foster the renewal of the federal public service workforce. The Agency already has modernization well underway, and we are "living" Beyond2020 in our day-to-day business as well as by incorporating being agile, inclusive and equipped into future plans.

For more information on CFIA's plans, priorities and planned results, see the Core responsibility: planned results and resources section of this report.

beyond2020. Description to follow.
Description for Beyond2020

The image contains a Venn diagram

The top circle has the word Agile at the top in bold and has the text Empower our workforce underneath the word Agile.

The bottom left circle has the word Inclusive at the top in bold and has the text Expand partnerships and remove barriers to collaborate underneath the word Inclusive.

The bottom right circle has the word Equipped at the top in bold and has the text Explore technology and tools to help you be more effective in your role underneath the word Equipped.

Core responsibility: planned results and resources

This section contains detailed information on the department's planned results and resources for each of its core responsibilities.

Safe Food and healthy plants and animals

Description

CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animals and plants, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment and economy.

Planning highlights

The health and safety of Canadians is the driving force behind the design and development of CFIA programs. In collaboration and partnership with industry, consumers, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, CFIA continues to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases. As a global leader, we also pursue improved international standards, fairness in trade practices and regulatory cooperation to advance market access for Canadian products. CFIA delivers its business in the following areas:

CFIA also plays a key role internationally by supporting:

CFIA's Core Responsibility is supported by three Departmental Results.

Departmental result 1: food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians

Description

Canada is recognized as having one of the strongest food safety systems in the world. CFIA designs and delivers programs to ensure that the food Canadians eat is safe, and that industry understands and follows sound rules to produce or import food that is safe and accurately labelled. CFIA's food safety programs aim to mitigate public health risks, prevent potential hazards in the food supply system and manage food safety emergencies when they occur.

Planning highlights

Safe Food for Canadians Regulatory Amendments

On January 15, 2019, the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) came into force. The regulations aim to make the food system as effective as possible by focusing on prevention and allowing for the faster removal of unsafe food from the marketplace. Furthermore, businesses, both big and small, are benefitting from reduced administrative burden as 14 sets of regulations were replaced with a single, comprehensive set of regulations. New licensing, preventive control and traceability requirements apply to food businesses that import or prepare food for export or to be sent across provincial or territorial boundaries. To date, over 9,000 licenses have been issued under the SFCR. Over the next year new regulatory requirements will come into force for fresh fruit, vegetables and most manufactured foods such as snack foods, cereals, beverages, baked goods and nuts. This will further strengthen the food safety system in Canada by extending the same controls to all food - whether it's made for trade across Canada or for export, or imported into Canada from other countries.

Did you know

In an effort to enhance the way digital services are delivered, CFIA has revamped its website using a data driven approach to make it easier for users to find important information on the new food regulations. The enhanced website is only the beginning of a new, dynamic web presence to provide the best user experience possible. As our users' needs change, the website will evolve to help meet the needs of Canadians and businesses regulated by CFIA.

Food Labelling Modernization

Did you know

In 2019-20, CFIA's Office of Food Safety and Recall (OFSR) celebrated its 20th anniversary. CFIA oversees approximately 250 recall incidents a year.

Consumer behaviour and domestic and international trade have changed significantly over the decades since many of the food labeling regulations were last amended. In June 2019, CFIA published proposed regulatory amendments that would modernize labeling requirements in key areas, such as date marking, food company information, and origin labeling for imported food, with the goals to promote consistency across food commodities and remove outdated labeling requirements. The amendments are intended to protect consumers and enable informed purchasing decisions, while allowing industry to innovate by making use of modern regulatory tools such as incorporation by reference for areas where industry and consumer needs are evolving. CFIA intends to publish final regulations in fall 2020, which will reflect the feedback received from a broad range of stakeholders. CFIA and Health Canada are working closely to align their respective labeling modernization activities by coordinating coming-into-force timelines of proposed regulatory changes in an effort to reduce the cumulative burden these changes can pose to industry.

Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program

A modernized slaughter inspection program (MSIP) moves the Agency from traditional inspection to a more science- and risk-based approach that increases industry responsibility while enhancing the inspector's capacity to focus on areas of highest risk to food safety by allocating time and resources to where they are most needed. Following a 2018 pilot program for hogs (MSIP-Hog), scientific data and performance indicators evaluated by CFIA experts demonstrated that new inspection procedures resulted in equally effective, or more effective, food safety outcomes. In 2020-21, the MSIP-Hog pilot will be expanded to additional hog establishments so more scientific data can be collected to validate initial findings. CFIA will also explore additional pilot projects in this area to provide equal or greater food safety to Canadians while increasing inspection efficiency.

Canadian Food Safety Information Network

Did you know

The Environmental Scanning Tool within the CFSIN platform is using machine learning algorithms in determining the relevance of open source articles.

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN) is a CFIA-led initiative that links federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) food safety authorities across Canada, enhancing their ability to collaborate and better anticipate, detect and respond to food safety incidents and emergencies. In 2020-21, FPT food safety authorities will have access to an inventory of Canadian food safety laboratories and food testing data, an environmental scanning tool, a secure event management space and a collaboration centre through CFSIN. CFIA will provide training to users within FPT food safety authorities to facilitate onboarding on to the CFSIN platform.

Food Surveillance Review

CFIA is undergoing a review of its surveillance activities for food safety, with similar exercises by the animal and plant health business lines, to ensure that this key control measure and risk intelligence is meeting the performance outcomes for CFIA's programs. CFIA undertakes surveillance activities to monitor the status of a specific hazard or risk; this could involve targeted surveillance, broad monitoring programs, or surveys which inform sound risk management strategies. CFIA is developing a work plan for the next 18 to 24 months to review the current end to end processes of CFIA's surveillance activities. The review will focus on sampling and testing, risk identification and analysis and establishing a pathway for the prioritization of activities. This work will inform an action plan for the implementation of risk-based decision-making, regular surveillance reviews and future work to expand CFIA's data sharing platform.

Tackling Food Fraud

Food fraud is the deliberate and intentional substitution, addition, tampering or misrepresentation of food, food ingredients or food packaging for economic gain. For example, adding sunflower oil to olive oil and passing it off as a pure product; labeling pollock as cod; and making false or disingenuous statements to mislead consumers on the benefit of a food product. It not only deceives consumers and damages their trust but could also present serious health risks.

Budget 2019 introduced a Food Policy for Canada, committing $24.4 million over five years and $5.2 million per year ongoing for CFIA to enhance federal capacity to detect and take enforcement action against instances of food fraud. Under the food fraud initiative, CFIA is enhancing the food fraud program by researching global best practices, conducting surveillance and targeted inspections, and determining strategies to detect and disrupt fraud in various food commodities supply chains. CFIA is also committed to collaborating at the international level to address this growing concern.

In 2018–2019, CFIA conducted an enhanced surveillance and enforcement of honey authenticity and published the Enhanced Honey Authenticity Surveillance Report. Building on this, CFIA will carry out additional targeted blitz-type activities to detect and promote awareness about food fraud in commodities identified as high risk. CFIA will also consider how tools such as traceability can support accurately labeling of food, such as fish and seafood. The food fraud prevention activities will ultimately protect consumers and enhance Canada's reputation in a global marketplace.

