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Archived - Annex F: Disposition for Red Meat Species

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This page was archived due to the coming into force of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. Archived information is provided for reference, research or record-keeping purposes only. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. For current information visit Food.

1 Introduction

The following section describes diseases and conditions requiring specific disposition, whether diagnosed by means of organoleptic observation (visual, tactile, olfactory) or by means of laboratory confirmation. It also provides the disposition for diseases that may be seen at slaughter that are subject to mandatory declaration.

Note:
The diseases that are subjected to mandatory declaration are set out in the schedule of the Reportable Diseases Regulations for the purpose of section 2 of the Health of Animals Act, please refer to these regulations for a full list of diseases that are subject to mandatory declaration.

2 Guiding Principles for Disposition and Detailed Disposition for Deviations from Normal Appearance

Before describing detailed disposition for deviations from normal appearance, it is important to speak of general theory and basic principles utilized in conducting meat hygiene disposition.

When assessing the disposition of a carcass or a part, the first step is to identify the pathological process and/or the nature of the condition. This helps in having a good understanding of the potential impacts that a condition could have on safety and suitability of a carcass or parts. In most circumstances, simply identifying a condition is not sufficient grounds to warrant its condemnation.

The next step is determining the distribution (i.e. localized VS systemic) and severity of the deviation. These are key elements in determining whether a meat product is edible or not. The final outcome of the decision process may consist of removing and identifying as inedible:

It is important to remember to evaluate the effects of the condition on the entire carcass before determining that a whole carcass is inedible. If the carcass is in good body condition and the lesions are localized, whole carcass condemnation is not normally justified. Localized conditions can often be removed by excising the lesion itself or the removal of an affected area, leaving the remainder of the carcass or part to be considered edible. Whole carcass condemnation is rarely warranted in animals that pass ante-mortem inspection. In order to justify such action on a carcass based on a post-mortem evaluation or inspection, the carcass will have to meet specific criteria as detailed in this document.

An evaluator will consider the following in order to determine the distribution and severity of a deviation:

In situations where more than one pathological process exist, the underlying cause (primary process) that resulted in the carcass to be condemned will be used for declaration purposes.

In situations where there is uncertainty as to the basic pathological process or disposition, an evaluator should,

3 Definitions

For the purpose of this document the following definitions apply:

4 Detailed Disposition for Selected Pathologies

For the purpose of this document, a carcass is considered to have systemic signs or an animal is severely affected if it shows adverse effect on the general health status of the animal/carcass because of the size, generalization or extensive nature of a lesion or condition. Such signs includes as an example emaciation, septicemia/ toxemia or embolic spread of the disease via either the lymphatic or the blood stream.

Consistent with this definition, reference to generalized lesions indicates situations where lesions/infestations/defects are easily noticeable, because of their numbers in the carcass and/or lesions are extensive and/or they are widely distributed in the carcasses; and where complete removal is likely impractical

Categorization of Diseases and Conditions – ruminants, equine, and swine
Category List
Generalized Conditions Anemia, Anthrax, Brucellosis, Caseous lymphadenitis, Central nervous system disorders, Clostridial diseases, Edema, Emaciation, Equine infectious anemia, Equine Purpura hemorrhagic, Erysipelas, Granulomatous Lymphadenitis, Icterus / Jaundice, Lymphadenitis, Melanosis, Moribund, Odour, Septicemia / Toxemia, Serous atrophy of fat, Steatitis, Tail biting, Tuberculosis, Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), Uremia, Yellow fat disease.
Chest and Upper Airway Conditions Endocarditis, Pericarditis, Pleuritis, Pneumonia, Strangles.
Abdominal Conditions Enteritis, Gastritis, Hepatitis, Hernia, Hydatid cysts, Mastitis, Metritis, Nephritis, Omphalophlebitis (navel ill), Peritonitis, Prolapse, Pyelonephritis, Splenic torsion, Traumatic reticulitis complex.
Abnormal Growths Abscess, Actinomycosis / Actinobacillosis, Lymphosarcoma, Melanoma, Neoplasia Not Otherwise Specified (NOS), Ocular squamous cell carcinoma, Schwannomas.
Skin Conditions Congenital porphyria, Dermatitis, Diamond skin disease, frost bite, sheep pox, Urine scald.
Muscular and Skeleton Conditions Abnormal bone coloration,  Arthritis, Bruising, Cysticercosis, Dark Firm Dry (DFD), Eosinophilic myositis, Fistulous withers, Fractures, Injection sites, Lipofuscinosis, Porcine Stress Syndrome (Pale, Soft Exudative-PSE), Trichinosis, White muscle disease, Xanthosis.
Processing Conditions Blood splash, Contamination, Inadequate bleed, Loss of identity, Mutilation, Overscald.

