Safe Food for Canadians Regulations: Glossary of key terms

Although the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) came into force on January 15, 2019, certain requirements are being phased in over the following 12 to 30 months. For more information, refer to the SFCR timelines.

Keep in Mind

This glossary includes and identifies terms that are defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act and in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR), as well as the Food and Drugs Act and the Food and Drug Regulations. Additional terms are also included and have generally been defined using their ordinary meaning.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

Acceptable level
(Niveau acceptable)

The Preventive Controls requirements in Part 4 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "acceptable level", with respect to a biological, chemical or physical hazard, as meaning "a level of a biological, chemical or physical hazard that does not present a risk of contamination of the food."

Accessible
(Accessible)

The term "accessible" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "accessible" refers to easily accessible usually without the need to remove obstruction or take an unnecessarily prolonged time to obtain access.

Agronomic input
(Intrant agronomique)

The Preventive Controls requirements in Part 4 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "agronomic input" as meaning "an input that is used in growing of fresh fruits or vegetables, and includes agricultural chemicals, biological controls, pollinators, commercial fertilizers, compost, compost tea, green manure, manure, mulch, row covers, soil amendments and pulp sludge."

Alcoholic beverage
(Boisson alcoolisée)

The term "alcoholic beverage" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, when used in the context of Part 2 – Trade of the SFCR, "alcoholic beverage" refers to a beverage that contains more than 0.5% absolute ethyl alcohol by volume.

Animal welfare audit
(Vérification du bien-être des animaux)

The term "animal welfare audit" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "animal welfare audit" refers to the on-site inspection or examination of specific slaughter activities in the establishment that have an impact on animal welfare of the food animals. It is a type of process audit of the operator's measures to prevent or mitigate key animal welfare risks using recognized set standards, best practices, performance criteria and benchmarks (national or international).

Apple
(Pomme)

The Fresh Fruits or Vegetables requirements in Part 6, Division 6 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) define "apple" as meaning "a fresh apple for which a grade is prescribed by these Regulations."

B

Batch thermal treatment
(Traitement thermique en lot)

The term "batch thermal treatment" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "batch thermal treatment" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to the application of a thermal treatment to a discrete group of products (a batch) as opposed to a continuous stream of products.

C

Carcass parts
(Parties de la carcasse)

The term "carcass parts" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "carcass parts" refers to parts from dressed carcasses.

Carry on business
(Exercice d'une activité commerciale)

The term "carry on business" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "carry on business" when used in Part 2 – Trade of the SFCR refers to conducting activities related to the import of the food identified on the licence.

Cleaning
(Nettoyage)

The term "cleaning" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "cleaning" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to the removal of soil, food residue, dirt, grease or other objectionable matter.

Clothing
(Vêtements)

The term "clothing" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "clothing" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR refers to items worn to cover the body. Examples include shirts, pants, socks and uniforms.

Commercially sterile
(Stérilité commerciale)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "commercially sterile" as meaning "has the same meaning as in section B.27.001 of the Food and Drug Regulations."

The Food and Drug Regulations define "commercially sterile" as meaning "the condition achieved in a food that has been processed by the application of heat, alone or in combination with other treatments, to render the food free from viable forms of microorganisms, including spores, capable of growing in the food at temperatures at which the food is designed normally to be held during distribution and storage."

Common name
(Nom usuel)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "common name", in respect of a food, as meaning

"(a) the name of the food that is printed in boldface type, but not in italics, in the Standards of Identity Document or in the document entitled Common Names for Prepackaged Fish, prepared by the Agency and published on its website, as amended from time to time;

(b) the name of the food that is printed in boldface type, but not in italics, in a provision of the Food and Drug Regulations; or

(c) in any other case, the name by which the food is generally known or that identifies its function."

Communicable disease
(Maladie transmissible)

The term "communicable disease" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "communicable disease" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to a disease that can be transmitted through direct contact with an individual or indirect contact through food. Examples of communicable diseases that can be transmitted through food include salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis, and hepatitis A.

Competencies
(Compétences)

The term "competencies" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "competencies" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to the observable or measurable level of knowledge, skills, abilities, and behaviours required to successfully perform a particular job or activity.

Condemnation
(Condamnation)

The term "condemnation" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "condemnation" refers to determination by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency that a food animal, its carcass, the parts of its carcass or its blood is inedible.

Consumer prepackaged
(De consommation préemballé)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "consumer prepackaged", in respect of a food, as meaning "packaged in a container in the manner in which the food is ordinarily sold to or used or purchased by an individual – or in which the food may reasonably be expected to be obtained by an individual – without being repackaged, to be used for non-commercial purposes."

Container
(Contenant)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations defines "container" as meaning "an outer receptacle or covering that is used or to be used in connection with a food. It includes a wrapper and a confining band but does not include a conveyance or any container that is an integral part of a conveyance".

Contaminated
(Contaminé)

The Safe Food for Canadian Regulations define "contaminated", in respect of a food, as meaning "that the food contains any micro-organism, chemical substance, extraneous material or other substance or thing that may render the food injurious to human health or unsuitable for human consumption, including those that are not permitted under the Food and Drugs Act or those that do not comply with any limits or levels provided under that Act."

Control measure
(Mesure de contrôle)

The Preventive Controls requirements in Part 4 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define this term as meaning "a measure that can be applied to prevent or eliminate any biological, chemical or physical hazard that presents a risk of contamination of a food or to reduce the hazard to an acceptable level."

Control program (in relation to meat products)
(Programme de contrôle (en ce qui a trait aux produits de viande))

The term "control program" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "control program"", in relation to meat products, refers to a subset of your preventive control plan that details any measures that are taken to meet a specific requirement.

Controlled Atmospheric Stunning (CAS)
(Étourdissement sous Atmosphère Contrôlée (EAC))

The term "controlled atmospheric stunning" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "controlled atmospheric stunning" refers to exposing the animals to a mixture of breathing gases, for example carbon dioxide, that produce unconsciousness or death through hypoxia or asphyxia. This can occur by a rapid onset of unconsciousness or in multiple stages to induce a more gradual onset of unconsciousness.

Conveyance
(Véhicule)

The Safe Food for Canadians Act defines "conveyance" as meaning "a vessel, aircraft, train, motor vehicle, trailer or other means of transportation, including a cargo container."

Note: refer to the separate definitions for conveyance or equipment and facility or conveyance.