Departmental result 2: plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests and are safe for Canadians and the environment

Description

Looking to the future, complex issues such as climate change will likely accelerate, impacting Canada's economy, productivity and health across all sectors, including resource-based sectors like agriculture, fisheries and forestry. As the sectors regulated by CFIA evolve their business models and technologies to keep pace with this change, they introduce novel products and processes into the market. This can result in new pathways for risks and threats to emerge. CFIA's plant and animal programs aim to mitigate risks of new diseases impacting on Canada's plant and animal resource base, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system and sustainable environment.

Planning highlights

Regulatory Amendments

Canada's regulatory system must adapt to keep pace with emerging challenges, enable industry to make informed risk management choices, while maintaining strong relationships with regulated parties and stakeholders to protect the interests of Canadians. In 2020-21, CFIA plans to advance the following important regulatory proposals:

Did you know

Many medications are delivered to livestock in their feed. CFIA inspects manufacturers of medicated feed to verify that they are being produced in an appropriate manner so that they are safe and will work as intended. This control measure is even more important now as Canada takes actions to address antimicrobial resistance.

Establishment risk assessment model

In a world of changing risks, innovation and new technologies, CFIA is adapting to be more efficient and responsive. To support industry's ability to compete globally, the way it manages risk and risk-based decision making is at the core of the Agency's everyday work. Using scientific data and establishment-specific information, the Establishment Risk Assessment (ERA) model allows CFIA to evaluate a food domestic establishment to determine their level of risk. This means that establishments or sectors that require more attention can be easily identified.

By identifying these areas of risks, the ERA model for food allows CFIA to take a proactive, science-based and risk-informed approach to managing food safety risks. It takes into consideration risks associated with a specific food commodity, operation or manufacturing process, mitigation strategies implemented by the industry to control food safety risks, as well as establishment compliance information to allocate inspection resources accordingly. The ERA models will inform risk management along the food supply continuum for both domestic and import food activities. This approach has received international recognition in four published scientific articles, explaining the model development in international peer-reviewed journals and at presentations at conferences worldwide. Integration of the ERA model results in CFIA's work planning has started in the dairy and maple sectors in April 2019, and plans are in development to continue to phase in other sectors, such as the honey and egg sectors, in 2020-21.

African swine fever

Did you know

International travelers are considered one of the highest risks for introducing ASF to Canada. To help protect Canada's pigs, more than two dozen international airlines play inflight messaging to passengers to remind them of their declaration requirements at Canadian customs. Vigilance at the border has been amplified with additional detector dog teams and increases in seizures and monetary penalties.

CFIA is at the forefront of national efforts to prevent the introduction of African swine fever (ASF) to Canada. Although the disease cannot be transmitted to humans and does not pose a food safety risk, the disease causes high mortality in pigs, and there is no treatment or vaccine currently available. As the devastating disease continues to spread at an alarming pace in Asia and parts of Europe, prevention and preparedness activities are critical to protecting the Canadian pork sector. Canada is unique in that it exports approximately 70% of the pork it produces. One positive case of ASF in Canada would stop live swine and pork exports immediately and the resulting surplus would have significant economic impacts.

In 2020-21, CFIA will continue to lead national efforts to prevent and prepare for an introduction of ASF to Canada through collaboration and engagement with domestic and international partners. To address the considerable risk posed by ASF, CFIA co-developed a Pan-Canadian Action Plan with provincial/territorial and industry partners to ensure a focused and coordinated approach to prevention and preparedness activities. Key elements of the plan for the coming year include:

Sidney Centre for Plant Health

CFIA is leading a cluster of the science-based departments and agencies involved in the Government of Canada's efforts to renew its science infrastructure. The construction of Centre for Plant Health in Sidney, British Columbia will be aligned with this strategic science infrastructure initiative. The Centre is Canada's only post-entry quarantine, research, and diagnostic facility for tree fruit, grapevine, and small fruit, responsible for virus testing of these commodities in order to ensure the safe introduction of these materials into Canada.

The Centre will be a world-class plant health diagnostic and research facility that will provide CFIA and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada scientists and partners with state-of-the-art amenities to advance plant science and address challenges in Canada. The redevelopment of the Centre is a pathfinder project that will share lessons learned and best practices to inform future science infrastructure projects. Over the course of 2020-21, planning and design for the Centre will continue with construction planned to begin in 2021-22.

Equine infectious anemia disease control program

At the request of industry, the Equine Infectious Anemia Disease Control program is delivered by CFIA with a goal of decreasing the number of horses in Canada that are infected by Equine Infectious Anemia. The current program has made great strides in Eastern Canada by decreasing the number of positive test results for the disease. Building on this success, CFIA plans to phase in mandatory testing requirements for horses moving to some equine events in Western Canada in 2020. Under phase one of this new program, testing will be required when 200 or more horses are being moved to organized events in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Yukon.

Federal Grain Partnership

Domestic and international consumers have confidence in the quality, safety and integrity of Canadian grains as a result of the joint efforts between CFIA and the Canadian Grain Commission (CGC). In 2020-21, CFIA will continue to work with the CGC to make meaningful progress in delivering greater value to clients by enhancing service delivery.

Review of Regulatory Programs for Products of Biotechnology

With the advent of ground-breaking biotechnologies, and against the backdrop of over 25 years of experience in assessing products of biotechnology, CFIA is collaborating with Health Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), and industry associations to review the approval process for crops developed using biotechnology. This review will focus on minimizing regulatory burden while improving the predictability and clarity of the regulatory system for both domestic and international stakeholders. The changes will enable businesses to plan with greater confidence and, consequently, support investment and innovation in Canada. Over the course of 2020-21, proposals resulting from this review will be brought forward for consultation, and work towards refining and implementing the proposals will continue.

Canadian Plant Health Information System

Did you know

Since all Canadians have a role in helping to prevent and control the spread of invasive species, CFIA conducts plant protection surveys, identifies invasive species and shares information with the public to promote citizen science. For example, over 50 box tree moth traps were distributed in 2019-2020 to support a citizen-based monitoring campaign throughout Ontario, which assesses the extent of the pest's distribution.

Identified as a key area of action within the Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada, an information system is necessary to improve communication and support evidence-based decisions among plant health communities. As CFSIN capabilities come online in 2020-21, CFIA will operationalize the Canadian Plant Health Information System (CPHIS). This will take advantage of the new technical platform to provide an inventory of plant health diagnostic laboratories, plant pest specific environmental scanning and a secure event management space. CPHIS will be instrumental in the delivery of the objectives laid out by the Canadian Plant Health Council, which includes membership from federal, provincial and territorial plant health authorities.

Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Laboratory Network

CFIA leads the Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Laboratory Network which convenes international experts to collaboratively find innovative solutions to common issues around high containment laboratories. The knowledge builds capacity within CFIA's National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease, and positions CFIA as an internationally recognized leader in high containment zoonotic diseases. In 2020-21, CFIA plans to contribute to a group of global experts who will conduct a gap analysis on Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus; and conduct an exercise to assess operational capabilities of the network in the event of a zoonotic disease emergency.

Departmental result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally

Description

As a science-based regulator, CFIA advances Canadian trade interests while protecting the Canadian public and the environment from environmentally harmful products and foreign and domestic pests, disease, and food safety risks. CFIA is responsible for administering and enforcing legislation related to the import and export of food, animal and plant products. Canada's regulatory system for food safety and the protection of its animal and plant resource base is respected around world. CFIA's science-based approach earns the trust and confidence of other countries in Canada's systems and is the foundation for advancing market access for Canada's agricultural exports.

