2017-2018 Departmental Results Report

PDF (3.79 MB)
ISBN: 2561-0775

The original version was signed by

The Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor, PC, MP
Minister of Health

For the period ending March 31, 2018

Table of contents

Minister's message

Minister of Health

As the Minister of Health, I am pleased to present the 2017-18 Departmental Results Report for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

I am proud of the work the CFIA carried out in 2017-18, in partnership with Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada and other partners in government and industry, to achieve results for Canadians. CFIA works 24/7 to uphold the Agency's mandate to safeguard food safety, animal health, plant health and international market access.

This past year the CFIA achieved an important milestone in protecting the health and safety of Canadians and promoting efficient and predictable regulation for industry. In June 2018, the Honourable Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-food, and I announced the publication of Canada's Safe Food for Canadians Regulations in Canada Gazette, Part II. As a result of in-depth public, industry, and expert engagement, these regulations consolidate 14 sets of regulations into a single set of rules for food safety in Canada.

While the new rules are designed first and foremost to protect the health of Canadians by strengthening our already world-class food safety system, they were also designed to support an agile regulatory system. To that end, the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations create a level playing field across all food industry sectors, align Canada's regulations with those of our trading partners and help maintain and grow market access for Canada's important agri-food and agricultural sector, which generates over $111 billion a year and accounts for 1 in 8 Canadian jobs.

The CFIA has also made great strides in implementing a National Plant and Animal Health Strategy. The strategy, designed to strengthen Canada's ability to protect its plants and animals from pests and diseases, received strong support from Canadians during consultations and was endorsed by federal, provincial and territorial agriculture ministers. Work continues to implement this strategy in collaboration with governments, industry and others who play a role in safeguarding plant and animal health.

The CFIA also continues to play a proactive role in global security initiatives to protect public health and animal health systems. In October 2017, the CFIA and Global Affairs Canada co-hosted the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE's) Second Global Conference on Biological Threat Reduction. This conference brought together a wider variety of experts including delegates from OIE member countries, scientific experts, representatives of security organizations and public health officials to discuss how to reduce the possibility of biological threats.

These are just a few of CFIA's achievements this year. We know that an effective and agile regulatory system is not just important for Canadians' health and safety, it is critical to maintaining public trust and market access for Canadian business, both domestically and in foreign markets. To that end, the CFIA is committed to openness and transparency in its engagement with industry and Canadians so that it can better respond to the needs of consumers.

As we look forward to the next year, the CFIA is committed to continuous improvement and innovation in an effort to proactively position itself as a global leader in addressing food safety, animal and plant health risks, as well as technological advancement in the agri-food sector.

The Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor, PC, MP
Minister of Health

Results at a glance

Mitigating risks to food safety is the CFIA's highest priority, and the health and safety of Canadians is the driving force behind our programs. In partnership with industry, consumers, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, the CFIA continues to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseasesFootnote 1. In addition, the current and future economic prosperity of the Canadian agriculture and forestry sectors relies on a healthy and sustainable animal and plant resource base. As such, the CFIA is continually improving its program design and delivery in the animal health and plant resource areas in order to minimize and manage risks.

In 2017-18, the CFIA focused its efforts on the development and implementation of its strategic framework – Responding to today, building for the future, which will guide Agency efforts in the coming years to help better manage emerging risks, respond to consumer demands and support industry as they compete in the global market place. The CFIA programs and internal services work closely together to advance the Agency's strategic direction.

Responding to today, building for the future

The CFIA continued to deliver on a modern regulatory toolkit, including outcome-based regulations, with new compliance promotion tools to protect Canada's food, plant and animal resource-base and to support innovation. The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations were published in Canada Gazette, Part II, on June 13, 2018 as a result of official consultations that took place between January 2017 and April 2017. Following these consultations the CFIA continued to engage with stakeholders to further strengthen awareness of, and preparation for, the coming into force of the new regulations. These new regulations will replace 14 sets of existing regulations with one and will make our food system safer by focusing on prevention and allowing for faster removal of unsafe food from the marketplace. Also, amendments are proposed to the Health of Animals Regulations which will better reflect current industry practices and scientific knowledge about animal welfare during transport. Considerable public engagement on the proposed amendments took place in 2017-18 and we are working to advance the amendments for publication in Canada Gazette Part II, in 2018-19.

The CFIA continued to adopt integrated risk management approaches, targeting resources to where they are needed most, through the development and implementation of new risk management tools, analytics and surveillance to inform resource allocations and enforcement priorities. These include the Establishment-based Risk Assessment model, the CFIA's Risk Intelligence Framework and various program risk summaries. Additionally, engagement with federal, provincial and territorial food safety authority partners allowed the CFIA to further develop the Canadian food safety information network and sign data sharing memorandums of understanding. The CFIA also published the Plant and Animal Health Strategy endorsed by Canada's Ministers of Agriculture in July 2017. The Strategy charts a path forward for collectively addressing evolving risks to plant and animal health, focusing efforts on prevention and increased partner collaboration and coordination.

The CFIA continued to deliver consistent and efficient inspections by implementing a single inspection approach focused on regulatory outcomes and was increasingly supported by mobile tools and guidance, which will lead to greater efficiency and agility to respond to emerging risks. To accommodate an increase in grain exports, the CFIA redesigned its export certification program to provide the option of testing by authorized private laboratories. This program will also build on the CFIA's partnership with the Canadian Grain Commission to help serve the grain sector more efficiently. Also in 2017-18, the Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program included pilots at federal hog slaughter establishments. The first participating establishment began using the new program in February 2018. Progress on food safety, plant protection, animal health and market access can only happen through collaboration, open communication and strong relationships, and the CFIA's results in 2017-18 raised the bar.

The CFIA continued to embrace technology, with a digital-first tools and services approach, and made it easier to get information and services, by continuing to establish electronic access as the preferred method of requesting and receiving services. The growing usage of the 'Ask CFIA' service has allowed the CFIA to identify improvements to current online information and tools that support regulatory compliance, as work continues to expand the service to include all sectors. Also, the Digital Service Delivery Platform was established, which allows inspectors to record findings and share information with stakeholders while being fully mobile. Finally, recognizing the necessity of accurate and timely responses to public requests for information as an essential element of our democracy, the Agency advanced its Access to Information and Privacy Paperless initiative. The e-Retrieval pilot project was implemented in 2017-18, and helped to streamline the retrieval process, reduce the use of paper and improve quality and delivery time.

plants

The CFIA was a global leader, supporting international consensus while pursuing improved international standards, fairness in trade practices, enhanced use of technology and regulatory cooperation in order to safeguard food, plants, animals and market access. The CFIA co-hosted the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE)'s Second Global Conference on Biological Threat Reduction. The conference focused on "Enhancing Health and Security for All" and included an update on global security initiatives for biological threat reduction, consideration of new technologies and discussions on public and animal health systems. The CFIA also signed a science-sharing memorandum of understanding with France's Agence nationale de sécurité sanitaire de l'alimentation, de l'environnement et du travail in March 2017. This memorandum enables the sharing of innovative science and risk assessment methods and strengthens scientific cooperation between the CFIA's laboratories and 11 French laboratories. The CFIA will continue to pursue improved international standards, fairness in trade practices, enhanced use of technology and regulatory cooperation with our international partners.

For more information on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's plans, priorities and results achieved, see the "Results: what we achieved" section of this report.

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is a large science-based regulatory Agency with employees working across Canada in the National Capital Region and in four operational regions: Atlantic, Québec, Ontario and Western Canada.

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food safety and animal and plant health, which enhances Canada's environment, economy, and the health and well-being of its residents. Additionally, to support market access, the CFIA works with Canada's trading partners to verify that Canadian products meet importing countries' technical requirements, thus expanding, gaining, restoring or maintaining access to markets.

Mandate and role

For more general information about the Agency, see the "Supplementary Information" section of this report. For more information on the department's organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister's mandate letter.

CFIA's key federal partners

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Canadian Grain Commission
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada, including the Canadian Wildlife Service and Parks Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Global Affairs Canada
  • Health Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada, including the Canadian Forest Service
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Public Safety Canada

The CFIA develops program requirements, conducts laboratory testing, and delivers inspections and services in order to:

  • prevent and manage food safety risks
  • protect plant resources from regulated pests, diseases and invasive species
  • prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases and protect animal resource health
  • contribute to consumer protection
  • contribute to market access for Canada's food, plants and animals, and their products

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective risk management, a commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

The CFIA shares its responsibilities with various levels of government, with which it implements food safety, plant and animal health measures, and manages risks, incidents, and emergencies.

As of March 31, 2017, the CFIA administered and enforced 14 federal statutes and 36 sets of regulations. In addition to supporting a sustainable plant and animal resource base, these statutes and regulations regulate the safety and quality of food and agricultural inputs sold in Canada, such as feed, seed, fertilizers and veterinary biologics.

For more general information about the Agency, please refer to the "Supplementary Information" section of this report.

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

The CFIA is responsible for safeguarding food safety, animal health and plant health, as it relates to the health and well-being of Canadians, the environment and our economy. The Agency shares these responsibilities with various levels of government, industry and other stakeholders with whom it implements safety measures, manages risks, incidents and emergencies.

At the CFIA, decisions are based on timely, relevant science. Science informs policy development, program design and program delivery. The Agency relies on foresight, advice, risk assessment, adherence to international standards, research and development, and testing. The CFIA also negotiates with trading partners to resolve scientific and technical issues related to food safety and animal and plant health. In this way, the Agency contributes to market access for Canadian food, plants, animals and their products.

Internally, the CFIA's operating environment is shaped by the Agency's strategic priorities as outlined in its Responding to today, building for the future document.

Internal influences

Over the last year, the CFIA's internal operating environment has included implementing a number of major change initiatives. The CFIA continued to streamline processes, advance science, and harness innovation to better serve Canadians. These initiatives will continue through to 2020 and beyond. Specifically, the following changes are at the heart of the CFIA's business, how it inspects and regulates, how it provides service, how it designs its programs and how it manages its resources:

  • Safe Food for Canadians Regulations
  • digital service delivery platform
  • My CFIA client service portal
  • integrated Agency inspection model (iAIM) and standard inspection procedure
  • client-centric service model and culture
  • organization re-design and development of new program management boards

External influences

The CFIA considers external factors in its daily operations. Each factor has a different impact as described below. External factors that influenced CFIA's operating environment include:

  • trade and market access: increases in volume, variety, and diversity of sources for trade
  • increased consumer knowledge and expectations
  • changing physical and social environment
  • advances in science and technology

Key risks

Mitigating risks that could affect our ability to achieve our plans and results

Did you know?

My CFIA is a convenient and secure way to do business with the CFIA online. Individuals, businesses and service providers, such as accredited veterinarians can sign up today to access a growing number of online services.

As the organization responsible for managing risks to food safety, plant and animal health, market access and the environment, the CFIA uses a number of control measures. To manage risk effectively, the CFIA promotes risk prevention activities, has risk mitigation measures in place, monitors and responds to risks at various levels and takes advantage of potential opportunities while minimizing the impact of unplanned or adverse events.

To respond to our ever-changing environment, the CFIA has developed a strategic framework – Responding to today, building for the future – to help the CFIA better manage emerging risks, respond to consumer demands and support industry as they compete in the global market place. The CFIA's risk management objectives are supported by initiatives and through continuous improvement in our day-to-day work. The initiatives are aligned with the CFIA's strategic framework to maximize our capacity to respond to risk now and into the future. The framework includes five priority areas:

  • modern regulatory toolkit
  • integrated risk management
  • consistent and efficient inspections
  • digital-first tools and services
  • global leader

The CFIA has developed new risk tools and refined existing ones for gathering information to continually improve how we manage current and emerging risks to food safety, plant and animal health, market access and the environment. Over the past two years, the CFIA has developed risk summaries that were used to identify emerging risks and to mitigate existing ones. For example, a risk summary profile for flour was produced following the emergence of a string of food recalls in 2017, to examine current control measures and develop options for adjusting the controls.

In line with its 2017-18 Departmental Plan, the CFIA's responses to risk were grouped under three corporate risk areas: managing change, emergency management and scientific capacity.

Managing change

Risk responses included:

  • the CFIA's Departmental Results Framework was approved and rolled out in April 2018
  • the CFIA's corporate risk profile was updated
  • the CFIA rolled out a risk assessment model (the Establishment-based Risk Assessment model) that uses data and a mathematical algorithm to evaluate federally-inspected food establishments in terms of the level of risk they represent to Canadian consumers
  • the CFIA published more information for Canadians online as part of our digital-first initiative. 'Ask CFIA' is now available for the following sectors - dairy, fish and seafood, fresh fruits and vegetables, processed products (fruit and vegetable), egg and egg products, honey and maple products – and later on, will include all industry sectors
  • the CFIA continued work on creating a single food import program under the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations, which were published in the Canada Gazette, Part II, in June 2018

Emergency management

The federal, provincial and territorial governments, industry, academia and other stakeholders developed a Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada that outlines how all parties will work together to protect plant and animal resources from new and emerging risks. In July 2017, federal-provincial-territorial Agriculture Ministers endorsed the strategy.

Scientific capacity

In 2017-18, as part of the implementation of the CFIA Risk Intelligence Framework, the CFIA developed strategic, functional and tactical intelligence products to support current or planned program and operational activities. In collaboration with internal and external partners, the CFIA continued to actively contribute to the identification, analysis and documentation of intelligence in a systematic, consistent and transparent way to address risk.

The CFIA continued to participate in the biosafety level 4 zoonotic disease laboratories network. This network is an international group of decision-makers and scientists from 14 partnering organizations in five countries: Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Australia that work together to improve the global capacity to respond to the threat of zoonotic diseases.

As part of the CFIA's effort to increase the focus on prevention through building partnerships to support decision making, the CFIA made progress on such initiatives as the Canadian Food Safety Information Network. Progress on the network is described in detail in the Results section of this report. The CFIA also continued to leverage laboratory networks and strategies to strengthen our scientific capacity.

The CFIA continued working with other science-based departments and agencies to advance the development of a 25-year federal science and technology infrastructure strategy aligned with the new vision for science in Canada. The results of this work will contribute to achieving a more collaborative, nimble and responsive federal science and technology enterprise and to informing the implementation of the Federal Science and Technology Infrastructure Initiative.

The CFIA continued to work collaboratively with Genome British Columbia and other partners on Genome British Columbia, which leads genomics innovation and facilitates its integration into society. Two projects, funded in part by Genome British Columbia, are applying cutting-edge genomics tools in early detection of viruses and pathogens in fruit trees.

Results: what we achieved

Programs

Food Safety Program

Description

The Food Safety Program aims to mitigate risks to public health associated with diseases and other health hazards in the food supply system and to manage food safety emergencies and incidents. The program achieves its objectives by promoting food safety awareness through public engagement and verification of compliance by industry with standards and science-based regulations. The program delivers initiatives to verify that consumers receive food safety and nutrition information and to mitigate unfair market practices targeting consumers and industry. Collaboration with other governments and stakeholders further enhances the Agency's ability to track, detect and mitigate risks associated with food and the food supply system, including food-borne illness. This program supports public health and instils confidence in Canada's food system.

Food Safety Program. Description follows.
Description for image: Food Safety Program

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.

The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • Food Safety Program

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated
  • Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • Healthy Canadians

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • Inspection Effectiveness
  • Scientific Capability
  • Legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • Transparency and Leveraging Partnerships
Results

Modern Regulatory Toolkit

The CFIA has engaged in unprecedented engagement with stakeholders on proposals to modernize regulations under the Safe Food for Canadians Act since 2013. Official consultations took place between January and April 2017 following which the CFIA continued to engage with stakeholders to further strengthen awareness of, and preparation for, the coming into force of the new regulations.

Extensive feedback was received from over 1,700 stakeholders who included: consumers, small businesses, importers and exporters and governments. The feedback showed that stakeholders supported the proposed direction, which is consistent with global approaches to food safety, and was considered in the final proposed regulations.

On June 13, 2018, the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations were published in the Canada Gazette, Part II. The regulations will make our food system even safer by focusing on prevention and allowing for faster removal of unsafe food from the marketplace. They will reduce unnecessary administrative burden on businesses by replacing 14 sets of regulations with one, and will help maintain and grow market access for Canada's agri-food and agricultural sector.

The new consolidated regulations will require food businesses that import or prepare food for export or to be sent across provincial or territorial borders to have licenses, as well as preventive controls that outline steps to address potential risks to food safety. They will also help reduce the time it takes to remove unsafe food from the marketplace by requiring businesses to trace their food back to their supplier and forward to whom they sold their products.

The CFIA began releasing Safe Food for Canadians Regulations guidance materials and tools for industry, including more information on critical control points.

Did you know?

A "What we heard" report that summarizes the feedback from the public consultation on the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations was posted on the CFIA's website.

Food production and processing methods continuously evolve, and global food trade is constantly increasing as consumers look for more diverse food choices. Additionally, as consumers are becoming more concerned about health and safety, and value for money, they scrutinize food product labels more closely. As such, the CFIA continued work on developing a modern food labelling system that:

  • appropriately responds to consumer and industry needs around food labelling within the CFIA's mandate, and
  • improves service delivery for inquiries and availability of labelling information and tools

In 2017-18, the CFIA analyzed stakeholder consultation feedback on food labelling proposals and conducted targeted discussions on commodity-specific labelling affecting individual sectors.

The CFIA, working in partnership with Health Canada, started developing food labelling regulatory amendments to the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations and the Food and Drug Regulations. This includes labelling provisions for date marking, origin, and company contact information. These changes were informed by three phases of broad stakeholder engagement and will result in a more modern food labelling system that responds to current and future challenges. This will improve access to information for consumers while enhancing opportunities for industry to compete and innovate. Once drafted, the proposed amendments will be pre-published in Canada Gazette, Part I, for consultation.

Did you know?

The CFIA published a "What we heard" report on the CFIA website that shows that stakeholders support the implementation of the food labelling modernization proposals.

The CFIA actively engages stakeholders on labelling modernization, and worked closely with Health Canada on labelling initiatives under its Healthy Eating Strategy, to coordinate implementation plans and align the timing of coming-into-force of proposed regulatory changes. The last phase of the food labelling modernization consultation was completed in early 2017, and used a combination of face-to-face discussions, webinars, and an online questionnaire to connect with stakeholders. This work reached over 2,500 stakeholders including consumers and consumer associations, industry and industry associations, governments and academia.

Integrated Risk Management

Did you know?

The CFIA received recognition for the Establishment-based Risk Assessment model from the international scientific community through the publication of three scientific articles in peer reviewed journals (Food Microbiology, Food Control and Microbial Risk Analysis), that cover the latest research in food safety and technology.

Over 2017-18, the CFIA made significant strides in the development of its risk management approach. The Agency used scientific data from the Comparative Risk Model, an analytical tool that uses data from external and internal sources to systematically measure and compare diverse risks across and within business lines, and data from the Establishment-based Risk Assessment (ERA) to guide tactical workplans and inspection activities. The data from these and other sources also inform risk summaries, part of a Food Program Management Framework, and provide evidence for risk-based decisions control measures.

The CFIA continued to implement the Establishment-based Risk Assessment model. Using scientific data and establishment-specific information gathered from questionnaires provided to regulated parties, the ERA model evaluates a facility and determines its level of risk. This means that higher risk establishments or sectors that require urgent attention can be easily identified and focused on.