Conveyance or equipment
(Véhicule ou matériel)

The phrase "conveyance or equipment" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "conveyance or equipment " when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to anything that is used within the establishment to transport or manufacture, prepare, store, package, or label food or slaughter a food animal.

Examples of conveyances or equipment include:

  • Forklifts and hand lifts used to transport materials within the establishment.
  • Trucks, trailers and wagons used in the field where fresh fruits or vegetables are grown or harvested.
  • Slaughter equipment such as stunning devices, evisceration machinery
  • Utensils, containers, thermometers and devices
  • Boning, grinding and processing equipment
  • Tables, ovens, mixers
  • Rails, rail supports and conveyors
  • Pasteurizers, pressure canners, refrigeration units, water baths, dump tanks
  • Growth media used in greenhouses
  • Mesh bags, wires, clips, ladders, stakes, elastic bands, gutters, chemical applicators used for growing and harvesting fresh fruits or vegetables.
  • Equipment used in cleaning systems such as Clean-In-Place (CIP)

Note: Refer to the separate definitions for conveyance and facility or conveyance.

Corrective action
(Mesure corrective)

The term "corrective action" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "corrective action" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to the actions taken to address a deviation from a preventive control plan. This could include controlling affected food as necessary, conducting a root cause analysis and modifying the control measure or animal welfare measure to prevent recurrence.

Critical Control Point (CCP)
(Point de contrôle critique)

The Preventive Controls requirements in Part 4 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "critical control point" as meaning "a step at which the application of a control measure is essential to prevent or eliminate any biological, chemical or physical hazard that presents a risk of contamination of a food or to reduce the hazard to an acceptable level."

Critical limit
(Limite critique)

The term "critical limit" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "critical limit" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to the maximum or minimum set values that control a hazard at a critical control point.

D

Dairy product
(Produit laitier)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "dairy product" as meaning "milk or a food that is derived from milk, alone or combined with another food, and that contains no oil and no fat other than that of milk."

Defect detection
(Détection des défauts)

The term "defect detection" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "defect detection" refers to the act of identifying and removing viscera and carcasses with specified pathology and processing defects before and after evisceration.

Document
(Document)

The Safe Food for Canadians Act defines "document" as meaning "anything on which information that is capable of being understood by a person, or read by a computer or other device, is recorded or marked."

Note: This can include figures, graphs, records, pictures or videos. In addition, a document can be in hard copy or electronic.

Dressing procedures
(Methodes d'habillage)

The term "dressing procedures" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "dressing procedures" refers to procedures to remove any parts that are not by nature edible and to allow better visualisation of all parts that may harbor a risk.

Driving tools
(Dispositifs servant à diriger ou à déplacer l'animal)

The term "driving tools" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "driving tools" refers to tools specialized for moving the food animals and can be hand-held tools or automatic equipment. Handheld driving tools include electric or vibrating prods, flags and capes. Automatic driving tools include the automatic gates used for moving pigs onto the gondolas for Controlled Atmospheric Stunning (CAS).

E

Egg
(Oeuf)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "egg" as meaning "an egg of a domestic chicken of the species Gallus domesticus or, in respect of a processed egg product, means that egg or an egg of a domestic turkey of the species Meleagris gallopavo. It does not include a balut."

Egg carton
(Boîte à oeufs)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "egg carton" as meaning "a package that is capable of being closed and of containing not more than 30 eggs in separate compartments."

Electrical stunning
(Étourdissement électrique)

The term "electrical stunning" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "electrical stunning" refers to stunning done by sending an electric current through the brain and/or heart of the animal before slaughter. Current passing through the brain induces an immediate but non-fatal general convulsion that produces unconsciousness. Current passing through the heart produces an immediate cardiac arrest that also leads shortly to unconsciousness and death; therefore, electrical stunning methods can be either reversible or irreversible depending on the equipment and operational parameters used.

Establishment
(Établissement)

The Safe Food for Canadians Act defines "establishment" as meaning "any place, including a conveyance, where a food commodity is manufactured, prepared, stored, packaged or labelled."

The term "establishment" is used throughout the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. Part 4 – Preventive Controls applies to "establishment" in the following manner

  1. In the case of the holder of a licence to
    • (a) manufacture, process, treat, preserve, grade, store, package or label a food, the establishment is the place identified in their licence
    • (b) store and handle a meat product in its imported condition, the establishment is the place identified in their licence
    • (c) slaughter a food animal, the establishment is the place identified in their licence
      • Note: For establishments identified in a licence to slaughter game animals, there are certain provisions in Part 4 – Preventive Controls
  2. In the case of a person who grows or harvests fresh fruits or vegetables, the establishment is the place where the person grows or harvests the fresh fruit or vegetables. Examples of places where fresh fruit or vegetables are grown or harvested include a facility or field
  3. In the case of a person who handles fish in a conveyance, the establishment is the conveyance, such as a fishing vessel, where the person handles the fish

    Note: Establishment refers to the facility, the land on which the facility is built and any surrounding area where the food may be manufactured, prepared, stored, packaged or labelled or where food animals may be slaughtered.

Export
(Exportation)

The term "export" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "export" refers to sending food from Canada to a foreign state.

Export certificate
(Certification d'exportation)

The term "export certificate" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "export certificate" includes an export certificate or other export permission, such as being on an export eligibility list.

F

Facility
(Installation)

The term "facility" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "facility" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to the physical structure or building within an establishment where a person is

Examples of facilities include

  • packing sheds for fresh fruits or vegetables
  • processing plants
  • slaughter plants

Note: refer to the separate definition for facility or conveyance.

Facility or conveyance
(Installation ou véhicule)

The phrase "facility or conveyance" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "facility or conveyance" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to the physical structure or means of transportation within the establishment where

Examples of facilities or conveyances include

  • fishing vessels where fish is handled
  • packing sheds for fresh fruit or vegetables
  • facilities where baked good are manufactured
  • facilities where milk is processed into yoghurt
  • shacks where maple syrup is prepared
  • facilities where food animals are slaughtered

Note: refer to the separate definitions for facility and conveyance.

Farmed game animal
(Gibier d'élevage)

The term "farmed game animal " is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "farmed game animal" refers to a food animal that is historically considered "wild" but has been raised for food production and is transported to an abattoir for traditional slaughter with stunning, eg., bison, musk ox, elk, deer, reindeer, caribou, quail, partridges, pheasants.

