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Video: Safe Food for Canadians Regulations for the fresh fruit or vegetable sector

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Safe Food for Canadians Regulations for the fresh fruit or vegetable sector – Transcript

[Slide 1, text on screen: Safe Food for Canadians Regulations for the Fresh Fruits or Vegetables (FFV) Sector]

Hi. Thank you for taking the time to watch the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations presentation specially meant for the Fresh Fruits and Vegetables sector.

[Slide 2, text on screen: Overview.

  1. Key Milestones and Benefits
  2. Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) requirements
    • Licensing
    • Preventive controls
    • Traceability
  3. Information for importers and exporters of fresh fruits or vegetables
  4. What to expect when you are inspected
  5. Overview of the additional resources available]

Today we will be talking about The key milestones of the Safe Food for Canadians Act and its Regulations.The benefits of the Safe for Food for Canadians Regulations – or SFCR – for the fresh fruits and vegetables sector. We will also cover:

  • Licensing
  • Preventive controls, and
  • Traceability

Under preventative controls we will look more closely at

  • Identification and analysis of hazards
  • Maintenance & Operations of establishment elements,
  • Investigation, Notification, Complaints and Recall,
  • The requirement to have a preventive control plan, also known as a PCP.

We will provide a summary of how the requirements apply to importing and exporting fresh fruits or vegetables. We will touch upon what to expect when you are inspected and what additional resources are available. Throughout the presentation, we have provided you with definitions of key terms in blue text boxes to help you better understand the requirements. We will also point to key guidance documents that are available on the CFIA website.

[Slide 3, text on screen: Key Milestones and benefits for fresh fruits or vegetables (FFV)]

Let's talk about key milestones and benefits.

[Slide 4, text on screen: Key Milestones
2012: Passage of the Safe Food for Canadian Act (SFCA)
2013-2014: Two major food safety forums
2015-2016: Micro and small businesses consultation
January 2017: Pre-publication in Canada Gazette, Part I (90 days)
June 2018: SFCR published in Canada Gazette, Part II
January 2019: SFCR came into force. Licensing and traceability came into force for certain businesses
January 2020: Coming into force of preventive controls, PCP & lot code labelling. Coming into force of traceability requirement for growers and harvesters]

Throughout the development of the SFCR, CFIA worked hand in hand with the Canadian Produce Marketing Association (CPMA), the Canadian Horticultural Council (CHC) and CanadaGap to make sure the new regulations would be applicable to this sector.

As you may all know, in January 2019, the SFCR came into force for all food that is exported or traded interprovincially. The licensing and traceability requirements also came into force for those in this sector who manufacture, process, treat, preserve, grade, package, label or import fresh fruits or vegetables.

On January 15, 2020, the preventive controls, including PCPs and the lot code labelling requirement will come into force for all fresh fruit or vegetable businesses, including growers and harvesters. Furthermore, growers and harvesters will now have to comply with the traceability requirement.

[Slide 5, text on screen: Benefits of the SFCR

  • Less burden through the removal of dual licensing (DRC membership only)
  • Level playing field for interprovincial trade
    • no shipping point inspections for apples, potatoes and blueberries from certain provinces
    • everybody who imports or manufacturers, processes, treats, preserves, grades packages and labels for interprovincial trade or export are required to have a licence
  • Incorporation by reference of grade requirements]

Benefits of the SFCR, specific to the fresh fruits and vegetables sector, include:

  • Removal of dual licensing
  • Levelling the playing field by:
    • removing the shipping point inspections for apples, potatoes and blueberries from certain provinces; and
    • licensing businesses that
      • import; or
      • manufacture, process, treat, preserve, grade, package or label for interprovincial trade or export
  • And finally – we know that the fresh fruits and vegetables sector has been waiting for this – the grade standards and requirements have been incorporated by reference to allow for easier and smoother revisions.

[Slide 6, text on screen: Requirements: Licensing for FFV]

Let's talk about licensing requirements specifically for the fresh fruits or vegetables sector.

[Slide 7, text on screen: Licensing

  • Licensing came into force in January 2019 for all fresh fruit or vegetable businesses, including growers and harvesters who:
  • grade, package/repackage or label
  • treat (e.g., fumigate, ethylene treatment)
  • minimally process (e.g., core, shred, fresh-cut)
  • package & label in the field, if the FFV will not be subsequently manufactured, processed, treated, preserved or graded by a licence holder in another province or territory
    • the above four items apply to interprovincial or export
  • Licensing also came into force in January 2019 for all fresh fruit or vegetable businesses, including growers and harvesters who:
    • import
    • export, if any export certificate is requested

Fresh fruit or vegetable is defined on the screen as any fresh plant or any fresh edible fungus, or any part of such a plant or fungus, that is a food is considered to be a fresh fruit or vegetable.]

Licensing came into force on January 15, 2019 for all fresh fruit or vegetable businesses, including growers and harvesters who:

  • Grade, package/repackage or label
  • Treat (for example, fumigation or ethylene treatment)
  • Minimally process (for example coring, shredding, fresh-cutting)
  • Package and label in the field, if the fresh fruits or vegetables will not be subsequently manufactured, processed, treated, preserved or graded by a licence holder
  • Import; and
  • Export, if an export certificate is requested from CFIA.

Fresh fruits or vegetables are defined in the SFCR as "any fresh plant or any fresh edible fungus, or any part of such a plant or fungus, that is a food." This includes, any fresh fruits, vegetables, herbs, mushrooms, nuts, and sprouts. The fresh fruits or vegetables may be wild or cultivated in a field, facility or building.

[Slide 8, text on screen: Safe Food for Canadians (SFC) Licence versus DRC Membership. There are two columns, one titled SFC Licence on the left and one titled DRC Membership on the right.

On the left, under SFC Licence, the intent is to

  • Identify businesses that import; export or prepare food for interprovincial trade or export
  • Authorize those businesses to carry out those activities

The scope of the SFC Licence is

For Interprovincial trade

  • Persons who prepare food
  • Persons who slaughter of food animals

For Import

  • Persons who import food

For Export

  • Persons who export a food if they require an export certificate

On the right, under DRC Membership, the intent is to require fair and ethical trading practice by minimizing trade irritants and facilitate effective trade dispute resolution.