Staff information sessions were held on national data collection in the egg and egg products sector in January 2018 in preparation for data collection later in 2018. As of March 31, 2018, data collection for federally-registered establishments was completed for dairy and meat, and is ongoing in the fish and seafood and maple and honey sectors.

The analysis of results for 265 active dairy establishments has been completed. The model results from the first dairy analysis were shared with inspector management teams across the country and staff identified potential discrepancies and gaps in the electronic model. These findings are being factored into the program design and will be used to improve the next round of analysis. The model results were also shared and discussed with the CFIA's key stakeholders and the model will continue to guide and support risk-based decision making in the CFIA.

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network (CFSIN) is a CFIA-led initiative designed to strengthen the ability of food safety authorities across Canada to better anticipate, detect and respond to food safety incidents and emergencies. Through a secure online platform, the network will link food safety authorities and food testing laboratories across the country, allowing for the sharing of data, expertise, analysis and scientific techniques. The CFIA continued to engage and collaborate with federal, provincial and territorial food safety authorities to develop the network and sign data sharing memorandums of understanding. In 2017-18, the CFIA signed a data sharing memorandum of understanding with Nunavut, and advanced discussions towards the finalization of memorandums of understanding with British Columbia and Québec.

Consistent and Efficient Inspections

In 2017-18, the CFIA made significant progress to advance consistency in food inspections. For example, over 400 staff were trained in the Standard Inspection Procedure (SIP) that looks at industry's preventative controls in a consistent and risk-informed manner. This training will continue in 2018-19 with an expected end result of over 800 staff trained on the procedure.

In addition, the Modernized Slaughter Inspection Program was developed to improve food safety through a consistent application of policy in hog slaughter houses. In 2017-18, the program included the launch of a pilot for federal pork slaughter establishments. The training phase for the pilot program began in November 2017 in the two participating establishments. In February 2018, the pilot launched with subject matter experts on site to address issues immediately. Engagement with staff, unions and industry was a key component.

Did you know?

'Ask CFIA' was established in response to stakeholders' desire for direct access to consistent and easy to understand information and access to technical expertise in the CFIA. It provides regulated parties with one point of entry to ask questions to help them understand and comply with CFIA regulatory requirements.

The CFIA continued work with the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service to improve alignment of the two countries' meat inspection systems, while also continuing to work on an international comparison of meat inspection systems to assist in improving access to international trade for Canadian meat.

Digital First Tools and Services

In addition to working to advance on more consistent standards across the food industry under the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations in 2017-18, the CFIA is making improvements in other areas to ensure Canadians can be confident that inspections are being carried out consistently and efficiently using the Digital Service Delivery Platform. We are rolling out the use of new digital tools for inspectors that give them better connectivity and online access to guidance and historical inspection records. The new Digital Service Delivery Platform, as implemented, will allow inspectors to record findings, complete inspection reports, record images and share information with stakeholders while fully mobile.

In 2017-18, releases on the platform included:

  • expanded access to a broader set of permissions related to multiple commodities
  • the introduction of export certificates for potatoes and fish (limited countries) and
  • significant new inspection functionalities

The CFIA completed the Electronic Service Delivery Platform project in 2017-18. The platform has now transitioned to an established system known as the Digital Service Delivery Platform, which will continue to be enhanced by building on the system and progress achieved to date.

In 2017-18, 'Ask CFIA', the CFIA's digital access platform to technical expertise, received 1,829 enquiries. The collection of data associated with 'Ask CFIA' questions has allowed the CFIA to identify improvements to current online information and tools that support regulatory compliance and the CFIA's digital-first approach. The CFIA is exploring how questions received can be used to promote greater industry understanding of regulatory requirements. 'Ask CFIA' will support the coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations.

Global Leader

The CFIA signed a science-sharing memorandum of understanding with France's Agence nationale de sécurité sanitaire de l'alimentation, de l'environnement et du travail in March 2017. This memorandum enables the sharing of innovative science and risk assessment methods and also strengthens and formalizes scientific cooperation between the CFIA's laboratories and 11 French laboratories.

The CFIA also continued to work with the United States Food and Drug Administration on initiatives under the Regulatory Cooperation Council Food Safety Work Plan and the implementation of the Canada-United States Food Safety Systems Recognition Arrangement. In addition to enhancing collaboration between the two agencies to improve public health and consumer protection related to food safety, this arrangement will specifically facilitate trade of Canadian food products under the United States Food and Drug Administration's new Foreign Supplier Verification Program rule. Under these requirements, rather than verifying that Canadian suppliers meet applicable United States safety standards, importers need only verify that their suppliers are in good regulatory standing with the CFIA.

Enhancing the Agency's ability to identify and prevent food safety issues offshore increases the safety of food imported to Canada. Foreign food safety assessments and the provision of technical assistance to strengthen them enhance market access for Canadian importers and provide more choices for Canadian consumers. As part of its efforts to verify the safety of food imported to Canada, the CFIA assesses certain foreign food systems and provides technical assistance to specific countries to strengthen their systems.

In 2017-18, the CFIA conducted foreign assessments in six countries: Colombia, China, Hungary, Uruguay, Costa Rica and Chile. The scope of these activities included fresh fruit and vegetables, meat and meat products, and shellfish.

This work determined that appropriate food safety controls are in place for the production of safe food for export to Canada. The foreign assessments also increased awareness of Canadian requirements and strengthened our relationships with our foreign counterparts. Information from these assessments was shared with other federal government departments and within the CFIA to inform risk evaluation and resource allocation.

In 2017-18, technical assistance was provided to five countries (China, India, Mexico, Guatemala and Costa Rica) as part of the CFIA's proactive offshore activities. The countries were selected based on various factors, including export volume to Canada, compliance history and commodity specific risks. The broad objective for these technical assistance activities was to reduce non-compliance of specific imports from those countries through information sharing workshops with government and industry (producers and exporters) representatives.

During these workshops, CFIA experts shared information on Canada's food safety regulatory framework, including the proposed Safe Food for Canadians Regulations, pesticide residue limits, microbial hazards, and undeclared allergens. As a result of these technical assistance activities:

  • foreign competent authorities and the export industry have an improved understanding of and ability to meet Canadian import requirements, thereby improving the safety of food sold in Canada
  • risk intelligence is collected on foreign food safety systems and export practices and is shared within the CFIA for improvement of import surveillance work and potential increased effectiveness of inspection controls
  • confidence in the safety of imported foods is increased

Results achieved

The indicators in the table below show continued high compliance of products tested and facilities inspected by the CFIA.

Although several industry sectors show a reduced compliance rate, this may be attributed to enhanced rigor and the introduction of standardized inspection procedures, resulting in an increase of corrective action request and enforcement action being taken by the CFIA.

Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017-18
Actual results
2016-17
Actual results
2015-16 Actual
results
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Number of commodity areas where inspected federally-registered establishments meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met March 31, 2018 3 out of 6 6 out of 6 5 out of 6
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Meat and Poultry 98% March 31, 2018 94.4%Table Note 2 97.5% 95.60%
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Egg 98% March 31, 2018 98.3% 98.25% 96.22%
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Dairy 98% March 31, 2018 94.7%Table Note 3 98.86% 99.00%
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Fish and Seafood 98% March 31, 2018 93.4%Table Note 4 97.23% 98.11%
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 98% March 31, 2018 97.6% 100% 98.85%
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Processed Products 98% March 31, 2018 99.4% 98.97% 97.77%
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Percentage of public warnings for Class I food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decisionTable Note 5 100% March 31, 2018 93.9%Table Note 6 96.9% 95.03%
Risks to the Canadian public associated with the food supply system are mitigated Percentage of public warnings for Class II food recalls that are issued within 24 hours of a recall decisionTable Note 7 95% March 31, 2018 89.4%Table Note 8 100% 100%
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where tested domestic food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met March 31, 2018 6 out of 6 6 out of 6 6 out of 6
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Meat and Poultry 95% March 31, 2018 97.8% 97.91% 97.32%
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Egg 95% March 31, 2018 94.3% 98.88% 99.00%
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Dairy 95% March 31, 2018 96.3% 96.52% 97.94%
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Fish and Seafood 95% March 31, 2018 99.1% 98.99% 97.61%
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 95% March 31, 2018 99.3% 99.10% 98.95%
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Processed Products 95% March 31, 2018 98.2% 98.20% 98.12%
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Number of commodity areas where tested imported food products meet established compliance targets 6 out of 6 met March 31, 2018 5 out of 6 5 out of 6 4 out of 6
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Meat and Poultry 95% March 31, 2018 98.3% 98.1% 98.62%
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Egg 95% March 31, 2018 99.8% 99.6% 99.53%
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Dairy 95% March 31, 2018 94.4% 90.5% 88.54%
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Fish and Seafood 95% March 31, 2018 94% 95.3% 87.89%
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 95% March 31, 2018 97.2% 95.7% 96.83%
Domestic and imported food products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Processed Products 95% March 31, 2018 98.1% 97.6% 96.98%

Table Notes

Table Note 2

Of the 698 registered meat and poultry establishments inspected, 39 in three Areas received a final notice of non-compliance. CFIA inspectors exercising enhanced rigor in following up on Corrective Action Requests (CARs) and following guidance and enforcement procedures more closely may have contributed to issuance of enforcement letters to establishments nationally. The CFIA aims to increase the level of compliance through enhanced communication and will continue its vigilance through inspection and enforcement of the defined standards.

Return to table note 2  referrer

Table Note 3

263 federally registered dairy establishments were inspected in 2017-18. Of these inspected establishments, 14 received a letter of non-compliance. The majority of the letters of non-compliance reflected food safety concerns related to achieving regulatory requirements for sanitary controls.

The CFIA continues to work with industry to increase compliance levels through ongoing compliance promotion, and to continue its vigilance through inspection and enforcement activities. CFIA will consider the results of this performance indicator in the design and delivery of these activities.

Return to table note 3  referrer

Table Note 4

561 federally registered fish and seafood establishments were inspected in 2017-18. Of the establishments inspected, 37 received letters of non-compliance. These letters of non-compliance reflected a variety of food safety and non-food safety concerns linked to regulatory infractions.

The CFIA continues to work with industry to increase compliance levels through ongoing compliance promotion, and to continue its vigilance through inspection and enforcement activities. CFIA will consider the results of this performance indicator in the design and delivery of these activities.

Return to table note 4  referrer

Table Note 5

Class I - represents a situation in which there is a reasonable probability that the consumption or exposure to a food will lead to adverse health consequences which are serious or life-threatening, or that the probability of a foodborne outbreak situation is considered high.

Return to table note 5  referrer

Table Note 6

The CFIA issued 99 public warnings for Class I food recalls where the average time to issue the public warning was just over 8 hours. Six public warnings did not meet the 24 hour performance indicator. Factors that contributed to the delays included the CFIA awaiting confirmation of the accuracy of recalled product details and recalling companies deciding to include additional products in their recalls.

Return to table note 6  referrer

Table Note 7

Class II - represents a situation in which there is a reasonable probability that the consumption or exposure to a food will lead to temporary or non-life threatening health consequences or that the probability of serious adverse consequences is considered remote.

Return to table note 7  referrer

Table Note 8

The CFIA issued 47 public warnings for Class II food recalls where the average time to issue the public warning was 12 hours. Five public warnings did not meet the 24 hour performance indicator, all of which were related to the recall of flour and raw flour based products. The investigation was particularly challenging as it revealed a food safety concern in an unusual food commodity produced from blending several types of wheat grains. These complexities contributed to delays in identifying and verifying the accuracy of affected product details. Accuracy of information was necessary to assist Canadians in taking appropriate action regarding products in their homes.

Return to table note 8  referrer

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Food Safety Program indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports/Departmental Results Report:

The following tables present the Food Safety Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2017-18.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017-18
Difference
(actual minus planned)
348,722,065 349,600,493 411,567,681 358,956,685 9,356,192

The increase of $62.0 million in food authorities over planned spending is mainly related to: the renewal of sunsetting funding for various food safety initiatives; the reimbursement of personnel-related payments made on behalf of the Government of Canada; and in-year funding received to support anticipated operating pressures related to the settlement of collective agreements.

The Agency spent $9.4 million more than planned, and $52.6 million less than total food authorities available for use. Unspent authorities were mainly related to: Federal Infrastructure Initiative funds which were re-profiled to 2018-19; and funds reserved for the anticipated collective bargaining settlement costs. Collective bargaining settlements were not finalized in 2017-18; therefore, these lapsing funds will be brought forward to 2018-19.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18
Difference (actual minus planned)
2,890 3,265 375

The increase of 375 full-time equivalents over planned mainly relates to in-year funding received for the renewal of sunsetting funding for various food safety initiatives.

Information on the CFIA's lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase.

Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Description

The Animal Health and Zoonotics Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's animal resource base, animal feeds and animal products, which are integral to a safe and accessible food supply system as well as to animal and public health. The program achieves its objectives by mitigating risks to Canada's animals (including livestock and aquatic animals) from regulated diseases, managing animal disease emergencies and incidents, limiting risks to livestock and derived food products associated with feed, promoting animal welfare and guarding against deliberate threats to the animal resource base. The program helps to mitigate risks associated with animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans by controlling diseases within animal populations. This program supports the health of Canada's animal resources and instills confidence in the safety of Canada's animals, animal products and by-products, and production systems.

Food Safety Program. Description follows.
Description for image: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.

The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • risk to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized
  • domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • risk to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated
  • effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases
  • disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • strong economic growth
  • a clean and healthy environment

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • inspection effectiveness
  • Scientific capability
  • legislative, regulatory and program framework
  • transparency and leveraging partnerships
Results

Modern Regulatory Toolkit

In 2017-18, following publication in the Canada Gazette, Part I, in December 2016, work continued to amend the Health of Animals Regulations. The proposed amendments will establish clear requirements that better reflect current industry practices and scientific knowledge about animal welfare during transport. Timelines for publication of the amendments have been revised due to the volume of public comments received and it is anticipated that the amendments will be published in Canada Gazette, Part II, in 2018.

As part of the work to amend the Health of Animals Regulations, amendments to the traceability section will strengthen existing livestock identification traceability requirements in Canada to better support effective and timely disease control investigations. The amendments will improve how we manage animal health issues, further protect Canadian public health, and improve our ability to maintain market access for Canadian animals and their products. The proposed amendments were drafted and are expected to be published next in the Canada Gazette, Part I, in 2018.

A committee comprised of the CFIA, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, provinces, responsible administrators and national industry associations, has been established to prepare for the coming-into-force of the regulations. The committee ran a communication blitz to increase understanding around the identification of premises and developed communication products to inform stakeholders of the proposed requirements.

Did you know?

The CFIA reviewed approximately 51,000 comments received from roughly 11,000 Canadians on the proposed amendments to the animal transport regulations.

Currently, livestock identification, movement, location and custodianship information is collected in multiple information systems managed by responsible administrators and provincial governments. The Traceability National Information Portal allows authorized users to access these various sources of information through a single-window. In 2017-18, significant progress was made in moving data sharing agreements forward with Québec and Newfoundland, premises identification information from Nova Scotia was linked to the portal, and linkages were created to the Agri-Traçabilité Québec system.

In 2017-18, as part of ongoing efforts to modernize Canada's Feeds Regulations, the CFIA posted, for public review and comments, a number of proposals related to maximum nutrient values and maximum contaminant levels in feed. The CFIA received, reviewed and assessed about 73 stakeholder responses from the commercial feed industry, ingredient suppliers, livestock producers, academia and federal/provincial/territorial governments. The publication of the proposed regulations in the Canada Gazette, Part I, was originally scheduled for the fall of 2017. We are working to advance the regulations for consideration in 2018-19.

As part of its regulatory modernization process, the CFIA has developed a regulatory toolkit focused on outcome-based regulations with up-to-date guidance and compliance promotion tools.

Integrated Risk Management

The Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System, an initiative of the National Farmed Animal Health and Welfare Council, is a federal/provincial/territorial and industry collaborative effort to build an animal health surveillance network-of-networks. Approximately 87 organizations worked to support the system's surveillance. All major sectors are now linked into the network-of-networks, including swine, poultry, equine, cattle, wildlife, and aquatics.

Did you know?

CFIA scientists monitor the health of domestic and wild animals by testing over 400,000 samples every year.

A key network within the system is the Community for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases - a virtual network that integrates current automated data-mining tools with a human-based multidisciplinary analytical capability. In 2017-18, the community continued to grow and diversify, and produced 38 early warning intelligence reports. This early warning of emerging animal or zoonotic disease outbreaks from within Canada or abroad supports disease prevention or mitigation action, thereby contributing to Canada's economic, animal and human health. The CFIA manages diseases and continuously improves programs and policies before, during and after various disease events. An infographic prepared by the CFIA's Animal Health Directorate demonstrates some of the animal diseases that the Agency encountered in 2017-18. To see a list of confirmed reportable terrestrial animal disease and aquatic animal disease detections in Canada in 2017-2018 visit CFIA's website.

Click on image for larger view
An infographic prepared by CFIA's Animal Health Directorate. Description follows.
Description for image: An infographic prepared by CFIA's Animal Health Directorate demonstrates some of the animal diseases that the Agency encountered in 2017-18.

Whirling Disease

  • Alberta
  • Various wild species of trout in 4 watersheds
  • Animal Health Directorate provided epidemiology and policy support

Chronic Wasting Disease

  • Saskatchewan and Alberta
  • 4 elk herds and 1 white-tailed deer herd infected
  • Animal Health Directorate provided policy support during the investigations

Equine Infectious Anemia

  • Alberta, Manitoba and Quebec
  • 13 premises affected
  • Animal Health Directorate provided policy support during investigations

Infectious Salmon Anemia

  • Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador and New Brunswick
  • Atlantic salmon
  • Animal Health Directorate provided epidemiology and policy support

Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease

  • British Columbia
  • Outbreaks in feral and wild rabbits, 1 outbreak in a rabbitry
  • Animal Health Directorate facilitated the emergency import of a vaccine & developed a biosecurity fact sheet for rabbit producers

Scrapie

  • Manitoba and Alberta
  • First case of goat scrapie in Western Canada
  • 9 farms declared infected
  • Animal Health Directorate provided epidemiological support

Seneca Valley Virus

  • Ontario and Alberta
  • Animal Health Directorate published a policy to facilitate movement of affected swine for slaughter

Viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus

  • Ontario, Quebec and Atlantic Ocean South
  • Various species (cultured and wild)
  • Animal Health Directorate epidemiology and policy support

In addition, CFIA scientists, in collaboration with the Canadian Safety and Security Program led by Defence Research and Development Canada, have made key breakthroughs, including an increased understanding of the virulence, and the ability to cause harm, of several pathogens.

In 2017-18, the CFIA took steps to consolidate its internal emergency management responsibilities, bringing all of the CFIA's emergency management activities under a single point of accountability. This will strengthen the CFIA's emergency management framework and provide better coordination and direction across the organization. The CFIA's Strategic Emergency Management Plan, Emergency Response Plan, and the mandate-specific emergency plan for Animal Health were reviewed, and are being updated to ensure alignment with each other, and to meet evolving changes both externally and within the CFIA.

The CFIA worked further with other government departments to advance activities committed to in the Federal Action Plan on antimicrobial resistance and use in Canada. In collaboration with the Public Health Agency of Canada, Health Canada, and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and other government departments, the CFIA actively supported the development and release of the pan-Canadian framework to address antimicrobial resistance.

The CFIA continued to work with partners to develop and implement a robust surveillance system to track antimicrobial use in Canada and develop an integrated risk assessment model to help prevent the spread of antimicrobial resistance. Additionally, the CFIA continued to support the regulatory and policy changes associated with antimicrobial use in the feed and agricultural sectors as part of our commitment towards antimicrobial use stewardship in Canada and worldwide. The CFIA worked closely with Health Canada on extensive engagement with stakeholders to update the compendium of medicating ingredient brochures. The updated brochures and shared compliance and enforcement approach were introduced on April 1, 2018.

Global Leader

In April 2018, the CFIA renewed the existing zoning arrangement with the United States Department of Agriculture. Zoning is an internationally recognized disease control strategy that limits market disruption in areas that are not affected by the disease. The renewed zoning arrangement will benefit Canadians by minimizing disruption of trade in the Canadian livestock sector, through the mutual recognition of foreign animal disease control and eradication zones. The Veterinary Infrastructure evaluations that provide support for the arrangement by measuring the performance of animal health facilities and systems in Canada and the United States were also updated and expanded.

As the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) does not recognize country zoning decisions for certain diseases, the CFIA started developing tools to facilitate the determination of whether to accept zoning decisions or not. The CFIA collaborated with the North American Virtual Animal Disease Modelling Centre to develop a modelling tool; however, the results were not sufficient to provide decision-makers with the required data. The upcoming changes to the World Organisation for Animal Health code, if accepted by the World Assembly, will clarify a number of international trade-related issues, and likely aid in a solution to this issue.

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) controls and programming were subject to internal evaluations in 2013 (Evaluation of the Enhanced Feed Ban) and 2014 (Evaluation of the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) management program). In 2015, recommendations from these evaluations, combined with other observations, lead to the identification of a number of priority areas for improvement that are required for the integrity of Canada's BSE control program delivery. These include BSE surveillance data, Specified Risk Material (SRM) control data, feed mills and rendering data, awareness data, training, export certification and succession planning.

In 2017-18, the CFIA made improvements and advanced initiatives in the BSE programming that included:

  • initiation of the collection of retrospective data pertaining to BSE awareness activities from provinces, other federal departments, industry, veterinarian associations and the CFIA (anticipating completion in mid-2018)
  • taking steps towards effective succession planning to retain CFIA BSE expertise
  • signing a new contract with a deadstock collector in Québec that will significantly increase the number of samples for BSE. Work is ongoing to find a strategy to improve sampling levels in the Western provinces, (Saskatchewan and Alberta in particular)
  • implementation of a new permitting system for Specified Risk Material in November 2017 that allows for the capture of validated tombstone data at the source and better access to reliable data. A new section was added to the BSE Hazard Specific Plan to provide information on the inspection of Specific Risk Material controls in non-federally registered abattoirs, and a new checklist was provided and training on this new tool was delivered. Work is ongoing with the Electronic Inspection Worksheet and Digital Service Delivery Platform team to ensure the data will be captured in these new tools in the next fiscal year
  • completion of the development and delivery of the training materials involved in the training of inspectors responsible for the inspection and audit of Specific Risk Material controls in non-federally registered abattoirs
  • conducting audits (Technical Assessor Component) to ensure that products and by-products exported from Canada meet foreign requirements on cross-contamination by specified risk material and/or with bovine material of Canadian origin
  • analyzing how programs perform to recommend reallocation of the existing BSE resources
  • ongoing implementation of improvements identified in the previous year, and
  • ensuring the availability of reliable BSE surveillance data on a monthly basis

The CFIA recently led the formation of the Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Laboratory Network, which brings together 12 organizations from five countries to strengthen international cooperation in response to potential high consequence bio-threats. Network partners worked together to complete and share an international operational capabilities benchmarking survey, a Nipah virus gap analysis, a laboratory interoperability plan, and developed targeted training.

The network has provided scientists and decision makers with a forum to exchange knowledge and expertise for Level 4 laboratories concerning risks, vulnerabilities, challenges, and opportunities for advancement. The network is breaking traditional national and geographic boundaries to promote collaborative science and technology development, while effectively elevating awareness of, and preparedness against harmful biological agents.

Federal Science and Technology Infrastructure

Did you know?

The CFIA's 13 laboratories, situated across the country, support scientific activities such as specialized diagnostic testing and research in support of food safety, plant and animal health to satisfy domestic and international trade requirements.

The CFIA's scientists enrich Canada's vibrant science ecosystem, contributing science and research that underpins evidence-based decisions that safeguard Canada's people, animals and plants, and advances innovation and economic growth. While this initiative is mentioned in the animal program, it spans the CFIA's food and plant programs as well. In 2017-18, the CFIA made significant contributions to advancing various components of the strategy, including identifying collaborative opportunities for science programs through partner engagement, defining information management and information technology needs for science, and reviewing scientific equipment processes. This work will facilitate designing future laboratory science clusters that will contribute to achieving a more collaborative, nimble, and responsive federal science and technology enterprise for the benefit of all Canadians.

The CFIA spearheaded interdepartmental work that identified common information management and information technology needs from the science practitioner's point of view. The results of this work are now being used by Shared Services Canada to develop an overall science information management and information technology infrastructure.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017-18
Actual results
2016-17
Actual results
2015-16 Actual
results
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Number of reportable animal diseases that have entered into Canada via specified regulated pathways 0 March 31, 2018 0 0 0
Risks to Canadians from the transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable zoonotic disease 100% March 31, 2018 100% 100% 100%
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of legally exported animal and animal product shipments destined for foreign markets that meet certification requirements 99% March 31, 2018 99% 100% 100%
Domestic and imported animals and animal products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Canada's status on the OIE disease risk status lists remains either "free, controlled risk, or negligible risk" Status maintained March 31, 2018 Status maintained Status maintained Status maintained
Risks to the Canadian animal resource base are mitigated Percentage of cases where investigations were completed following the positive identification of a reportable animal disease 100% March 31, 2018 100% 100% 100%
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases Manuals for CFIA officials are updated as needed 100% of all necessary manual updates are completed March 31, 2018 34%Table Note 9 of all necessary manual updates are completed 32% of necessary manual updates were completed 75% of necessary manual updates were completed
Effective preparedness to prevent, control, and eradicate transboundary diseases and emerging diseases Number of emergency preparedness simulation exercises and drills in which CFIA participates 9 March 31, 2018 40 8 11
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of detections of reportable transboundary diseases and significant emerging diseases in which an investigation was commenced in a timely fashion 100% March 31, 2018 100% 100% 100%
Disease outbreaks in Canada are promptly and effectively responded to Percentage of cases where CFIA communicated with key stakeholders in a timely fashion following the confirmation of a transboundary or significant emerging disease 100% March 31, 2018 100% 100% 100%

Table Notes

Table Note 9

Due to several high visibility or emerging issues, resources were not available to update the existing program guidance material. We evaluated the number of manuals to identify which ones were updated this year as required. Only 33% of the required updates were completed.

Return to table note 9  referrer

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CFIA performance targets were set to be achieved on a long-term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Animal Health and Zoonotics indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports/Departmental Results Report:

The following tables present the Animal Health and Zoonotic Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2017-18.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017-18
Difference
(actual minus planned)
124,518,784 125,411,593 145,569,202 135,253,334 9,841,741

The increase of $20.2 million in animal authorities over planned spending is mainly related to: statutory payments to compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control; reimbursement of personnel related payments made on behalf of the Government of Canada; and in-year funding received to support the anticipated operating pressures related to the settlement of collective agreements.

The Agency spent $9.8 million more than planned, and $10.3 million less than total animal authorities available for use. Unspent authorities were mainly funds reserved for anticipated collective bargaining settlement costs. Collective bargaining settlements were not finalized in 2017-18; therefore, these lapsing funds will be brought forward to 2018-19.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18
Difference (actual minus planned)
942 1,001 59

The increase of 59 full-time equivalents over planned is partially due to incremental in-year activity related to the Agency's response to the Bovine Tuberculosis outbreak in Alberta South.

Information on the CFIA's lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase.

Plant Resources Program

Description

The Plant Resources Program aims to mitigate risks to Canada's plant resource base, which is integral to a safe and accessible food supply, as well as to public health and environmental sustainability. The program achieves its objectives by regulating agricultural and forestry products; mitigating risks to the plant resource base (including crops and forests) from regulated pests and diseases; regulating the safety and integrity of seeds, fertilizers and plant products; and managing plant health emergencies and incidents. The program also guards against deliberate threats to the plant resource base, facilitates the introduction of emerging plant technologies and protects the rights of plant breeders. Achieving the objectives of the program instills confidence in Canada's plants, plant production systems and plant products, and contributes to the health of Canada's plant resources.

Plant Resources Program. Description follows.
Description for image: Plant Resources Program

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.

The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • Plant Resources Program

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated
  • domestic plants and plant products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements
  • confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders)
  • Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • Strong economic growth
  • A clean and healthy environment

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • Inspection effectiveness
  • Scientific capability
  • Legislative, regulatory and program framework
  • Transparency and leveraging partnerships
Results

Modern Regulatory Toolkit

The CFIA is working to modernize fertilizer regulations to address gaps and inconsistencies, respond to emerging risks, and reflect current science. They will be more responsive to industry needs while maintaining strong, risk-based oversight of the safety of fertilizer entering Canada.

Did you know?

Scientific partnerships and investments are important aspects of protecting the health of Canadians, our environment and the economy. In September 2017, the CFIA announced contributions of $320,000 in the University of Guelph's Biodiversity Institute of Ontario to support collaborative research projects which will use DNA barcoding and innovative computer technology to help protect Canada's plants, animals and people from invasive pests and diseases.

The CFIA experienced minor setbacks on its regulatory agenda to amend the Fertilizers Regulations due to a re-prioritization of regulatory amendments. The regulatory drafting instructions are completed and we are working to advance the consideration of the regulations for publication in Canada Gazette, Part I, in 2018-19.

Integrated Risk Management

In early 2017, a draft version of the partnership-based, co-created Plant and Animal Health Strategy was published for consultation with Canadians. There was strong overall support for the draft strategy indicating that it would strengthen Canada's ability to protect its plants and animals from pests and diseases. The strategy was endorsed by Canada's Ministers of Agriculture in July 2017 and work is proceeding on its implementation.

The strategy identifies four areas for action:

  • coordination through partnerships
  • a system founded on prevention and defended through effective response and recovery
  • collection, analysis and sharing of information
  • enabling desired behaviours

Since then, plant health partners have been preparing for implementation, including the establishment of an implementation and coordination council for plant health. A multi-partner plant health task team has been assembled to develop recommendations for the structure and function of the proposed coordinating council. The task team, with representatives from federal/provincial/territorial governments, industry and academia, continues its work with the guidance of a Regulatory Assistant Deputy Minister Champion from the Province of Saskatchewan.

Did you know?

During the Plant and Animal Health Strategy consultation, approximately 250 partners were engaged, including roughly 100 provincial partners and representatives of more than 130 different organizations.

Building on the foundation set by the Plant and Animal Health Strategy, the CFIA continued to strengthen partnerships in plant health science. A Canadian Plant Health Science Network will enable more rapid access to specialized knowledge and expertise. The network will lead to increased collaboration and coordination, resulting in more efficient use of resources and increased protection of Canada's plant resources. As a first step, the CFIA and its partners identified the current state of information exchange and defined their information sharing needs. A workshop was hosted in February 2018 with plant health partners from government, industry and academia to validate and further expand these efforts.

Consistent and Efficient Inspections

To accommodate the increase in grain exports, an alternative service delivery for grain testing was introduced. In 2017-18, the CFIA redesigned its Grain Export Certification program to provide exporters the option of having their grain shipments sent to certain export partners for phytosanitaryFootnote 10 testing by authorized private laboratories. The Recognition of Export Grain Analysis by Authorized Laboratories program will also build on the CFIA's data sharing partnership with the Canadian Grain Commission to help serve the grain sector more efficiently.

The CFIA consulted with stakeholders and, in August 2017, shared details of the pilot program, which aims to provide more choices and potentially faster testing of grains for export, thus facilitating trade. The CFIA authorized the first laboratory in December 2017 and has approximately eight other laboratories in the process of being authorized.

Digital First

As part of the Government of Canada's Open Government commitment, as outlined in its Third Biennial Plan to the Open Government Partnership, implemented in 2016, science-based departments and agencies are making the science performed in support of Government of Canada programs and decision-making more open and transparent to Canadians. While this initiative is mentioned in the Plant program of this report, it spans and supports the Food and Animal program.

To that end, the CFIA accomplished the following in 2017-18:

  • strengthened open access of scientific publications through an Open Access Peer-reviewed Scientific Publications Pilot to increase the number of peer-reviewed articles authored by CFIA employees that are freely available to the public (open access publication increased from ~40% to ~60% during the pilot).
  • implemented policies, guidelines, processes or tools, including the CFIA Scientific Publication Policy, to enable open science and foster a consistent approach to publications within the CFIA's Science Branch.
  • strengthened open data through actively encouraging and supporting the posting of scientific data to the Open Data portal.
  • strengthened internal communications and employee engagement through the creation of CFIA open science departmental points of contact.
  • strengthened science communications capacity through:
    1. The promotion of media training for CFIA scientists.
    2. The creation of a dedicated, public-facing web page for "Science at the CFIA" to share laboratory and research information.
    3. Videos made available on the CFIA YouTube channel, social media, and the public-facing website to highlight: Women in Science, Genomics, Seed Science, Safeguarding with Science.
  • increased activities/mechanisms to engage with the public by:
    1. promoting the participation of CFIA scientists in the federal directory of scientists on science.gc.ca.
    2. participating in Science Odyssey 2017, Canada 150, local and regional activities to promote science at the CFIA.
    3. contributing CFIA science information to CFIA and S&T Cluster social media (including the Facebook page and Twitter feed) and the public-facing CFIA website (e.g., outreach materials, information on laboratories, scientific publications, and research).
  • explored basic types of metrics to track and report on the progress of Open Science through the development of a federal Open Science Metrics working group, with members from each science-based department and agency. This working group developed the Open Science Metrics report and recommendations (finalized in June 2018) that will be implemented as part of the new 4th Open Government federal action plan

Global Leader

In 2017-18, the CFIA continued to develop the post-entry quarantine program, in collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture - Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. This program will allow plants grown in Canada to be deemed to meet the import requirements of the United States. A proposal was submitted that would establish the equivalency of certain import requirements between the countries. By aligning these phytosanitary import requirements, the CFIA will help protect both countries from the unintentional introduction of pests through the movement of plants and plant products. Implementation of the program will proceed once the CFIA and the United States Department of Agriculture have finalized the process.

In 2017-18, as part of the expansion of the prevention program for the Asian gypsy moth, the CFIA and the United States Department of Agriculture - Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service jointly:

  • discussed collaborative opportunities with Chile, Ecuador, Paraguay, Uruguay, Brazil, Argentina and Peru on mitigating phytosanitary risks from other invasive alien pests and pathways
  • continued to advance collaborative opportunities with the national plant protection organizations of Korea, Russia, Japan, and China on the Asian gypsy moth certification program and on mitigating phytosanitary risks from other invasive alien pests and pathways
  • published a bulletin on requirements for 2017 for the maritime shipping industry

In 2017-18, CFIA developed partnerships to leverage the $80M investment into the replacement of its post-quarantine laboratory in Sidney, BC. As part of pre-planning for this investment, research partners from academia and other federal departments were consulted to see how the modern, new facilities could be best used to prevent the introduction, establishment and spread of plant pests and pathogens, to promote appropriate control measures and to minimize trade impacts of pest and pathogens. The industry was consulted to determine how the new facilities could support a Clean Plant Network and industry certification networks, such as the one recently created for grapevines. The research priorities of the Sidney laboratory were established with the participation of Genome BC, industry, academia and federal researchers.

Highlights of Pest Incident Responses

In December 2017, the CFIA confirmed the presence of emerald ash borer in the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, which was outside of the regulated area. In January 2018, the CFIA updated the regulated areas to include the City of Winnipeg and new areas in the Province of Québec, to slow the spread of this pest, since it cannot be eradicated.

In August 2017, the CFIA confirmed the presence of hemlock woolly adelgid, a regulated pest, in southwestern Nova Scotia. This is the first time the pest has been detected in Atlantic Canada and a Ministerial Order was issued on December 15, 2017, to restrict movement of regulated materials in the affected areas.

In July 2017, the CFIA detected a Japanese beetle for the first time in British Columbia, in the City of Vancouver, and the CFIA engaged with the British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture, the City of Vancouver and other non-governmental stakeholders. In January 2018, the CFIA notified these partners that it would not undertake an eradication effort on its own, but encouraged collaboration among the stakeholders. In March 2018, the CFIA participated in a meeting of interested stakeholders and a successful collaborative group was put in place, led by the province and facilitated by the Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.

Plant Breeders' Rights

Plant Breeders' Rights are a form of intellectual property rights by which plant breeders can protect their new varieties in the same way an inventor protects a new invention with a patent. The CFIA administers the Plant Breeders' Rights Act (1990) and Regulations, which provide legal protection for these plant breeders. The CFIA's Plant Breeders' Rights Office successfully adhered to the legislative requirements of the Plant Breeders' Rights Act (1990), to advance applications for intellectual property protection, through the process of assessment and examination, in a timely manner. For fiscal year 2017-18, the Plant Variety Journal was published on the targeted dates of publication, as follows:

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017-18
Actual results
2016-17
Actual results
2015-16 Actual
results
Risks to the Canadian plant resource base from imported plants and plant products are mitigated Number of regulated foreign plant pests that enter into Canada through regulated pathways and establish themselves 0 March 31, 2018 0 1 0
Domestic plants and plants products are compliant with Canadian regulations and international agreements Percentage of domestic seed, crop inputs and plants with novel traits in compliance with Canadian regulations and international agreements 90% March 31, 2018 90.7% 93.2% 96.16%
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of confirmed introductions of quarantine pests for which notices are issued 100% March 31, 2018 100% 100% 100%
Confirmed introductions of quarantine pests in Canada are contained and risk-mitigated (e.g. through the issuance of Notices of Prohibition of Movement, Quarantine, up to and including the issuance of Ministerial Orders) Percentage of notices issued in a timely manner 90% March 31, 2018 100% 100% 100%
Canadian exports of plants and plant products meet the country of destination regulatory requirements and Canada's reputation is maintained Percentage of certified plants and plant products shipment (lots) that meet the country of destination phytosanitary import requirements 99% March 31, 2018 99.6% 99.73% 99%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CFIA performance targets are set to be achieved on a long term basis in support of the expected results. The CFIA monitors progress to achieve the targets and adjusts as appropriate.

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the Plant Health indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports/Departmental Results Report:

The following tables present the Plant Resources Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2017-18.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017-18
Difference
(actual minus planned)
78,138,366 78,664,213 82,585,356 74,846,479 (3,817,734)

The increase of $3.9 million in plant authorities over planned is mainly related to: modest in-year funding received to commence work on the construction of a new state-of-the-art Centre for Plant Health in Sidney, British Colombia; and in-year funding received to support the anticipated operating pressures related to the settlement of collective agreements.

The Agency spent $3.8 million less than planned, $7.7 million less than total plant authorities available for use. Unspent authorities were mainly funds reserved for the anticipated collective bargaining settlement costs. Collective bargaining settlements were not finalized in 2017-18; therefore, these lapsing funds will be brought forward to 2018-19.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18
Difference (actual minus planned)
688 706 18

The modest increase in full-time equivalents is partially due to incremental in-year funding received to commence work on the construction of a new state-of-the-art Centre for Plant Health in Sidney, British Colombia.

Information on the CFIA's lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase.

International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

Description

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's International Collaboration and Technical Agreements program contributes to a coherent, predictable, and science-based international regulatory framework that facilitates meeting regulatory requirements of importing countries' food, animals, and plants, and their products, resulting in the facilitation of multi-billion dollar trade for the Canadian economy. The program achieves its objectives by actively participating in international fora for the development of international science-based rules, standards, guidelines and policies and the management of sanitary and phytosanitary committees established under international agreements. The CFIA's active promotion of the Canadian science-based regulatory system with foreign trading partners, and negotiations to resolve scientific and technical issues, contribute to market access.

International Collaboration and Technical Agreements. Description follows.
Description for image: International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

At the top of the image there are three boxes/shapes in a row.

The first box says:

  • Program

The second box says:

  • Expected Results

The third box says:

  • Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area

Under this row, there is a second row with an additional three boxes.

The first box is placed directly under the Program box. It says:

  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the second box, which is directly below the "Expected Results" box.

It says:

  • canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) negotiations and international Standards Setting Bodies (ISSB) such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC
  • international markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants and their products
  • International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate

There is an arrow from this box, pointing to the third box, which is directly below the "Government of Canada (GoC) Outcome Area" box, that says:

  • a Fair and secure Marketplace
  • a Prosperous Canada through Global Commerce

The last row has one box which identifies the Key Risk Areas. It says:

  • scientific Capability
  • legislative, Regulatory and Program Framework
  • transparency and Leveraging Partnerships
Results

International Standard Setting

To promote the development of science-based international standards, consistent with Canada's regulatory framework and Government of Canada objectives, the CFIA led Canada's participation at the International Plant Protection Convention, and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Conference, and, with Health Canada, co-led Canada's participation on the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Canada is the permanent host of the Codex Committee on Food Labelling, and successfully co-hosted the 44th Session in Paraguay, in October 2017. The committee, chaired by the CFIA, finalized and advanced guidance on the date marking of pre-packaged foods. Led by Canada, the committee also began work on front-of-package labelling guidance and identified new areas of potential work for the committee, such as internet sales of food, allergen labelling, and the use of technology in food labelling.

Did you know?

If you are travelling with your pet to a foreign country, your pet may need an export certificate signed by the CFIA – including for stopover and layover countries in between.

The CFIA was again active at the International Plant Protection Convention, notably by hosting, and participating in the meeting of the Expert Working Group on the Authorization of Entities to Perform Phytosanitary Actions, to develop an international standard on alternative service delivery, which has been a priority for Canada. The CFIA also participated as the North American representative on the Convention's Commission on Phytosanitary Measures and chaired meetings of its financial committee. In addition, the CFIA participated as the North American representative and Vice-Chair at the first meeting of the newly-formed Implementation and Capacity Development Committee. The CFIA chaired the first meeting of the International Plant Protection Convention Sea Container Task Force in Shanghai, China, to engage world experts in sea container usage and movement, including industry and international organizations, to develop actions to reduce pest risks in the international movement of sea containers. This is an issue that the CFIA is already active on as co-lead with the United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service on the North American Sea Container Initiative. The CFIA is also a member of the North American Plant Protection Organization, working with Mexico and the United States to develop standards and guidelines, and pursue related initiatives to protect North America's plant resources and facilitate safe trade.

Last year, Canada underwent the most comprehensive evaluation of its veterinary services to date. The evaluation was conducted by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), and the CFIA led the coordination of the evaluation at the federal/provincial/territorial level and, where relevant, with Canadian stakeholders. This evaluation plays an essential role in maintaining international confidence in Canada's domestic systems for animal health and animal welfare, and provides valuable feedback on areas of improvement for animal health. The evaluation report highlighted Canada's strengths as a world leader in the safe trade of animals and animal products and showed its strong commitment to transparency and continuous improvement; the results were among the highest achieved internationally. The report made some recommendations to enhance veterinary services in Canada, and the CFIA is leading the development of an action plan to address these recommendations.

In October 2017, the CFIA successfully co-hosted, with Global Affairs Canada, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)'s Second Global Conference on Biological Threat Reduction, focused on "Enhancing Health and Security for All". The conference, organized by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), brought together national delegates of several member countries, renowned scientific experts, representatives of security organizations and stakeholders, and public health officials. The purpose of the conference was to provide an update on global security initiatives for biological threat reduction, consider the risks and benefits of new technologies, discuss public health and animal health systems, and develop recommendations on inter-sectoral activities to be undertaken by partners to reduce biological threats.

The CFIA continued to enhance its engagement in international standards setting bodies by assigning Canadian technical experts to the International Plant Protection Convention, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), and the Food and Agriculture Organization's Food Safety and Quality Unit, to provide scientific support for the development of international standards. Notably, the CFIA expert working at the International Plant Protection Convention is continuing to manage the development of a globally harmonized tool - ePhyto Solution - to facilitate the adoption and exchange of official electronic phytosanitary certificates between trading countries. The ePhyto Solution is intended to enable all countries, regardless of development capacity, to exchange certificates in a simple harmonized manner. The hub component of the ePhyto solution has recently undergone testing and plans are moving forward to fully implement it in countries with national systems capable of creating the electronic message.

The CFIA risk assessment expert on assignment to the Food and Agriculture Organization contributed to the development of scientific advice on Shiga-toxin producing E. coli in food, the safety and quality of water used in food production, and processing, and the development of guidelines; the expert also conducted capacity building activities on risk-based meat inspection.

The CFIA technical expert on assignment to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)'s Science and New Technologies Department was a key contributor to the development of a "Roadmap for Zoonotic Tuberculosis", prepared jointly by the World Health Organization, World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), Food and Agriculture Organization and The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. The roadmap outlines a strategy for the control and eradication of a form of tuberculosis that affects cattle and that can be transmitted to humans. The technical expert is currently contributing to the development and global implementation of harmonized international quality standards for vaccines and diagnostic tests for use in animals, and coordinating a major international collaborative study to develop and test a new international reference standard that will be used for quality control of tuberculins that are used for bovine tuberculosis diagnosis and surveillance. The study involves collaborators from 14 countries, including Canada.

As the Canadian Head of Delegation to the World Trade Organization Committee on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures committee, the CFIA played an active role in 2017-18 to advance the work of the committee. Canada intervened in support of other members on specific items of interest and met bilaterally with members on the margins of the committee meetings. In addition, Canada participated in a workshop on the margins of the October 2017 meeting, where interested members learned about the implementation of the Transparency Article in the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures. During the March 2018 meeting, members also adopted the Catalogue of Instruments, a list of tools available for members to manage sanitary and phytosanitary issues, which was developed by Canada and Kenya.

In support of the Government of Canada's ambitious trade agenda, the CFIA participated actively in a number of free trade agreement negotiations. This included negotiating new free trade agreements with fast-growing markets (i.e. India and Pacific Alliance), negotiating the modernization of existing free trade agreements (i.e. North American Free Trade Agreement), and holding discussions with trading partners to explore the potential of launching negotiations for a free trade agreement (i.e. China and Mercosur).

The CFIA's participation in an increased number of priority free trade agreements negotiating rounds during 2017-18 and international standards setting meetings resulted in a significantly higher number of meetings (53) than the target number (36) for the 2017-18 DRR.

International regulatory cooperation and collaboration

The CFIA continued to work with its international regulatory counterparts in like-minded countries, such as the United States and member countries of the European Union, and in emerging economies, to align regulatory approaches.

The provisional application of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement took effect in September 2017. The Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures Joint Management Committee was established and held its first meeting in March 2018. It was the first committee under trade agreement to hold a meeting. The CFIA led Canadian participation as the Canadian Chair of the Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures Joint Management Committee and the European Commission's Directorate-General for Health and Food Safety (DG SANTE) is the European Union Chair. The implementation of the Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures Joint Management Committee aligns with the mandate letter commitments of both the Minister of Trade, "to ratify and implement Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement", and the Minister of Agriculture, "to promote Canadian agricultural interests during future trade negotiations."

Canada and the United States continue to collaborate to align regulatory approaches between the two countries, where appropriate, under the Regulatory Cooperation Council and through other fora. In 2017-18 the CFIA and its United States counterparts:

  • continued advancing the Greenhouse Certification Program in collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, which will help simply the flow of low-risk greenhouse-grown plants between Canada and the United States, recognizing mutually acceptable standards, while reducing paperwork.
  • advanced implementation of the Canada-United States Food Safety Systems Recognition Arrangement, signed by the CFIA, Health Canada, and the United States Food and Drug Administration. The CFIA is also continuing to advance efforts with the United States Department of Agriculture towards the exchange of electronic certificates.
  • advanced the development of a bilateral arrangement which, if implemented, would facilitate the transit of live animals between the United States and Canada in emergency situations.

Additionally, the CFIA and the United States Food and Drug Administration signed a memorandum of understanding in October 2017 to facilitate the sharing of food safety information and data, and enable collaborative research projects.

In 2017-18, the CFIA presented current regulatory requirements, as well as the proposed Safe Food for Canadians Regulations, to international stakeholders in various countries (e.g. India, China, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Mexico, Chile and Colombia), providing an overview of the proposal and the available tools, resources and guidance materials.

Technical assistance is a means to promote Canadian interests and help the recipient country meet Canadian import requirements in support of the CFIA's International Strategic Framework. Technical assistance was delivered through in-person meetings in Canada, site visits, workshops, webinars, teleconference links, response to questionnaires, and email exchanges. A total of 17 activities were successfully delivered in response to requests from developing countries and emerging economies for technical assistance during 2017-18. The use of these alternative delivery mechanisms allowed the CFIA to exceed its target with using fewer resources, while meeting requestor's expectations.

Two technical assistance missions (one to Costa Rica, Guatemala, and Mexico and another to India) were planned and delivered in 2017-18 to enhance food safety through the "improving food safety offshore" program preventive activities. Through the planned missions, the CFIA was able to engage with targeted foreign counterparts at source to provide information on non-compliance of imported food products from the country of export. Delivery of these missions helps manage risks prior to food reaching Canada and strengthens the CFIA's relationships with its foreign counterparts.

The technical assistance missions also increased the knowledge of Canada's food safety oversight system within the government departments and exporters from China, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Mexico, and India.

Market Access Support

Access to markets, both existing and new, is critical to Canada's economy. In 2017-18, the CFIA continued to promote the Canadian science-based regulatory system with counterparts in key trading countries, negotiated import and export conditions and resolved technical issues to expand or maintain access to markets. This was achieved with CFIA's specialists in Canada and abroad. In 2017-18, 65 market access issues were resolved and examples include:

  • maintained access to Pakistan for Canadian oilseeds and pulses
  • maintained access to China for canola and developed materials to support risk assessment for Canadian exports to China
  • maintained access to China for canola and developed materials to support risk assessment for Canadian pulses and oat grain exports to China
  • maintained access to Ukraine for fish
  • expanded access for beef to China by approving additional establishments eligible to export to China, and
  • regained access to Argentina for pork meat

Global Food Safety Partnership

CFIA is a part of the Global Food Safety Partnership which, under the auspices of the World Bank, enables effective and coordinated food safety capacity building through a robust public-private partnership aiming to improve public health and economic development outcomes.

A delegation of Indian government officials from the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India, with representation from the Export Inspection Council and the Central Institute of Fisheries Technology, was in Canada on April 18-19, 2017. At the invitation of the CFIA, the delegation visited Headquarters and laboratories to exchange information on laboratory management and the operation of a national laboratory network. The laboratory diagnostic training is an initiative of the Global Food Safety Partnership, with funding from Canada. The four-member delegation from India increased their knowledge of Canada's food safety system and learned how to adapt the system to their situation to meet their needs and interest, which will assist them in providing safe food in India and support compliance with Canada's food safety import requirements. The visit was a follow-up to a one-day CFIA-led workshop on laboratory management held at Food Safety and Standards Authority of India offices in Delhi in February 2017. Prior to coming to Ottawa, the delegation had visited the International Food Safety Training Laboratory at the University of Maryland for training on veterinary drug residue testing.

The CFIA was a founding member of the Governing Council to the Global Food Safety Partnership and has funded the partnership in the past. The Governing Council was dissolved in November 2017, and in the last quarter of 2017-18, the Global Food Safety Partnership adopted a new and simplified governance structure with greater transparency and accountability to donors, while still allowing the partnership to embrace its public private persona in support of food safety capacity building in low and middle-income countries.

In 2017-18, the CFIA continued to support the Global Food Safety Partnerships objectives of strengthening science-based regulations, international and national regulatory frameworks for food safety

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017-18
Actual results
2016-17
Actual results
2015-16 Actual
results
Canadian interests are reflected in science-based international rules, standards, Free Trade Agreements, and technical arrangements through effective participation in sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and International Standards Setting Bodies such as Codex, OIE, and IPPC Number of key sanitary and phytosanitary negotiations and international standards setting bodies meetings where the CFIA promoted Canada's interests 36 March 31, 2018 53 36 38
International markets are accessible to Canadian food, animals, plants and their products Number of unjustified non-tariff barriers resolved 45 March 31, 2018 65 64 57
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of senior level CFIA-led committees with foreign regulatory counterparts 4 March 31, 2018 6 4 6
International regulatory cooperation, relationship building and technical assistance activities that are in line with the CFIA's mandate Number of CFIA-led technical assistance activities provided to foreign national governments 8 March 31, 2018 20 16 11

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For details on past performance and lessons learned for the International Collaboration and Technical Agreement indicators that did not meet their target, please refer to the relevant section in past Departmental Performance Reports/Departmental Results Reports:

The following tables present the International Collaboration and Technical Agreement Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2017-18.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017-18
Difference
(actual minus planned)
31,736,983 36,418,999 36,721,749 31,725,840 (4,693,159)

The net increase of $0.3 million in international authorities over planned is related to: in-year funding received to support the anticipated operating pressures related to the settlement of collective agreements; partially offset by an in-year adjustment to align authorities, initially included in international planned spending, to the food, animal and plant programs where the related expenditures were actually incurred.

The Agency spent $4.7 million less than planned, $5.0 million less than total international authorities available for use. Unspent authorities were mainly funds reserved for the anticipated collective bargaining settlement costs. Collective bargaining settlements were not finalized in 2017-18; therefore these lapsing funds will be brought forward to 2018-19.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18
Difference (actual minus planned)
310 319 9

Full-time equivalents were relatively stable between plans and actuals in 2017-18.

Information on the CFIA's lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support program delivery in the organization, regardless of the internal services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Results

The CFIA's internal services are vital for enabling the delivery of CFIA programs and initiatives. Many of the initiatives mentioned in various sections of this report (i.e. Federal Science and Technology Infrastructure and Electronic Service Delivery Platform) have been supported by our internal services.

Service Delivery

As part of the CFIA's Service Management Strategy, in 2017-18 the service inventory was streamlined to ensure better alignment with the structure of the CFIA's new Permissions programs (i.e. Food Products, Plant Products, and Animal Products). These are part of the CFIA's new Departmental Results Framework (DRF), which came into effect on April 1, 2018.

Additionally, by streamlining its service definitions and publishing service standards, the CFIA has simplified the terminology used and now provides Canadians with clearer service delivery expectations. This in turn reduces effort, waste and costs.

The CFIA has established service standards for 63% of its priority services, which is an increase from 35% in 2016-17. The CFIA will report publicly on performance against these standards in the Government of Canada wide service inventory.

These exercises have enhanced the CFIA's ability to review, analyze and manage the services it provides to industry and Canadians. This includes the ability to design service processes end-to-end from the client's perspective.

Information is the cornerstone of a democratic, effective and accountable government. The CFIA recognizes the necessity of accurate, timely and complete responses to public requests for information as an essential element of our democracy. In support of this, the Agency launched an initiative called Access to Information and Privacy Paperless that enables the electronic retrieval of records in their native digital format.

In 2017-18, the e-Retrieval pilot project, a component of the Access to Iinformation and Privacy Paperless Initiative, was completed. This initiative has streamlined the retrieval process, reduced the use of paper, and improved quality and delivery time for retrieval of records, reducing the time required for the retrieval, triage and importation of records by 40 percent (6.2 days). The pilot project was recognized for an award of excellence in Access to Information and Privacy services by the Conference Board of Canada's Council of Chief Information Officers.

Web Renewal

In 2017-18, the CFIA developed a new information classification structure in preparation for the shift towards the common Government of Canada documents management system. In support of this, the CFIA enhanced its current electronic document and records management system to improve the accessibility of information and increase performance and accessibility.

Did you know?

The first quarterly publication from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), The Chronicle was made available online in Winter of 2017.

The Chronicle provides updates on the Agency's activities and highlight some of the changes we have underway. Canadians can keep up to date with changes happening at the CFIA by subscribing to the modernization initiatives listserv.

In June 2017, the CFIA replaced its legacy GroupWise email and calendar platform with Microsoft Outlook which aims to improve productivity and efficiency among Agency employees. Due to a change in the timing for the roll-out of the Canada.ca web renewal process, the CFIA did not migrate to the new Canada.ca web structure, but instead focused on preparing for the future implementation by aligning its web content with the Canada.ca format to make it easier for Canadians to find CFIA-related information and services.

Open Government

Open Government is about making government more accessible to everyone. This means giving greater access to government data and information to the Canadian public and the businesses community. In 2017-18, in line with the Government of Canada's Open Government Implementation Plan, the CFIA developed a framework to enhance openness and transparency and began preparations for the official launch of consultations with Canadians and stakeholders.

Additionally, the CFIA supported the Open Government Implementation Plan by maintaining a comprehensive data asset inventory and publishing 24 data sets in accessible and reusable formats on the Open Government Portal.

Enhancing Project Management

The management of projects is key to providing value for money and demonstrating sound stewardship in program delivery at the CFIA. The CFIA's comprehensive approach to managing projects, which is integrated across the Agency, enhances the likelihood of realizing project outcomes and ensuring clear accountability. In December 2017, the CFIA launched its Project Management Competency Development Program, which aims to increase the knowledge, understanding, and application of project management principles. Ten participants registered and completed their prerequisite project management training and individual mentors have been assigned to each participant.

Additionally, the CFIA completed an assessment of its Enterprise Project Management Framework with an emphasis on identifying portfolio and program of projects approaches within the CFIA. These continuous improvement efforts will improve the CFIA's ability to ensure that investment oversight is reflective of the level of risk and complexity and will encourage innovation by considering the full range of options available to best meet the Agency's needs.

People Management

Effective people management is a cornerstone of a high performing public service and a key enabler in building Canadians' trust in and satisfaction with government. The CFIA's approach continues to evolve to keep pace with and to address the challenges of globalization and increasing operating complexity.

In 2017-18, the CFIA focused on diversity and on employment equity, to strengthen its ability to achieve its program goals and provide services to Canadians. The CFIA attended career fairs and conducted outreach with Indigenous communities throughout the year and formally launched the Indigenous Summer Student Program, which provides mentorship and cultural support and engagement for Indigenous students. The CFIA also enhanced its online presence by posting job opportunities on campus websites, LinkedIn and Twitter and encouraged Agency managers to utilize student hiring initiatives, such as the Youth Accessibility Student Employee Opportunity and Indigenous Student Employment Opportunities. As a result of these efforts and changes in our approach to recruitment and hiring, the CFIA was able to increase recruitment of Indigenous students by 57 percent, and students with disabilities by 150 percent, and continues to benefit from the social and cultural diversity that enriches Canada.

The CFIA made progress towards implementing a new talent management framework and work was completed to adopt a common performance assessment tool that will bring the CFIA in line with core departments in the government. The CFIA also encouraged open and collaborative dialogue with employees throughout 2017-18. Examples include the President's Blog, a proactive, two-way communication tool, increased use of video messaging and prominently displaying the Agency's Twitter feed on the intranet home page. The CFIA used these means to facilitate broad employee awareness of activities and new information and to help build and maintain trust, which helps to create conditions to allow all employees to maximize their contributions and provide world-class service to Canadians.

The following tables present the Internal Service Program's planned and actual spending and full-time equivalents for 2017-18.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017-18
Difference
(actual minus planned)
121,533,396 121,954,294 143,540,357 138,235,246 16,280,952

The increase of $21.6 million in authorities over planned spending is mainly related to: the renewal of sunsetting funding for various food safety initiatives; the reimbursement of personnel related payments made on behalf of the Government of Canada; incremental Agency investments to support the implementation of Government of Canada and Agency initiatives, projects and the resolution of Agency Phoenix pay-related issues; and in-year funding received to support the anticipated operating pressures related to the settlement of collective agreements.

The Agency spent $16.3 million more than planned, and $5.3 million less than total internal services authorities. Unspent authorities were mainly funds reserved for the anticipated collective bargaining settlement costs. Collective bargaining settlements were not finalized in 2017-18; therefore, these lapsing funds will be brought forward to 2018-19.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18
Difference (actual minus planned)
861 980 119

The increase of 119 full-time equivalents over planned is largely related to: the renewal of sunsetting funding for various food safety initiatives; compensation and benefits specialists to support the resolution of Phoenix issues; and additional internal services resources to support the implementation of Government of Canada and Agency initiatives and projects.

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

The tables presented in this section reflect the CFIA's historical spending levels from 2015-16 to 2017-18 and planned spending for the next three fiscal years (2018-19 to 2020-21). Planned spending excludes funding extensions that the Agency plans to pursue. Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend, reduce or enhance funding.

The Agency will assess initiatives that are sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. Following parliamentary approval, funding renewal decisions will be reflected in the Agency's budgetary authorities. Agency-level information, including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, can be found in the Departmental spending trend graph below.

Departmental spending trendFootnote 11

Departmental spending trend graph. Description follows.
Description for image: Departmental spending trend graph
Departmental spending trend graph
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21
Sunset Programs - - - 19.4 71.2 70.3
Voted 595.1 624.4 638.5 561.4 505.9 506.0
Statutory 154.2 161.5 100.5 137.7 132.8 132.8
Total / Forecasted 749.4 785.9 739.0 718.5 709.9 709.1
Sunset Programs - FTEs - - 0 127 545 544
FTEs 5,901 6,101 6,271 5,944 5,519 5,519
Total / Forecasted - FTEs 5,901 6,101 6,271 6,071 6,064 6,063
Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2017-18
Main Estimates
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
2017-18 Total authorities available for use 2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016-17 Actual spending (authorities used) 2015-16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Food Safety Program 348,722,065 349,600,493 N/A N/A 411,567,681 358,956,685 368,568,579 376,113,531
Animal and Zoonotics Program 124,518,784 125,411,593 N/A N/A 145,569,202 135,253,334 173,246,450 141,043,127
Plant Resources Program 78,138,366 78,664,213 N/A N/A 82,585,356 74,846,479 79,435,589 79,807,062
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 31,736,983 36,418,999 N/A N/A 36,721,749 31,725,840 31,229,287 32,552,166
Safe Food and Healthy Plants and Animals (Core Responsibility) N/A N/A 571,740,385 512,414,764 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Subtotal 583,116,198 590,095,298 571,740,385 512,414,764 676,443,988 600,782,338 652,479,905 629,515,886
Internal Services 121,533,396 121,954,294 127,384,141 126,301,772 143,540,357 138,235,246 133,431,955 119,846,641
Total 704,649,594 712,049,592 699,124,526 638,716,536 819,984,345 739,017,584 785,911,860 749,362,527

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Programs and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Programs and Internal Services 2015-16
Actual full-time equivalents
2016-17
Actual full-time equivalents
2017-18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017-18 Actual full-time equivalents 2018-19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019-20 Planned full-time equivalents
Food Safety Program 3,155 3,220 2,890 3,265 N/A N/A
Animal and Zoonotics Program 959 975 942 1,001 N/A N/A
Plant Resources Program 703 695 688 706 N/A N/A
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 307 295 310 319 N/A N/A
Safe Food and Healthy Plants and Animals (Core Responsibility) N/A N/A N/A N/A 5,043 4,625
Subtotal 5,124 5,185 4,830 5,291 5,043 4,625
Internal Services 777 916 861 980 901 894
Total 5,901 6,101 5,691 6,271 5,944 5,519

The CFIA's actual spending and full-time equivalents (FTEs) trended up from 2015-16 to 2017-18 mainly due to an increase in temporary resources for: the Federal Infrastructure Initiative; the digital service delivery platform initiative; the Improved food safety for Canadians initiative; and increase expenditures related to statutory payments made to compensate Canadians for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control. Also, the Agency realigned existing resources and FTEs from its programs to Internal Services to finalize compliance with the April 2016 amendment to the Treasury Board requirements for classifying internal services activities.

In 2017-18, Agency FTEs further increased mainly due to Agency investments in: compensation and benefits specialists to support the resolution of Phoenix issues; and additional internal services resources to support the implementation of Government of Canada and Agency initiatives and projects. However, 2017-18 actual spending is less than 2016-17 due to a year over year decrease in statutory compensation payments made to Canadians to compensate them for animals or plants ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.

In 2018-19, 2019-20 and 2020-21, planned spending and FTEs decrease compared to prior years mainly due to the sunsetting of funding for various initiatives and projects, and the exclusion of anticipated in-year allocations from planned spending (such as annual reimbursements of personnel related payments made on behalf of the Government of Canada).

However, the Agency will assess initiatives that are sunsetting and seek renewal, as required, to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system, safe and accessible food supply, and plant and animal resource base. When including anticipated renewal of sunsetting resources, Agency spending and FTEs utilization is forecasted to be more stable as illustrated in the Departmental spending trend graph.

Expenditures by vote

For information on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017–2018.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's spending with the Government of Canada's spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

The CFIA's financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2018, are available on the Agency's website.

Financial statements highlights

The financial statements highlights presented within the Departmental Results Report are intended to serve as a general overview of the CFIA's financial position and operations. Financial statements are prepared in accordance with accrual accounting principles, Treasury Board accounting policies and year-end instructions issued by the Office of the Comptroller General, which are based on Canadian generally-accepted accounting principles for the public sector, as required under Section 31 of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act.

However, the financial information previously presented in the earlier portion of this Department Results Report was drawn from the Public Accounts of Canada which were prepared using an expenditure basis of accounting, also known as modified cash accounting.

The main financial highlights for 2017-18 are the decrease in the bovine tuberculosis outbreak compensation payments in the Animal Health and Zoonotics Program and the increase in the allowance for collective bargaining. Capital investments related to the Federal Infrastructure Initiative and the Digital Service Delivery Platform were comparable to the prior year.

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2017-18
Planned
results
2017-18
Actual
results
2016-17
Actual
results
Difference (2017-18 Actual results minus 2017-18 Planned results) Difference (2017-18 Actual results minus 2016-17 Actual results)
Total expenses 808,983,000 844,907,000 877,477,000 35,924,000 (32,570,000)
Total revenues 52,687,000 56,449,000 53,787,000 3,762,000 2,662,000
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 756,296,000 788,458,000 823,690,000 32,162,000 (35,232,000)

Note: For more information about the planned results, please visit the 2017-18 Future-Oriented Statement of Operations.

The total expenses were $844.9 million in 2017-18, a decrease of $32.6 million compared to last year's $877.5 million. Variances came from a decrease in statutory compensation payments and other associated expenses, such as travel, related to the bovine tuberculosis emergency ($3.4 million compared to $36.2 million in fiscal year 2016-17). In addition, these elements along with the reductions in expenses related to amortization have been offset by a $11.8 million increase in salary due to anticipated collective bargaining increases.

Total revenues amounted to $56.4 million for 2017-18, which is similar to last year's $53.8 million.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as at March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial Information 2017-18 2016-17 Difference
(2017-18 minus
2016-17)
Total net liabilities 198,169,000 171,912,000 26,257,000
Total net financial assets 100,353,000 98,051,000 2,302,000
Departmental net debt 97,816,000 73,861,000 23,955,000
Total non-financial assets 200,579,000 189,067,000 11,512,000
Departmental net financial position 102,763,000 115,206,000 (12,443,000)

Total liabilities at the end of 2017-18 were $198.2 million, an increase of $26.3 million over the previous year. The increase is mostly the result of the allowance for expired collective agreements. Total non-financial assets increased $11.5 million resulting from capital asset acquisitions net of amortization.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Ginette C. Petitpas Taylor, PC, MP

Institutional head: Paul Glover

Ministerial portfolio: Health

Enabling instruments:

CFIA Wide

Food Safety

Plant and Animal Health

Plant

Animal Health

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1997

Reporting framework

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) of record for 2017-18 are shown below:

Strategic Outcome. Description follows.
Description for image: Strategic Outcome

The image is composed of two large boxes/shapes, one on top of the other.

The top box says:

  • Strategic Outcome: A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base

The bottom box has multiple smaller boxes within, arranged in five columns. The first row of each column are programs. The boxes below the first row are sub-programs.

The first box of the first column says:

  • Food Safety Program

There are seven sub-program boxes below the "Food Safety Program" box, and they say:

  • Meat & Poultry
  • Egg
  • Dairy
  • Fish & Seafood
  • Fresh Fruit & Vegetables
  • Processed Products
  • Imported and Manufactured Food Products

The first box of the second column says:

  • Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

There are three sub-program boxes below the "Animal Health and Zoonotics Program" box, and they say:

  • Terrestrial Animal Health
  • Aquatic Animal Health
  • Feed

The first box of the third column says:

  • Plant Resources Program

There are four sub-program boxes below the "Plant Resources Program" box, and they say:

  • Plant Protection
  • Seed
  • Fertilizer
  • Intellectual Property Rights

The fourth column only has one box and it says:

  • International Collaboration and Technical Agreements

The first box of the fifth column says:

  • Internal Services

There are ten sub-program boxes below the "Internal Services" box, and they say:

  • Management and Oversight
  • Communications
  • Legal
  • Human Resources Management
  • Financial Management
  • Information Management
  • Information Technology
  • Real Property Management
  • Materiel Management
  • Acquisition Management

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on lower-level programs is available on the GC InfoBase

Supplementary information tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Context for the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2016-2019 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS):

  • sets out the Government of Canada's sustainable development priorities
  • establishes goals and targets
  • identifies actions to achieve them, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act

In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) supports reporting on the implementation of the FSDS and its Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, or equivalent document, through the activities described in this supplementary information table.

2. Sustainable Development in the CFIA

The CFIA's Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy for 2017 to 2020 describes the Department's actions in support of achieving sustainable food and a low-carbon government. This supplementary information table presents available results for the departmental action[s] pertinent to these goals. Last year's supplementary information table is posted on the department's website.

3. Departmental performance by FSDS goal

The following tables provide performance information on departmental actions in support of the FSDS goals listed in section 2.

FSDS goal: sustainable food
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved
Ensure safe and accessible food supply by mitigating risks to animal and plant resources from pests, diseases and other health hazards and prevent risks to health of Canadians Work with partners to address invasive alien species
  • Participate in international fora such as the International Plant Protection Convention, and the North American Plant Protection Organization.
  • Contribute to the development of international phytosanitary standards.
  • Foster partnerships with provincial invasive species councils and agricultural, forestry, and horticultural stakeholders.
  • Work with the United States to collect data on the inspection of vessels for Asian gypsy moth conducted by other countries at origin and upon arrival in North America to determine compliance rates.

Starting point:

  • Not applicable

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

  • Percentage of North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO), International Plant Protection Convention and Quadrilateral Groups projects with CFIA plant health experts
  • Number of new and revised regional and international standards for plant health
  • Number of new partnership initiatives (consultation, outreach, research, info sharing, alternative service delivery, etc.)
  • 55% of North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO), International Plant Protection Convention and Quadrilateral Groups projects with CFIA plant health experts. Table Note 12
  • 25 new and revised regional and international standards for health
  • 13 new partnership initiatives

Table Notes

Table Note 12

The CFIA participates in 100% of all current NAPPO and Quadrilateral projects but at the IPPC, because projects are more global and include a much wider range of plant pests and pathways; the CFIA participates in those for which Canada can contribute relevant expertise, hence the 55% performance result.

Return to table note 12  referrer

FSDS goal: low-carbon government
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved
Reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025 Modernize our fleet
  • Report annually on GHG emissions from fleet sources.
  • Have the existing Fleet Management Strategy Working Group consider ways to reduce the CFIA's GHG emissions in its light duty vehicles.

Starting point:

  • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2005-06 (base year): = 6.43 ktCO2e

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

  • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2029-30 = 2.57 ktCO2e
  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleet from fiscal year 2005-06 to fiscal year 2029-30 = 40%
  • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2017-18 = 3.82 ktCO2e
  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleet from fiscal year 2005-06 to fiscal year 2017-18 = 41%
Reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025 Support the transition to a low-carbon economy through green procurement
  • Include environmental considerations in procurement instruments.
  • Fulfill the requirements of the Policy on Green Procurement related to training, employee performance evaluations, procurement management processes and controls, and using common use procurement instruments.
  • The CFIA will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into procurement, in accordance with the Federal Policy on Green Procurement.
  • The CFIA will continue to ensure that 100% of procurement and material management specialists complete the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course.
  • The CFIA will continue to ensure that 100% of identified managers and functional heads of procurement and material have performance evaluations that clearly include support and contribution toward green procurement.
  • The CFIA awarded 146 contracts with a total value of $6,691,037 to purchase environmentally-friendly products from certified green suppliers.
  • 100% of CFIA procurement and material management specialists have completed the CSPS Green Procurement Course.
  • 100% of CFIA managers and functional heads of procurement have performance evaluations supporting green procurement

4. Report on integrating sustainable development

During the 2017-18 reporting cycle, the CFIA considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, as part of its decision-making processes.

As the CFIA did not develop any initiatives that required a Strategic Environmental Assessment, no related public statements were produced.

Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

General information
Name of transfer payment program Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by Regulations under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act (S.C., 1997, c. 6)
Start date N/A
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Other
Type of appropriation Statutory authorities provided through Regulations under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act (S.C., 1997, c. 6)
Fiscal year for terms and conditions N/A
Strategic outcome A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.
Link to the Department's [Program Alignment Architecture or Program Inventory] Animal Health and Zoonotics Program, Plant Resources Program
Description These payments are to compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for plants or animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
Results achieved In 2017-18, nine (9) Canadians were compensated for plants ordered destroyed and 162 Canadians were compensated for animals ordered destroyed.
Comments on variances

Animal Health and Zoonotics actual compensation payments made to Canadians were $3.1 million higher than the $3.2 million that was earmarked under Planned Spending. This increase is largely attributed to compensation payments related to Bovine Tuberculosis in Alberta.

Plant Resources actual compensation payments made to Canadians were $0.2 million lower than the $0.3 million that was earmarked under Planned Spending. This decrease is attributed to the lower than usual compensations requested for Potato Wart.

Audits completed or planned N/A
Evaluations completed or planned Included in Evaluation of Terrestrial Animal Health, 2018-19
Engagement of applicants and recipients N/A
Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015-16 Actual
spending
2016-17 Actual
spending
2017-18 Planned
spending
2017-18 Total
authorities available for use
2017-18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total other types of transfer payments
(Animal Health and Zoonotics Program)
15,498,181 40,629,889 3,200,000 6,284,134 6,284,134 3,084,134
Total Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 15,498,181 40,629,889 3,200,000 6,284,134 6,284,134 3,084,134
Total other types of transfer payments
(Plant Resources Program)
1,632,836 238,062 300,000 88,427 88,427 (211,573)
Total Plant Resources Program 1,632,836 238,062 300,000 88,427 88,427 (211,573)

Evaluations

Evaluations in progress or completed in 2017-18
Title of evaluation Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture Status on March 31, 2018 Deputy head approval dateTable Note 13
Evaluation of Terrestrial Animal Health Terrestrial Animal Health In progress December 2018
Evaluation of Traceability (Program lead) Terrestrial Animal Health In progress December 2018

Table Notes

Table Note 13

An evaluation is considered complete when the deputy head approves the evaluation report (including a management response and an action plan).

Return to table note 13  referrer

Fees

Fee information will be available by March 31, 2019.

Horizontal initiatives

General information
Name of horizontal initiative Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Renewal
Lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Federal partner organization(s) Health Canada; Public Health Agency of Canada
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15 Renewal Core BSE program (program regularly renewed since inception in 2003)
End date of the horizontal initiative 2018-19
Description of the horizontal initiative

To protect human and animal health, the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy program conducts surveillance, research and risk assessments on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies to minimize the risk of exposure to infected materials, maintain consumer confidence through assessment of the effectiveness of the risk mitigation measures and having measures in place to control any potential outbreaks. The Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy program supports market access for cattle, beef and related products by promoting and explaining Canada's Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy program to domestic and international stakeholders.

Health Canada conducts research and risk assessments on human exposure to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, and the Public Health Agency of Canada carries out surveillance of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and targeted supporting research in this area. The CFIA enforces the removal of specified risk material from the animal feed and the human food chains, monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country, monitors for the prevalence of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in the cattle population (through surveillance), verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place and explains Canada's Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy control measures to domestic and international stakeholders (for example, through the veterinarians abroad program) in order to maintain confidence in Canada's Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy program.

Governance structures The CFIA is the federal lead for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Program delivery. A summative evaluation of the CFIA's Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy program conducted in 2008 recommended the governance of the program be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication regarding Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy-related activities, both internally and with partner organizations. Based on that recommendation and consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives, the CFIA has since 2010 maintained committees in line with the Agency's overall governance structure, which evolve to address business needs in 2015. The governance structure enhances whole-of-Agency information sharing and integration and ensures a more efficient and streamlined senior-level committee structure. It is intended to foster a whole-of-Agency approach to decision making and support day-to-day operations across the Agency. To ensure that business line perspectives are integrated into the decision-making process, three senior executive-level committees on Animal Health, Plant and Food Safety are supported.
Total federal funding allocated (2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 203,229,460
Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2018 (dollars) 162,493,419
Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2018 (dollars) 149,362,712
Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative 2014-15
Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal, and source of funding (dollars) 203,229,461 (Budget 2014)
Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars) Not applicable
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation TBD
Shared outcome of federal partners

To contribute to the protection of human and animal health, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian cattle, beef and beef products.

ER 1: Specified Risk Material Removal from the Human Food Chain:

Performance indicator(s) PI 1: Industry compliance rate for removal of specified risk material.
Target(s) T 1: 100% compliance.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Internal files/ documents/databases; quarterly monitoring; annual reporting.
Results

AR 1: Of the 93.03% looked at, a compliance rate of 99.44% was achieved in tasks delivered in federally-registered establishments.

The CFIA conducts on-site inspections of SRM removal in federally-registered slaughter and boning establishments. The CFIA also reviews records to verify compliance and the effectiveness of the SRM control program. In 2017-18, 93.03% (6153/6614) of the planned programming specific to the enforcement and verification of SRM removal and controls was delivered nationally.

In addition, the CFIA conducts annual inspections of non-federally registered cattle abattoirs and audits of provincial inspection systems overseeing SRM controls. Inspections and audits include a review of records to verify that SRMs are removed, segregated and disposed of properly and to determine the adequacy of provincial oversight for plant controls. In some provinces, meeting inspection targets has been a challenge.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable.
Name of theme Not applicable.
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 2: Import Controls:

Outcome: Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards.

Performance indicator(s)

PI 2.1: Percentage of import policies verified and updated as required.

PI 2.2: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Import Policy is verified and updated as required.

Target(s)

T 2.1: 25% per year.

T 2.2: Annually, when the World Organisation for Animal Health updates the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy risk status country lists.

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Internal files/documents/ databases; annual monitoring and reporting.
Results

AR 2.1: 100% of the ABP import policies were reviewed and updated. Development of the new ABP import policy framework

AR 2.2: The BSE import policy has been updated at least once in the past 12 months.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable.
Name of theme Not applicable.
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 3: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Surveillance:

Outcome: Safe animals and food and market access

Performance indicator(s) PI 3: Temporal trend in exposure to the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy agent in the cattle population.
Target(s) T 3: Testing 30,000 samples from the high-risk category of cattle is the minimum national target.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Internal files/ documents/databases; monthly monitoring and quarterly reporting.
Results

AR 3: In the 2017-18 fiscal year, the total number of BSE samples tested by the national transmissible spongiform encephalopathy network laboratories was 29,094 (19,125 CFIA and 9,969 provincial). Sampling for BSE surveillance is conducted primarily on-farm or at dead stock facilities.

In Eastern Canada, sampling at dead stock is consistent, since contracts are signed with the facilities to hold a specified number of eligible carcasses for testing.

Sampling in Western Canada is done mostly on-farm by private practitioners. The surveillance program relies on producers or practitioners voluntarily submitting eligible diseased, down, dead or dying animals for sampling. If producers and practitioners do not send in samples, the numbers fall. Since BSE can mimic many other common disease conditions of cattle, it would be neither practical nor feasible to try to enforce mandatory surveillance.

However, the CFIA has collaborated with provinces and industry representatives (CanSurvBSE) to encourage continued commitment to the BSE surveillance program. The CFIA continues to work with our industry and provincial partners to maintain a high level of awareness of the importance of sample submission for BSE.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 4: Cattle Identification:

Outcome:

  • Governments and other entities make informed decisions to manage animal and related human health issues
  • Risk to Canadian livestock resource base are mitigated
  • Canadian livestock sector is compliant with regulations
Performance indicator(s)

PI 4.1: Number and development status of inspection tools in place

PI 4.2: Number of inspectors trained

PI 4.3: Ratio of non-compliances versus number of Compliance Verification System tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage

PI 4.4: Percentage of responses to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards

Target(s)

T 4.1: Training, tools and materials are relevant and up-to-date

T 4.2: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained

T 4.3: 95% compliance

T 4.4: 100%

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

DSF 4.1: Manual for Policy and Programs Branch, annually

DSF 4.2: Manual for Operations Branch, annually

DSF 4.3: Manual for Operations Branch, annually

DSF 4.4: Manual for Operations Branch, annually

Results

AR 4.1: Inspection tools (e.g. Manual of procedures) and materials (e.g. guidance, list of approved indicators) are relevant and up-to-date. Inspectors' training courses (e-courses and classroom delivery) are available and up-to-date; to be revised with proposed regulatory amendment in 2019.

AR 4.2: All inspectors verifying compliance have completed the required training courses.

AR 4.3: 94% in 2016-17

AR 4.4: Few responses to disease and epidemiological investigations are completed within service standards due to program design issues, aimed to be resolved through regulatory amendment due in 2019.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 5: Export Certification:

Outcome: Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

Performance indicator(s) PI 5: Percentage of exports meeting the standards of the importing country as required.
Target(s) T 5: 100%
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Internal files/documents/ databases; quarterly monitoring and annual reporting.
Results 100%
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 6: Technical Market Access Support:

Outcome: Maintain or improve confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets.

Performance indicator(s) PI 6: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.
Target(s) T 6: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Internal files/documents/ databases; annual monitoring and reporting.
Results

AR 6: Target met for 2017-18.

As part of the Federal Market Access Team, a portfolio comprised of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Global Affairs Canada (GAC), the Agency continues to support the collaborative approach to advancing Canadian agricultural interests abroad. The Federal Market Access Team works closely with industry stakeholders to open, maintain, and expand international markets for the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector. The Federal Market Access Team focuses market access efforts, sets priorities, and allocates resources for markets and cross-commodity market access issues that have the greatest potential.

In 2017-18, the CFIA continued the support and undertaking of Market Access efforts. This resulted in the opening, maintaining and expanding of cattle, genetics and beef access in markets where BSE was a concern in a number of countries, including:

  • Gained access to beef (deboned and bone-in), excluding offal, from animals under 30 months of age to China
  • Gained access to beef (bone-in) to Singapore
  • Improved access for bovine embryos in South Korea
  • Maintained access for bovine semen in South Korea and Japan

In fiscal year 2017-2018, the CFIA received 4 media calls relating to BSE and 10 calls relating to consumer confidence in beef in Canada. All media calls on BSE came from industry outlets (La Terre de chez nous, Western Producer, Bloomberg News, Alberta Beef Magazine). BSE media coverage focused mostly on the OIE BSE status and the livestock traceability program. Neither the CFIA nor AAFC conducted public opinion research regarding public confidence in beef.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 7: Health Products Risk Assessment and Targeted Research

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy/transmissible spongiform encephalopathies science, risks and product surveillance

Performance indicator(s)

PI 7.1: Number and type of training sessions, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy/transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics.

PI 7.2: Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted as a result of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy suspicion by product line (i.e. biologics).

PI 7.3: Number of products/product lots assessed for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies/Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy risks).

Target(s)

T 7.1: 0 (as needed)

T 7.2: 0 (as needed)

T 7.3: 400 lots per year

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Annual monitoring and reporting of data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, risk assessments, incident reports, certificates, internal records.
Results

AR 7.1: Health Canada attended three international meetings.

AR 7.2: Health Canada prepared one Issues Analysis Summary.

AR 7.3: 571 lots were assessed (538 lots of human/animal plasma derived products and 33 lots of human derived excipients products). Additionally, Health Canada completed the review of 44 submissions (23 Clinical Trial Applications/ Clinical Trial Applications Amendments; 6 Market Authorizations; and 15 Post-market Changes) which included the verification of the acceptability of source material related to BSE. Staff also participated in 3 applicable international meetings and gained knowledge and expertise.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 8: Food Safety and Nutrition: Risk Assessment

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy/transmissible spongiform encephalopathies science, risks and product surveillance

Intermediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making

Performance indicator(s)

PI 8.1: Number and type of training sessions, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by Health Canada staff on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy/transmissible spongiform encephalopathies topics.

PI 8.2: Number of Health Risk Assessments conducted as a result of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy suspicion by product line (i.e. food products).

PI 8.3: Number of knowledge transfer activities related to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy/transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

Target(s)

T 8.1: 1 conference

T 8.2: 0

T 8.3: 1

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Annual monitoring and reporting of data analysis, research papers, laboratory studies, research findings, risk assessments, incident reports, certificates, internal records.
Results

AR 8.1: Health Canada officials attended the International Workshop on Chronic Wasting Disease: Emerging Questions in Science and Policy. Departmental attendance at this workshop strengthens the scientific and regulatory capacity in this area and permits access to key international BSE/TSE experts.

AR 8.2: Health Canada prepared a risk advisory opinion on potential human health risks from chronic wasting disease. The Department also continued to provide food safety risk assessment and policy advice to federal and provincial regulatory authorities on BSE/TSE-related risks and conducted environmental scanning activities to identify new and emerging threats from BSE/TSE in the food supply.

AR 8.3: Succession planning took place to ensure that there is continuity in the Health Canada relationships with key stakeholders in the area of BSE/TSE.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 9: Prion Diseases Program

Outcome: Risks of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled.

Performance indicator(s) PI 9.1: Alignment of Public Health Agency of Canada data from human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies surveillance with international benchmarks; number of research presentations and publications; use of policy advice in decision-making.
Target(s)

T 9.1: Maintenance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance sensitivity at a level where observed mortality from all human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Canada is consistent with that observed internationally i.e. 1-2 per million population.

T 9.2: Technological development to ensure Canadian diagnostic analyses remain consistent with those performed internationally.

T 9.3: At least 2 research presentations, publications or reports per year.

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

DSF 9.1: Continuous monitoring and reporting of surveillance statistics and database

DSF 9.2: Annual monitoring and reporting of scientific publication records of researchers and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease surveillance system, electronic databases (publications; citations; impact factors)

DSF 9.3: Annual monitoring and reporting of laboratory reports and databases (internal records), National Microbiological Laboratory Quality System (internal records)

Results

AR 9.1: As a result of intensified surveillance effort, in 2017 the PHAC CJD Surveillance System confirmed a total of 74 definite and probable cases of human TSEs in Canada to date. This corresponds to a crude mortality rate of approximately 2.0 per million per year, and the estimate may rise further as additional case investigations from 2017 are closed in the coming months.

The epidemiologic data of the PHAC CJD Surveillance System continue to be used to assess the human health risk from zoonotic TSEs in Canada. The strong evidence base for the negative findings of this national surveillance program for human TSEs directly support the success of the BSE Horizontal Initiative, as well as risk assessment for other potentially zoonotic TSEs such as chronic wasting disease (CWD).

AR 9.2: The prospective study of the diagnostic accuracy of EPQuIC for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease continued. Real-time clinical-epidemiologic assessment of factors influencing CJD case detection and diagnosis by the PHAC CJD Surveillance System continued.

AR 9.3: Lamoureux L, Simon SLR, Waitt B, Knox JD: Proteomic Screen of Brain Glycoproteome Reveals Prion Specific Marker of Pathogenesis Proteomics 2017.

Cheng K, Sloan A, Wait B, Vendramelli R, Godal D, Simon S, O'Nei J, Carpenter M, Jackson D, Eastlake J, Mallinson G, Knox JD: Altered rPrP substrate structures and their influence on real-time quaking induced conversion reactions. Protein Expression and Purification. 143:20-27. 2018.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Performance highlights

Canada continues to qualify annually as a country assigned a controlled risk status by the World Health Organisation (OIE). The CFIA has presence and oversight of SRM removal at federally-registered establishments, which account for the majority (95%) of livestock processing in Canada. At the same time, the CFIA acknowledges that there have been some challenges with meeting inspection targets for non-federally registered abattoirs in some provinces.

In 2017-18, the CFIA continued to meet BSE sampling targets for high-risk cattle; however, regional variations in the number of samples submitted for BSE sampling has been noted. The CFIA continues to work with industry and provincial partners to encourage horizontal consistency in BSE sample submissions across Canada.

Canada's BSE programming continues to mitigate introduction risks via a strong import program. In addition, the CFIA continues to update import policies, manuals and training to ensure that Canada's BSE program is continuously updated to reflect the latest science of BSE.

Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Michelle Illing
Associate Executive Director
Animal Health Directorate
Policy & Programs Branch
613-773-7645

Public Health Agency of Canada
Steven Sternthal
Director General
Centre for Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Branch
613-948-6883

Health Canada
Etienne Ouimette
Director General
Resource Management & Operations Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
613-957-6690

Performance summary

Federal organizations Link to the Department's [Program Alignment Architecture or Program Inventory] Horizontal initiative activities Total allocation (2014-15 to 2018-19)
(dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending (dollars) 2017-18 Actual spending (dollars) 2017-18 Expected results 2017-18 Performance indicators 2017-18 Targets Date to achieve target 2017-18 Actual Results
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Specified risk material removal from the human food chain 45,946,160 9,189,232 9,488,674 ER 1 PI 1 T 1 March 31, 2018 AR 1
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Import controls 3,347,815 669,563 910,944 ER 2 PI 2.1
PI 2.2
T 2.1
T 2.2
March 31, 2018 AR 2.1
AR 2.2
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements BSE surveillance 80,912,125 16,182,425 14,719,497 ER 3 PI 3 T3 March 31, 2018 AR 3
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Cattle identification 10,672,140 2,134,428 2,428,290 ER 4 PI 4.1
PI 4.2
PI 4.3
PI 4.4
T 4.1
T 4.2
T 4.3
T 4.4
March 31, 2018 AR 4.1
AR 4.2
AR 4.3
AR 4.4
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Export certification 29,822,860
5,964,572 4,297,999 ER 5 PI 5 T 5 March 31, 2018 AR 5
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Animal Health and Zoonotics Program/ Food Safety Program/ International Collaboration and Technical Agreements Technical market access support 22,794,635 4,558,927 3,238,155 ER 6 PI 6 T 6 March 31, 2018 AR 6

Health Canada

Health Products Risk assessment 1,538,882 306,881 282,586 ER 7 PI 7.1
PI 7.2
PI 7.3
T 7.1
T 7.2
T 7.3
March 31, 2018 AR 7.1
AR 7.2
AR 7.3
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Risk assessment and standard setting 4,194,844 930,014 884,880 ER 8 PI 8.1
PI 8.2
PI 8.3
T 8.1
T 8.2
T 8.3
March 31, 2018 AR 8.1
AR 8.2
AR 8.3
AR 8.4

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Health Surveillance and Assessment Prion Diseases Program 4,000,000 800,000 786,965 ER 9 PI 9 T 9.1
T 9.2
T 9.3
March 31, 2018 AR 9.1
AR 9.2
AR 9.3

Total for all federal organizations

Not applicable Not applicable 203,229,461 40,736,042 37,037,990 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
General information
Name of horizontal initiative Food Safety Oversight
Lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Federal partner organization(s) Health Canada
Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15
End date of the horizontal initiative Ongoing
Description of the horizontal initiative

The objectives of this horizontal initiative are to strengthen the CFIA's and Health Canada's food safety oversight of the fresh fruits and vegetables sector, the fish and seafood sector and the manufactured food products sector.

These objectives will be achieved through the implementation of new programming and increased oversight activities.

These objectives are in line with the Government of Canada outcome of "Healthy Canadians".

The two federal organizations, the CFIA and Health Canada, received a total spending authority of $152 million over five years and $35.6 million on an ongoing basis for this initiative.

Governance structures

The CFIA and Health Canada currently work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates. This is supported by a memorandum of understanding, signed in 2008, which provides the foundation for building a clear understanding of their respective roles and responsibilities as they relate to human health and to provide links across the organizations to improve the design and delivery of integrated health-related solutions.

A governance model exists for the partner organizations to regularly convene and discuss food safety issues of mutual concern and responsibility.

This governance framework includes Assistant Deputy Minister-level and Director General-level committees on food safety that meet regularly to discuss and plan approaches for addressing joint food safety issues.

The CFIA and Health Canada will continue to work horizontally through these governance committees. As complementary components of the health portfolio, the two organizations will report results within an integrated, collaborative performance measurement framework.

Total federal funding allocated (2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 151,999,631 and 35,606,377 ongoing
Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2018 (dollars) 116,393,254
Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2018 (dollars) 98,769,719
Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative Not applicable
Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal, and source of funding (dollars) Not applicable
Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars) Not applicable
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 10: Enhanced preventive food safety program management
Performance indicator(s) PI 10: Strengthened design and management of preventive food safety programing
Target(s) T 10: List of events and materials to support program delivery
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Data source: A comprehensive review of relevant program design initiatives, communications, products, and tools is developed based on input from subject matter experts.

Frequency: Annually (i.e. for Departmental Performance Report).

Results

AR 10.1: Development of seven food risk summaries.

As part of the work carried out under the Program Management Framework (PrMF), risks and CFIA controls were analyzed with the goal of strengthening program design and management of these risks.

  • The CFIA completed four risk summaries (pathogens in flour, vomitoxin (deoxynivalenol – DON) in grain-based foods, pathogens in raw fish and shellfish for direct consumption, and pathogens in raw fish and shellfish for further processing).
  • Three additional risks summaries (pathogens in fresh whole fruits and vegetables, pathogens in minimally processed fruits and vegetables, and marine toxins in fish and shellfish) were also initiated and are expected to be completed in 2018-2019.

AR 10.2: Stakeholder intelligence gathering in food sectors known to be involved in recent food safety issues.

The CFIA enhanced its understanding of industry sector recognized to have food safety risks through on-site visits, gathering information about food safety controls in place for the purpose of program design. For instance, the CFIA visited a grower-packer- processor of leafy greens and fresh herbs, which contributed to risk intelligence for risk summaries and awareness of industry practices for the purpose of communication with foreign competent authorities.

AR 10.3: Risk management for Vibrio and Norovirus in bivalve shellfish.

  • The CFIA continued its efforts to review the recommendations for Vibrio risk management stated in the Inter-sectoral Working Group Report, and to develop and implement appropriate responses. The CFIA also contributed to the review of a manuscript describing the impact of changes to Vibrio risk management on the reduced incidence of Vibrio illnesses in 2016 and 2017.
  • The CFIA collaborated with government and industry partners to develop a specific response framework to be able to more rapidly respond to Norovirus outbreaks and ensure the appropriate management of risks, based on scientific information. The Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program (CSSP) provided updated guidance (chapter 13 of the CSSP manual) for responding to outbreaks of shellfish-related illnesses encompassing the evidence from epidemiological information and food safety investigations. New criteria for shellfish harvest areas, landfills, or lease closures and re-openings in response to Norovirus contamination events were added.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Theme outcome Not applicable
Theme performance indicator(s) Not applicable
Theme target(s) Not applicable
Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Theme results Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 11: Enhanced inspection cctivities
Performance indicator(s) PI 11: Increase in inspection activities to the non-meat food areas.
Target(s) T 11: Number of inspections conducted in the non-meat food area.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Reporting: The CFIA reports this information internally on a quarterly basis.
Results AR 11 CFIA allocated inspection resources to deliver key food safety priorities.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Theme outcome Not applicable
Theme performance indicator(s) Not applicable
Theme target(s) Not applicable
Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Theme results Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 12: Enhanced sampling, testing, and analysis
Performance indicator(s) PI 12: Increase in sampling, testing and analysis
Target(s)

T 12a: Sample testing reports, results and analysis completed in the non-meat food areas for the additional 6000 planned samples.

T 12b: Validated methods developed and implemented to support increased testing in the non-meat food areas.

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

DSF 12a:

Data source: Test reports and analytical results are accessible to CFIA employees through the internal Laboratory Information Management System.

Frequency: Actionable results that may be a food safety risk are communicated immediately to the appropriate CFIA personnel responsible for follow-up and investigation. A number of samples received and tested are reviewed and reported on a quarterly basis. A final internal sample delivery report is compiled on an annual basis.

DFS 12b:

Data source: Methods that were developed and validated in previous years will now be implemented for use in regulatory testing.

Frequency: This will be ongoing for the 2017-18 fiscal year

Results

AR 12a: Sample testing reports, results and analysis completed in the non-meat food areas for the 6,000 planned samples.

For 2017-18, the CFIA Food Microbiology and Food Chemistry laboratories received approximately 5,500 additional samples of high risk non-meat food commodities within the Imported and Manufactured Foods, Fish and Seafood, and Fresh Fruit and Vegetables sectors in support of the Food Safety Oversight (FSO) initiative. Sample testing reports, results and analysis for approximately 5,100 samples representing approximately 14,000 microbial and chemical tests and analyses have been generated. Four hundred domestic and imported fish and seafood samples have been received for pesticide analysis, but are pending analysis until method validation is completed.

The FSO initiative allowed CFIA labs to effectively respond to pressing food safety emergencies, while also maintaining laboratory capacity for all routine and planned testing activities. CFIA laboratories offered testing support for a number of food safety investigations, including the testing of approximately one hundred and seventy samples of frozen raspberries imported from China in support of an outbreak of Norovirus illness cases in Quebec, and offering testing support to a multi-provincial outbreak of Norovirus illness cases associated with the consumption of oysters from British Columbia. CFIA laboratories also tested approximately three hundred samples of flour in support of a multi-provincial outbreak of pathogenic E.coli O, where 121 illness cases were associated with the consumption of flour produced by a Canadian mill from Saskatchewan, the first Canadian outbreak linked to flour. In addition, CFIA laboratories supported testing requests for lettuce samples submitted as part of a US-Canada cross-jurisdictional outbreak of pathogenic E.coli O, where 157 illness cases were associated with the consumption of romaine lettuce from the USA.

In addition to supporting testing requests for samples submitted under food safety investigations, CFIA labs implemented a new sampling plan for multi-class veterinary drug residues and carbapenems in fish and seafood samples.

AR 12b: Validated methods developed and implemented to support increased testing in the non-meat food areas.

CFIA Food Microbiology and Food Chemistry laboratories have undertaken a number of projects to expand and improve testing methods in support of the increased testing in the non-meat food areas.

Leading edge genomics-based technologies were developed and implemented for the detection and characterization of the E.coli bacteria recovered from the first ever Canadian outbreak linked to flour. Next generation sequencing approaches are under development to reveal the entire genetic blueprint of bacteria recovered from food inspection samples to provide a comprehensive analysis of the organism's identity and potential to cause disease, and improve the ability to determine whether it is the source of infection in people.

A multi-class veterinary drug residue method was developed and validated to replace single-class veterinary drug residue methods for the analysis of fish and seafood products. A method for the analysis of carbapenems in fish and seafood was developed and validated due to the threat of antibiotic resistance under the FSO program. Mercury and heavy metal methods were consolidated into one method and validated to analyze fish and seafood products which increased laboratory efficiency.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Theme outcome Not applicable
Theme performance indicator(s) Not applicable
Theme target(s) Not applicable
Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Theme results Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 13: Improved safety in imported food
Performance indicator(s) PI 13: Increase in foreign country assessments of priority areas
Target(s) T 13: Establish baseline of foreign country assessments and show increase of foreign country assessments.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Data source: Reports of foreign country assessments.

Reporting: Final reports of foreign country assessments will be accessible through the CFIA website.

Results

AR 13.1 The CFIA continued to build its capacity to perform foreign system assessments. In this regard, the CFIA updated its tools and templates and provided mentoring and training to its staff.

AR 13.2 The CFIA delivered two on-site assessments, one for fresh fruits and vegetables (Costa Rica) and one for shellfish (Chile) in fiscal year 2017-18.

AR 13.3 The CFIA continued to engage with authorities in South Korea for the delivery of a shellfish sanitation program audit.

AR 13.4 The CFIA will publish the final assessment reports on its external website.

AR 13.5 Fish products or foreign processors are added to the Enhanced Inspection List when there is information that the product may be potentially unsafe or unwholesome or the processors may potentially be producing unsafe products. The information may be obtained from a product investigation, product recall, a review of the Mandatory Inspection List, environmental scanning, other government departments or foreign competent authorities.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Theme outcome Not applicable
Theme performance indicator(s) Not applicable
Theme target(s) Not applicable
Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Theme results Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 14a: Standard setting support
Performance indicator(s) PI 14a: Development of new and/or updated standards is initiated in 100% of cases where there is an identified need to do so in order to address food safety risks
Target(s) T 14a 100% of cases where there is an identified need to do so in order to address food safety risks
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Manual and CFIA systems
Results

AR 14a:

100% of all identified needs to develop or update standards to address food safety risks were completed. In this regard, work was undertaken to modernize the regulatory requirements for infant formulas that are listed under Division 25 of the Food and Drug Regulations (FDR). As well, an internal consultation meeting was held in November 2017 to identify topics that will inform the modernization work. An internal working group was formed to work on the various science/policy topics.

Additionally, Health Canada undertook work to prepare and finalize a new regulatory framework for human milk fortifiers, which includes amendments to Division 25 of the FDR to include these regulations.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Theme outcome Not applicable
Theme performance indicator(s) Not applicable
Theme target(s) Not applicable
Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Theme results Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 14b: Standard setting support
Performance indicator(s) PI 14b: Number and type of involvement activities associated with standard setting initiatives
Target(s) T 14b: To be determined since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Results

AR 14b: (Target met)

Two meetings were held with the Food and Consumer Products Canada Infant Formula Council. The first meeting, in May 2017, included presentations on the work of the Health Canada Submissions Management and Information Unit, the new Safe Foods for Canadians Act and Regulations, manufacturing facility evaluations, the clinical evidence required to demonstrate the nutritional adequacy of infant formulas, and the compliance of claims on infant formula with the WHO Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes. The second meeting, in October 2017, was to discuss the first four guidance documents listed below. These guidance documents were also shared for input from infant formula company representatives in January 2018.

Six guidance documents for existing and prospective infant formula manufacturers were drafted by Health Canada:

  1. A Guide to Preparing an Infant Formula Premarket Notification;
  2. Infant Formula: Requirements for a New Manufacturing Facility;
  3. Protocol for a Growth/Tolerance Clinical Trial for Healthy Term Infants;
  4. A Guide to Industry on the Scientific Evidence Needed to Establish the Nutritional Adequacy of a New Term Infant Formula or Formula that has Undergone a Major Change;
  5. Update to 2006 version of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) for Infant Formula; and
  6. Infant Formulas Available in Canada.

As well:

  • Five pre-submission discussions were held with prospective new Infant formula manufacturers for Canada.
  • Five technical consultation documents were posted online specific to updating food contaminant standards and removing a food additive listing. Subsequent to this, four contaminant maximum levels were updated and/or added to the List of Contaminants and Other Adulterating Substances in Food through posting the corresponding Notices of Modification.
  • One food additive listing was removed from the List of Food Additives with other Accepted Uses Guidance document on ready-to-eat smoked fish products and vegetables and herbs stored in oil finalized for publication.
  • Microbiological criteria for fruits and vegetables were reviewed and updated.
  • Microbiological guidance was issued for the control of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in live oyster shellstock intended for raw consumption in Canada.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Theme outcome Not applicable
Theme performance indicator(s) Not applicable
Theme target(s) Not applicable
Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Theme results Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 14c: Standard setting support
Performance indicator(s) PI 14c: Number of risk assessments developed in support of standard setting initiatives
Target(s) T 14c: To be determined since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Results

AR 14c: (Target met)

Four risk assessments in support of standard setting initiatives were completed; chemicals included shellfish biotoxins, cadmium in oysters, cyanide in bitter apricot kernels, and ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages.

The development of a risk profile on Salmonella in sprouted chia and flax seed powder in Canada was initiated. Work continued on drafting the report for the joint US-Canada quantitative risk assessment on the potential risks and mitigation strategies associated with Norovirus contamination of oysters.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Theme outcome Not applicable
Theme performance indicator(s) Not applicable
Theme target(s) Not applicable
Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Theme results Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 14d: Standard setting support
Performance indicator(s) PI 14d: Number of detection methods developed and enhanced in support of standard setting initiatives
Target(s) T 14d: To be determined, since it will depend on the number and type of standards being developed
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Results

AR 14d: (Target met)

  • Five detection methods were developed and enhanced in support of standard setting initiatives; the chemicals involved included emerging flame retardants, mycotoxins, perfluorochemicals and plant alkaloids.
  • Advancements were also achieved in the development and validation of new and improved test detection methods for selected microbial pathogens.
  • Six new methods and five updated methods were approved by the Microbiological Methods Committee (MMC) for publication in the Compendium of Analytical Methods.
  • Two outdated methods from the Compendium were removed and two new guidance documents on method validation were published.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Theme outcome Not applicable
Theme performance indicator(s) Not applicable
Theme target(s) Not applicable
Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Theme results Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 15: Enhanced food safety risk assessments
Performance indicator(s) PI 15: Timely response to emerging food and nutrition safety incidents including foodborne illness outbreaks
Target(s) T 15: 90% of health risk assessments provided to the CFIA within standard timelines to manage food safety incidents
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Results

AR 15: (Target met)

100% of the 181 health risk assessment (HRA) requests from the CFIA were completed within agreed upon service standards. Health Canada continues to fully meet performance targets for completing these types of HRAs.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Name of theme Not applicable
Theme outcome Not applicable
Theme performance indicator(s) Not applicable
Theme target(s) Not applicable
Theme data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting Not applicable
Theme results Not applicable
Performance highlights

In 2017-18, the CFIA maintained the implementation of a preventive food safety program for the non-meat sector under FSO. To further support risk-based planning in all food areas, the CFIA continued its work to develop risk summaries for high priority food risks under the Program Management Framework. Summaries were completed for pathogens in raw fish and shellfish for direct consumption or further processing, for DON (deoxynivalenol) in grain-based food and for pathogens in flour, and additional risk summaries are in progress for pathogens in fresh fruits and vegetables (whole and minimally processed) and for marine toxins in fish and shellfish.

Risk management of pathogens in bivalve shellfish has been enhanced through development and implementation of a strategy including revised guidance for response to outbreaks (e.g. due to pathogens such as Vibrio or Norovirus).

The CFIA continued to dedicate inspection resources funded under the FSO initiative to key activities in the Fish, Fresh Fruits and Vegetables, and Imported and Manufactured Food programs. The main focus of these resources was to deliver verification activities at domestic establishments, to respond to complaints and food recalls, and to follow-up on non-compliant samples found under enhanced FSO sampling.

Growers, shippers, importers and foreign authorities are notified of non-compliances with respect to chemical residue levels in fresh fruits and vegetables, in an effort to share information that may improve the suppliers' food safety programs and compliance with Canadian requirements. The CFIA compiles and communicates the non-compliance information to the public through its website, and further targets products with a history of non-compliance through directed testing under its chemical residue surveillance program.

CFIA laboratories received 92% of all samples planned under the FSO initiative, performing approximately 14,000 tests and analyses. The majority of the samples were determined to be compliant with existing Canadian regulations and guidelines. Positive results were sent to CFIA Operations for follow-up and investigation as necessary.

In order to continue to support enhanced sampling and testing under the FSO initiative, the CFIA conducted several method development and validation studies to implement new and expanded analytical capabilities specific to the non-meat food area. These include: genomics-based technologies to detect E.coli bacteria in flour; a multi-class veterinary drug residue method for the analysis of fish and seafood products; a detection method for antibiotic residues in fish and seafood; and the consolidation of mercury and heavy metal methods for fish and seafood products to increase laboratory efficiency.

Finally, to enhance the safety of imported products, the CFIA continued building its capacity to perform foreign country assessments and update its tools.

Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Lyzette Lamondin
Executive Director
Food Safety and Consumer Protection Directorate
Policy and Programs Branch
Telephone: 613-773-6189

Dr. Aline Dimitri
Executive Director
Food Safety Science Directorate
Science Branch
Telephone: 613-773-5542

Jag Dhanda
Senior Director
National Inspection Division
Operations Branch
Telephone: 613-773-6536

Health Canada
Karen McIntyre
Director General
Food Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
Telephone: 613-957-1821

Performance summary
Federal organizations Link to the Department's [Program Alignment Architecture or Program Inventory] Horizontal initiative activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2017-18 Planned spending (dollars) 2017-18 Actual spending (dollars) 2017-18 Expected results 2017-18 Performance indicators 2017-18 Targets Date to achieve target 2017-18 Actual results
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Preventive food safety program management 11,786,965 and 2,138,827 ongoing 2,138,827 1,817,799 ER 10 PI 10 T 10 March 2018 AR 10
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Enhanced inspection activities 90,809,417 and 22,189,785 ongoing 22,189,785 18,821,355 ER 11 PI 11 T 11 March 2018 AR 11
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Increased sampling, testing and analysis 22,283,451 and 5,411,341 ongoing 5,411,341 5,363,076 ER 12 PI 12

T 12a
T 12b

March 2018

AR 12a
AR 12b

Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Foreign country assessments 6,293,373 and 1,245,327 ongoing 1,245,327 1,055,836 ER 13 PI 13 T 13 March 2018 AR 13
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Standard setting 14,246,254 and 3,080,927 ongoing 3,080,927 3,174,443

ER 14a
ER 14b
ER 14c
ER 14d

PI 14a
PI 14b
PI 14c
PI 14d

T 14a
T 14b
T 14c
T 14d

March 2018

AR 14a
AR 14b
AR 14c
AR 14d

Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Health risk assessments 6,580,170 and 1,540,170 ongoing 1,540,170 1,414,202 ER 15 PI 15 T 15 March 2018 AR 15
Total for all federal organizations Not applicable Not applicable

151,999,631 and
35,606,377 ongoing

35,606,377 31,646,711 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
General information
Name of horizontal initiative Canadian Food Safety Information Network
Lead department(s) Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Federal partner organization(s)

Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Health Canada

The Public Health Agency of Canada is a federal partner in a project capacity only and is not contributing to the Canadian Food Safety Information Network program.

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative 2014-15
End date of the horizontal initiative 2018-19
Description of the horizontal initiative

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network will respond to recommendations from the Report of the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak [Weatherill Report; recommendations 33 and 34]. The initiative will strengthen the ability of Canada's federal, provincial and territorial food safety authorities to share data and information to anticipate, detect and respond to foodborne hazards and minimize the impact of food safety events. The Canadian Food Safety Information Network is expected to link federal, provincial and territorial food safety authorities and food testing laboratories across Canada by leveraging the Public Health Agency of Canada's web-based informatics platform, the Canadian Network for Public Health Intelligence.

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network complements the federal public service's modernization strategy, Blueprint 2020, in two of its priority areas. The Canadian Food Safety Information Network contributes to Innovative Practices and Networking by sharing food safety data and information across federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions. It also contributes to the Technology Priority of Blueprint 2020 by providing a web-based solution combining automated early warning with advanced data analysis for risk-based modelling and planning.

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network supports the Government of Canada's approach to evidence-based policy. Aggregated food safety data will increase the reliability of scientific evidence in risk-based decision-making to strengthen Canada's food safety system.

Additionally, the Canadian Food Safety Information Network aligns with the Government of Canada's objective to improve relationships with federal, provincial and territorial partners. The initiative represents a pan-Canadian approach to food safety and requires that federal, provincial and territorial partners work collaboratively to achieve its goals.

Governance structures

The CFIA's Vice President, Science, is the Executive Sponsor for the implementation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network. A Canadian Food Safety Information Network Federal, Provincial and Territorial Steering Committee provides integrated federal, provincial and territorial leadership, input, guidance, and decision-making authority for the development and implementation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network program component and associated food safety activities.

The Senior Management Committee, chaired by the CFIA President, provides direction for the initiative and is accountable for overall implementation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network.

The CFIA, Health Canada, and the Public Health Agency of Canada work horizontally in delivering their shared food safety mandates, and meet regularly to discuss food safety issues of mutual concern. Additionally, regularly scheduled, targeted discussions regarding the implementation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network occur.

Total federal funding allocated (2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 12,133,149 Table Note 19
Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2018 (dollars) 9,275,895
Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2018 (dollars) 8,487,564
Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative Not applicable
Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal, and source of funding (dollars) Not applicable
Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars) Not applicable
Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation 2022-23
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 16: In fiscal year 2016-17, extensive consultations took place between the Canadian Food Safety Information Network program team, CFIA business experts, and federal, provincial and territorial partners. From these consultations, a detailed list of business requirements was gathered. These requirements will:

  • Inform the CFIA Information Management and Information Technology enhancements, which will facilitate the exchange and analysis of food safety data among Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners; and
  • Ensure that the Canadian Food Safety Information Network food safety module within the Public Health Agency's Canadian Network for Public Health Intelligence has the capabilities and business functions required to meet the needs of Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners.
Performance indicator(s) PI 16: A report containing the business requirements gathered and listed by functionality and priority level.
Target(s) T 16: A completed report that has been validated and approved by the Canadian Food Safety Information Network Federal, Provincial and Territorial Steering Committee.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Data source: Canadian Food Safety Information Network governance documents (such as, Steering Committee and working group Record of Decisions), program tracking documents (such as, Pilot Tracking Sheet, Stakeholder Engagement List).

Frequency of Monitoring and Reporting: Monthly

Results AR 16: Through outreach activities with the federal, provincial and territorial food safety authorities, the Canadian Food Safety Information Network has finalized a report that includes complete and validated business requirements that will provide the basis for the development and prioritization of the capabilities and functionalities of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network technical solution. The business requirements document has been approved by the Canadian Food Safety Information Network Federal, Provincial and Territorial Steering Committee.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners

ER 17: Two completed pilot projects:

  1. Testing data exchange with a provincial partner to determine which data elements will be shared through the Canadian Food Safety Information Network; and
  2. Testing various food classification systems to support data sharing and integration activities with Canadian Food Safety Information Network federal, provincial and territorial partners.
Performance indicator(s)

PI 17.1: Agreement on the data elements to be shared among partners; and

PI 17.2: A decision regarding the food classification system to be used for the Canadian Food Safety Information Network.

Target(s)

T 17.1: One completed technical annex to the Canadian Food Safety Information Network bilateral memorandum of understanding detailing the specific data elements to be shared among Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners.

T 17.2: A completed report summarizing the findings from the pilot project.

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Data source: Canadian Food Safety Information Network governance documents (such as, Steering Committee and working group Record of Decisions) and program tracking documents (such as, Pilot Tracking Sheet, Stakeholder Engagement List, Memorandum of Understanding Status Log).

Frequency of Monitoring and Reporting: Monthly

Results

AR 17.1: A technical annex to the Canadian Food Safety Information Network bilateral memorandum of understanding detailing the specific data elements to be shared among Canadian Food Safety Information Network partners was drafted in 2017-18. CFSIN started to engage and consult with the provinces and territories on the specifics of the proposed technical annex. Engagement and consultation activities will continue in 2018-19.

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network Federal, Provincial and Territorial Steering Committee endorsed the list of essential data elements to be shared among partners and included in the technical annex.

AR 17.2: A report summarizing the findings of a data exchange pilot project between the Alberta Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, the Alberta Provincial Laboratory for Public Health and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency was completed and shared with interested parties.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable.
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 18: The CFIA will continue outreach activities with federal, provincial and territorial partners and formalize participation in the Canadian Food Safety Information Network through bilateral data sharing arrangements.
Performance indicator(s) PI 18: Number of data sharing arrangements signed by the Canadian Food Safety Information Network with federal, provincial and territorial partners.
Target(s) T 18: Five signed data sharing arrangements.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Data source: Canadian Food Safety Information Network governance documents (such as, Steering Committee and working group Record of Decisions) and program tracking documents (such as, Memorandum of Understanding Status Log).

Frequency of Monitoring and Reporting: Monthly

Results AR 18: One data sharing arrangement was signed with the Government of Nunavut in March 2018. In total, there are three signed data sharing arrangements. Two data sharing arrangements are close to being finalized for signature, which will bring the total number of signed data sharing arrangements to five.
Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 19: Working with federal, provincial and territorial partners to advance a more collaborative and systematic approach to improve food safety programs. Continue the development for a systematic pan-Canadian approach to searching and cataloguing intelligence and information by developing an algorithm to detect relevant food safety information.
Performance indicator(s)

PI 19.1: The development of a food safety specific algorithm; and

PI 19.2: The number of Canadian Food Safety Information Network federal, provincial and territorial partners contributing to the testing of the algorithm (i.e., rating and ranking the sources of information found by the algorithm to determine its success in providing relevant information)

Target(s)

T 19.1: Develop and test one food safety specific algorithm; and

T 19.2: Five Canadian Food Safety Information Network federal, provincial and territorial partners participating in the rating and ranking of sources.

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Data Source: Canadian Food Safety Information Network governance documents (such as, Steering Committee and working group Record of Decisions) and program tracking documents (such as, Pilot Tracking Sheet, Master Federal, Provincial and Territorial Surveillance Inventory Tracking, Stakeholder Engagement List).

Frequency of Reporting: Monthly

Results

AR 19.1: A pilot project of an existing environmental scanning tool was completed to solicit feedback on the functions that the tool offers and to validate the business requirements for an environmental scanning tool. Preliminary information sources to be automatically scanned through the tool were identified through the engagement sessions with federal, provincial and territorial subject matter experts. The pilot participants had the opportunity to validate these sources and explore the automatically-generated notifications. As a result, the preliminary list of validated information sources to be incorporated into the algorithm to scan using an automated tool was established. Additional classification and exploration of food safety information sources to be included in the algorithm is ongoing.

AR 19.2: During the pilot, federal, provincial and territorial subject matter experts were asked to rate and rank the preliminary sources identified for the algorithm and to review and provide feedback on the tool's various functionalities. The results of this pilot informed the validation and finalization of the business requirements for the environmental scanning tool on the Canadian Food Safety Information Network Technical Solution. Additional activities included the creation of a federal, provincial and territorial inventory of scanning and intelligence resources and activities, identifying best practices and methodologies for scanning and the ongoing development of a pan-Canadian approach to environmental scanning.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Shared outcome of federal partners ER 20: Improved ability of government agencies and the industry to anticipate, prepare, and efficiently respond to food safety issues and emergencies. Coordination and outreach support that primarily supports the Canadian Food Safety Information Network and expanded use of CANLINE within Health Canada food science laboratories.
Performance indicator(s) PI 20 Outreach and training sessions held with the Health Canada Food Directorate's research and regulatory community; Food laboratory research results uploaded to CANLINE
Target(s) T 20: One refresher training session for the food laboratories and fifteen food laboratory research results uploaded to CANLINE.
Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

Data source: Administrative data/ Health Canada files

Frequency of Monitoring and Reporting: Annually

Results

AR 20: No outreach training sessions were undertaken due to focus on critical design and development activities. In this regard, extensive outreach sessions with the Health Canada Food Directorate's research and regulatory community took place through joint design sessions, interviews and business needs surveys.

One food laboratory research dataset consisting of 85 results was uploaded into CANLINE. CANLINE version 4.1 was near completion at the end of the fiscal year. Upgrades to the application have improved the completeness of laboratory test results and the bilingual web content, allowing for improved access to and analysis of data by HC researchers, risk assessors and evaluators.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable
Performance highlights

A completed report containing business requirements has been validated and approved by the Canadian Food Safety Information Network Federal, Provincial and Territorial Steering Committee. The report is being used to develop capabilities of the technical solution that support collaborative food safety activities within the Canadian Food Safety Information Network.

The Canadian Food Safety Information Network Federal,Provincial, Territorial Steering Committee endorsed the list of essential data elements to be shared among partners.

A data sharing memorandum of understanding was signed with the Government of Nunavut in March 2018.

A pilot project of an existing environmental scanning tool was completed to receive feedback on the functions that the tool offers and to validate the business requirements for an environmental scanning tool.

A needs analysis and evaluation of potential food classification systems report has been finalized, resulting in the identification of food classification systems that would meet the business requirements of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network.

Contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency:
Christiane Villemure
Executive Director, Canadian Food Safety Information Network
Telephone: 613-773-5811

Health Canada:
Karen McIntyre
Director General, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch
Telephone: 613-957-1821

Table Notes

Table Note 19

Previously reported as $15,606,877. Upon further clarification from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, the project component has been removed, as it is not considered part of the horizontal initiative.

Return to table note 19  referrer

Performance summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from 2014-15 to 2018-19) (dollars) 2017-18 Planned spending (dollars) 2017-18 Actual spending (dollars) 2017-18 Expected results 2017-18 Performance indicators 2017-18 Targets Date to achieve target 2017-18 Actual results
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Data support, coordination and outreach 9,901,987 2,285,403 2,243,710

ER 16
ER 17
ER 18

P 16
P 17
P 18

T 16
T 17
T 18

March 31, 2019

AR 16
AR 17
AR 18

Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Program Environmental scanning 1,060,365 251,138 217,095 ER 19 P 19 T 19 March 31, 2019 AR 19
Health Canada Food Safety and Nutrition Food Safety Data support, coordination and outreach 1,170,797 263,423 216,167 ER 20 P 20 T 20 March 31, 2019 AR 20
Total for all federal organizations Not applicable Not applicable 12,133,149 2,799,964 2,707,688 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

Internal audits

Internal audits completed in 2017-18
Title of internal audit Internal audit type Completion date
Audit of National Chemical Residue Monitoring Program Program March 2018
Audit of CFIA Inspector General Office Program March 2018

CFIA audit reports can be found on the CFIA's website.

Response to parliamentary committees and external audits

House of Commons Standing Committee on Health's report:

A Study on the Status of Antimicrobial Resistance in Canada and Related Recommendations

HESA (Standing Committee on Health) Committee News Release, May 1, 2018 (report presented in the House of Commons on May 1, 2018):

The Committee's report examines current efforts across Canada and globally to address antimicrobial resistance, drawing on expert testimony from government officials, academics, international organizations and stakeholders in the fields of both human and animal health.

Over the course of six meetings held between June and November 2017, the Committee heard that work is already well underway in the public and private sectors to address antimicrobial resistance both in Canada and abroad. Witnesses explained that in Canada many of these activities are being coordinated through two main strategic plans: Antimicrobial Resistance and Use in Canada: A Federal Framework for Action and Tackling Antimicrobial Resistance and Antimicrobial Use: A Pan-Canadian Framework for Action. However, though progress has been made, witnesses identified the need for improved surveillance and data, stewardship, and more funding for research and innovation. Most of all, they called for greater federal leadership to promote collaboration and co-ordination to address this rising public health threat.

In response to these concerns, the Committee's report recommends that the Public Health Agency of Canada appoint a federal advisor to be a national champion for combatting antimicrobial resistance across Canada. It also calls on the Government of Canada to accelerate the development of its Pan-Canadian Action Plan to support the implementation of the Tackling Antimicrobial Resistance and Antimicrobial Use: A Pan-Canadian Framework for Action.

The Committee believes that these recommendations, coupled with the other critical actions identified in the report, are necessary to ensure that the current momentum to address antimicrobial resistance in Canada and abroad is not lost.

There were no recommendations for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Response to audits conducted by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada (including audits conducted by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

The following responses to audit recommendations by the Auditor General are based on CFIA management assertions:

Audit 1

OAG – Managing the Risk of Fraud (Spring 2017 Reports)

Summary of Report:

Fraud can happen in any organization. Fraud in a federal government organization can cause the loss of public money or property, hurt employee morale, and undermine Canadians' confidence in public services. Therefore, federal organizations must manage their fraud risks.

This audit examined whether the selected organizations had mechanisms in place to appropriately manage the risk of fraud.

The audit also examined whether the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat provided support to federal organizations to manage their risks, including fraud risks, and monitored the implementation of its relevant policies and directives.

The audit concluded that in the areas we examined, the selected federal organizations did not appropriately manage all of their fraud risks. The OAG did, however, see a number of good practices in all the organizations we examined. Overall, the organizations had appropriate governance structures to help them manage their risk of fraud, but some organizations did not use a strong enough approach to assess those risks, and none of the organizations made sure that the specific controls we looked at worked as they should have. For example, the organizations did not make sure that all their employees received mandatory training in values and ethics.

The audit also concluded that the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat developed guidance for departments and agencies to help them assess and manage overall departmental risks. However, the Secretariat did not provide specific guidance on fraud risk management or monitor how departments and agencies managed their risk of fraud.

OAG Recommendations and CFIA Response

1.29 Ensure that its current fraud risk assessments are reviewed and updated periodically, following best practices.

CFIA Response: Agreed. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency will review the current formal fraud risk assessment and update it periodically, incorporating best practices. The first review will be completed by December 2017.

Action taken: Completed

1.39 Identify operational areas at higher risk for fraud and develop targeted training for employees in these areas, and ensure that employees are taking mandatory training in a timely manner.

CFIA Response: Agreed. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is committed to increasing employee awareness through regular reminder communications. The Agency will also conduct a needs assessment by June 2017 to identify the best approach for mitigating areas of higher risk for fraud. This assessment will consider the need for additional training or other products to mitigate fraud risks.

Action taken: In progress

1.54 Ensure that logs used to track and manage declarations of conflict of interest and the related mitigation measures have sufficient and complete information to support the timely resolution of employee declarations of conflict of interest.

CFIA Response: Agreed. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is currently reviewing the Conflict of Interest Secretariat's tracking and logging system to ensure critical data is captured for enhanced tracking and reporting capabilities. These activities will be completed by April 2017.

Action taken: Completed

1.55 Identify operational areas at high risk for conflict of interest and ensure that public servants occupying positions in those areas are regularly required to indicate whether or not they are in a conflict of interest, and follow up on the implementation of mitigating measures for conflicts of interest on a risk basis.

CFIA Response: Agreed. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency currently requires all its employees to attest to the Conflict of Interest and Post-Employment Policy during their annual performance reviews. In addition, the Agency's Conflict of Interest Secretariat will commence a review to identify areas of high risk for conflict of interest and to consider whether additional mechanisms are required to confirm whether or not there is a conflict of interest. These actions will be completed by March 2018.

Action taken: Completed

1.71 Ensure that contract files and contracting data are complete and accurate. They should also conduct data analytics and data mining to evaluate controls and identify signs of potential contract splitting, inappropriate contract amendments, and inappropriate sole-source contracting on a risk basis.

CFIA Response: Agreed. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency will continue to perform monthly validations to ensure the accuracy and completeness of its procurement files, data, and reporting. Procurement records, including the accuracy of related financial coding, are now being reviewed and validated on a monthly basis. The Agency is also reviewing how best to increase the use of data analytics to evaluate procurement and contracting controls and identify possible areas of concern. Identified opportunities to increase the data analytics will be implemented by March 2018.

Action taken: Completed

1.80 Maintain a comprehensive and complete log that captures and tracks the status of all allegations, where appropriate, including where corrective measures were implemented to prevent fraud.

CFIA Response: Agreed. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is currently implementing a centralized function for the coordination, management, and reporting of any instances of fraud activity. A tracking system will be used to capture and monitor the status of suspected fraud cases and their related corrective action plans. These actions will be completed by March 2018.

Action taken: Completed

Audit 2

OAG/CESD – Adapting to the Impacts of Climate Change (Fall 2017 Reports)

Summary of Report:

Environment and Climate Change Canada is the federal lead on climate change, including adaptation. The Department led the development of the 2011 Federal Adaptation Policy Framework. This framework states that the federal government must take action to effectively integrate climate change considerations into its programs, policies, and operations, and facilitate action by others. Each federal organization is responsible for applying its experience in risk management to the climate change issues that could affect its ability to deliver its mandate.

This audit focused on the extent to which federal organizations had made progress in adapting to climate change. We examined federal leadership efforts and whether departments and agencies implemented the Federal Adaptation Policy Framework.

The audit examined progress by determining whether 19 key departments and agencies identified and assessed climate change risks and took measures to adapt to climate change in their areas of responsibility.

The audit concluded that Environment and Climate Change Canada, in collaboration with other federal partners, did not provide adequate leadership to advance the federal government's adaptation to climate change impacts. Although the Federal Adaptation Policy Framework and the recent Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change provided a foundation, there was no action plan nor clear direction to ensure that the federal government would integrate climate change considerations into its own programs, policies, and operations.

Most of the federal departments and agencies examined did not take appropriate measures to adapt to climate change impacts by assessing and managing the climate change risks to their programs, policies, assets, and operations. As a result, the federal government could not demonstrate that it was making progress in adapting to a changing climate. Stronger federal leadership is needed.

Recommendations and CFIA Response

2.74 Departments and agencies should identify, assess, prioritize, and address the climate change risks related to their areas of responsibility:

CFIA Response:

In addition to creating various mandate-related risk profiles, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency also initiated a refresh of its corporate risk profile to contemplate climate change risks. The Agency will use the corporate risk profile, along with other risk intelligence products, to inform corporate and program priorities. The risk profiles will also support the identification of any necessary adjustments to plans or new actions required to address risks. This work will be completed by March 31, 2018.

Action taken: Completed

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

There were no audits in 2017-18 requiring a response.

Status report on projects operating with specific Treasury Board approval

Project name and project phase Original estimated total cost (dollars) Revised estimated total cost (dollars) Actual total cost (dollars) 2017-18 Main Estimates (dollars) 2017-18 Planned spending (dollars) 2017-18 Total authorities (dollars) 2017-18 Actual spending (dollars) Expected date of close-out
Electronic Service Delivery Platform (Close Out) 48,352,695 47,747,450 44,875,235 10,660,824 10,660,824 14,325,884, 14,884,724 March 2018
Canadian Food Safety Information Network (Stage 4) 23,238,740 22,762,917 9,243,748 2,481,708 2,481,708 3,423,108 2,403,753 December 2019

Note: dollar amounts exclude both the goods and services tax (GST) and the harmonized sales tax (HST). Total authorities include funding received through Supplementary Estimates and Carry Forward allocations.

Status report on transformational and major Crown projects

General information
Project name Electronic Service Delivery Platform (ESDP)
Description

The objective of the ESDP is to provide a set of technologies and tools for citizens, industry, international trading partners, and CFIA inspectors to more readily carry out their respective roles and conduct regular business transactions including:

  • Portals and interchanges to simplify communications between the CFIA and citizens, industry, and international trading partners;
  • Online application and payment tools for registration, licencing, export certificates, and other permissions;
  • Workflow tools (e.g., case/client workflow capabilities, policy automation, and/or middleware application(s)) to facilitate the completion of electronic transactions;
  • Automatic identification of an inspection requirement based on triggers (events and transactions) and risk;
  • Tools (e.g., case/client functionality) to assign, schedule and track inspection activities;
  • An inspection "workbook" to support inspection activities; and
  • Reporting tools (e.g., Cognos, case/client functionality) to manage inspection workloads, analyze inspection results, and track system performance.
Project outcomes

Enabled by the technologies and tools provided by ESDP:

  • Citizens will be able to file complaints online (e.g., food-related illness, labelling, quality);
  • Field inspectors will compile information into an electronic inspection workbook, record inspection results, and track and record the results of samples submitted for lab analysis;
  • CFIA managers will be able to plan, track, and assign inspection activities, and report on the performance of the inspection regime through the consistent capture and summarization of results; and
  • The CFIA will issue, validate and provide certificates online, and exchange export pre-clearance information with international trading partners.
Industrial benefits Industry will be able to register, apply for a licence, view the status of various transactions, and pay for services on line. In addition, industry will be able to browse and query export information, apply for export certificates via a secure portal, receive the status of their export certificates, and print the electronically-issued certificates at their premises.
Sponsoring department Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Contracting authority Public Services and Procurement Canada
Participating departments Shared Services Canada
Prime contractor System Integrator (SI) – Accenture Inc.
Major subcontractors N/A
Project phase

Stage 4 – Project Execution

Stage 5 – Project Close-out

Major milestones

2017-2018 Stage 4 and Stage 5

Incremental deployments of in-scope functionalities in releases 3 & 4, including the development of all in-scope export certificates and stabilization activities, which include bug fixes and maintenance.

Utilization of release 1, 2, 3 & 4 functionalities with the active engagement of industry.

Knowledge transfer activities between the CFIA and the System Integrator, supporting build/test and go-live/deployment activities.

Implementation, monitoring and refinement of project management and contract management documentation and processes.

Final acceptance of all System Integrator deliverables.

Approval of project close-out documentation.

Business readiness/business adaptation activities enabling Industry and Agency are well trained and confident in using ESDP/MyCFIA functionalities.

Progress report and explanation of variances

Treasury Board approved the Electronic Service Delivery Project (ESDP), at an estimated cost of $52.1 million, as part of the $138.1 million plan to modernize Canada's food safety inspection.

The Agency completed the roll out of the ESDP project in March 2018, at a total cost of $44.9 million, $7.2 million less than originally anticipated.

The project reported a surplus as a result of unrequired contingency funds.

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

1400 Merivale Road,
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9
Canada
Telephone: 1-800-442-2342 / 1-613-773-2342
Teletypewriter: 1-800-465-7735
Online: http://inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/contact-us/eng/1299860523723/1299860643049

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)

A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)

A report on an appropriated department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

evaluation (évaluation)

In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.

experimentation (expérimentation)

Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])

An analytical approach used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people may experience policies, programs and initiatives. The "plus" in GBA+ acknowledges that the gender-based analysis goes beyond biological (sex) and socio-cultural (gender) differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability. Examples of GBA+ processes include using data disaggregated by sex, gender and other intersecting identity factors in performance analysis, and identifying any impacts of the program on diverse groups of people, with a view to adjusting these initiatives to make them more inclusive.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)

For the purpose of the 2017–18 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)

An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.

Management, Resources and Results Structure (structure de gestion, des ressources et des résultats)

A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)

A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)

The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

plan (plan)

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

priority (priorité)

A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.

program (programme)

A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d'alignement des programmes)

A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

result (résultat)

An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)

A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program (programme temporisé)

A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target (cible)

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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