CFIA is developing the CFIA International Strategic Plan: Delivering on Government of Canada Priorities, which guides CFIA's international work through to 2025. In collaboration with other federal departments and stakeholders, CFIA's international efforts contribute to the Government of Canada's target to increase the value of Canadian agri-food exports to $75 billion by 2025, while preserving the ability of Canada to protect and promote the safety of imports and domestic products.

Planning highlights

International Standard Setting

Participating in international standard setting allows Canada to promote the development of science-based international standards, support predictable and transparent rules-based trade, and ensure Canadian approaches are reflected. To remain at the forefront of developing standards that are consistent with Canadian approaches and are conducive to the safe trade of food, animal and plant products, CFIA will continue to:

International regulatory cooperation and collaboration

CFIA cooperates with other countries to advance international regulatory and science initiatives. This ensures Canada's science-based positions and regulatory systems are accepted internationally; that regulatory and bilateral relationships are established and maintained; and that associated risks are mitigated. CFIA will continue to cooperate and collaborate with:

Did you know

CFIA is leading the development of international consensus on assessing environmental risk of genetically engineered plants through its work with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Once completed in 2021, this document will be adopted by member countries and developing economies as central guidance for environmental risk assessments.

Market access support

Many of the challenges the global trade environment saw in 2019 continue today. These challenges include trade uncertainty and protectionism, shifting consumer preferences, animal diseases, and an increase of new and complex regulatory requirements that affect Canadian exported commodities in several markets. In this context, CFIA provides the technical expertise needed to facilitate the opening, re-opening, and maintenance of markets while advancing issues related to food safety, animal and plant health.

In the year ahead, CFIA will work with other government departments, industry, and international partners and organizations to address these challenges to gain, maintain, and expand market access for Canadian agricultural and food products. CFIA will also continue to preserve the safety and integrity of Canada's domestic markets, products, and resources, while responding to increased demands by Canadians for imported products.

E-certification: redesigning the delivery model

CFIA oversees the issuance and delivery of export certificates to Canadian products as a type of official assurance that the product being received by the importing country meets their standards and requirements. CFIA is moving towards an automated process for requests for certification of food, animal and plant commodities for export using "My CFIA" – a convenient and secure online portal through which clients can request CFIA services. This will help address the increased demand for export certificates in a way that is both convenient and efficient.

In 2020-21, CFIA will continue to work with clients to ensure they are equipped to begin using My CFIA by providing new, online guidance and tools, as well as a mechanism for clients to seek assistance. CFIA will continue to promote the benefits of the My CFIA portal as a convenient and secure way to do business with CFIA. The promotion of My CFIA will help move clients to the digital portal, thereby, moving the Agency closer to its vision for a more digital service channel.

Gender-based analysis plus

CFIA is committed to ensuring gender impacts are meaningfully incorporated into its decision-making. As part of this commitment, CFIA regularly considers the factors in gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) when administering its food safety, animal and plant health programs and services and associated policies. As a science and risk-based regulator, CFIA also identifies risks to potentially vulnerable populations to incorporate mitigating measures into its programs and services.

Building off the implementation of CFIA's 2018-2020 strategic GBA+ action plan, CFIA will continue roll-out of GBA+ training to key staff, managers and executives to increase capacity and bolster its integration in key functional areas such as evaluation, service delivery, policy and programs. For 2020-21, CFIA will:

Experimentation

Innovative Solutions Canada

CFIA is one of 20 federal departments and agencies participating in the Innovative Solutions Canada (ISC) program. The ISC program is designed to stimulate growth in Canadian small businesses, while also providing federal departments and agencies with opportunities to develop new capabilities to meet their functional program delivery needs. Through the program, CFIA can exploit cutting-edge technology and products put forward by Canadian small businesses to solve problems in support of its mandate. Throughout 2020-21, CFIA will continue to develop, manage and implement the ISC program including planning for the establishment and administration of a granting program. In order to meet the funding targets allocated for ISC, CFIA will also establish contracts with successful bidders by identifying opportunities and addressing new challenges in the areas of plant health, animal health and food safety.

Comparative Risk Model

The Comparative Risk Model (CRM) is an analytical tool which uses data from external and internal sources to provide a comprehensive risk assessment across and within CFIA's business lines for food, animal health and plant. It is a foundational model which takes a comprehensive look at a portfolio of risks related to human health, the economy, animal health and welfare and the environment and how much current CFIA activities cost, along with their contribution to reducing risk. CFIA will continue to use the results to inform its resource allocation, strategic priority setting and tactical planning activities.

The CRM draws on CFIA's Establishment-based Risk Assessment (ERA) model, which identifies risks associated with federally regulated establishments in food and animal health (e.g., feed). The models are complementary tools, and both allow CFIA to take a proactive, evidence-based and consistent approach to manage risk, and enable CFIA to identify and act upon emerging trends that may impact CFIA's regulatory mandate.

In 2020-21, CFIA will continue to refine the foundation of the CRM's risk information. This will enable CFIA to enhance its understanding of current and emerging risks for decision making purposes.

Application Modernization

Delivery of CFIA's programs and services increasingly depend on IT applications and platforms and CFIA works to increase the digitization of inspections and services. In 2020-21, CFIA will move forward with the modernization of the first "wave" of "at risk" applications supporting service delivery across all of its business lines. CFIA is currently in the discovery and planning phase of this initiative with the objective of identifying the technical conditions, business value life cycle and underlying technology of its applications. CFIA will submit cost estimates and a project plan to the Treasury Board Oversight team. The plan, once refined, will be presented to the Government of Canada Enterprise Review Board (EARB) for endorsement.

Blockchain

The nature of this technology requires collaboration between multiple parties and organizations. Current areas of opportunity being pursued include collaborative work on the development of agricultural blockchain standards and data governance to support interoperability, the facilitation of international trade, and supply chain traceability.

CFIA will continue its collaboration with the Community of Federal Regulators, federal partners, key innovator firms, innovative industry associations and firms working in the blockchain space in the coming year. Underpinning further development in the blockchain space is the development of standards.

In the coming year CFIA will develop a user case with the Canadian Standards Council on a specific element of a supply chain with potential ledger standards. In addition, CFIA will continue to collaborate with a group of federal partners experimenting in this space.

Planned results for safe food and healthy plants and animals

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18 Actual results 2018-19 Actual results
Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians. Percentage of food businesses that comply with federal rules. 95% N/A 94.24% 93.86% 98.01%
Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians. Percentage of Public Warnings for high risk food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision 95% N/A 96.90% 93.90% 96.90%
Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests and are safe for Canadians and the environment. Number of harmful foreign plant pests that have entered and established themselves in Canada. 0 N/A 1 0 0
Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests and are safe for Canadians and the environment. Percentage of domestic seed, fertilizer, and new or modified plant varieties and products that comply with Canadian regulations and international agreements 95% N/A 93.20% 90.07% 92.20%
Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests and are safe for Canadians and the environment. Percentage of inspected loads of live animals that comply with federal humane transportation requirements. 95% N/A 98.53% 98.90% 99%
Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pests and are safe for Canadians and the environment. Number of cases of animal diseases that affect human and/or animal health that have entered into Canada. 0 N/A 0 0 0
Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally. Number of shipments of Canadian goods that are rejected at foreign borders because they do not meet their import requirements. TBD N/A N/A N/A 2,198

Financial, human resources and performance information for CFIA's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned budgetary financial resources for safe food and healthy plants and animals

2020–21 Main Estimates 2020-21 Planned spending 2021-22 Planned spending 2022-23 Planned spending
587,145,700 587,145,700 576,297,655 589,534,987

In fiscal years 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23, planned spending will decrease compared to prior years mainly due to the sunsetting of funding for various initiatives such as the Daily Shift Inspection Presence and Improving Food Safety for Canadians. However, CFIA will assess initiatives that are sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. When including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, CFIA spending is forecasted to be more stable.