The scope of the DRC membership is, depending on the level of trade

Persons, with some exceptions, who (with respect to fresh produce):

  • sell or negotiate sale
  • purchase or negotiate purchase
  • receive or receive on another person's behalf
  • send or convey from one province to another or import or export

Prepare is defined as manufacture, process, treat, preserve, grade, package, label]

Let's take a quick moment to clear some confusion between the Safe Food for Canadians licence requirement and the DRC membership. The purpose of the Safe Food for Canadians licence is to identify businesses that import or manufacture, process, treat, preserve, grade, package or label food for interprovincial trade or export and to authorize those businesses to carry out those activities.

The DRC membership serves to ensure fair and ethical trading practices by minimizing trade irritants and facilitating effective trade dispute resolution.

Many fresh fruit or vegetable businesses will need both a SFC licence and a membership with the DRC.

[Slide 9, text on screen: Resources: Licensing. There are two columns, one titled Topics on the left and one titled Guidance Tools available at inspection.gc.ca/safefood on the right.

Under the topic "Do you require a licence?" the resource available is the licensing interactive tool.

Under the topic "Videos on licensing" the resources available are

Under the topic "Additional information to help you determine whether the activities you conduct require a licence" the resource available is a link to Section 5.8 and Annex 1: Food business activities that require a licence under the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations.

Under the topic "Key considerations to help you prepare to apply for a licence" the resource available is What to consider before applying for a Safe Food for Canadians licence.

Under the topic "Licensing application (including step by step user guide, instructions and walk through videos)" the resource available is My CFIA.

Under the topic "List of food businesses with an SFC licence with the CFIA" the resource available is the Safe Food for Canadians Licence Registry.

Here is a list of key guidance materials and resources to help you navigate your way through licensing.

[Slide 10, text on screen: requirements: Preventive Controls for FFV]

Let's move on to preventive controls, the main focus of this presentation.

[Slide 11, text on screen: Safe Food for Canadians Regulations for the Fresh Fruits or Vegetables (FFV) Sector

  • Will come into force for fresh fruits or vegetables on January 15, 2020.
  • Outcome-based to allow for flexibility and innovation
  • Based on the internationally recognized principles of food hygiene, including Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) and Good Agricultural Practices (GAP).
  • Apply to Operators:
    • fresh fruit or vegetable businesses that have a licence; and
    • growers and harvesters who export or trade across provincial orterritorialboundaries.

Operator is defined as:

(a) a licence holder
(b) any person who grows or harvests fresh fruits or vegetables; and
(c) any person who handles fish in a conveyance]

Preventive controls are found in Part 4 of the SFCR. These requirements will be coming into force for fresh fruits or vegetables on January 15, 2020. They are outcome-based to allow for flexibility and innovation. They are based on the internationally recognized principles of food hygiene, including Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Agricultural Practices. They help to prevent food safety hazards and reduce the likelihood of contaminated food entering the market, whether they are prepared within or outside of Canada.

Preventive controls apply to operators. For fresh fruits or vegetables, this means those who have a licence as well as growers and harvesters who export or trade across provincial and territorial boundaries. Although in many cases, the market drove the fresh fruits and vegetables sector to implement food safety, there was no government oversight in the eyes of consumers and our international trading partners.

[Slide 12, text on screen: Preventive controls

Preventive controls are outcome-based and include:

  • Identification and control of biological, chemical and physical hazards
  • Treatments and processes (not applicable to fresh fruits or vegetables)
  • Maintenance and Operation of Establishment
    • Sanitation, pest control and non-food agents
    • Conveyances and equipment
    • Conditions of the establishment
    • Unloading, loading and storing
    • Competency
    • Hygiene
  • Investigation, Notification, Complaints and Recall

Preventive controls are defined as the Combination of measures used to achieve compliance with regulatory requirements. They form a system focused on prevention to control risks to food and to food animal welfare during slaughter activities

A useful resource shared is the Regulatory requirements: Preventive controls.

The slide also includes, on the right side of the screen, a graphic titled "Key Preventive Food Safety Controls"]

As mentioned in the previous slide, the preventive control requirements are outcome-based, where possible, to allow for flexibility and innovation. Please take note that outcome-based regulations do not lower food safety standards or allow you to cut corners. ‎While CFIA is open to innovation, we will be vigilant in verifying high standards of food safety.

  • Preventive controls include:
    • Identification and analysis of hazards
    • Maintenance and operation requirements
    • Investigation, notification, complaints and recall
  • We will go into more detail into each of these in the next few slides.

[Slide 13, text on screen: Requirements: Preventive controls for FFV Identification and Analysis of Hazards]

Let's talk about identification and analysis of hazards as part of preventive controls.

[Slide 14, text on screen: Identification and control of biological, chemical and physical hazards

For each identified biological, chemical and physical hazard that presents a risk of contamination to the fresh fruit or vegetable:

  • analyze the hazard;
  • use control measures to prevent, eliminate or reduce it to an acceptable level; and
  • have evidence to show that the control measure is effective

Useful resources shared are

For each identified biological, chemical and physical hazard that presents a risk of contamination to the fresh fruits or vegetables, the SFCR requires that you;

  • analyze the hazard;
  • use control measures to prevent, eliminate or reduce it to an acceptable level; and
  • have evidence to show that the control measure is effective.

Conducting a hazard analysis is usually associated with having a written food safety system such as Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points or HACCP. However under the SFCR, even if a written preventive control plan is not required – a hazard analysis, the use of control measures and validation of their effectiveness is still required.

[Slide 15, text on screen: Control measures and evidence of effectiveness (validation)

  • No re-validation required: for control measures that were acceptable prior to the SFCR
  • Re-validation required when:
    • changes are made to a control measure
    • repeated failures or deviations
  • The evidence of effectiveness must be:
    • proportional to the level of risk
    • relevant to the food and the operation

A Useful resource is Evidence showing a control measure is effective.

As mentioned in the previous slide your control measures must be shown by evidence to be effective. This is also known as validation. Validation is an important activity to ensure your preventive controls meet the outcomes identified in the regulations. The definition of validation is based on the Codex definition: the process of obtaining evidence that a control measure or combination of control measures, if properly implemented, is capable of controlling the hazard to a specified outcome. If you have in place control measures that were validated and found to be acceptable before the SFCR came into force, you do not need to revalidate them. However, revalidation is required if you have made changes to the control measure or if you have found repeated failures or deviations.

The validation you conduct on the control measures should be proportional to the level of risk. This means that evidence could:

  • be very simple (for example, good hygiene practices or prerequisite programs)
  • be more detailed (so for example, "known" Critical Control Points), or
  • require a full validation study because the control measure is new

Always make sure that the type of evidence you choose is relevant to your particular hazard. There is industry guidance on our website that explains validation and what is meant by "Proven to be effective".