Fish
(Poisson)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "fish" to include "shellfish, crustaceans and other marine animals, and any of their parts, products and by-products."

Fixed place of business
(Lieu fixe d'affaires)

The term "fixed place of business" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "fixed place of business" when used in Part 2 – Trade of the SFCR, refers to a permanent, physical business location. A post office box is not considered a fixed place of business.

Food
(Aliment)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "food" as meaning "has the same meaning as in section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act."

The Food and Drugs Act defines "food" as meaning "any article manufactured, sold or represented for use as food or drink for human beings, chewing gum, and any ingredient that may be mixed with food for any purpose whatever."

Food additive
(Additif alimentaires)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "food additive" as meaning "has the same meaning as in section B.01.001(1) of the Food and Drug Regulations."

The Food and Drug Regulations define "food additive" as meaning

"any substance the use of which results, or may reasonably be expected to result, in it or its by-products becoming a part of or affecting the characteristics of a food, but does not include

(a) any nutritive material that is used, recognized or commonly sold as an article or ingredient of food;
(b) vitamins, mineral nutrients and amino acids, other than those listed in the tables to Division 16,
(c) spices, seasonings, flavouring preparations, essential oils, oleoresins and natural extractives;
(d) agricultural chemicals, other than those listed in the tables to Division 16,
(e) food packaging materials and components thereof; and
(f) drugs recommended for administration to animals that may be consumed as food."

Food animal
(Animal pour alimentation humaine)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "food animal" as meaning "a bird or mammal, other than a marine mammal, from which an edible meat product may be derived."

Food Animal Information Document (FAID)
(Document d'information sur l'animal pour alimentation humaine)

The term "food animal information document" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "food animal information document" refers to a document that is prepared and attested by the owner, or the person having care and control over the food animal prior to its arrival at slaughter, that details specifics regarding its rearing that will inform as to whether the food animal might harbor potential hazards, such as disease, chemical residues, physical hazards.

Food commodity
(Produit alimentaire)

The Safe Food for Canadians Act defines "food commodity" as meaning "any food as defined in section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act; any animal or plant, or any of its parts, from which food may be derived; or anything prescribed to be a food commodity."

Note: For more information on prescribed food commodities, refer to sections 5, 6, 7, 17, 26, 27, and 341 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations.

Footwear
(Chaussures)

The term "footwear" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "footwear" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR refers to outer coverings for the feet, such as shoes, disposable footwear and rubber boots.

Foreign animal disease
(Maladie animale exotique)

The term "foreign animal disease" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "foreign animal disease" refers to a serious epizootic disease from which Canada is considered free, such as avian influenza.

Fresh fruits or vegetables
(Fruits ou légumes frais)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "fresh fruits or vegetables" as meaning "any fresh plant or any fresh edible fungus, or any part of such a plant or fungus, that is a food is considered to be a fresh fruit or vegetable."

Note: this meaning does not apply for the purposes of section 122. Section 122 covers the requirements for the fair and ethical trading practices of fresh fruits and vegetables.

G

Game animal
(Gibier)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "game animal" as meaning "a wild ruminant, pig or bird - including a ruminant, pig or bird that lives in an enclosed territory under conditions of freedom similar to those of wild animals - that is a food animal and that is hunted for commercial use under an authorization issued by a competent authority." Also referred to as wild game animal in guidance documents.

Good Agricultural Practices (GAP)
(Bonnes pratiques agricoles)

The term "good agricultural practices" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "good agricultural practices" refers to the general practices used in the planting, growing, harvesting, sorting, packing, storing and transporting of agricultural products that reduce risks of contamination.

Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP)
(Bonnes pratiques de fabrication)

The term "good manufacturing practices" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "good manufacturing practices" refers to general practices designed to ensure product quality and safety. They set appropriate standards and practices for product manufacturing, storing, handling and distribution.

Grade (verb)
(Classifier)

The verb "to grade" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "grade" refers to examining a food against a set of requirements prescribed in the SFCR and determining the grade for that food.

Grader
(Classificateur)

The Grades and Grade Names requirements in Part 12 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "grader" as meaning "a person designated as a grader under subsection 13(3) of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act for the purposes of the Act."

Grade name
(Nom de catégorie)

The Safe Food for Canadians Act defines "grade name" as meaning "a prescribed name, mark or designation of a food commodity."

Section 305 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations further specifies that, for the purposes of this definition, "the grade names that are set out in the Compendium and in the Grades Document are prescribed in respect of foods."

H

Handle (in relation to animal welfare)
(Manipulation (en ce qui a trait au bien-être des animaux))

The term "handle" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "handle" when used in relation to animal welfare in Part 6, Division 7 – Meat Products and Food Animals of the SFCR, refers to the handling of food animals during all slaughter activities when any person is conducting an activity on the animal to achieve a specific outcome. This would include holding animals in lairage or holding areas, driving or moving, restraining, stunning and cutting to bleed the animal. It also includes the use of any tool or equipment used for the activity.

Hazard
(Danger)

The term "hazard" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "hazard" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to a biological, chemical or physical agent that has the potential to cause illness or injury to humans when present.

  • Biological hazard: Any illness-causing pathogen, micro-organism, pest or vector that poses a danger to human health
  • Chemical hazard: A chemical substance, including allergens, that poses a danger to human health
  • Physical hazard: A physical substance that poses a danger to human health, such as wood slivers, needles, glass fragments, metal shavings, and shell fragments, among others
Hazard analysis
(Analyse des dangers)

The term "hazard analysis" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "hazard analysis" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to the process of collecting and interpreting information pertaining to potential hazards and conditions that may support the occurrence of hazards and identify which ones pose a significant risk to food safety.

Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP)
(Analyse des risques et maîtrise des points critiques)

The term "hazard analysis critical control point" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "hazard analysis critical control point", when used in the context of Part 4 - Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to an internationally recognized food safety system that identifies, evaluates, and controls hazards.

Hermetically sealed package
(Emballage hermétiquement scellé)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "hermetically sealed package" as meaning "a package that, due to its design, is secure against the entry of micro-organisms, including spores."

Humidity-control system
(Système de contrôle de l'humidité)

The term "humidity-control system" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "humidity-control system" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to a system that adds or removes water vapour from indoor air to maintain the desired humidity level.