Financial, human resources and performance information for CFIA's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for safe food and healthy plants and animals

2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents 2021–22 Planned full-time equivalents 2022–23 Planned full-time equivalents
5,089 4,882 4,884

Financial, human resources and performance information for CFIA's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services: planned results

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of Programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct services that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. These services are:

Planning highlights

Enhancing Open and Transparent Government

CFIA will advance its Transparency Agenda by proactively releasing relevant, accurate and timely information about its activities to support accountability, citizen engagement, and preserve public trust in the delivery of its mandate.

To support Canadians in making informed decisions about the food, animal and plant products they purchase and consume, CFIA will, among other things:

To help stakeholders have the information and tools they need to achieve compliance with regulatory requirements, CFIA will, among other things:

To show Canadians how and why CFIA takes action to safeguard their interests as part of enhancing their well-being, and that of the environment and the economy, CFIA also plans to release more information about its regulatory processes and decisions.

Canada's 2018-2020 National Action Plan on Open Government was released late last year, and continues to chart the federal path forward in promoting openness, transparency, and accountability in the Government of Canada. Open Government plays a critical role in ensuring that citizens are served by their governments in ways that are responsive, efficient, and fair. In 2020-21, CFIA will continue to work with its federal Open Science partners to collect data and information on the progress and impact of Open Science on Canadians.

Enhancing Project Management

CFIA has continued to strengthen the Agency's project management capabilities in response to the new Treasury Board of Canada Policy on the Planning and Management of Investments and new Directive on the Management of Projects and Programs. In 2020-21 CFIA will:

Planned budgetary financial resources for Internal Services

2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2020–21 planned spending 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending
142,553,596 142,553,596 142,124,704 142,743,826

Planned human resources for Internal Services

2020–21 planned full-time equivalents 2021–22 planned full-time equivalents 2022–23 planned full-time equivalents
940 940 940

Spending and human resources

This section provides an overview of the Agency's planned spending and human resources for the next three consecutive fiscal years, and compares planned spending for the upcoming year with the current and previous years' actual spending.

Planned spending

Departmental spending 2017–18 to 2022–23

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory) spending over time.

planned spending graph. Description follows.
Description for planned spending graph
2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23
Statutory 101 160 150 143 141 141
Voted 639 632 620 595 586 600
Total 740 792 770 738 727 741

This bar graph illustrates CFIA's actual spending for fiscal years 2017-18 and 2018-19, forecast spending for fiscal year 2019-20 and planned spending for fiscal years 2020-21, 2021-22 and 2022-23. Financial figures are presented in dollars along the y axis, increasing by $100 million and ending at $900 million. These are graphed against fiscal years 2017-18 to 2022-23 on the x axis. For each fiscal year, amounts for CFIA's program expenditures and statutory vote are identified.

In 2017-18, actual spending was $101 million for statutory items and $639 million for program expenditures for a total of $740 million.

In 2018-19, actual spending was $160 million for statutory items, $632 million for program expenditures for a total of $792 million.

In 2019-20, forecast spending is $150 million for statutory items, $620 million for program expenditures for a total of $770 million.

Planned spending for statutory items goes from $142 million in 2020-21, to $139 million in 2021-22 and to $141 million in 2022-23. Planned spending for program expenditures goes from $588 million in 2020-21, to $579 million in 2021-22 and to $600 million in 2022-23.

Total planned spending goes from $730 million in 2020-21, to $718 million in 2021-22 and to $732 million in 2022-23. Increased spending in 2018-19 and 2019-20 mainly relates to disbursements of ratified collective agreements.

Budgetary planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned spending for CFIA's core responsibility and to Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Core responsibility and Internal Services 2017–18 expenditures 2018–19 expenditures 2019–20 forecast spending 2020–21 main estimates 2020–21 planned spending 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending
Safe food and healthy plants and animals 600,782,338 645,785,932 620,456,061 587,145,700 587,145,700 576,297,655 589,534,987
Subtotal 600,782,338 645,785,932 620,456,061 587,145,700 587,145,700 576,297,655 589,534,987
Internal Services 138,235,246 146,521,359 149,775,570 142,553,596 142,553,596 142,124,704 142,743,826
Total 739,017,584 792,307,291 770,231,631 729,699,296 729,699,296 718,422,359 732,278,813

CFIA saw increased spending in 2018–19 and 2019-20, primarily relating to salary cost increase as CFIA ratified the majority of its collective agreements. This resulted in significant one-time retroactive salary settlement payments and ongoing cost increases.

Planned human resources

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned full-time equivalents (FTEs) for the core responsibility in CFIA's departmental results framework and to Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Human resources planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services
Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2017–18 actual full time equivalents 2018–19 actual full time equivalents 2019–20 forecast full time equivalents 2020–21 planned full time equivalents 2021–22 planned full time equivalents 2022–23 planned full time equivalents
Safe food and healthy plants and animals 5,291 5,187 5,138 5,089 4,882 4,884
Subtotal 5,291 5,187 5,138 5,089 4,882 4,884
Internal Services 980 974 972 940 940 940
Total 6,271 6,161 6,110 6,029 5,822 5,824

Given that 80% of CFIA's annual operating expenditures support personnel costs, limited flexibility existed to realign non-personnel authorities. As a result, CFIA saw a slight decline in its FTEs complement in fiscal years 2018–19 and 2019-20.

In fiscal years 2020–21, 2021–22 and 2022–23, planned FTEs will decrease compared to prior years mainly due to the sunsetting of funding for various initiatives such as the Daily Shift Inspection Presence and Improving Food Safety for Canadians. However, CFIA will assess initiatives that are sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. When including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, CFIA's FTEs utilization is forecasted to be more stable.

Estimates by vote

Information on CFIA's organizational appropriations is available in the 2020–21 Main Estimates.

Condensed future-oriented statement of operations

The condensed future oriented statement of operations provides an overview of CFIA's operations for 2019–20 to 2020–21.

The amounts for forecast and planned results in this statement of operations were prepared on an accrual basis. The amounts for forecast and planned spending presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan were prepared on an expenditure basis. Amounts may therefore differ.

A more detailed future oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

Condensed future oriented statement of operations for the year ending March 31, 2021 (dollars)
Financial information 2019–20 forecast results 2020–21 planned results Difference (2020–21 planned results minus 2019–20 forecast results)
Total expenses 853,080,000 898,512,000 45,432,000
Total revenues 53,161,000 53,000,000 (161,000)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 799,919,000 845,512,000 45,593,000

The forecast results for fiscal year 2019-20 and planned results for fiscal year 2020-21 slightly differ. The difference noted in the expenses is mainly explained by the increase of the allowance for expired collective agreements and the increase of amortization cost related to IT systems for fiscal 2020-21.

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Patty Hajdu

Institutional head: Dr. Siddika Mithani

Ministerial portfolio: Health

Enabling instrument(s):

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1997

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is a large science-based regulatory Agency with employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region and in four operational regions: Atlantic, Québec, Ontario and Western Canada.

CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food , and animal and plant health, which enhances Canada's environment, economy, and the health and well-being of its residents. Additionally, to support market access, CFIA works with Canada's trading partners to verify that Canadian products meet importing countries' technical requirements, thus expanding, gaining, restoring or maintaining access to markets.

Mandate and role

In fulfilling its role as a science-based regulatory agency, CFIA serves Canadians by developing policies and strategies, conducting specialized laboratory tests, and monitoring industry practice and compliance with legislation, in order to:

CFIA works with a variety of departments across all three levels of government, collaborates with stakeholders, and remains receptive to the values of interests groups. Together, all parties play a unique role in managing food, plant and animal risks, incidents and emergencies as they occur, and the implementation of appropriate measures and interventions where necessary.

For more information on the department's organizational mandate letter commitments, see the "Minister's mandate letter".

Operating context

CFIA is responsible for safeguarding food safety, animal health and plant health, as it relates to the health and well-being of Canadians, the environment and our economy. The Agency shares these responsibilities with various levels of government, industry and other stakeholders with whom it implements safety measures, manages risks, incidents and emergencies as they occur.

CFIA must consider multifaceted external factors in its daily operations. A rapidly changing global economy means that CFIA must be responsive to an increasingly complex global supply chain of food and agricultural products; changing consumer preferences; new business models and market demands; and deepening challenges towards the established international rules-based trade regime. CFIA navigates such external influences while considering the impacts of advanced science and technological change on both CFIA's regulatory oversight and industry practices. Furthermore, CFIA remains vigilant of the escalating impacts of climate change on the movement and survival of regulated plant and animal pests and diseases.

CFIA's internal operating environment is guided by the Agency's forward agenda. CFIA continues to advance regulatory reform to more effectively manage risk, reduce burden on industry and further public trust. As part of the Government of Canada's digital-first strategy, CFIA will exploit new technology and innovation to deliver enhanced client services; equip inspectors with modern tools; and share and harness data with provincial and territorial regulatory partners and laboratories. CFIA's investment in risk intelligence will enhance operational efficiency and better align Agency resources with evolving risks. As a global leader, CFIA will continue to lead domestic and international efforts to prevent and prepare for emerging threats to the food supply, as well as plant and animal health. Together, focused action on these priorities will enable CFIA to better respond to heightened policy and service delivery expectations, as well strengthen its reputation as an internationally recognized science-based regulator.

Looking ahead, CFIA is also committed to the Government of Canada's Beyond2020 vision to build a workforce that is agile, inclusive and equipped to meet the current and future challenges and opportunities faced by the federal public service.

Reporting framework

CFIA's approved departmental results framework and program inventory for 2020–21 are as follows.

reporting framework. Description follows.
Description for image: Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory

At the top of image, there is a table with four columns in a row.

The first column spans from the top to the bottom of the table with text rotated ninety degrees counter clockwise. The first column says:

  • Departmental Results Framework

The second column has multiple rows of boxes

The first box in the second column says:

  • Core Responsibility: Safe Food and healthy plants and animal

The second box in the second column says:

  • Departmental Result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians

The third box in the second column says:

  • Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment

The fourth box in the second column says:

  • Departmental Result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally

The third column has multiple rows that are aligned to the second box, third box, and the fourth box in the third column.

The first box in the third column is blank.

The second box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians" and it says:

  • Percentage of food businesses that comply with federal rules

The third box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 1: Food sold in Canada is safe and accurately represented to Canadians" and it says:

  • Percentage of Public Warnings for high risk food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decision

The fourth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Number of harmful foreign pests that have entered and established themselves in Canada

The fifth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Percentage of domestic seed, fertilizer, and new or modified plant varieties and products that comply with Canadian regulations and international agreements

The sixth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Percentage of inspected loads of live animals that comply with federal humane transportation requirements

The seventh box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 2: Plant and animal resources are protected from diseases and pets and are safe for Canadians and the environment" and it says:

  • Number of cases of animal diseases that affect human and/or animal health that have entered into Canada

The eighth box in the third column is aligned to the "Departmental Result 3: Canadian food, plants and animals and their associated products can be traded internationally" and it says:

  • Number of shipments of Canadian goods that are rejected at foreign borders because they do not meet their import requirements

There is a blank row separating the first and second table.

The second table has two columns in a row.

The first column spans from the top to the bottom of the table with text rotated ninety degrees counter clockwise. The first column says:

  • Program Inventory

The second column has several rows.

The first row in the second column says:

  • Setting Rules for Food Safety and Consumer

The second row in the second column says:

  • Food Safety and Consumer Protection Compliance Promotion

The third row in the second column says:

  • Monitoring and Enforcement for Food Safety and Consumer Protection

The fourth row in the second column says:

  • Permissions for Food Products

The fifth row in the second column says:

  • Setting Rules for Plant Health

The sixth row in the second column says:

  • Plant Health Compliance Promotion

The seventh row in the second column says:

  • Monitoring and Enforcement for Plant Health

The eighth row in the second column says:

  • Permissions for Plant Products

The ninth row in the second column says:

  • Setting Rules for Animal Health

The tenth row in the second column says:

  • Animal Health Compliance Promotion

The eleventh row in the second column says:

  • Monitoring and Enforcement for Animal Health

The twelfth row in the second column says:

  • Permissions for Animal Products

The thirteenth row in the second column says:

  • International Standard Setting

The fourteenth row in the second column says:

  • International Regulatory Cooperation and Science Collaboration

The fifteenth row in the second column says:

  • International Market Access Support

Supporting information on the program inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to CFIA's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

CFIA will table its 2020 to 2023 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) in June 2020, in accordance with the requirements of the Federal Sustainable Development Act. A link will be made available on our departmental website after the DSDS is tabled in Parliament.

Details on transfer payment programs

TPPs with total planned spending of $5 million or more

3 year plan for Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by Regulations under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act (S.C., 1997, c.6) - Statutory

Start date 1997-98
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Compensation payment
Type of appropriation Statutory authority under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 1997-98
Link to departmental result(s) Safe Food and Healthy Plants and Animals
Link to the department's Program Inventory Monitoring and Enforcement for Plant Health
Monitoring and Monitoring and Enforcement for Animal Health
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program Compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Expected results In accordance with the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, owners and/or producers will be compensated for ordered destruction of animals or plants for the purpose of disease control. Compensation will be provided according to the market value of the animals or plants.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation 2015
Note: CFIA's Plant Protection Program was evaluated in 2015, including compensation under the Plant Protection Act.
Decision following the results of last evaluation Continuation
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation TBD
General targeted recipient groups Canadians who have had animals and/or plants ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients Information is provided to the eligible producers when animals and/or plants are ordered to be destroyed.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2019–20 planned spending 2020–21 planned spending 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments $12,500,000 $12,500,000 $12,500,000 $12,500,000
Total program $12,500,000 $12,500,000 $12,500,000 $12,500,000