5 Summarized list of diseases and conditions

List of diseases and conditions
Category condition Name and code of condition Comments Evaluation
Generalized Conditions

Anemia

910

See section 6.1

Anthrax

102

Ante-mortem
Post-mortem

Because of the human health implications, the suspicion of this disease at the slaughterhouse must trigger emergency measures.

Totally condemn

Brucellosis

102

See section 6.2

Caseous Lymphadenitis

420

See section 6.3

Central nervous system disorders

102

Ante-mortem
Depending on the species and evaluation.

Possible diagnostics:

  • Intoxication;
  • Listeriosis;
  • Pseudorabies;
  • Rabies;
  • TSE

Totally condemn
or treat as suspect

Clostridial diseases

Including
Bacillary hemoglobinuria (Clostridium haemolyticum)

Blackleg (Clostridium chauvoei)

102

Ante-mortem
Post-mortem

Totally condemn

Edema

340

See section 6.4

Emaciation

220

See section 6.5

Equine infectious anemia

102

Ante-mortem
If animal severely affected

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Treat as suspect

Post-mortem
If carcass shows systemic signs

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Remove and condemn affected parts

Equine Purpura Hemorrhagic

102

Ante-mortem
If animal severely affected

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Treat as suspect

Post-mortem
If carcass shows systemic signs

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Remove and condemn affected parts

Erysipelas

435

See section 6.6

Granulomatous lymphadenitis

495

See section 6.14

Icterus/Jaundice

920

See section 6.7

Lymphadenitis

546

See section 6.8

Melanosis

071

See section 6.9

Moribund

See section 6.10

Odour
Atypical
061

Sexual
062

See section 6.11

Septicemia / Toxemia

930

See section 6.12

Serous atrophy of fat

250

See section 6.5

Steatitis
(Yellow fat disease)

102

Post-mortem
If generalized lesion(s)

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Remove and reject affected parts

Note:
If the condition is accompanied by fishy odour, please refer to section 6.11 on Odour

Tail biting
(swine)

See section 6.13

Tuberculosis

490

See section 6.14

Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)

102

Includes:

  • Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)
  • Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)
  • Scrapie

See Central nervous system disorders

Uremia

350

See section 6.15

Chest and upper airway Conditions

Endocarditis

572

See section 7.1

Pericarditis

571

See section 7.2

Pleuritis

577

See section 7.3

Pneumonia

579

See section 7.4

Strangles

Disease caused by Streptococcus equi

102

Ante mortem
If animal severely affected

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Treat as Suspect

Post mortem
If the carcass shows systemic signs

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Remove and condemn affected parts

Abdominal Conditions

Enteritis

530

See section 8.1

Gastritis

535

See section 8.1

Hepatitis

545

See section 8.2

Hernia
(umbilical, inguinal, diaphragmatic)

095

Ante-mortem
If animal severely affected

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Treat as suspect

Post-mortem
If it meets condemnation criteria for peritonitis or emaciation.

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Remove and condemn affected parts

Hydatid cysts

089

Post-mortem
If systemic lesion(s)

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Remove and condemn affected parts

Note:
Condemn viscera and the head of any affected carcasses.

Mastitis

547

Ante-mortem
If animal severely affected

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Treat as suspect

Post-mortem
If carcass shows systemic signs

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Remove and condemn affected parts

Metritis

548

Ante-mortem
If animal severely affected

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Treat as suspect

Post-mortem
If carcass shows systemic signs

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Remove and condemn affected parts

Nephritis

560

See section 8.3

Omphalophlebitis
(navel ill)

445

Ante-mortem
If animal severely affected

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Treat as suspect

Post-mortem
If carcass shows systemic signs

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Remove and condemn affected parts

Peritonitis

573

See section 8.4

Prolapse

See section 8.5

Pyelonephritis

566

See section 8.3

Splenic Torsion

See section 8.6

Traumatic reticulitis complex
(Hardware disease)

855

See Peritonitis and/or Pericarditis

Abnormal growths

Abscess

001

See section 9.1

Actinobacillosis

401

Actinomycosis
403

Ante-mortem

Treat as suspect depending on extent of the lesions

Post-mortem
If carcass shows systemic signs

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Remove and condemn the head, tongue and other affected parts

Lymphosarcoma
(Malignant lymphoma)

635

See section 9.3

Melanoma

645

See section 9.2

Neoplasm (Not Otherwise Specified NOS)

660

Note:
Lymphosarcoma, Melanoma, Ocular squamous cell carcinoma and Schwannoma have their own sections.