Humane killing (in relation to animal welfare)
(Tuer l'animal sans cruaté (en ce qui a trait au bien-être des animaux)

The term "humane killing" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "humane killing", when used in relation to animal welfare in Part 6, Division 7 – Meat Products and Food Animals of the SFCR, refers to the killing of a food animal by an employee of the slaughter establishment to alleviate its suffering or for disease control purposes or for any other reason that it is not slaughtered. Humane killing must be by an approved method, such as acceptable stunning methods that result in the death of the animal, for example penetrative captive bolt. The carcass of the humanely killed food animal is not eligible for human consumption and the carcass must be conveyed to the inedible section of the facility.

I

Import
(Importation)

The term "import" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "import" refers to bringing food into Canada from a foreign state.

Incompatible activities
(Activités incompatibles)

The term "incompatible activities" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "incompatible activities" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to two or more activities that, if they occur simultaneously, sequentially, and/or in close proximity, would present a risk of contamination to the food.

Inedible
(Non comestible)

The term "inedible" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "inedible", in relation to a food, refers to food not fit for human consumption, for example spoiled food, or contaminated food.

Inedible meat product
(Produit de viande non comestible)

The term "inedible meat product" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "inedible meat product" refers to any part of a food animal carcass that does not meet the requirements of section 125 of the SFCR. For further specifics refer to the guidance material on Inedible meat products (under development).

Insignificant quantity
(Produit de viande en quantité négligeable)

The term "insignificant quantity" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. The term is used in the definition of Meat product. In that context, the following foods are not considered a meat product as they include an insignificant quantity of meat:

  1. Pork and beans
  2. Traditional bakery products including plum pudding (Note: does not include bakery products with a meat topping or filling)
  3. Salad dressings
  4. Dairy-based dip
  5. Cheese containing 3% or less of added meat product provided:
    • the meat utilized in the cheese originates from a licence holder or its foreign equivalent;
    • a statement on the label of the cheese reflects the origin of the meat product; and,
    • the cheese containing the meat product was prepared by a licence holder or its foreign equivalent
  6. Foods, other than meat products, fried in animal fat
  7. Potato-based foods such as perogies containing not more than 3% meat products
  8. Flavouring and seasoning preparations
  9. Fish products in which the only meat product is rendered animal fat
  10. Capsules, tablets and retail size containers of liquid and powder-concentrates, containing meat or meat by-products, that are intended and labelled for sale as pharmaceuticals or pseudopharmaceuticals rather than as food products
  11. Foods containing 2% meat product or less other than (g), calculated on the basis of the cooked weight of the meat product
Inspector
(Inspecteur)

The Safe Food for Canadians Act defines "inspector" as meaning "a person designated under subsection 13(3) of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act or paragraph 9(2)(b) of the Canada Border Services Agency Act as an inspector for the purposes of this Act."

Interprovincial trade
(Commerce interprovincial)

The term "interprovincial trade" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "interprovincial trade" refers to the trade of food from one province or territory to another. In the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations, this is referred to as "send or convey from one province to another."

Intraprovincial trade
(Commerce intraprovincial)

The term "intraprovincial trade" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "intraprovincial trade" refers to the trade of food within a single province or territory.

Investigate
(Enquête)

The term "investigate" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act (SFCA) nor the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "investigate" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls, involves the collection and review of information to determine

  • the nature and extent of an issue or complaint; and
  • if the food in question presents a risk of injury to human health or does not meet the requirements of the SFCA or SFCR

Generally, the review of information may include conducting sampling, reviewing the process steps that were used in the food production and reviewing relevant documents.

Irreversible stun
(Étourdissement irréversible)

The term "irreversible stun" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "irreversible stun" refers to when the animal does not return to consciousness with time after stunning. This method of stunning is also referred to as stun-kill because the animal may die prior to cutting and bleeding.

L

Label (noun)
(Étiquette)

The Safe Food for Canadians Act defines "label" to include "a legend, word or mark that is or is to be applied or attached to or included in, or that accompanies or is to accompany, a food commodity or a package."

Label (verb)
(Étiqueter)

The verb "to label" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "to label" refers to applying or attaching a label, including a legend, a word or a mark, to a food or a package of food.

Land that forms part of an establishment
(Terrain qui fait partie de l'établissement)

The phrase "land that forms part of an establishment" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "land that forms part of an establishment", when used in Part 4 - Preventive Controls of the SFCR refers to the land on which the facility is built and any surrounding area within the establishment where food may be manufactured, prepared, stored, packaged or labelled or where food animals may be slaughtered.

Lesion
(Lésion)

The term "lesion" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "lesion" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to a region in an organ or tissue which has suffered damage through injury or disease. Examples include superficial or surface cuts, scratches, boils, sores, and skin infections.

Licence
(Licence)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "licence" as meaning "a licence that is issued under paragraph 20(1)(a) or (b) of the Act".

Licence holder
(Titulaire de licence)

A person who has been issued a licence under paragraph 20(1)(a) or (b) of the Safe Food for Canadians Act.

Lot code
(Code de lot)

The term "lot code" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "lot code" when used in Part 5 - Traceability of the SFCR refers to a code that can be used to identify a lot that was manufactured, prepared, produced, stored, graded, packaged or labelled, under the same conditions. A lot code can be numeric, alphabetic or alphanumeric.

Examples of lot code include, production date, best before date, establishment number, or SFC licence number. In addition, for fresh fruits or vegetables (FFV), the lot code may also be the harvest date, grower identification number, GPS coordinates, growing region* or any other code that may be used for traceability purposes.

Note

A growing region cannot be a country of origin. However the growing region may be a province/state or sub-provincial/state within a country.

Low-acid food
(Aliment peu acide)

The Preventive Controls requirements in Part 4 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "low-acid food" as meaning "a food of which any component has a pH that is greater than 4.6 and a water activity, as determined by the ratio of the water vapour pressure of the component to the vapour pressure of pure water at the same temperature and pressure, that is greater than 0.85."

M

Maintain (in relation to document)
(Tenir à jour (en ce qui a trait à un document))

The term "maintain" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "maintain" when used in relation to a document, includes the review, analysis and updating of a document as necessary.

Maintain and maintenance (in relation to conveyance, facility or conveyance, and conveyance or equipment)
(Entretenir et entretien (en ce qui a trait à véhicule, installation ou véhicule, et véhicule ou matériel)

The terms "maintain" and "maintenance" are not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "maintain" and "maintenance", when used in the context of conveyance, facility or conveyance, and conveyance or equipment in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to their upkeep to make sure that they continue to be suitable for their intended purposes and that they do not become a risk of contamination of a food or, as applicable, a risk of harming a food animal.

Manipulated
(Manipulé)

The term "manipulated" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "manipulated" when used in Part 5 – Traceability of the SFCR, refers to the ability to alter, edit, or move electronic data using standard commercial software.

Manufacture
(Fabriquer)

The term "manufacture" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "manufacture" refers to making or fabricating a food from raw ingredients or already pre-manufactured ingredients, manually or with the use of machinery.

Meat product
(Produit de viande)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "meat product" as meaning "the carcass of a food animal, the blood of a food animal or a product or by-product of its carcass or any food that contains the blood of a food animal or a product or by-product of its carcass. It does not include

(a) gelatin, bone meal, collagen casing, hydrolyzed animal protein, monoglycerides, diglycerides or fatty acids; or

(b) any food that contains a meat product in an insignificant quantity, having regard to the nature of the food and of the meat product"

Measures (in relation to the animal welfare preventive control plan)
(Mesures (en ce qui a trait au plan de contrôle préventif du bien-être des animaux)

The term "measures" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "measures" when used in the context of the animal welfare preventive control plan, refers to preventive measure procedures or protocols that control the animal welfare risks in order to achieve an outcome of humane handling and slaughter of food animals.

Mechanical stunning
(Étourdissement mécanique)

The term "mechanical stunning" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "mechanical stunning" refers to mechanical or percussive stunning requires a device to hit the head with or without penetration. Percussive stunning produces immediate unconsciousness through brain trauma.

Monitoring
(Surveillance)

The term "monitoring" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "monitoring", when used in Part 4 - Preventive controls of the SFCR, refers to a planned sequence of observations or measurements of control parameters to assess whether a control measure or an animal welfare measure is effective.

N

Name and principal place of business of the person by or for whom the food was manufactured, prepared, produced, stored, packaged or labelled
(Nom et principal lieu d'affaires de la personne par qui ou pour qui l'aliment a été fabriqué, conditionné, produit, entreposé, emballé ou étiqueté)

The phrase "by or for whom the food was manufactured, prepared, produced, stored, packaged or labelled" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations.

To help you to understand this phrase, please consider the following

  • 'by whom' refers to the person who manufactured, prepared, produced, stored, packaged or labelled. For example, food business ABC prepares food. Therefore the name and the principal place of business is that of ABC
  • 'for whom' refers to a person who manufactured, prepared, produced, stored, packaged or labelled the food for someone else. For example, food business ABC prepares food for DEF. Therefore the name and principal place of business is that of DEF
Non-food chemical agents
(Agents chimiques non alimentaires)

The term "non-food chemical agents" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "non-food chemical agents" refer to chemicals in the establishment that are not considered to be a food or food ingredient, including cleaning chemicals, detergents, lubricants, petroleum products, and pest control products.

Noxious
(Nocif)

The term "noxious" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "noxious" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR refers to harmful, poisonous, or very unpleasant.

O

Onion
(Oignon)

The Fresh Fruits or Vegetables requirements in Part 6, Division 6 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) define "onion" as meaning "a fresh onion for which a grade is prescribed by these Regulations."

Operator
(Exploitant)

The Preventive Controls requirements in Part 4 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "operator" as meaning

"(a) the holder of a licence to manufacture, process, treat, preserve, grade, store, package or label a food, to store and handle an edible meat product in its imported condition or to slaughter a food animal
(b) any person who grows or harvests fresh fruits or vegetables; and
(c) any person who handles fish in a conveyance."

On-farm food safety program
(Programme de salubrité des aliments à la ferme)

The Meat Products and Food Animals requirements in Part 6, Division 7 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "on-farm food safety program", in respect of food animals, as meaning "a program that is operated on a farm or at a similar place and under which hazards relating to the safety of meat products that may be derived from those food animals are identified, analyzed and controlled."

Organoleptic examination
(Examen organoleptique)

The term "organoleptic examination" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "organoleptic examination" refers to physical examination using the senses of touch, smell, and sight to determine the wholesomeness and cleanliness of a meat product.

P

Package (noun)
(Emballage)

The Safe Food for Canadians Act defines "package" as meaning "an inner or outer receptacle or covering used or to be used in connection with a food commodity and includes a wrapper or confining band."

Package (verb)
(Emballer)

The verb "to package" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "package" refers to placing a food in an inner or outer receptacle or covering, including a wrapper or confining band.

Performance criteria
(Critère de rendement)

The term "performance criteria" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "performance criteria" refers to standards by which a given performance is evaluated, while maintaining objectivity and providing information about expectations for a target or goal for which to strive. In the context of the animal welfare preventive control plan, these will be standards of acceptability for the outcomes of the slaughter activities which impact humane handling and slaughter, such as (but not limited to) moving, stunning, cutting and bleeding the animals.

Person
(Personne)

"Person" has the same meaning as in the Criminal Code. When used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations, "person" can be an individual, including employees, visitors, contractors, inspectors or an organization, including an association, company, or corporation.

Pest control products
(Produit antiparasitaire)

The Pest Control Products Act defines "pest control products" as meaning

"(a) a product, an organism or a substance, including a product, an organism or a substance derived through biotechnology, that consists of its active ingredient, formulants and contaminants, and that is manufactured, represented, distributed or used as a means for directly or indirectly controlling, destroying, attracting or repelling a pest or for mitigating or preventing its injurious, noxious or troublesome effects
(b) an active ingredient that is used to manufacture anything described in paragraph (a); or
(c) any other thing that is prescribed to be a pest control product"

Physical or other effective means
(Dispositifs physiques ou d'autres moyens efficaces)

The phrase "physical or other effective means" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "physical or other effective means" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR, in relation to the separation of incompatible activities, refers to the separation by time, space, or preparation practices.

Examples of physical or other effective means include:

  • Scheduling the preparation of ready-to-eat foods before the preparation of raw foods
  • Use of separate food preparations lines and equipment
  • Use of separate rooms and dedicated employee coverings
  • Use of dedicated and colour-coded equipment
  • Use of separate storage rooms and areas
  • Cleaning in between the preparation of different food
Pithing rod
(Tige de jonchage)

The term "pithing rod" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "pithing rod" refers to a metal rod that is inserted into the stunning hole to cause further disruption of the brain tissue in order to reduce/stop reflexive movements.

Plain text
(Texte clair)

The Traceability requirements in Part 5 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "plain text" as meaning "data that is not encrypted and whose semantic content is available."

Post-cut management
(Gestion post-égorgément)

The term "post-cut management" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "post-cut management" refers to the time immediately after the cut is executed until the animal dies from exsanguination requires careful post-cut management to mitigate any suffering especially in the case of ritual slaughter because the animal remains conscious until it collapses and subsequently dies from blood loss.

Post-mortem defect management program
(Programme de gestion post mortem des défauts)

The term "post-mortem defect management program" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "post-mortem defect management program" refers to a program that must be authorized by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and would permit a licence holder, under the supervision of a veterinary inspector, to conduct a post mortem screening of the carcasses, parts and blood of food animals. Post-mortem defect management includes the screening (detection and identification) of defects of carcasses and parts prior to the beginning of the post-mortem inspection, and the management of defects detected before post-mortem inspection is completed, along with other elements set out in the document Fundamentals of the Post Mortem Defect Management Program, incorporated by reference in the SFCR.

Post-mortem examination program
(Programme d'examen post mortem)

The term "post-mortem examination program" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "post-mortem examination program" refers to a program that must be authorized by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and would permit a licence holder to conduct post-mortem examinations of the carcasses, parts, and blood of food animals, under the supervision of a veterinary inspector. Post-mortem examination includes the detection of defects of carcass and parts along with the other elements set out in the document Fundamentals of the Post-Mortem Examination Program, incorporated by reference in the SFCR.

Potable water
(Eau potable)

The term "potable water" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "potable water", when used in Part 4 - Preventive Controls of the SFCR, refers to water that is safe to drink.

Potato
(Pomme de terre)

The Fresh Fruits or Vegetables requirements in Part 6, Division 6 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) define "potato" as meaning "a fresh potato for which a grade is prescribed by these Regulations."

Prepackaged
(Préemballé)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "prepackaged", in respect of a food, as meaning "packaged in a container in the manner in which the food is ordinarily sold or used or purchased by a person, and includes consumer prepackaged."

Prepare
(Conditionnement)

The Safe Food for Canadians Act defines "prepare", in respect of a food commodity, to include "process, treat, preserve, handle, test, grade, code or slaughter it or to do any other activity in respect of it that is prescribed." The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations further prescribe the activity of growing and harvesting as preparing.

Preserve (verb)
(Conserver)

The term "to preserve" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "to preserve" refers to maintaining a food in its original or existing state; to retain the condition of a food; to treat a food to prevent its decomposition.

Preventive controls
(Contrôles préventifs)

The term "preventive controls" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "preventive controls" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR refers to a combination of measures to achieve compliance with regulatory requirements that forms a system focused on prevention to control risks to food and to food animal welfare during slaughter activities.

Preventive Control Plan (PCP)
(Plan de contrôle préventif (PCP))

The term "preventive control plan" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "preventive control plan" refers to a written document that demonstrates how risks to food and food animals are identified and controlled.

Primary Production
(Production primaire)

The term "primary production" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "primary production" refers to the growing, cultivation, picking, harvesting, collection or catching of food. Some examples of primary producers include fish and shellfish harvesters (including wild and aquaculture), egg farmers, dairy farmers, honey producers and maple sap producers.

Principal display panel
(Espace principal)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "principal display panel" as meaning

"(a) in the case of a consumer prepackaged food whose container is mounted on a display card, the part of the label that is applied to one or both of the following

  • (i) all or part of the principal display surface, or
  • (ii) all or part of the surface of the display card that is displayed or visible under customary conditions of sale or use

(b) in the case of a consumer prepackaged food whose container is an ornamental container, the part of the label that is applied

  • (i) to all or part of the bottom of the container,
  • (ii) to all or part of the principal display surface, or
  • (iii) to all or part of a tag that is attached to the container

(c) in the case of a consumer prepackaged food whose container is not described in paragraph (a) or (b), the part of the label that is applied to all or part of the principal display surface

(d) in the case of a prepackaged food other than a consumer prepackaged food, the part of the label

  • (i) that is applied or attached to all or part of the surface of the container that is displayed or visible under customary conditions of sale or use, or
  • (ii) if the container does not have a surface described in subparagraph (i), that is applied to any part of the container except any part that is the bottom of the container; or

(e) in the case of a food that is not a prepackaged food, the part of the label that is applied or attached to all or part of the surface of the food that is displayed or visible under customary conditions of sale or use"

Process (verb)
(Transformer)

The verb "to process" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "process" refers to a series of steps taken in order to prepare a food; a series of changes to a food.

Processed egg product
(Produit d'oeufs transformés)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "processed egg product" as meaning "a food for which a standard is set out in Volume 2 of the Standards of Identity Document."

Processed fruit or vegetable product
(Produit de fruits ou de légumes transformés)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "processed fruit or vegetable product" as meaning "a food

(a) for which a standard is set out in Volume 4 of the Standards of Identity Document

(b) for which a grade is set out in Volume 3 of the Compendium

(c) that is set out in column 1 of Table 3 of Schedule 3 in items 2 to 11 or in column 1 of Table 4, 5 or 6 of that Schedule; or

(d) to which Division 3 of Part 10 applies"

Protective coverings
(Accessoires de protection)

The term "protective covering" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "protective covering" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR refers to items used to protect and cover the body or clothing. Examples include lab coats, aprons, gloves, sleeve coverings, smocks, coveralls, hairnets, beard nets and boot covers.

Provide
(Fournir)

The term "provide" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "provide", when used in relation to food in Part 5 – Traceability of the SFCR, refers to give, supply, sell or to be picked up by another person.

Q

Qualifications
(Qualifications)

The term "qualifications" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "qualifications" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR refers to a quality or accomplishment that makes someone suitable for a particular job or activity.

This may include a combination of formal education or training, knowledge, experience, skills, abilities or evaluation that would make a person suitable to perform a particular activity or duty. Qualifications should be demonstrated by some sort of documented proof, for example a diploma, certificate of completion.

R

Ready-to-eat
(Prêt à manger)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "ready-to-eat", in respect of an edible meat product, as meaning "that it has been subjected to a treatment or process that is sufficient to inactivate vegetative pathogenic micro-organisms or their toxins and control spores of food-borne pathogenic bacteria so that the meat product does not require further preparing before consumption except washing or thawing or exposing it to sufficient heat to warm it without cooking it."

Recall
(Rappel)

The term "recall" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "recall" refers to the removal of a food from further sale or use, or the correction of its label, at any point in the supply chain as a risk mitigation action.

Receiving (in relation to food animals and animal welfare)
(Réception (en ce qui a trait aux animaux pour alimentation humaine et bien-être des animaux)

The term "receiving" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "receiving" of the food animals in the context of animal welfare provisions under the SFCR refers to the licence holder's responsibilities for the animals that are received for slaughter begins the moment the truck with the food animals or containers of food animals arrives at the gates of the premises of the establishment identified in the licence. This also means that the licence holder is responsible for ensuring there will be personnel available to receive and to assess the animals upon their arrival.

Reclaimed water
(Eau récupérée)

The term "reclaimed water" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "reclaimed water" when used in the context of Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR refers to water that has been removed from a food and that is intended to be re-used in the establishment where food is prepared.

Record
(Registre)

The term "record" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "record" refers to a type of document used to capture observations, measurements, and other data.

Refrigerated
(Réfrigéré)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "refrigerated", in respect of a food, as meaning "that it is kept at a temperature of 4°C or less, without being frozen."

Regulated party
(Partie réglementée)

The term "regulated party" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "regulated party" refers to a person, including an individual, corporation, partnership or organization, who is subject to the Acts and Regulations administered by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Rejection (in relation to carcass parts)
(Rejet (en ce qui a trait aux parties de la carcasse))

The term "rejection" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "rejection" refers to treating as inedible, by the licence holder, any part of a carcass that presents a defect.

Rejected (in relation to eggs)
(Rejetés (en ce qui a trait aux oeufs))

The term "rejected" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "rejected" in relation to eggs, refers to eggs that have been assessed by the grader and determined to not meet the grade criteria described in the Canadian Grade Compendium, Volume 5. Rejected shell eggs are not eligible to be used as food for humans.

Reportable disease
(Maladie déclarable)

The term "reportable disease" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "reportable disease" refers to a disease listed in the Reportable Diseases Regulations that must be reported/declared to the Minister.

Reprocessing/Reconditioning
(Retransformation/reconditionnement)

The term "reprocessing/reconditioning" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "reprocessing/reconditioning" refers to a process by which defects are removed from within the abdominal cavity of a carcass by vacuuming, scraping, trimming, or a combination thereof.

Restaurant or other similar enterprise
(Restaurant ou une autre entreprise similaire)

The phrase "restaurant or other similar enterprise" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, this phrase when used in relation to the traceability and licensing requirements of the SFCR includes sit-down, buffet, fast food or take-out restaurants, cafeterias, caterers, food stands or wagons and ice cream or coffee shops.

Restraining equipment
(Matériel de contention)

The term "restraining equipment" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "restraining equipment" in relation to food animals, refers to equipment used to restrain food animals during their handling, assessment, ante-mortem examination, and inspection. These include chutes, head gates, crates, and crowding gates, among others.

Restraint
(Contention)

The term "restraint" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "restraint", in relation to slaughter, refers to either manual that will require at least one person to hold the animal firmly, gently and calmly or it is restraint equipment that may be specialized, as in the case for ritual slaughter that must be able to immobilize the animal well without causing it distress or pain.

Retail
(Au détail)

The term "retail" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "retail" refers to the sale of food to consumers for consumption. Examples include supermarkets, farmers' markets, grocery stores, bakeries and butcheries.

Reversible stun
(Étourdissement réversible)

The term "reversible stun" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "reversible stun" refers to when the animal returns to consciousness after stunning with time unless slaughtered or humanely killed.

Ritual slaughter
(Abattage rituel)

The term "ritual slaughter" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "ritual slaughter" refers to the practice of slaughtering livestock for meat in the context of a ritual. Ritual slaughter involves a prescribed method of slaughtering an animal for food production purposes. The requirements are outlined in the religious rules for Jewish Shechita or Islamic Ḏabīḥah slaughter, with any deviation from the protocol rendering the resulting derived meat non-Kosher or unfit as Halal.

Ritual slaughterer
(Abatteur rituel)

The term "ritual slaughterer" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "ritual slaughterer" refers to the person who conducts the ritual slaughter either without stunning or with pre-cut or post- cut stunning must be qualified and skilled to conduct the ritual cut properly, in accordance with these regulations and in accordance with the religious laws for Jewish Shechita or Islamic Ḏabīḥah slaughter.

S

Sanitary condition
(Conditions hygiéniques)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "sanitary condition" as meaning "a condition that does not present a risk of contamination of a food."

Sample of a shipment
(Échantillon d'envoi)

The term "sample of a shipment" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "sample of a shipment", in relation to food animals received in crates or cages as part of a truckload/shipment, refers to a number that sufficiently represents the whole shipment to ensure that food safety, reportable disease and animal welfare conditions will be detected if present in the shipment.

Sanitize
(Assainir)

The term "sanitize" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "sanitize" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR refers to the reduction of microorganisms to levels that are considered safe from a public health viewpoint. Examples of sanitization methods include:

  • Thermal sanitization – the use of hot water or steam for a specified temperature and contact time.
  • Chemical sanitization – the use of an acceptable chemical sanitizer at a specified concentration and contact time.
Scheduled process
(Traitement programmé)

The Preventive Controls requirements in Part 4 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "scheduled process" as meaning "a process in which a treatment is applied to a food to render the food commercially sterile, taking into account the critical physical and chemical factors that affect the treatment's effectiveness."

Self-audit
(Auto-vérification)

The term "self-audit" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "self- audit" refers to a self or internal or first party audit conducted by employees of the slaughter establishment. For animal welfare audits, the employee must have the appropriate competency to conduct them and must be able to report audit findings objectively to give meaningful results.

Sell
(Vente)

The Safe Food for Canadians Act defines "sell" as meaning "includes agree to sell, offer for sale, expose for sale or have in possession for sale – or distribute to one or more persons whether or not the distribution is made for consideration."

Semantic content
(Contenu sémantique)

The phrase "semantic content" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Acts nor in the Safe Food Regulations (SFCR). In general terms "semantic content" when used in Part 5 - Traceability of the SFCR refers to the meaning in language or logic of the lot code or unique identifier.

Send or convey from one province or territory to another
(Expédier ou transporter d'une province ou un territoire à un autre)

The phrase "send or convey from one province or territory to another" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, this phrase refers to the trade of food from one province or territory to another, and is often referred to as inter-provincial trade.

Shellfish
(Mollusque)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "shellfish" as meaning "a bivalve mollusc of the class Bivalvia or a carnivorous marine mollusc of the class Gastropoda, or any product that is derived from one of those molluscs."

Single file
(Seul fichier)

The term "single file" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "single file", when used in Part 5 – Traceability of the SFCR, refers to electronic data that can be contained within one, concise file. For example, data that can appear on one page and is not unreasonably separated into multiple pages.

Slaughter
(Abattage)

The term "slaughter" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "slaughter" of the individual animal is one of the slaughter activities. It is the activity during which the animal is bled out or exsanguinated completely to result in the food animal's death, except for cases where the stun method itself or humane killing method results in the animal's death prior to the bleed out stage.

Slaughter activities
(Activités relatives à l'abattage)

The term "slaughter activities" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "slaughter activities" refers to all the stages, procedures or processes conducted in the federally licenced slaughter establishment during operations that directly affect the live animal prior to its death.

Sound construction
(Bien construit)

The term "sound construction" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "sound construction" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR in relation to facility or conveyance, refers to the construction of the facility or conveyance being of good condition. For example, this includes free from flaw, defect, or decay.

Specified risk material
(Matériel à risque spécifié)

The Meat Products and Food Animals requirements in Part 6, Division 7 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "specified risk material" as meaning "has the same meaning as in section 6.1 of the Health of Animals Regulations."

Standard commercial software
(Logiciel commercial courant)

The term "standard commercial software" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "standard commercial software" when used in Part 5 – Traceability of the SFCR refers to non-specialized software which would normally be purchased and used by the general public.

Standards of Identity Document
(Document sur les normes d'identité)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "Standards of Identity Document" as meaning "the document entitled Canadian Standards of Identity, prepared by the Agency and published on its website, as amended from time to time."

Starter products
(Matériel de démarrage)

The Preventive Controls requirements in Part 4 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "starter products" as meaning "the materials that are used to start growing fresh fruits or vegetables and includes seeds, seedlings, plants, cuttings, canes, seed potatoes and nursery stock."

Station
(Poste)

The term "station" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "station" refers to work spaces that allow for post-mortem examination or screening by the licence holder's employees, or, in the case of "inspection stations at fixed locations", work spaces determined in number and location by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency to allow for post mortem inspections by inspectors, including veterinary inspectors.

Storing and handling an edible meat product in its imported condition
(Entrepose et manipule un produit de viande comestible dans son état d'importation)

The phrase "storing and handling an edible meat product in its imported condition" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, this phrase refers to preparing edible meat products for inspection by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). Examples of activities which may occur under an SFC licence for "storing and handling an edible meat product in its imported condition" for the purpose of inspection include

  • extracting samples (cutting, drilling or sawing)
  • freezing, packaging, staging, thawing, trimming or unpacking
  • refrigerating or storing at room temperature
  • removing parts with defects or contamination
Stunning
(Étourdissement)

The term "stunning" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "stunning" refers to the process of rendering animals unconscious, with or without killing the animal, when or immediately prior to slaughtering them for food.

T

Temperature-sensitive indicator
(Indicateur sensible à la chaleur)

The term "temperature-sensitive indicator" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "temperature-sensitive indicator" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR refers to an indicator that changes in appearance after exposure to high temperature. These are heat specific in that the process temperature has to have been attained to result in the colour change. Temperature sensitive indicators come in various forms including

  • paints, lacquers, crayons or pellets that change shape or texture; and
  • tapes, labels or chemical inks that change colour

Note: Colour change is only an indication that containers have been subjected to heat, and are not a means to verify that an adequate heat process was performed.

Third-party animal welfare auditor
(Vérificateur tiers du bien-être des animaux)

The term "third-party animal welfare auditor" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "third-party animal welfare auditor" refers to independently contracted auditors qualified through a recognized auditing program or organization.

Traceability
(Traçabilité)

The term "traceability" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "traceability" refers to the ability to track the movement of a food or food commodity one step forward and one step back in the supply chain.

Tray
(Plateau)

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "tray", in respect of eggs, as meaning "a package, other than an egg carton, that is capable of containing not more than 30 eggs in separate compartments."

Treat (verb)
(Traiter)

The verb "to treat" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "treat" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR refers to applying a process or a substance to a food to protect it or to give it particular properties.

U

Unique identifier
(Identifiant unique)

The term "unique identifier" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "unique identifier" when used in Part 5 – Traceability of the SFCR, refers to a code that can be used to identify a defined quantity of food. This may include a lot code, purchase order number, or a bill of lading number.

V

Verification
(Vérification)

The term "verification" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "verification" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR refers to the application of methods, procedures, tests and other evaluations, in addition to monitoring, to determine whether the control measure or animal welfare measure is and has been operating as intended.

Veterinarian with supervisory authority
(Vétérinaire avec autorité de supervision)

The term "veterinarian with supervisory authority " is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "veterinarian with supervisory authority" refers to a CFIA veterinary inspector who is authorized to supervise inspection staff in an establishment and is referred to as veterinarian -in-charge (VIC) of an establishment.

Veterinary inspector
(Inspecteur vétérinaire)

The Meat Products and Food Animals requirements in Part 6, Division 7 of the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations define "veterinary inspector" as meaning "a person who is designated as a veterinary inspector under subsection 13(3) of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act for the purposes of the Act."

W

Waste
(Déchets)

The term "waste" is not specifically defined in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR). In general terms, "waste" when used in Part 4 – Preventive Controls of the SFCR includes a material, substance, or by-product that is discarded as no longer useful or required.

Wild game animal
(Gibier sauvage)

The term "wild game animal " is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "wild game animal" refers to a ruminant, porcine or bird that lives in the wild and that is slaughtered by means of hunting and reflects the meaning of "game animal" in the SFCR.

Z

Zoonosis
(Zoonose)

The term "zoonosis" is not used in the Safe Food for Canadians Act nor in the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations. In general terms, "zoonosis" refers to an infection or disease that is transmissible between animals and humans.

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