TPPs with total planned spending of less than $5 million

3 year plan for Innovative Solution Canada (ISC)
Start date 2018-19
End date 2021-22
Type of transfer payment Grant
Type of appropriation Voted appropriation – annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2018-19
Link to departmental result(s) Safe Food and Healthy Plants and Animals
Link to the department's Program Inventory The ISC program is linked to all programs under CFIA's Program Inventory.
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program The ISC program supports the generation of new and unique intellectual property (IP), stimulation of R&D collaborations, and growth of small businesses in the Canadian innovation ecosystem.
Expected results CFIA's Innovative Solutions Canada grants will promote the development of innovative approaches to improve sector outcomes.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation N/A – new program
Decision following the results of last evaluation N/A
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation TBD
General targeted recipient groups Canadian small businesses
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients Applicants and recipients engagement and consultation is conducted by Innovation, Science and Economic Development (ISED) Canada.
3 year plan for Federal Assistance Program (FAP)
Start date 1997-98
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Voted appropriation – annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2014-15
Link to departmental result(s) Safe Food and Healthy Plants and Animals
Link to the department's Program Inventory The FAP is linked to all programs under CFIA's Program Inventory.
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program The FAP supports projects and initiatives that advance the CFIA's strategic outcome of a safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.
Expected results The expected results include:
  1. scientific and technical knowledge is advanced and/or enhanced,
  2. individual knowledge and skills are developed and/or improved,
  3. international collaborations are expanded and/or strengthened,
  4. organizations or initiatives are established or sustained
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation 2016-17
Decision following the results of last evaluation Continuation
Fiscal year of next planned evaluation 2020-21
General targeted recipient groups Eligible recipients include those whose goals and objectives are complementary to and supportive of CFIA's mission and strategic outcome. This includes individuals, groups of individuals, agriculture and commodity organizations, and conservation districts.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients Program managers conduct informal outreach and consultation with potential recipients to seek new project proposals that may be considered for support with FAP contributions.

Gender-based analysis plus

General information
Governance structures
  • The CFIA's Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) strategic action plan uses the six key elements outlined by Status of Women Canada for the successful integration of a Gender-based Analysis Plus Framework. These elements will support the systematic use of GBA+ across the Agency, and provide a foundation for staff to develop competencies and apply GBA+ to their work, and ensure GBA+ is integrated into Agency decision-making processes.
  • As signatory to the Health Portfolio's Sex and Gender-Based Analysis Policy, the CFIA ensures all research, legislation, policies, programs and services will apply GBA+ as part of a framework which includes the following elements:
  • The application of quality GBA+ into decision-making, means using CFIA's GBA+ templates for a deeper, thorough analysis of the needs and impacts of diverse population groups to inform options and recommendations for all budget and Cabinet-related proposals and other initiatives
  • In addition to a GBA+ tracking mechanism that helps monitor the quality and overall performance of the Agency's gender-based analyses, as well as aids reporting and surveys, a CFIA-specific Logic Model along with a suite of performance measurement indicators will be introduced. Following an environmental scan and needs analysis of GBA+ diversity factors, the GBA+ responsibility centre will work with CFIA's programs to strengthen the collection and analysis of primary individual and business-relevant diversity factor data for improved GBA+.
  • GBA+ Champion: the Agency's Vice-President of Policy and Programs Branch (PPB) provides an essential role in leading and coordinating awareness raising and capacity building efforts, including the promotion, implementation and reporting on GBA+ in policies, programs and legislation.
  • GBA+ Responsibility Centre: with the GBA+ Focal Point in the Program Policy Integration Division of PPB, the responsibility centre liaises with other departments and agencies and leads the integration, promotion, monitoring, and reporting of GBA+ activities, and ensures quality and consistency of GBA+ in policy, programs, and legislation. To ensure the comprehensiveness of cabinet and budget proposals, they will be reviewed by the CFIA's GBA+ responsibility centre, who will monitor and track performance in applying quality GBA+, including acquiring research and evidence to fully support gender and diversity considerations.
  • The ad-hoc, advisory group will be formalized into the CFIA GBA+ Advisors Network, comprised of functional area and Branch representatives as a national forum to consult, collaborate, and exchange ideas and information on GBA+.
Human resources
  • The CFIA has one full-time employee as the GBA+ focal point that is responsible for GBA+ activities / implementation at the Agency including: the GBA+ Responsibility Centre
  • A GBA+ Champion that supports and promotes awareness of GBA+ at the CFIA with senior management and governance committees.
  • The ad-hoc, inter-branch advisory group will be supplanted by a formal GBA+ Advisors Network; a permanent body of agency managers directors and subject-matter experts that meets regularly to strengthen GBA+, prioritize implementation and share information.
Planned initiatives
  • In the coming fiscal year, CFIA's food safety science program will be finalizing the Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN), a federal, provincial and territorial initiative that will better anticipate, detect and respond to food safety events. Supporting improved health outcomes under the Gender Results Framework, the CFSIN platform aids prevention, detection and faster response to food safety incidents (such as those related to E. coli or listeria outbreaks).
  • For listeria, this represents an increased benefit for pregnant women, older adults, fetuses, neonates, and immune suppressed people, as clinical listeriosis affects mainly this sub-group of the population.
  • With sufficient funding, a baseline scan is proposed to track and report on progress on the gender equality and diversity of Canada's food safety authorities and food testing laboratories that will be using the CFSIN Technical Solution. As a shared initiative, this scan will need to be undertaken with CFIA's partners from the Public Health Agency of Canada, Health Canada and provincial and territorial food safety authorities.
  • To measure performance, the CFIA will gather feedback received from diverse groups and stakeholders on the accessibility and use of technological upgrades in question, and refine its implementation plan as needed. The net impact of the initiative on gender equality and diversity will be positive. As an end goal, having a diverse and inclusive spectrum of laboratories across Canada, including the potential to fund the opening of additional indigenous-represented facilities regionally, will allow for stronger surveillance and better data sharing mechanisms for all population segments.
Reporting capacity and data
  • To best support CFIA's core responsibility, Safe Food and Healthy Plants and Animals, the CFIA undertakes gender-based analysis for Cabinet, regulatory and program development initiatives. For programs related to Food Safety and Consumer Protection (Compliance Promotion/Monitoring and Enforcement), though the CFIA does not collect gender disaggregated microdata in any of its forms at this time, the Agency does use Health and census information from Statistics Canada studies like the Census of Agriculture to consider such socio-economic factors as age, gender (woman-owned businesses), income (small – medium-sized businesses), race and geography.
  • For its international programs, which include standard setting and market access support, the CFIA uses data from Global Affairs Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service to understand the realities of female-owned, small- and medium-sized exporters, and other diverse groups to help prioritize expanded exports, greater trade liberalization and supporting international trade and standard-setting.
  • The CFIA intends to review the availability of data and develop a plan with both the Health and Agriculture Portfolios to augment the Agency's Data Asset Inventory for improved GBA+ in rule-setting, compliance promotion, monitoring and enforcement. This will reinforce the CFIA's strong data foundation, which includes a logic model and CFIA-specific GBA+ performance indicators, and position the Agency to align well with expanded priorities and policies such as TBS Policy Direction on Building Inclusive Services.

Horizontal initiatives

Horizontal Initiative – Close-Out Reports

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Renewal Close-Out Report

Name of the horizontal initiative: BSE Renewal

Start date: 2014-15 Renewal Core BSE program (program regularly renewed since inception in 2003)

End date: March 31, 2019 (BSE funding was renewed in Budget 2019, however it is no longer a Horizontal Initiative)

Lead department: Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Number of times renewed: 2

Partner departments: Health Canada; Public Health Agency of Canada

Other non-federal partners: N/A

Expenditures (millions): Total federal funding from start to end date (Authorities and Actual): $40.3M ($38.2M actual) for 2014-15, $40.7M ($39.0M actual) for 2015-16, $40.7M ($35.1M actual) for 2016-17, $40.7M ($37.0M actual) for 2017-18, $40.7M ($38.7M actual) for 2018-19.