[Slide 16, text on screen: Requirements: Preventive controls for FFV Maintenance & Operation of Establishment]

Let's talk about maintenance and operation of establishment as part of preventive controls. Specifically:

  • Sanitation, pest control & non-food agents
  • Conditions of the Establishment
  • Unloading, loading and storing
  • Competency
  • Hygiene

[Slide 17, text on screen: Maintenance & Operation of Establishment Sanitation, pest control & non-food agents

Sanitation

  • Maintain the establishment and any conveyance or equipment used in the establishment for manufacturing, preparing, storing, packaging or labelling clean and in sanitary condition
  • Cleaning and sanitizing activities do not present risk of contamination to the fresh fruits or vegetables.

Establishment is defined as any place, including a conveyance, where food is manufactured, prepared, stored, packaged or labelled. The establishment is also the place (facility or field) where fresh fruits or vegetables are grown or harvested.

Conveyance or equipment is defined as anything that is used within the establishment to transport or manufacture, prepare, store, package, or label food.

Prepare is defined as includes process, treat, preserve, handle, test, grade, code or slaughter or any other activity that is prescribed. The SFCR prescribes the growing and harvesting of fresh fruits or vegetables under prepare.

Sanitary condition is defined as condition that does not present a risk of contamination of food.]

To prevent the contamination of fresh fruits or vegetables, it is crucial that the following are kept clean and in a sanitary condition:

  • the establishment, where you manufacture, prepare, store, package or label fresh fruits or vegetables. This also includes the facility or field where you grow or harvest fresh fruits or vegetables; and
  • any conveyance or equipment that you use within the establishment.

Conveyance or equipment is anything that you use in the establishment to transport, grow, harvest, process, treat, grade, package or label the fresh fruits or vegetables. Examples include, trucks or trailers used in the field where fresh fruits or vegetables are grown or harvested, conveyor belts, mesh bags, and wires.

In addition to maintaining the cleanliness of the establishment and conveyances or equipment, you need to make sure that the cleaning and sanitizing activities do not contaminate the fresh fruits or vegetables.

[Slide 18, text on screen: Maintenance & Operation of Establishment Sanitation, pest control & non-food agents

Pest control

  • Presence and protection against entry of animals in the establishment, facility or conveyance and land that forms part of the establishment
  • Measures taken do not present risk of contamination to FFV.

Facility or conveyance is defined as: physical structure or means of transportation within the establishment where a food is manufactured, prepared (including growing or harvesting fresh fruits or vegetables) stored, packaged, or labelled.

Land that forms part of the establishment is defined as: land on which the facility is built and any surrounding area within the establishment where food may be manufactured, prepared, stored, packaged or labelled or where food animals may be slaughtered.]

You are required to protect the establishment, facility or conveyance and the land that forms part of the establishment, against the entry of animals that present a risk of contamination to the fresh fruits or vegetables. Animals include vermin, rodents, mammals, insects, and birds.

With respect to the field, where you grow or harvest fresh fruits or vegetables, use reasonable measures to prevent the entry of animals onto the field.

Also, make sure that the measures you use do not contaminate the fresh fruits or vegetables

[Slide 19, text on screen: Maintenance & Operation of Establishment Sanitation, pest control & non-food agents

Non-food chemicals, sanitizers and agronomic inputs

  • identification,
  • suitable for their intended use
  • do not present risk of contamination to FFV
  • handling and use do not present risk of contamination to the FFV

Non-food chemical is defined as chemicals that are not considered to be a food or food ingredient, including cleaning chemicals, detergents, lubricants, petroleum products, and pest control products.

Agronomic input is defined as an input that is used in growing fresh fruits or vegetables, and includes agricultural chemicals, biological controls, pollinators, commercial fertilizers, compost, compost tea, green manure, manure, mulch, row covers, soil amendments and pulp sludge.]

This requirement has to do with the identification, suitability, handling and use of non-food chemicals, sanitizers and agronomic inputs so that the fresh fruits or vegetables do not become contaminated.

The identification of non-food chemicals, sanitizers and agronomic inputs can be through the use of labels, colour coding the containers, or other means – as long as you can make sure that they are well identified so that they are not accidently misused.

[Slide 20, text on screen: Maintenance & Operation of Establishment Conditions of the Establishment

Conveyances or equipment

  • Appropriate and function as intended
  • Design construction & maintenance
  • Appropriateness and suitability of materials used for design, construction & maintenance
  • Equipped with instruments to control, indicate and record parameters
  • Accessible for cleaning, sanitizing, maintenance and inspection.
  • Manner in which they are used, maintained, if necessary calibrated,
  • Characteristics of food contact surface
  • Handling of contaminated materials, waste or other inedible things

Conveyance or equipment is defined as anything that is used within the establishment to transport or manufacture, prepare, store, package, or label food.]

The next set of requirements are around conveyances or equipment that you use in the establishment to prevent contamination of fresh fruits or vegetables.

Specifically, these requirements address the functioning, design, construction and maintenance, conditions and use of conveyances or equipment.

Remember, the establishment is any place, including a field, where you manufacture, prepare (including grow or harvest), store, package or label fresh fruits or vegetables.

Examples of conveyances or equipment, include:

  • Trucks, trailers and wagons used to transport fresh fruits or vegetables in the field where they are grown or harvested
  • Mesh bags, wires, clips, ladders, stakes, elastic bands, gutters, chemical applicators used for growing and harvesting fresh fruits or vegetables.
  • Dump tanks or wash tanks; and
  • Conveyors

[Slide 21, text on screen: Maintenance & Operation of Establishment Conditions of the Establishment

Establishment

  • Conditions of the land that forms part of the establishment
  • Proximity of the establishment to places or things
  • Control of movement within, into and out of the establishment
  • Separation of incompatible activities and food
  • Control of food that is unsafe, returned and non-compliant
  • Appropriateness of natural and artificial lighting in the establishment
  • Removal and disposal of contaminated material and waste
  • Hand-cleaning & drinking stations, lavatories, showers, break/change rooms
  • Water, steam and ice
  • Areas for inspector's use

Establishment is defined as any place, including a conveyance, where food is manufactured, prepared, stored, packaged or labelled. The establishment is also the place (facility or field) where FFV are grown or harvested.

Land that forms part of the establishment is defined as land on which the facility is built and any surrounding area within the establishment where food may be manufactured, prepared, stored, packaged or labelled or where food animals may be slaughtered.]