Ante-mortem
depending on presence of specific lesions

Treat as suspect
Totally condemn

Post-mortem
If carcass shows systemic signs or metastasis

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Remove and condemn affected parts

Ocular Squamous Cell Carcinoma

620

See section 9.4

Schwannoma

670

See section 9.5

Skin Conditions

Congenital porphyria
(Osteohemochromatosis)

130

Post-mortem
If generalized lesion(s)

Totally condemn

If localized lesion(s)

Remove and condemn affected parts

Dermatitis

810

See section 10.1

Diamond skin disease
(Erysipelas)

435

See section 10.2

Frost bite

049

Ante-mortem

Treat as suspect depending on extent of the lesions

Post-mortem
If generalized lesion(s)
or carcass shows systemic signs.

Totally condemn

Red swollen areas on the underside of the skin often extending into the underlying tissues.

Remove and condemn affected parts

Sheep/Goat Pox

102

Ante-mortem
Post-mortem

Totally condemn

Urine scald

Post-mortem

Remove and condemn affected parts

Muscular and skeleton conditions

Abnormal bone coloration caused by tetracycline deposits

See chapter 5 for guidance

Arthropathy/ Arthritis

512

See section 11.1

Bruising

051

Ante-mortem

Treat as suspect

Post-mortem
If generalized lesion(s).

Totally condemn

Otherwise

Remove and condemn affected parts

Cysticercosis

735

See section 11.2

Dark Firm Dry (DFD)

See section 11.3

Eosinophilic myositis

551

See section 11.4

Fistulous withers

Ante-mortem

Treat as suspect

Post-mortem

Remove and condemn affected parts

Fracture

Ante-mortem

Treat as suspect

Post-mortem

Remove and condemn affected parts

Injection sites
(Injection myositis)

265

Antibiotic Residues

065

See section 11.5

Pale Soft Exudative (PSE)

See section 11.6

Trichinosis

101

Post-mortem
If laboratory detection

Totally condemn

White Muscle Disease

211

Post-mortem
If generalized lesion(s)
or carcass shows systemic signs.

Totally reject the carcass

Otherwise

Remove and reject affected parts

Xanthosis

(Lipofuscinosis)

079

Post-mortem
If generalized lesion(s)

Totally reject the carcass

Otherwise

Remove and reject affected parts

Processing conditions

Blood splashing

See section 12.1

Contamination

010

See section 12.2

Inadequate bleeding

096

See section 12.3

Loss of identity

097

See section 12.4

Mutilation

Post-mortem

Remove and reject affected parts

Overscald

046

Burn

045

See section 12.5

6 Generalized Conditions

6.1 Anemia

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

6.2 Brucellosis

Ante-mortem:

It is unlikely that animals affected with brucellosis will be presented to an abattoir except for those animals licensed to be transported directly to an establishment as serological reactors or their contacts.

Post-mortem:

6.3 Caseous lymphadenitis

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

6.4 Edema

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

6.5 Emaciation / Serous Atrophy of Fat

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

6.6 Erysipelas

Including "Diamond skin disease".

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

6.7 Icterus / Jaundice

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

Feeding practices may influence the colour of fat in animals leading to yellow colouration. The fat tissues of certain breeds can also be yellow in colour. In such cases, normal carcasses can be differentiated from icteric carcasses by the fact their cartilage, connective tissue, sclera and renal pelvis are not affected.

6.8 Lymphadenitis

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

6.9 Melanosis

Post-mortem:

Clinical signs must be clearly distinguished from melanoma (see section 9.2).

6.10 Moribund

Ante-mortem:

6.11 Odour

Ante-mortem:

Note:
Slaughter of the affected animals may also be delayed if it is believed that such a measure will allow the odour to dissipate.

Post-mortem:

Unless the origin of the odour can be clearly determined, the following general principles will apply:

Additional or different disposition actions may be implemented when the origin of the odour can be determined:

When it can be determined that the odour is associated to a pathological condition:

When it can be determined that the odour is associated to chemical or medicinal drugs:

When it can be determined that the odour is associated to the diet:

When it can be determined that the odour is associated to a sexual odour:

6.12 Septicemia / Toxemia

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

6.13 Tail Biting in Swine

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

6.14 Tuberculosis/Granulomatous Lymphadenitis

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

When granulomatous lesions are detected in:

the following lymph nodes (if available) will be incised and examined for the presence of granuloma: caudal deep cervical, superficial cervical, hepatic, renal, superficial inguinal (scrotal or mammary), medial iliac, subiliac and deep popliteal.

In the case of routine slaughter:

In case of herds being depopulated because of bovine tuberculosis, reactors or animals licensed to be transported directly to an establishment because of bovine tuberculosis:

6.15 Uremia

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

Note:
In cases where there is localized contamination with urine (e.g. bladder incision during evisceration), remove and condemn affected parts.

7 Chest and upper airway Conditions

7.1 Endocarditis

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

Presence of embolic lesions in internal organs will trigger an in-depth evaluation of the internal surface of the heart (especially the heart valves).

7.2 Pericarditis

Including "Traumatic reticulitis complex".

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

7.3 Pleuritis

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

7.4 Pneumonia

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

8 Abdominal Conditions

8.1 Gastritis/Enteritis

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

8.2 Hepatitis

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

Rarely is hepatitis a primary cause to warrant full carcass condemnation. Acute viral hepatitis in swine would be an exception.

8.3 Nephritis / Pyelonephritis

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

8.4 Peritonitis

Including "Traumatic reticulitis complex".

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

8.5 Prolapses

Ante-mortem:

Animals with prolapses may need to be euthanized or sent immediately to slaughter after Ante-mortem examination and inspection.

See "Peritonitis" for disposition (see section 8.4).

8.6 Swine Splenic Torsion

Post-mortem:

9 Abnormal growths

9.1 Abscess

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

Note:
If one of the following part/organ is affected by a single abscess, that part/organ will be condemned entirely (i.e. the organs cannot be trimmed of): brain, thymus, heart, lung, liver, spleen, kidney, mammary gland, testicle, pizzle, uterus.

9.2 Melanoma

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

When a lesion is suspect, evaluate associated lymph nodes and internal organs.

9.3 Malignant Lymphoma (Lymphosarcoma)

This lesion is more common in old cattle resulting from complication of bovine leukemia virus infection and in market age swine. Other species may be affected as well.

Ante-mortem:

Since there are many different manifestations of the disease (i.e. unspecific clinical lesions) which can be mistaken with other conditions, proper ante-mortem diagnosis is always difficult.

Post-mortem

Note:
In hogs, the enlargement of a single lymph node is often the only macroscopic lesion of the condition. The mandibular or medial iliac lymph nodes are often involved.

9.4 Ocular Squamous Cell Carcinoma

This lesion is also called "Epithelioma of the eye". It is more common in cattle. Other species may be affected as well.

Ante-mortem:

Note:
Animals with ocular squamous cell carcinoma may need to be euthanized or sent immediately to slaughter after Ante-mortem examination and inspection.

Post-mortem:

Note:
When an animal exhibits the loss of one eye at the ante-mortem, treat it as suspect and thoroughly evaluate the head and carcass for the presence of metastasis and apply disposition criteria above. Regardless of the presence of lesions, the head and tongue will be removed and condemned.

9.5 Schwannoma

This lesion is also called "Neurofibroma" or "Nerve sheath tumor". It is more common in cattle.

Post-mortem:

When a lesion is found the following flow chart should be followed:

Figure #3: Schwannoma Flow Chart
Schwannoma Flow Chart. Description follows.
Description for flowchart - Figure #3: Schwannoma Flow Chart

Descriptive text for schwannoma flow chart:

This chart provides details on examination procedures and resulting decisions when a lesion of schwannoma is found.

The first box (level 1) consists of Examining the heart base, mediastinum, and intercostal nerves. Results from this examination are on level 2

  • Level 2:
    • The left side box describes when no other lesions are found during examination of the heart base, mediastinum, and intercostal nerves: release carcass and dispose of affected tissue.

      The right side box describes detection of additional lesions during examination of the heart base, mediastinum, and intercostal nerves: proceed to examine brachial plexus and intercostal nerves. Results from this examination are on level 3.

  • Level 3:
    • The left side box describes the finding of localised lesions: trim plexus and ribs, condemn heart, release carcass.

      The right side box describes the finding of further lesions in plexus: proceed to examine nerves over and under scapula and along thoracic wall. Results from this examination are on level 4.

  • Level 4:
    • The left side box describes when there is no finding of extension to the muscle: trim nerves, release carcass.

      The right side box describes when further lesions are found in the muscle: condemn front quarter +/− thoracic wall and examine sciatic nerve. Results from this examination are on level 5.

  • Level 5
    • The left side box describes when no sciatic nerve lesions are found: pass remnant of carcass.

      The right side box describes when further lesions in nerves of the hind quarter are found: go to level 6.

  • Level 6
    • Describes when there is finding of extension to muscles: condemn hindquarters (total condemnation).

Note:
Operator may remove all potential lesion(s) from a carcass at a step downstream (e.g. in the deboning room) provided a program acceptable to the CFIA exists.

10 Skin Conditions

10.1 Dermatitis

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

10.2 Diamond skin disease

See section 6.6 on "Erysipelas".

11 Muscular and skeleton conditions

11.1 Arthropathy

This section provide guidance on "Arthritis" and "Degenerative Arthropathy"

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

Note:

11.2 Cysticercosis

11.2.1 Bovine Cysticercosis

Ante-mortem:

Animals affected with Bovine cysticercosis will not show specific signs at the ante-mortem. However, an animal may be presented to an abattoir from an infested premise. Animals suspected to be infested with Cysticercus Bovis will be licensed to be transported directly to an establishment.

Note:
All animals received under licence will be subjected to enhanced post-mortem inspection procedures.

Post-mortem:

If one or more carcasses in a lot are found to be affected with lesions suggestive of Cysticercus bovis during routine inspection (not sent under license to slaughter), all affected carcasses and their parts shall be held pending laboratory confirmation. As bovine cysticercosis is a reportable disease under the Health of Animals Act, the identity of the owner and the origin of the cattle must be established for follow up actions. However, in the case of affected carcasses originating from an identified infested premises (i.e. animals which are sent for slaughter under license to transport), the disposition criteria below will be applied immediately (i.e. no laboratory confirmation is required).

Note:
When a cyst-like structure determined to be suggestive of C. bovis is found in a carcass or its parts during routine inspection, the official veterinarian may request the operator to implement additional measures to ensure the food safety and suitability of meat products derived from animals submitted from the same producer/lot. In such a case, additional inspection measures are to be implemented on all carcasses originating from the same producer/lot inspected after the initial case, and up until laboratory confirmation (or disproof). As well, additional measures by the operator may be deemed appropriate, and requested, for all carcasses and parts originating from the same producer/lot that were inspected prior to the initial case on that day of production. Such a request may therefore result in the implementation of the following measures:

11.2.2 Swine Cysticercosis

Swine cysticercosis is a reportable disease under the Health of Animals Act. Canada is currently considered free of swine cysticercosis.

Post-mortem:

Lesions suggestive of Cysticercus cellulosae must be sent for laboratory confirmation.

Note:
When a cyst-like structure determined to be suggestive of C. cellulosae is found in a carcass or its parts during routine inspection, the official veterinarian will request the operator to implement additional measures to ensure the food safety and suitability of meat products derived from animals submitted from the same producer/lot. In such a case, additional inspection measures are to be implemented on all carcasses originating from the same producer/lot inspected after the initial case, and up until laboratory confirmation (or disproof). As well, additional measures by the operator may be deemed appropriate, and required, for all carcasses and parts originating from the same producer/lot that were inspected prior to the initial case on that day of production. Such a request may therefore result in the implementation of the following measures:

11.2.3 Cysticercosis in ovine

Post-mortem:

Cysticercus ovis is not a food safety concern; accordingly no additional treatment is required.

11.3 Dark firm dry (DFD), also known as dark cutting beef

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

11.4 Eosinophilic myositis

Including "Sarcocystosis/Sarcosporidiosis".

Post-mortem:

11.5 Injection sites (Injection myositis)

Including "Antibiotic Residues".

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

Hold the carcass for chemical/veterinary drug testing as per procedures of Chapter 5 of the Meat Hygiene Manual of Procedures.

When the initial carcass chemical residue screening test is negative:

When the initial carcass chemical residue screening test is positive:

When the operator agrees to the confirmation testing:

11.6 Pale Soft Exudative Pork (PSE)

Ante-mortem:

Post-mortem:

12 Processing conditions

12.1 Blood splash

Post-mortem:

12.2 Contamination

Post-mortem:

A carcass may show:

The operator is responsible to remove any contamination/defect on a carcass or parts:

12.3 Inadequate bleeding

Post-mortem:

The operator will implement the following:

12.4 Loss of identity

Post-mortem:

Where viscera, head and/or carcass:

12.5 Overscald/Burn

Post-mortem:

A carcass may show:

The operator is responsible to remove any defect on a carcass or part:

Appendix 1

Control of boar taint in meat products derived from intact male pigs

Definitions:

For the purpose of this appendix the following definitions apply:

Introduction

Hog operators need to develop, implement and maintain a validated program where carcasses potentially affected with a sexual odour (i.e. all boars, ridglings, and stags) are detected, identified, controlled, evaluated and segregated according to their expected market.

The CFIA created this document as a guideline to help hog operators developing a program to comply with the section 6.11 of the document entitled "Red Meat Disposition".

Note:
Operators are encouraged to consult importing country's requirements to ensure compliance.

Component of the program

The operator will examine the carcass of every boar, stag and ridgling at the time of dressing for the presence of sexual odour.

Note:
The organoleptic detection of sexual odour is subjective and there is a large variation in individual ability to detect sexual odour. Accordingly, operator will select appropriate individuals who have the ability to detect such odours for the purpose of this examination.

1. Light Boar

Carcasses derived from boar, stag and ridgling at market weight or under, with no detectable odour will be stamped with a letter, as an example "L", on the hams, bellies, loins and shoulders. These carcasses are referred to as "light boar" carcasses.

Meat products derived from dressed light boar carcasses can be sold domestically without further identification (i.e. the labelling of these meat products as "BOAR" is not necessary). As certain export restrictions may apply, these meat products must however still be controlled. The identification system used for these meat products will provide adequate control against accidental shipping to countries where such products is not permitted.

2. Heavy Boar

Any carcasses derived from boar, stag and ridgling above market weight OR with an odour shall be stamped with a different letter, as an example "B", on the hams, bellies, loins and shoulders. These carcasses are referred to as "heavy boar" carcasses.

In any case (presence or absence of odour), the appropriate use of dressed heavy boar carcasses (i.e. marked with the letter B) and their parts is determined by the operator. These carcasses and their parts may be sold as is provided the label describes the product adequately (e.g. "boar meat").

If odour is detected, affected carcasses and their parts may be chilled for up to 48 hours in an attempt to dissipate the odour. Further testing may be done by the operator after cooling to evaluate the intensity of the sexual odour. Examples of such testing include:

If odour is still present, the operator may:

Component of the program in case of Immunocastration

Health Canada registered specific veterinary prescription products that are safe and effective alternative to surgical castration (e.g. IMPROVEST™ injection). These are indicated for the temporary suppression of testicular function and reduction of boar taint in intact male pigs intended for slaughter.

Market weight intact male pigs, including ridglings, treated with any immunocastration product as per supplier's established protocols are considered as barrows when presented for slaughter. Every shipment of treated animals will be accompanied by a statement on an Animal Information Document or a completed and signed Farm Declaration (contact the veterinary product supplier for a copy of such document) stipulating that intact males, including the ridglings, in the shipment have been effectively treated with the immunocastration products in accordance with the established protocol. As per the established protocol, producers will identify every treated pig with a specific slap tattoo character in order to positively identify treated animals. The description of the specific tattoo must be communicated to CFIA for awareness.

Unless an odour is detected, any meat products derived from intact male pigs, no matter their weight, that have been effectively treated with immunocastration product will simply be identified as pork. This means that carcasses and parts derived from immunocastrated animals can be sold domestically without further identification. Since immunocastrated animals are considered as barrows they are not theoretically exposed to specific restrictions imposed by foreign countries on boars. Operators are however encouraged to consult importing country requirements to ensure compliance.

If meat products derived from intact male pigs that have been treated with immunocastration product exhibit an odour, the carcasses will have to be considered "heavy boar" carcasses, and subjected to the same criteria mentioned for heavy boar as presented in this document.

A program regarding immunocastration should consider at least the following elements:

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