Themes and Internal Services
Theme and Internal Services Authorities Actual Spending Variance(s)
CFIA FSP - SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain $45,946,160 $40,358,636 $5,587,524
CFIA FSP - Import Controls $3,347,815 $4,529,196 ($1,181,381)
CFIA FSP - BSE Surveillance $80,912,125 $77,062,960 $3,849,165
CFIA FSP - Cattle Identification $10,672,140 $10,929,481 ($257,341)
CFIA FSP - Export Certification $29,822,860 $24,599,887 $5,222,973
CFIA FSP - Technical Market Access Support $22,794,635 $20,440,965 $2,353,670
HC Health Products - Risk Assessment $1,538,882 $2,446,305 ($907,423)
HC Food Safety and Nutrition - Risk Assessment and standard setting $4,194,844 $3,821,503 $373,341
PHAC Food-borne and Zoonotic Diseases - Prion Diseases Program $4,000,000 $3,899,927 $100,073
Totals $203,229,461 $188,088,860 $15,140,601
Result:
Performance indicator(s) and trend data for shared outcome(s):
Performance indicators Trend data
Governance Structures
1. Specified Risk Material (SRM) Removal from the Human Food Chain
(1.1) Industry compliance rate for removal of SRM.
  • The CFIA conducts on-site verification of federally licensed slaughter and boning establishments. The CFIA also reviews records to verify compliance and the effectiveness of the control program. In 2018-2019, 92.40% (6015/6510) of the planned programming specific to the enforcement and verification of SRM removal was delivered nationally. A compliance rate of 99.50% was achieved in tasks delivered.
  • CFIA continued to conduct annual inspections of targeted non-federally licensed cattle slaughter establishments and audits of provincial inspection systems. Records are reviewed to ensure the removal, segregation and disposal of Specified Risk Material from food are properly carried out and to determine the adequacy of provincial oversight for plant controls.
2. Import Controls
(2.1) Percentage of import policies verified and updated as required.
  • Import controls must provide an appropriate level of protection for public, animal, and environmental health within Canada, while being scientifically supported and meeting Canada's domestic regulatory requirements and complying with international obligations
  • 100% of Animal Products and by Products Import Policies have been reviewed and updated in one single Import Frame Work Policy including the BSE-related import conditions by commodity.
(2.2) BSE Import Policy is verified and updated as required.
  • The BSE import policy for bovine animals and animal products, animal by-products, germplasm, animal food, meat, meat by-products and veterinary biologics, of bovine origin, adheres closely to the recommendations of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE).
  • In 2019, the BSE Import Policy has been updated to reflect the requirements indicated with respect to the slaughter of bovine animals under the authority of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR).
3. BSE Surveillance
(3.1) Temporal trend in exposure to the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy agent in the cattle population.
  • In the 2018-19 fiscal year, the total number of BSE samples tested by the National TSE Network Laboratories was 31,747 (21,206 CFIA and 10,541 provincial). Sampling for BSE surveillance is conducted primarily on-farm or at dead stock facilities.
4. Cattle Identification
(4.1) Number and development status of inspection tools in place
  • Inspection tools (e.g. Manual of procedures) and materials (e.g. guidance, list of approved indicators) are relevant and up-to-date. Inspectors' training courses (e-courses and classroom delivery) are available and up-to-date.
(4.2) Number of inspectors trained
  • All inspectors verifying compliance have completed the required training courses.
(4.3) Ratio of non-compliances versus number of Compliance Verification System (CVS) tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage
  • 95% compliance (5% non-compliance) of CVS tasks carried out in 2018-19
(4.4) Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards
  • Few responses to disease and epidemiological investigations are completed within an ideal time frame due in part to the complexity of investigations of diseases with a long incubation period like BSE. These issues are aimed to be mitigated through a regulatory amendment due to be published in Canada Gazette, Part 1 in 2020.
5. Export Certification
(5.1) Percentage of exports meeting the standards of the importing country as required
  • 100% of exports meet the required BSE standards of importing countries.
6. Technical Market Access Support
(6.1) Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada
  • The Canadian meat sector, based on retail sales values (including beef, chicken, lamb, pork, packaged or fresh turkey and other meat categories), is expected to grow from US$22.1 billion (C$28.2 billion) in 2018 to US$29.7 billion (C$33.9 billion) in 2023
  • Between 2014 and 2018, Canadian retail sales in the meat sector for beef increased by 2.2%, going from US$8.3 billion to US$9.1 billion. Fresh beef from over the retail counter is the largest category, with US$5 billion in off-trade sales in 2018, while frozen processed or whole cuts of beef is expected to remain the fastest growing category, with an anticipated growth rate of 5% between 2019 and 2022
  • Per capita expenditure of meat in Canada stood at US$594 in 2018, which was higher when compared to both global (US$180) and North American regional (US$558) averages

Note: Growth rates were determined using Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR).

7. Health Products Risk Assessment and Targeted Research
(7.1) Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on BSE/TSE topics
  • Since 2015, Health Canada staff has attended 8 training events, conferences or symposiums on BSE/TSE related topics.
(7.2) Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. biologics).
  • In 2017-18, one Health Risk Assessment as a result of BSE suspicion in biologics.
(7.3) Number of products / product lots assessed for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies / Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy risks).
  • Health Canada exceeded its target each year of 400 lots per year assessed for TSEs (or risks thereof). Since 2014, an average total of 582 lots of human/animal plasma derived products and human derived excipients products per year have been assessed.
8. Food Safety and Nutrition Risk Assessment
(8.1) Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy / transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics
  • Health Canada increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSEs science, risk and product surveillance by attending meetings such as the "International Workshop on Chronic Wasting Disease: Emerging Questions in Science and Policy" in 2017-18, which strengthens the scientific and regulatory capacity in this area and permits access to key BSE/TSE experts.
(8.2) Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted as a result of BSE suspicion by product line (i.e. food products)
  • In 2015-16, Health Canada provided expert advice and recommendations on the risks of human exposure to BSE through the consumption of Canadian beef and beef products, as well as on the risks of human exposure to classical and atypical scrapie through the consumption of food products derived from Canadian sheep and goats.
  • In 2017-18, Health Canada prepared a risk advisory opinion on potential human health risks from chronic wasting disease. The Department also continued to provide food safety risk assessment and policy advice to federal and provincial regulatory authorities on BSE/TSE-related risks and conducted environmental scanning activities to identify new and emerging threats from BSE/TSE in the food supply.
(8.3) Number of knowledge transfer activities related to BSE/TSE
  • Health Canada has engaged in succession planning activities to ensure that there is continuity in the Health Canada relationships with key stakeholders in the area of BSE/TSE expertise.
9. Prion Diseases Program
(9.1) Alignment of Public Health Agency of Canada data from human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies surveillance with international benchmarks; number of research presentations and publications; use of policy advice in decision-making
  • In 2015 PHAC began participation in an EU Joint Programme - Neurodegenerative Disease sponsored consortium to gain knowledge about a novel test to detect infectious prions in CSF, real-time QuIC analysis.
  • In 2015-2016 PHAC developed capacity to produce commercially unavailable test reagents and perform retrospective QuIC analysis and validation.
  • QuIC test and performance parameters introduced to clients through presentations at national conferences and meetings as well as publication in peer reviewed journals. (2016-2019)
  • QuIC test incorporated into panel of tests performed on CSF samples submitted to the NML for CJD testing. (2017)
Brief explanation of performance

The Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Program supports government-wide and CFIA priorities and will enhance how CFIA carries out its activities. Program activities produce their intended outputs and are aligned with overall program objectives.