These requirements have to do with the establishment where you manufacture, prepare (including grow or harvest), store, package or label the fresh fruits or vegetables. Examples include a facility, conveyance or land where any of those activities are conducted. Most of these requirements are written in an outcome-based manner. It is your responsibility as the operator to determine if there is a risk of contamination to fresh fruits or vegetables, and if yes, determine how you will make sure that those risks are mitigated.

An interesting outcome-based requirement is the one about water, steam and ice. It requires that water that may come into contact with fresh fruits or vegetables, be potable, unless there is no risk of contamination. For example, growers and harvesters need to make sure that the water they use for irrigation is not a source of contamination for the fresh fruits or vegetables.

Another outcome-based requirement is the separation of incompatible activities and incompatible food. If there is a risk of contamination to fresh fruits or vegetables, you need to separate any incompatible activities from each other and any incompatible food.

[Slide 22, text on screen: Maintenance & Operation of Establishment Conditions of the Establishment

Facility or conveyances

  • Sanitary design of the facility or conveyance
  • Size and layout
  • Entry prevention of insects, rodents and other vermin
  • Floors, walls, ceilings, windows and doors
  • Appropriateness and suitability of material used in construction and maintenance
  • Sound construction and good repair
  • Control of movement within, into and out
  • Ventilation system
  • Temperature and humidity

Facility or conveyances is defined as physical structure or means of transportation within the establishment where a food is manufactured, prepared (including growing or harvesting fresh fruits or vegetables) stored, packaged, or labelled.]

Let's talk about facilities or conveyances. Examples include: packing shed, sprout facilities, mushroom production facilities, greenhouses and fresh-cut facilities. In addition to complying with the establishment requirements, facilities or conveyances must also comply with the following:

  • sanitary design to prevent the accumulation of substances presenting a risk of contamination (for example, dust, food particles, etc.);
  • size and layout to accommodate the activity conducted and equipment used;
  • design, construction and maintenance to prevent the entry of animals, including vermin, rodents, mammals, insects and birds;
  • floors, walls, ceilings, windows and doors designed not to present a risk of contamination;
  • material used in its construction and maintenance that are suitable and appropriate;
  • ventilation system that provides sufficient air exchange to provide clean air and remove odours;
  • temperature and humidity control that's appropriate for the activity being conducted; and
  • control of movement of persons and things. A few examples of 'things' include: food, non-food chemicals, agronomic inputs, starter products, packaging material, and equipment or conveyances.

[Slide 23, text on screen: Maintenance & Operation of Establishment Unloading, loading and storing

Conveyances used to carry food to or from the establishment

  • Design construction and maintenance
  • Temperature and humidity control
  • Things contained in the conveyance
  • Clean and sanitary condition
  • Appropriateness and suitability of material used in construction and maintenance
  • Manner of unloading and loading

Conveyance is defined as a vessel, aircraft, train, motor vehicle, trailer or other means of transportation, including a cargo container.

Establishment is defined as any place, including a conveyance, where food is manufactured, prepared, stored, packaged or labelled. The establishment is also the place (facility or field) where fresh fruits or vegetables are grown or harvested.]

As the Operator, it is your responsibility to make sure that conveyances that arrive and leave the establishment comply with these requirements. In addition, the manner in which the food is loaded and unloaded from the establishment must not contaminate the fresh fruits or vegetables.

[Slide 24, text on screen: Maintenance & Operation of Establishment Unloading, loading and storing

Storing

  • Manner of storing to prevent risk of contamination of the fresh fruits or vegetables:
    • Food, including fresh fruits or vegetables
    • Non-food items
      • conveyances or equipment
      • sanitizers, chemical agents, agronomic inputs and starter products,
      • packaging material and labels
      • other things used to manufacture, prepare, store, package and label

Agronomic inputs is defined as an input that is used in growing fresh fruits or vegetables, and includes agricultural chemicals, biological controls, pollinators, commercial fertilizers, compost, compost tea, green manure, manure, mulch, row covers, soil amendments and pulp sludge

Starter products is defined as the materials that are used to start growing fresh fruits or vegetables and includes seeds, seedlings, plants, cuttings, canes, seed potatoes and nursery stock.]

And let's not forget about the manner of storing fresh fruits or vegetables, and non-food items. Non-food items include:

  • Conveyances or equipment
  • Sanitizers and chemical agents
  • Agronomic inputs and starter products
  • Packaging material and labels
  • And other things used to manufacture, prepare (including grow or harvest), store, package or label the fresh fruits or vegetables.

[Slide 25, text on screen: Maintenance & Operation of Establishment Competency

Competency and qualifications

  • Persons involved in manufacturing, preparing, storing, packaging or labelling have competencies and qualifications to carry out their duties

Examples

  • Technical knowledge, such as calibrating, maintaining and operating conveyances or equipment, monitoring critical control points (CCP)
  • Training, such as procedures for preventing contamination, allergen prevention, GAPs, GHPs, GMPs,
  • Valid accreditation and certifications, if necessary to perform their duties, such as performing grading activities, managing hazardous material

Qualifications is defined as a quality or accomplishment that makes someone suitable for a particular job or activity. This may include a combination of formal education or training, knowledge, experience, skills, abilities or evaluation that would make a person suitable to perform a particular activity or duty.]

Competencies and qualifications of employees, including contractors and international farm workers are important for

  • supporting food safety awareness and safe handling practices, and
  • mitigating hazards that may contaminate the fresh fruits or vegetables.

[Slide 26, text on screen: Maintenance & Operation of Establishment Hygiene

Clothing, personal cleanliness and behaviour

  • Applies to persons who enter or are in an area where fresh fruits or vegetables are manufactured, prepared, stored, packaged or labelled
  • Example: visitors, employees, contractors and international farm workers
  • Personal cleanliness and hand cleaning, and if necessary sanitizing
  • The following must not present a risk of contamination to the fresh fruits or vegetables:
    • clothing, footwear and protective coverings
    • wearing and using objects and substances
    • personal behaviour and habits]

Good hygiene is crucial to food safety. As the operator, it is your responsibility to make sure that any person who enters or is in an area where the fresh fruits or vegetables are manufactured, prepared (including grown or harvested), stored, packaged or labelled maintains good hygiene. This includes:

  • Maintaining personal cleanliness, such as hand cleaning, and if necessary sanitizing; and
  • Making sure that the following do not present a risk of contamination to the fresh fruits or vegetables:
    • clothing, footwear and protective coverings
    • the wearing and use of objects and substances; and
    • personal behaviour, such as spitting, chewing gum and other acts

[Slide 27, text on screen: Maintenance & Operation of Establishment Hygiene

Diseases, illnesses, symptoms and lesions

  • Applies to in persons who work in an area where the fresh fruits or vegetables are manufactured, prepared, stored, packaged or labelled
  • Example: employees, contractors and international farm workers
  • Reporting of any diseases, illnesses, symptoms, open or infected lesions to the operator
  • if there is a risk of contamination of the fresh fruits or vegetables, the operator must prevent from entering or being in those areas]

As the operator, you also have to make sure that any person who works in an area – where the fresh fruits or vegetables are manufactured, prepared (including grown or harvested), stored, packaged or labelled – who has a disease, illness, symptom of a disease or illness, or any open or infected lesion reports it to you.

And you determine if there is a risk of contamination to the fresh fruits or vegetables. If there is, you are required to exclude them from those areas.

[Slide 28, text on screen: Requirements: Preventive controls for FFV Investigation, Notification, Complaints and Recall]

Let's talk about investigation, notification, complaints and recall as part of preventive controls.

[Slide 29, text on screen: Investigation, Notification, Complaints and Recall

Investigation and notification

  • Investigate (immediately) when the fresh fruit or vegetable
    • may present a risk of injury to human health; or
    • does not meet the Act or Regulations
  • If the fresh fruit or vegetables present risk of injury to human health, immediately
    • notify CFIA; and
    • take action to mitigate the risk

Investigate involves the collection and review of information to determine:

  • the nature and extent of an issue or complaint; and
  • if the food in question presents a risk of injury to human health or does not meet the requirements of the SFCA or SFCR

Generally, the review of information may include conducting sampling, reviewing the process steps and reviewing relevant documents.]

As the operator, if you suspect that a fresh fruit or vegetable may present a risk of injury to human health or does not meet the Acts or Regulations, you are obliged to investigate the matter immediately. If you determine that there is a risk of injury to human health, you are required to immediately:

  • notify CFIA; and
  • take action to mitigate the risk.

[Slide 30, text on screen: Investigation, Notification, Complaints and Recall

Complaints

  • Procedure for receiving, investigating and responding to complaints
  • Implement the complaint procedures.
  • Document requirements
    • written complaint procedure
    • details of the complaint
    • results of investigation
    • actions taken
    • retention period for each complaint – at least 2 years after completing the actions taken]

You are also required to prepare, keep and maintain a procedure for receiving, investigating, and responding to complaints. And whenever you receive a complaint related to the fresh fruit or vegetables, you implement that procedure. As the operator, regardless of your gross annual food income, you are required to keep documents of:

  • the complaint procedure;
  • the details of the complaint;
  • the results of your investigation; and
  • the actions you have taken.

These documents are to be kept for at least 2 years after completing the actions you have taken as a result of your investigation.

[Slide 31, text on screen: Investigation, Notification, Complaints and Recall

Recall

  • Procedure for conducting a recall
  • Conduct a recall simulation (at least once every 12 months)
  • Implement recall procedure if fresh fruits or vegetables present a risk of injury to human health
  • Notify CFIA when a food is recalled
  • Document requirements:
    • Written recall procedures (including contact person for the procedure and person responsible for conducting recalls)
    • Details and results of the recall simulation
    • Details of the recall and evidence of its effectiveness
    • Retention period for each recall conducted – at least 2 years after the recall was initiated

Useful resource is the Recall procedure: A guide for food businesses.

Recall is defined as removal of a food from further sale or use, or the correction of its label, at any point in the supply chain as a risk mitigation action.]

Recall refers to the removal of a food from further sale or use, or the correction of its label, at any point in the supply chain, as a risk mitigation action. CFIA created guidance to help you prepare your procedure to carry out effective recalls. Remember, you are required to conduct a recall simulation, at least once every 12 months. Similar to the requirements regarding complaints, regardless of your gross annual food income, you are required to keep documents of:

  • the recall procedures (including contact person for the procedure and person responsible for conducting recalls);
  • the details and results of the recall simulation; and
  • the details of any recall you conducted and evidence of its effectiveness.

These documents also need to be kept for at least 2 years after the recall was initiated.

[Slide 32, text on screen: Resources: Preventive controls. There are two columns, one titled Topics on the left and one titled Guidance Tools available at inspection.gc.ca/safefood on the right.

Under the topic "Explanation of the preventive controls requirements" the resource available is the Regulatory Requirements: Preventive Controls.

Under the topic "General recommendations for preventive controls" the resource available is the Preventive controls for establishments and food.

Under the topic "Recommended preventive controls for FFV" the resources available are

Here is a list of key guidance materials and resources to help you navigate your way through preventive controls.

[Slide 33, text on screen: Requirements: Preventive controls for FFV Preventive control plan]

Let's move on to the next transitional component – requirement to have a written Preventive Control Plan (or PCP).

[Slide 34, text on screen: Preventive Control Plan (PCP)

  • Licence holders and businesses that grow or harvest fresh fruits or vegetables for interprovincial trade or export must prepare, keep and maintain a preventive control plan (PCP).
    • exception: $100K or less in gross annual food sales
      • Even if you may not need a written PCP, you are still required to comply with Part 4 of the SFCR, including the document requirements related to schedule processes, complaints and recalls
    • The PCP must address:
    • food safety hazards, control measures and associated evidence of their effectiveness (consistent with HACCP); and
    • consumer protection requirements (e.g., packaging, labelling and grades)

Preventive control plan (PCP) is defined as a written document that demonstrates how risks to food and food animals are identified and controlled.

Maintain is defined as includes the review, analysis and updating of a document as necessary]

A PCP is a written document that demonstrates how risks to food (including fresh fruits or vegetables) and food animals are identified and controlled. The controls are based on internationally recognized Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point principles or HACCP principles. Essentially, the written PCP includes the details of the preventive controls discussed in the previous slides. However, if your gross annual food sales is 100,000 dollars or less, you are not required to prepare, keep and maintain a PCP.

Regardless of whether you have a PCP or not, you must still comply with the preventive controls, as well as the document requirements related to complaints and recalls. If you have a HACCP system in place, you are well positioned to show compliance with the PCP requirements as they relate to food safety. Review your system to make sure that it meets all the PCP requirements, including those related to consumer protection such as packaging, labelling and grading.

[Slide 35, text on screen: Preventive control plan Food Safety

Food Safety

  • Description of the biological, chemical and physical hazard
  • Control measures you use to prevent, eliminate or reduce the hazards to an acceptable level
  • Evidence that the control measures are effective
  • Description of the critical control points (CCP)
  • For each CCP:
    • control measure that you use and evidence that it is effective
    • description of the critical limit
    • monitoring procedures in relation to the critical limit
    • corrective actions procedures if the critical limit is not met

Control measure is defined as a measure that can be applied to prevent, eliminate or reduce a hazard to an acceptable level.

Evidence in relation to control measures, refers to a collection of scientific, technical and observational information, such as existing codes of practice, operational data, validation studies, or mathematical modelling that shows a control measure, or series of control measures is capable of preventing or eliminating or reducing a hazard to an acceptable level.]

For food safety, the written preventive control plan must include:

  • a description of each biological, chemical and physical hazard;
  • control measures to prevent, eliminate or reduce the hazards to an acceptable level;
  • evidence that the control measures are effective;
  • a description of the critical control points (CCP).
  • For each CCP:
    • a description of the control measure that is applied and evidence that it is effective;
    • a description of the critical limit;
    • the monitoring procedures in relation to the critical limit; and
    • the corrective action procedures if the critical limit is not met.

You must also keep documents that prove you have implemented your PCP for 2 years after the day on which you prepared them.

[Slide 36, text on screen: Preventive control plan Food Safety

Food Safety (continued)

  • The PCP must also include the information you used to:
    • identify the biological, chemical and physical hazard
    • determine appropriate control measures
    • determine CCPs, their related control measures and their critical limits
    • determine appropriate monitoring procedure
    • determine corrective action procedures]

Your PCP must also include the information you used to identify the hazards. It must capture the information you used to determine:

  • the appropriate control measures;
  • the critical control points, their related control measures and critical limits; and
  • the appropriate monitoring procedure, and corrective action procedures.

There is no retention period for these supporting documents because they should always be current and available.

[Slide 37, text on screen: Preventive control plan Consumer Protection

Consumer protection

  • description of the measures you take to make sure that the fresh fruits or vegetables:
    • comply with the specified consumer protection requirements and
    • are packaged and labelled in a manner that is not:
      • false
      • misleading or deceptive
      • likely to create an erroneous impression with respect to its character, quality, value, quantity, composition, merit, safety or origin or the method of its manufacture or preparation
    • documents used as evidence of the measures you take (for example, label verification checklists, net quantity determination records, grading records)]

For the consumer protection portion, your PCP must include:

  • a description of the measures you take to make sure that the fresh fruits or vegetables
    • comply with the specified consumer protection requirements (for example labelling, grading), and
    • are packaged and labelled in a manner that is not:
      • false;
      • misleading or deceptive; or
      • likely to create an erroneous impression.

The PCP must also include the documents that show you are using those measures. For example, label verification checklists, net quantity determination records and grading records.

[Slide 38, text on screen: Resources: Preventive Control Plan Food Safety and Consumer Protection. There are two columns, one titled Topics on the left and one titled Guidance Tools available at inspection.gc.ca/safefood on the right.

Under the topic "Do you need a written PCP?" the resource available is the Preventive control plan interactive tool.

Under the topic Video on creating a PCP the resource available is Creating a Preventive Control Plan (PCP) under the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations.

Under the topic Explanation of the PCP requirement the resource available is Regulatory requirements: Preventive control plan (PCP)..

Under the topic PCP development the resource available is A guide for preparing a preventive control plan – For domestic food businesses.

Under the topic PCP templates the resource available is the Preventive control plan templates for domestic food businesses.

Under the topic Elements of the PCP the resources available are

Here is a list of key guidance materials and resources to help you navigate your way through the preventive control plan requirements. Please note that similar resources have been developed for importers, which will be discussed further in this presentation.

[Slide 39, text on screen: Requirements: Traceability for FFV]

Let's talk about traceability requirements.

[Slide 40, text on screen: Traceability

There are two columns, one titled Businesses that deal with FFV on the left and one titled Coming into force on the right. Note: for Coming into force the date for lot code labelling of consumer prepackaged fresh fruits or vegetables is January 15, 2020.

Under "Businesses that deal with FFV" Licence holders (e.g., importers, field-packers, (re)packers, fresh-cut operators, greenhouse, sprout and mushroom producers), the coming into force is January 15, 2019.

Under "Growers and harvesters who trade interprovincially or export", the coming into force is January 15, 2020.

Under "Businesses whose sole activity is interprovincial trade or export (e.g., wholesaler and distributors)", the coming into force is January 15, 2019.

Under "Retail who sell directly to consumers (e.g., grocery stores, farmers' market)", the coming into force is January 15, 2019.

Under "Restaurants and other similar enterprises", there is no coming into force.]

The traceability requirements align with Codex international standards. They support food safety investigations, including recalls, reduce the time it takes to remove unsafe food from the market; and they minimize the scope of recalls therefore reducing the cost for businesses. The traceability requirements in the SFCR apply to a much broader scope of food businesses than licensing and preventive controls. For FFV, it applies to:

  • Licence holders (for example, packers including those who package in the field, fresh-cut operators, and importers);
  • Growers and harvesters who export or trade interprovincially;
  • Businesses whose sole activity is interprovincial trade or export (for example wholesalers and distributors); and
  • Retail.

There are two components to traceability, specifically document requirements and labelling requirements.

[Slide 41, text on screen: Traceability

Document requirements

  1. Identify:
    • common name
    • name and principal place of business by whom or for whom the fresh fruits or vegetables were manufactured, prepared, produced, stored, packaged or labelled
    • lot code or other unique identifier to allow for traceability
  2. Trace back: date provided to you and by whom
  3. Trace forward: date provided and to whom (not applicable to retail sale to consumers)

By whom refers to the food business who manufactured, prepared, produced, stored, packaged or labelled.

For whom refers to the food business for whom the food was who manufactured, prepared, produced, stored, packaged or labelled the food for someone else (e.g., business ABC prepares food for DEF. Therefore the name and principal place of business is that of DEF)]

There are three main pieces of information that you need to prepare and keep in a document.

  • The first piece of information is used to identify the fresh fruit or vegetable you provide using:
    • its common name;
    • the name and principal place of business by whom or for whom, the fresh fruits or vegetables were manufactured, prepared, produced, stored, packaged or labelled; and
    • the lot code or unique identifier to allow them to be traced.
  • The next piece of information is used to trace back the fresh fruits or vegetables and any other ingredients you use to prepare the fresh fruits or vegetables. Specifically,
    • the date on which they were provided to you; and
    • by whom it was provided.
  • And the last piece of information is used to trace forward the fresh fruits or vegetables, so
    • The date you provide the fresh fruits or vegetables; and
    • To whom you provided them.
  • Trace forward does not apply to the sale of fresh fruits or vegetables to consumers.

[Slide 42, text on screen: Traceability

Labelling requirements

  • A label with the following information must be applied, attached or accompany the fresh fruits or vegetables when you provide them to another person:
  • common name
  • name and principle place of business
  • unique identifier or lot code (lot code only for consumer prepackages)]

The second component to traceability is labelling. You are required to make sure that the fresh fruits or vegetables you provide to another person have a label with the following information applied, attached or accompanying them:

  • the common name
  • the name and principle place of business by whom or for whom the fresh fruits or vegetables were manufactured, prepared, produced, stored, packaged or labelled; and
  • a lot code or unique identifier. However, do note for consumer prepackages, it must be a lot code.
    • To give you a little bit of background, unique identifier was added, based on comments received at Canada Gazette, Part 1, to provide flexibility for food that is not packaged in consumer prepackages.
    • Therefore,
      • a unique identifier is used to identify a defined quantity of food. It could be a lot code, purchase order number or bill of lading.
      • While a lot code is used to identify a quantity of food that was manufactured, prepared, produced, stored, graded, packaged or labelled, under similar conditions.

Examples include, production date, best before date, establishment number and SFC licence number. Further examples for fresh fruits or vegetables, include harvest date, grower ID, growing region or any other code that may be used for traceability purposes. The traceability labelling requirements take into consideration the labelling exceptions in Part 12 of the SFCR.

[Slide 43, text on screen: Resources: Traceability. There are two columns, one titled Topics on the left and one titled Guidance Tools available at inspection.gc.ca/SafeFood on the right.

Under the topic "Do you need traceability?" the resource available is the Traceability interactive tool.

Under the topic "Video on traceability" the resource available is the Traceability requirements under the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations.

Under the topic "Explanation of the traceability requirements" the resource available is Regulatory requirements: Traceability.

Here is a list of key guidance materials and resources to help you navigate your way through the traceability requirements.

[Slide 44, text on screen: Information for importers of FFV]

Let's take a closer look at the SFCR requirements related to importing fresh fruits or vegetables into Canada.

[Slide 45, text on screen: Importers

Importers are required to:

  • have a licence to import
  • comply with investigation, notification, complaint and recall requirements.
  • have a written PCP (> $100,000 gross annual food income)
  • comply with the traceability requirements (document and labelling)
  • have a DRC membership (some exemptions apply)
  • comply with Import requirements for fresh fruits or vegetables (maintained from repealed Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Regulations)

Import restrictions for blackberries from Guatemala, cantaloupes from Mexico and leafy greens from California and Arizona continue to apply.

Border processes with CBSA have not changed – updates to requirements have been uploaded into the Automated Import Reference System.]

These new regulations apply to all imported fresh fruits or vegetables. As of January 15, 2019, importers were required to obtain an Safe Food for Canadians or SFC licence. Importers operating without a licence are advised to apply as soon as possible in order to comply with the regulations. Importing fresh fruits or vegetables without a licence may result in delays with your shipment at the border. Under the SFCR, a person who imports is the person identified by industry as performing the activity of importing. And only the person importing requires the licence. If you are the importer, while you can hire a broker to help facilitate the import process, you need to hold the licence. The declaration information for imported fresh fruit or vegetable shipments must include your licence number for each shipment. As part of your licence, you are required to comply with certain preventive control requirements, namely,

  • Hazard identification, analysis and control measures;
  • Investigation, notification and recalls; and
  • if your gross annual food sales are greater than $100,000, you also need a written preventive control plan.

As an importer, you are also required to:

  • comply with the traceability requirements;
  • have a DRC membership, unless you are exempt. It is also encouraged that your foreign supplier be a member of the DRC; and
  • comply with the import requirement for fresh fruits or vegetables. These are found in Part 6, Division 6 of the SFCR.

The import restrictions for blackberries from Guatemala, cantaloupes from Mexico and leafy greens from California and Arizona continue to apply. The Automated Import Reference System or AIRS has been updated to reflect SFCR requirements

[Slide 46, text on screen: Non-resident Importers

Non-resident importer (NRI)

  • May obtain a licence as long as their fixed place of business is located in the United States
  • The shipments of fresh fruits or vegetables must be sent directly to Canada from the United States.
  • Shipments from countries other than the United States may be sent to Canada by an NRI in the United States only if the shipment enters commerce into the United States before being sent to Canada.
  • Are required to meet the same requirements as Canadian importers

Non-resident importer is defined as a person that imports food into Canada whose fixed place of business is located in a country other than Canada.

Fixed place of business is defined as a permanent, physical business location. A post office box is not considered a fixed place of business.]

A non-resident importer, also referred to as NRI, is a person that imports food into Canada whose fixed place of business is located in a country other than Canada. NRIs can apply for a licence to import as long as their fixed place of business is located in a country recognized by CFIA as having at least the same level of protection as that of Canada for the food being imported. Currently, for fresh fruits or vegetables, the only foreign country where there is a food safety systems recognition arrangement in place is the United States. Therefore, the United States is the only foreign country that is eligible for NRI status for the import of fresh fruits or vegetables. For example:

  • an NRI located in the United States would not be able to import fresh grapes directly to Canada from any country other than the United States. The grapes would have to be imported into the United States where it would be subject to US government oversight before it is sent to Canada.

The NRI needs to meet the same requirements as Canadian importers. Please note, foreign fresh fruit or vegetable businesses cannot obtain a licence for the fresh fruits or vegetables they export to Canada. Only the person importing the fresh fruits or vegetables into Canada is to have the licence. This includes importers with a fixed place in Canada or non-resident importers with a fixed place of business in the United States.

[Slide 47, text on screen: Resources: Importers. There are two columns, one titled Topics on the left and one titled Guidance Tools available at inspection.gc.ca/SafeFood on the right.

Under the topic "General requirements for importers and imported food" the resource available is the General import requirements.

Under the topic "Guide to importing food into Canada" the resource available is Importing food: A step-by-step guide.

Under the topic "Requirements for non-resident importers importing food into Canada" the resource available is Non-resident importers.

Under the topic "Requirements for importing specific food to Canada" the resource available is Importing specific foods.

Under the topic "Requirements for importing food from specific countries with CFIA-recognized food safety systems" the resource available is Importing food from specific countries.

Under the topic "Submit import documentation and ask questions about import requirements for CFIA-regulated commodities" the resource available is the National Import Service Centre (NISC).

Under the topic "Search engine for import requirements for specific foods and other CFIA-regulated commodities" the resource available is the Automated Import Reference System (AIRS).

Here is a list of key guidance materials and resources to help you navigate your way through import requirements. If you are new to importing or just want a general overview of importing food into Canada, we recommend you start with the Step-by-Step guide. To determine the import requirements for a specific type of food, the AIRS tool continues to be your best resource. The CFIA's National Import Service Centre continues to be available if there are questions about CFIA's import requirements.

[Slide 48, text on screen: Information for exporters of FFV]

Let's take a look at what the SFCR means for exporters.

[Slide 49, text on screen: Exporters

Exporters are required to:

  • meet both Canadian and foreign country requirements
    • if Canadian requirements are not met, have written documents substantiating that foreign requirements are met; and
    • implement controls to prevent distribution in Canada including labelling the FFV for export.
  • make sure that:
    • any manufacturing, processing, treating, preserving, grading, packaging or labelling of FFV in Canada is conducted by a licence holder
    • the FFV was imported by a licence holder (if applicable)
  • have a DRC membership (some exemptions apply)]

As an exporter you are required to meet both the Canadian as well as the foreign country requirements. If the fresh fruits or vegetables do not meet Canadian requirements, you must have written documents that prove that foreign requirements are met, and the fresh fruits or vegetables are labelled "For Export"; you must make sure that any manufacturing, processing, treating, preserving, grading, packaging or labelling of the fresh fruits or vegetables in Canada is conducted by a licence holder; and if you are exporting imported fresh fruits or vegetables, that it was imported by a licence holder. You must also have a DRC membership, unless you are exempt. It is also encouraged that your foreign customer be a member of the DRC.

[Slide 50, text on screen: Export Certificates

Exporters may obtain an export certificate from CFIA if they:

  • have an SFC licence
  • have a written PCP (even if the food is exempt from the SFCR), and
  • comply with traceability requirements

To facilitate export, CFIA created a registry of licensed food businesses that are in good regulatory standing who meet licensing, preventive controls and traceability.

If you need a CFIA export permission, you must have a licence and a written preventive control plan – even if the food you are exporting is normally exempt from these requirements]

If you would like to obtain an export certificate from CFIA, you need to have a Safe food for Canadians licence, a written preventive control plan and you need to be complying with the traceability requirements. To facilitate export, CFIA created a registry of licensed food businesses that are in good regulatory standing who meet licensing, preventive controls and traceability.

[Slide 51, text on screen: Resources: Exporters. There are two columns, one titled Topics on the left and one titled Guidance Tools available at inspection.gc.ca/SafeFood on the right.

Under the topic General requirements for exporters, the resource available is "General export requirements"

Under the topic "Guide to export food out of Canada" the resource available is Exporting food: A step-by-step guide.

Under the topic "Steps needed to be taken to export food" the resource available is the Checklist for exporting food.

Under the topic "Information on export certifications" the resource can be found online at Export certification.

Under the topic "Information on foreign country export requirements" the resource available is Food-specific export requirements.

Under the topic "Lists of exporters eligible to export food out of Canada" the resource available is the Export registers and lists.

Under the topic "Notices of changes to foreign market export requirements" the resource available is the Food export notices.

Under the topic "Information on exporting food, including guides and export policies" the resource available is Additional resources for exporters.]

Here is a list of key guidance materials and resources to help you navigate your way through exports. The Step-by-step guide and "General requirements for exporters" are excellent starting points. The export eligibility lists have also been carried forward so that information will continue to be available.

[Slide 52, text on screen: What to expect when you're inspected]

Let's move on to what to expect when you're inspected.

[Slide 53, text on screen: Regulatory Compliance. To the right of the title text is a graphic entitled What to expect when you're inspected.

The following text is below the title Regulatory Compliance

How will an inspector evaluate compliance?

  • Verifies that information on the licence is accurate (locations, activities, food)
  • Verifies preventive controls are in place
  • Verifies that control measures are in place and that there is evidence that they are effective
  • Reviews Preventive Control Plan

Note:

An inspector can at any time request product samples/testing and review traceability plans to confirm compliance if suspicion of a food safety risk exists.

The type, frequency, and extent of CFIA's oversight activities for your business will be proportional to the risks that need to be managed. The purpose of an inspection is to assess whether a food business meets the legislative requirements and conditions of a licence or other permission (for example an export certificate). You will see that CFIA verifies compliance by conducting a range of inspection activities. These inspection activities can include:

  • Making visual observations, interviewing personnel, sampling, measuring or testing; and
  • Evaluating documentation.

CFIA has developed an infographic on what to expect before, during, and after an inspection.

[Slide 54, text on screen: Additional information]

Here is some additional information for you to be aware of.

[Slide 55, there is a title text on screen which says www.inspection.gc.ca/SafeFood. Below is a screen shot of this page www.inspection.gc.ca/SafeFood, highlighting the Services and information section with the following headings circled:

  • Food-specific requirements and guidance, and
  • Labelling, standards of identity and grades]

Although we mainly focused on licensing, preventive controls, PCP and traceability – there are other requirements in the SFCR that you also need to meet. These already came into force in January 2019.

From the Food landing page, you can click on the links "Labelling, standards of identity and grades" and "Food-specific requirements and guidance" for guidance material on these requirements.

[Slide 56, text on screen: SFCR Getting Started, Help

Have questions?

After consulting the web resources,

  • If you have an immediate question on Licensing, call 1-800-442-2342 to get in touch with the My CFIA Support Team
  • For all other inquiries, use the Contact us form found on the CFIA website

Stay up to date

  1. Sign up to receive email notifications
  2. Follow the CFIA on Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and Facebook
  3. Subscribe to the CFIA Chronicle

If you have an immediate question in relation to the licensing application please call our 1-800 number and an agent will help you through the process. For all other inquiries, please use the contact us form found on CFIA's website. We also encourage you to stay connected by:

  1. Signing up to receive our email notifications;
  2. Following us on Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and Facebook; and
  3. Subscribing to the CFIA Chronicle.

To help you manage your time, here are links to specific sections of the video and the number of minutes it takes to cover each.

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