Programs receiving ongoing funding

Funding for the BSE Management Program was renewed for five years in Budget 2019.

Plans (including timelines) for evaluation and/or audit

The CFIA conducted an evaluation of its Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Management Program from 2013-14 to 2014-15. The scope covered the time period from 2009-10 to 2012-13 and CFIA received $193.5M of funding over this time period. The evaluation concluded that the BSE Program should continue. More information can be found on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.

BSE has not been explicitly identified for audit or evaluation, as per the 2019 CFIA Integrated Risk Based Audit and Evaluation plan. However, BSE will be considered for inclusion during the development phase of subsequent plans.

Planned evaluation coverage over the next five fiscal years
Planned evaluation coverage, 2019–20 to 2023–24
Program Last evaluation Evaluations planned in the next 5 years Fiscal year of approval 2019–20 Program spending covered by the planned evaluation (dollars) 2019–20 Program spending covered by all planned evaluations (dollars) 2019–20 Total program spending (dollars) Rationale for not evaluating Program or spending
Setting Rules for Plant Health Evaluation of the Plant Protection Program (2014-15) Genomics Research Development Initiative 2020-2021 $240,000 $18,350,000 $18,350,000 Not applicable
Domestic Risk Management 2021-2022 $18,110,000
Plant Health Compliance Promotion Evaluation of the Plant Protection Program (2014-15) Domestic Risk Management 2021-2022 $1,638,000 $1,638,000 $1,638,000 Not applicable
Monitoring and Enforcement for Plant Health Evaluation of the Plant Protection Program (2014-15) Single Window Initiative 2020-2021 Not applicable $44,491,000 $44,491,000 Not applicable
Domestic Risk Management 2021-2022 $44,491,000
Permissions for Plant Products Evaluation of the Plant Protection Program (2014-15) Export Certification 2019-2020 $11,103,480 $27,416,000 $27,416,000 Not applicable
Domestic Risk Management 2021-2022 $16,312,520
Setting Rules for Animal Health Evaluation of the BSE Management Program (2014-15) Terrestrial Animal Health Program  Table note1 2019-2020 $6,858,729 $7,098,729 $28,974,406 Not applicable
Genomics Research Development Initiative 2020-2021 $240,000
Animal Health Compliance Promotion Evaluation of the BSE Management Program (2014-15) Terrestrial Animal Health Program  Table note1 2019-2020 $357,430 $357,430 $5,765,000 Not applicable
Monitoring and Enforcement for Animal Health Evaluation of the BSE Management Program (2014-15) Terrestrial Animal Health Program  Table note1 2019-2020 $31,941,480 $31,941,480 $56,235,000 Not applicable
Single Window Initiative 2020-2021 Not applicable
Permissions for Animal Products Evaluation of the BSE Management Program (2014-15) Terrestrial Animal Health Program 2019-2020 $1,859,006 $7,454,430 $18,406,000 Not applicable
Export Certification 2019-2020 $5,595,424
Setting Rules for Food Safety and Consumer Protection Meat and Poultry Program Evaluation (2017-18) Genomics Research Development Initiative 2020-2021 $240,000 $55,772,953 $55,772,953 Not applicable
Food Safety Program 2021-2022 $55,532,953
Food Safety and Consumer Protection Compliance Promotion Meat and Poultry Program Evaluation (2017-18) Food Safety Program 2021-2022 $12,074,715 $12,074,715 $12,074,715 Not applicable
Monitoring and Enforcement for Food Safety and Consumer Protection Meat and Poultry Program Evaluation (2017-18) Single Window Initiative 2019-2020 Not applicable $221,000,761 $221,000,761 Not applicable
Food Safety Program 2021-2022 $215,150,817
Canadian Food Safety Information Network 2022-2023 $5,849,944
Permissions for Food Products Meat and Poultry Program Evaluation (2017-18) Export Certification 2019-2020 $12,241,125 $30,225,000 $30,225,000 Not applicable
Food Safety Program Evaluation 2021-2022 $17,983,875
International Standards Setting Meat and Poultry Program Evaluation (2017-18) Market Access 2023-2024 $3,861,111 $3,861,111 $3,861,111 Not applicable
International Regulatory Cooperation and Science Collaboration Meat and Poultry Program Evaluation (2017-18) Market Access 2023-2024 $6,441,941 $6,441,941 $6,441,941 Not applicable
Market Access Support Meat and Poultry Program Evaluation (2017-18) Canadian Food Safety Information Network 2022-2023 Not applicable $6,490,917 $6,490,917 Not applicable
Market Access 2023-2024 $6,490,917
Internal Services Internal Services tend to be examined as part of other evaluations. They are typically not chosen as stand-alone topics. Not applicable 2023-2024 $138,638,594 $138,638,594 $138,638,594 Not applicable

Table notes

Table note 1

The Terrestrial Animal Health Evaluation does not cover BSE funding.

Return to table note 1  referrer

Note

All references to program spending refer to planned spending for the 2019–20 fiscal year only and not cumulative spending over 5 years.

Thematic Evaluation Last Evaluation Date of planned evaluation approval Program spending covered by the evaluation that is not counted above (i.e. to avoid double counting) Program spending covered by the planned evaluation (based on 2019-20 amounts)
Alternative Service Delivery Systems Analysis Evaluation of the Plant Protection Program (2014-15) 2019-2020 $133,565 $2,685,715
Alternative Service Delivery Case Studies Evaluation of the Plant Protection Program (2014-15) 2020-2021 $133,565 $2,685,715
Import Controls Program Meat and Poultry Program Evaluation (2017-18) 2022-2023 $3,701,160 $10,266,345
Upcoming internal audits for the coming fiscal year
Internal audits
Title of internal audit Area being audited Status Expected completion date
Data Integrity Information Management
Information Technology
In Progress June 2020
Payroll Follow-up HR Management
Expenditure Management, including Adherence to Financial Administration Act
In Progress March 2020

Note

Audits identified as "Planned" may be subject to change due to shifting of priorities based on annual evaluation of risk elements

Status report on transformational and major Crown projects

The CFIA has no status reports.

Up front multi year funding

The CFIA has no multi-year funding.

Federal tax expenditures

CFIA's Departmental Plan does not include information on tax expenditures that relate to its planned results for 2020–21.

Tax expenditures are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance, and the Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for government‑wide tax expenditures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report provides detailed information on tax expenditures, including objectives, historical background and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis. The tax measures presented in this report are solely the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Mailing address

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
1400 Merivale Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9

Telephone

1-800-442-2342 (Canada and U.S.)

1-613-773-2342 (local or international)

Website(s)

CFIA - Contact Us

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of a department over a 3 year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
departmental priority (priorité ministérielle)
A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Departmental priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.
departmental result (résultat ministériel)
A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.
departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
A framework that consists of the department's core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on a department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare, the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works and what doesn't. Experimentation is related to, but distinct form innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.
full time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2020–21 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision-making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates. A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all of the department's programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department's core responsibilities and results.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
strategic outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
Date modified: